National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activities in cluding

  1. Lab active in support of science activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active in support of science activities Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab active in support of science activities Los Alamos High Schools wins regional event February 1, 2014 Left to Right: Katherine Wang; William Wang; Alexander Swart; Alexandr Wang; William Zhao, Team Captain; and Kathleen Boerigter, Coach Los Alamos High School wins the regional Science Bowl. Left to Right:

  2. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Zia Haq, Senior Analyst, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  3. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2016 Title: Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and...

  4. Science Activities in Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concern plant growth and the environment, byproducts of biomass, and energy contained in different types of biomass. Provided by the Department of Energy's National Renewable...

  5. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zia Haq, Department of Energy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy 2 DOE Joins Farm to Fly 2.0 * We appreciate the hard work in approving alternative fuels and commitment to sustainable growth made by the aviation industry. * DOE is actively committed to accelerating the adoption of alternative fuels by this market. * In 2013, USDA and FAA made a commitment to the aviation industry to help meet their goals with the Farm to Fly 2.0 agreement. This effort seeks to enable the use of commercially

  6. Mound History and Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    In the 1950s, the facility began to manufacture a variety of nuclear weapons parts, in- cluding cable assemblies, explosive detonators, and the electronic firing sets that ...

  7. US5391887.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particularly to the management of radioactive waste materials. 2. Discussion of Related Art The management of hazardous waste material, in cluding radioactive, biological, and...

  8. An

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Other advantages of digitizing the signals in- clude the ability to separate Gaussian pulses from noise and identifying, and possibly resolving, the pileup of pulses. With...

  9. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environments | Department of Energy Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. To date, UFD's International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several

  10. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 2/5/2014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The activation occurred as a result of an emergency incident at the site. More information will be provided as soon as the extent of the emergency is determined. The Joint Information Center (JIC), located at 4021 National Parks Highway, has been

  11. Role of water activity in ethanol fermentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.P.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    A separate role for water activity in the conversion of sugars to ethanol by two strains of yeast is identified. During fermentation of both single and mixed sugar substrates, the water activity was shown to remain constant during the logarithmic growth phase. This is despite the changes in concentration of substrates and production, the constancy reflecting the fact that the greater influence of ethanol on the solution activity is counterbalanced, in the early stages of the fermentation, by its low yield. The end of the log phase of growth coincides with the start of a period of gradually decreasing water activity. For the more ethanol-tolerant strain UQM66Y, growth was found to cease at a constant value of water activity while that for the less tolerant strain UQM70Y depended on both ethanol concentration and water activity. It is argued that water activity is a more appropriate variable than ethanol concentration for describing some of the nonspecific inhibitory effects apparent in ethanol fermentations. A straightforward method for the calculation of water activity during such fermentations based on the use of solution osmolarity is presented.

  12. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGVs and UAVs. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  13. Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity) Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity) Below is information about the student activity...

  14. Competitive Wetting in Active Brazes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chandross, Michael Evan

    2014-05-01

    We found that the wetting and spreading of molten filler materials (pure Al, pure Ag, and AgAl alloys) on a Kovar ™ (001) substrate was studied with molecular dynamics simulations. A suite of different simulations was used to understand the effects on spreading rates due to alloying as well as reactions with the substrate. Moreover, the important conclusion is that the presence of Al in the alloy enhances the spreading of Ag, while the Ag inhibits the spreading of Al.

  15. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  16. POSSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN AD LEO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Petrucci, Romina; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Jofr, Emiliano

    2014-01-20

    AD Leo (GJ388) is an active dM3 flare star that has been extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully convective boundary, studying its long-term chromospheric activity in detail could be an appreciable contribution to dynamo theory. Here, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we analyze the Ca IIK line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both of these totally independent time series, we obtain a possible activity cycle with a period of approximately seven years and a less significant shorter cycle of approximately two years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe different spectral features simultaneously, we also analyze the relation between simultaneous measurements of the Na I index (R{sub D}{sup ?}), H?, and Ca IIK fluxes at different activity levels of AD Leo, including flares.

  17. Waste handling activities in glovebox dismantling facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Okada, Takashi; Kashiro, Kashio; Yoshino, Masanori; Hirano, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The Glovebox Dismantling Facility is a facility to decontaminate and size-reduce after-service gloveboxes in the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The wastes generated from these dismantling activities are simultaneously handled and packaged into drums in a bag-out manner. For future waste treatment and disposal, these wastes are separated into material categories. In this paper, we present the basic steps and analyzed data for the waste handling activities. The data were collected from dismantling activities for three gloveboxes (Grinding Pellet Glovebox, Visual Inspection Glovebox, Outer-diameter Screening Glovebox) conducted from 2001-2004. We also describe both current and near-future improvements. (authors)

  18. Active mines in Arizona - 1993. Directory 40

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, K.A.; Niemuth, N.J.; Bain, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A directory of the active mines in Arizona is presented. The directory was compiled in November, 1992 from field visits and information received by the Department's technical staff. For the purpose of this directory, an active mine is defined as a mine in continuous operation, either in production or under full-time development for production. Custom milling operations that are active or available on a full-time basis are also included in the directory. It is acknowledged that there are additional mines not listed that are in an exploration, evaluation, or part-time development phase. There are others where production is on an intermittent basis that are not listed. The report is dependent on the cooperation of government agencies, private industry, and individuals who voluntarily provide information on their projects and activities. The directory is arranged alphabetically by company name. Each listing includes corporate addresses, mine name and location, operation description, and key personnel. The listing for the sand and gravel operations include name, address, and phone number.

  19. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development ...

  20. Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR)...

  1. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account Sectors, May 2003 Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account ...

  2. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-05-27

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  3. Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy Savings Performance Contract Process M&V activities span three phases of the the ESPC process. M&V activities span ...

  4. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal...

  5. Misaligned Disks as Obscurers in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, A.; Elvis, M.

    2010-06-02

    We review critically the evidence concerning the fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) which appear as Type 2 AGN, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGN from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGN, and from low excitation narrow line AGN, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low excitation AGN occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGN represent 58{-+}5% of all AGN, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGN a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGN of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disc' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  6. ACTIV: Sandwich Detector Activity from In-Pile Slowing-Down Spectra Experiment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    ACTIV calculates the activities of a sandwich detector, to be used for in-pile measurements in slowing-down spectra below a few keV. The effect of scattering with energy degradation in the filter and in the detectors has been included to a first approximation.

  7. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina Congiu, Mirko Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de; Fernandes, Jssica Colnaghi Biziak de Figueiredo, Natlia Mulato, Marcelo

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  8. Overview of tritium activity in Japan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    tritium activity in Japan Overview of tritium activity in Japan Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014. PDF icon Overview of tritium activity in Japan More Documents & Publications Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed Technological Assessment of Plasma Facing Components for DEMO Reactors

  9. An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D projects on thermoelectric power generation technology in Europe. PDF icon rowe.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicular Applications of Thermoelectrics Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in

  10. Key Activities in Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Program » Key Activities in Wind Energy Key Activities in Wind Energy In order to reduce the cost of wind power technologies and accelerate the deployment of wind power, the Wind Program conducts the following key activities: Research and Development Lower the cost of wind energy through R&D activities focused on innovative wind turbine components, systems, materials, and manufacturing Partner with the academic community, research institutions, and industry to improve wind turbine

  11. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices Technology available for licensing: A process that includes suspending/dissolving an electro-active material and a carbon precursor in a solvent; and then depositing the carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal oxides without the problems associated with

  12. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced ActivationFerritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Overview of tritium activity in Japan Tritium Plasma Experiment and Its Role in PHENIX Program...

  13. Key Activities in Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About » Key Activities in Energy Efficiency Key Activities in Energy Efficiency The Building Technologies Office conducts work in three key areas in order to continually develop innovative, cost-effective energy saving solutions: research and development (R&D), market stimulation, and building codes and equipment standards. Working with our partners on these activities results in better products, better new homes, better ways to improve older homes, and better buildings in which to work,

  14. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biology University of Tromso, Tromso, Norway The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil...

  15. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in...

  16. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind...

  17. In-Reach/Outreach Activities | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-Reach/Outreach ... In-Reach/Outreach Activities For in-reach activities, the SPO holds meetings and conducts numerous presentations each year for Y-12's operations, divisions, and management team to provide training and guidance for buyers concerning socioeconomic program policy, procedures, goals, and federal regulations that govern the program. Other in-reach activities may also include posting the capabilities and accomplishments of small businesses in Y-12's newsletter, The Y-12 Times.

  18. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for surveillance PDF icon taylor.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric ...

  19. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical...

  20. A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document is a compilation of the activities and initiatives concerning control system security that are influencing the standards process in the development of secure communication...

  1. Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Active Geothermal Systems...

  2. Active Learning in the Era of Big Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Kevin; Davis, IV, Warren L.

    2015-10-01

    Active learning methods automatically adapt data collection by selecting the most informative samples in order to accelerate machine learning. Because of this, real-world testing and comparing active learning algorithms requires collecting new datasets (adaptively), rather than simply applying algorithms to benchmark datasets, as is the norm in (passive) machine learning research. To facilitate the development, testing and deployment of active learning for real applications, we have built an open-source software system for large-scale active learning research and experimentation. The system, called NEXT, provides a unique platform for realworld, reproducible active learning research. This paper details the challenges of building the system and demonstrates its capabilities with several experiments. The results show how experimentation can help expose strengths and weaknesses of active learning algorithms, in sometimes unexpected and enlightening ways.

  3. Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

    2010-04-08

    Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

  4. Overview of Japanese Activities in Thermoelectrics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japanese Activities in Thermoelectrics Overview of Japanese Activities in Thermoelectrics An overview presentation of R&D projects on thermoelectric power generation technology. PDF icon kajikawa.pdf More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Technologies Office

  5. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a clayshale formation (currently 15 partners); 3 Colloid Formation and Migration (CFM) with 9 partners; 4 FEBEX-DP in-situ full-scale heater test conducted in a ...

  6. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui | Department of Energy Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui DOE Geothermal

  7. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  8. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  9. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Subsurface (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was

  10. Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics (clay/shale, granite), most of which were very different from those studied in the United States. The DOE recognizes that close international collaboration

  11. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  12. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  13. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Device Development | Department of Energy Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development Presentation given at the 2011 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology. PDF icon konig.pdf More

  14. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Account Sectors, May 2003 | Department of Energy Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account Sectors, May 2003 Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account Sectors, May 2003 Potential distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States cover a broad spectrum of market segments, from nursing homes requiring a few hundred kilowatts (kW) of power and an economical hot water source

  15. Phase development in conventional and active belite cement pastes by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rietveld analysis and chemical constraints (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Phase development in conventional and active belite cement pastes by Rietveld analysis and chemical constraints Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Phase development in conventional and active belite cement pastes by Rietveld analysis and chemical constraints High belite cements may be an alternative to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Although CO{sub 2} emissions may be depleted up to 10%, unfortunately, the

  16. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the Army Research Laboratory | Department of Energy Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices at the Army Research Laboratory Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices at the Army Research Laboratory Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy About the Vehicle Technologies Office » Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or improving performance, power, and comfort. Research and development (R&D); testing and analysis; government and community stakeholder support; and education help people access and use efficient, clean

  18. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

  19. Overview of Joining Activities in Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Joining Activities in Lightweighting Materials Overview of Joining Activities in Lightweighting Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm_13_feng.pdf More Documents & Publications Dynamic Characterization of Spot Welds for AHSS Dynamic Characterization of Spot Welds for AHSS FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining

  20. Long-lived activation products in reactor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

  1. Environmental guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this document, entitled Guidance on Public Participation for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Activities, to summarize policy and provide guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities at DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, facilities, and laboratories. While the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has environmental restoration responsibility for the majority of DOE sites and facilities, other DOE Project Offices have similar responsibilities at their sites and facilities. This guidance is applicable to all environment restoration activities conducted by or for DOE under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) (corrective actions only); and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). This guidance also is applicable to CERCLA remedial action programs under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 and the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, where DOE is the designated lead. The primary objectives of this guidance document are as follows: acclimate DOE staff to a changing culture that emphasizes the importance of public participation activities; provide direction on implementing these public participation activities; and, provide consistent guidance for all DOE Field Offices and facilities. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on conducting effective public participation activities for environmental restoration activities under CERCLA; RCRA corrective actions under sections 3004(u), 3004(v), and 3008(h); and NEPA public participation activities.

  2. Exploration slack in mature areas, new producers more active

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vielvoye, R.

    1989-05-22

    This special report examines the current status of drilling, production, and refining activities, and what's being planned. Little money will be spent on exploration in most areas, but Iraq and Iran will spend billions reconstructing production and refining facilities. And some refiners in the region are anxious to expand into markets in Japan and other Far East consuming countries.

  3. Update on EH-23 activities in Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This report briefly describes the activities undertaken by the US DOE`s Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) of the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment (EH-20) in Calendar Year (CY) 1993 in seven major areas: (1) regulatory review and analysis; (2) environmental policy and guidance; (3) environmental training courses and workshops; (4) workgroups and committees; (5) environmental regulatory management support; (6) special projects and other activities; and (7) special presentations. A list of selected environmental guidance memoranda and documents distributed by EH-23 in CY 1993 is also included.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trk, T.; Titov, V. S.; Miki?, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  5. Natural Radionuclide Activity Concentrations In Spas Of Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnoni, G.; Czerniczyniec, M.; Canoba, A.; Palacios, M.

    2008-08-07

    Geothermal waters have been used on a large scale for bathing, drinking and medical purposes. These waters can contain natural radionuclides that may increase the exposure to people. In this work the most important natural radionuclide activity concentrations in different thermal spas of Argentina were measured to characterize waters and to evaluate the exposure of workers and members of the public.

  6. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Performance Assessment Assistance Activities in the DOE Complex - 12325

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Letourneau, Martin J.

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford. DOE-EM established the PA CoP to help improve the consistency and quality of implementation of modelling activities around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP has sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from ongoing modelling activities. Practitioners; project managers; oversight personnel; and regulators from United States and international facilities have participated in the three technical exchanges that have been held to date. At the working level, the PA CoP has sponsored technical assistance in support of modelling activities that are currently underway. The assistance concept provides a means to share specific experience, good practices, and lessons learned on topics of interest at a given site while the modelling is being conducted. Such up-front assistance complements the sharing of information that occurs via regular LFRG meetings and independent LFRG reviews that are conducted when the modelling effort is completed. Examples from assistance activities that have been conducted at Idaho, Paducah, Portsmouth and Hanford were highlighted in this paper. There were differences in the types of assistance provided at each site. In some cases the assistance was focused on technical support for the practitioners and management responsible for the development of the PAs. At other sites, the assistance included working with the developers and regulators/stakeholders involved in the process to help with reaching consensus on critical assumptions. Such interactions have proven to be very effective to help all parties get a chance to discuss their perspectives and better understand the different points of view. In all cases, the assistance was used as a means to share broader perspectives, experiences and lessons learned with personnel engaged in a modelling activities at a given site. The combination of technical exchanges and targeted technical assistance has provided additional means to encourage the sharing of information around the DOE Complex and globally. Feedback from practitioners, oversight personnel, regulators and stakeholders that have been involved has been overwhelmingly positive. It is believed that such sharing of information and experiences is contributing to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy, and quality of modelling activities. Alt

  8. EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  9. Active-R filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  10. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. ); Marcus, Y. ); Moroney, J.V. )

    1989-04-01

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

  12. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFDs International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  13. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  14. Activities and Accomplishments in MY 2004/FY 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    From vehicle acquisition and credit trading to exemptions and outreach activity, the Annual Report summarizes the State & Alternative Fuel Provider Activity's accomplishments during MY 2004/FY 2005.

  15. Activities and Accomplishments in MY 2005/FY 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    From vehicle acquisition and credit trading to exemptions and outreach activity, the Annual Report summarizes the State & Alternative Fuel Provider Activity's accomplishments during FY 2004/FY 2005.

  16. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2012-01-23

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) has established a Performance Assessment Community of Practice (PA CoP) to foster the sharing of information among performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, regulators and oversight personnel. The general intent is to contribute to continuous improvement in the consistency, technical adequacy and quality of implementation of PAs and risk assessments around the DOE Complex. The PA CoP activities have involved commercial disposal facilities and international participants to provide a global perspective. The PA CoP has also sponsored annual technical exchanges as a means to foster improved communication and to share lessons learned from on-going modelling activities. The PA CoP encourages activities to provide programmatic and technical assistance in the form of sharing experience and lessons learned with practitioners during the development of PAs and risk assessments. This assistance complements DOE-EM reviews through the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) that are conducted after modelling efforts are completed. Such up-front assistance is providing additional value in terms of improving consistency and sharing of information. There has been a substantial increase in the amount of assistance being provided. The assistance has been well received by practitioners and regulators that have been involved. The paper highlights assistance and sharing of information that has been conducted in the last two years to support activities underway in support of proposed disposal facilities at Paducah, Portsmouth, and the Idaho National Laboratory and tank closure at Hanford.

  17. Tensor analysis methods for activity characterization in spatiotemporal data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haass, Michael Joseph; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Ochoa, Edward M.

    2014-03-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition offers unique advantages for activity characterization in spatio-temporal datasets because these methods are compatible with sparse matrices and maintain multiway structure that is otherwise lost in collapsing for regular matrix factorization. This report describes our research as part of the PANTHER LDRD Grand Challenge to develop a foundational basis of mathematical techniques and visualizations that enable unsophisticated users (e.g. users who are not steeped in the mathematical details of matrix algebra and mulitway computations) to discover hidden patterns in large spatiotemporal data sets.

  18. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  19. Activities of HPS standards committee in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Chen, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The Health Physics Society (HPS) develops American National Standards in the area of radiation protection using methods approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Two of its sections, Environmental Health Physics and Contamination Limits, have ongoing standards development which are important to some environmental remediation efforts. This paper describes the role of the HPS standards process and indicates particular standards under development which will be of interest to the reader. In addition, the authors solicit readers to participate in the voluntary standards process by either joining active working groups (WG) or suggesting appropriate and relevant topics which should be placed into the standards process.

  20. Update on petroleum exploration activities in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcedo, B.H.C.; Bausa, G.J.G.; Ocampo. I.U.

    1996-01-01

    The first significant event in Philippine Petroleum exploration dates back to 1896 with the drilling of Toledo-1 in Cebu by Smith Bell. From the 1950's to the 1970's, widespread exploration activities were carried out but it was only eighty years after the first oil drilling in 1896 that oil was finally discovered in commercial quantity in Northwest Palawan. This could be attributed to the fact that serious exploration for petroleum was made with the enactment of Presidential Decree No. 87, better known as the [open quotes]Oil Exploration and Development Act of 1972[close quotes], which takes into effect the current Service Contract System. Amendments to P.D. No. 87 is underway to further improve its incentive package and make it more attractive to explorationists. Petroleum exploration in the Philippines continues to be an energetic industry even if the players are not always rewarded with finds. Frontier areas have become attractive for exploration in view of the continuing research studies resulting to increased database thereat. While Northwest Palawan continues to be the hub of action, frontier areas as well as the more risky deepwater acreages still generate interests, if one wishes to be an active player in a growing energy-hungry economy.

  1. Update on petroleum exploration activities in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcedo, B.H.C.; Bausa, G.J.G.; Ocampo. I.U.

    1996-12-31

    The first significant event in Philippine Petroleum exploration dates back to 1896 with the drilling of Toledo-1 in Cebu by Smith & Bell. From the 1950`s to the 1970`s, widespread exploration activities were carried out but it was only eighty years after the first oil drilling in 1896 that oil was finally discovered in commercial quantity in Northwest Palawan. This could be attributed to the fact that serious exploration for petroleum was made with the enactment of Presidential Decree No. 87, better known as the {open_quotes}Oil Exploration and Development Act of 1972{close_quotes}, which takes into effect the current Service Contract System. Amendments to P.D. No. 87 is underway to further improve its incentive package and make it more attractive to explorationists. Petroleum exploration in the Philippines continues to be an energetic industry even if the players are not always rewarded with finds. Frontier areas have become attractive for exploration in view of the continuing research studies resulting to increased database thereat. While Northwest Palawan continues to be the hub of action, frontier areas as well as the more risky deepwater acreages still generate interests, if one wishes to be an active player in a growing energy-hungry economy.

  2. Industry decries sharp decline in U. S. offshore activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    Roadblocks to offshore activity in the U.S. drew much of the spotlight at the 24th Offshore Technology Conference last week in Houston. Among OTC highlights included in this paper are: Two panels reviewed how federal leasing moratoriums and regulatory restrictions are reining U.S. offshore development. Conoco Inc.'s manager of exploration and development in Russia detailed the allure of giant and supergiant fields in the Commonwealth of Independent States and reviewed the status of the company's efforts to negotiate E and D deals with Russian partners. Minerals Management Service officials reviewed environmental challenges facing operators on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf and new MMS inspection strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. The 1992 OTC Distinguished Achievement Award for companies went to Brazil's Petroleo Brasileiro SA for deepwater development records set with the 3 Marlim well in the Campos basin off Brazil.

  3. Active mines in Arizona and Arizona exploration offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book is a directory that lists 91 mining operations and 107 sand and gravel operations. It lists the company name, address, key personnel, mine, mill, or smelter location, and a description of the operation. A map plotting the locations of all the active mines is also available ($2). Arizona Exploration Offices is a directory that lists 68 exploration companies in Arizona, 80% of whom list gold or silver as their principal exploration target. Other exploration companies are searching for industrial minerals, uranium, beryllium, rare earths, ferroalloys, and sulfur.

  4. Active eutectoid decomposition in Zr-3 wt.% Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, L.; Ramanujan, R.V.; Tewari, R.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Banerjee, S.

    1999-02-19

    In the work reported here, the microstructural features associated with the active eutectoid decomposition of a near eutectoid alloy (Zr-3 wt.%Fe) on {beta} quenching were examined. The effects of aging after {beta} quenching, and of furnace cooling from the {beta} phase field, on the microstructure of the alloy were also studied. The microstructural characterization was carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The room temperature mechanical properties corresponding to some of the microstructures were evaluated by mechanical testing.

  5. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magneticmore » field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.« less

  6. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magnetic field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.

  7. Integration of biotechnology in remediation and pollution prevention activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement/North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation provides a mechanism for an international collaboration between the US, Canada, and Mexico to jointly develop, modify, or refine technologies that remediate or protect the environment. These countries have a vested interest in this type of collaboration because contaminants do not respect the boundaries of a manufacturing site, region, city, state, or country. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of a diverse group of individuals who address a variety of environmental issues. ESD is involved in basic and applied research on the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants; environmental assessment; environmental engineering; and demonstrations of advanced remediation technologies. The remediation and protection of the environment includes water, air, and soils for organic, inorganic, and radioactive contaminants. In addition to remediating contaminated sites, research also focuses on life-cycle analyses of industrial processes and the production of green technologies. The author focuses this discussion on subsurface remediation and pollution prevention; however, the research activities encompass water, soil and air and many of the technologies are applicable to all environments. The discussion focuses on the integration of biotechnology with remediation activities and subsequently linking these biological processes to other remediation technologies.

  8. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2011-01-15

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  9. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  10. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM); Fehler, Michael C. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Phillips, W. Scott (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  11. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  12. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Boring

    2011-09-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  13. A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the:...

  14. Activities and Accomplishments in MY2003/FY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    From vehicle acquisition and credit trading to exemptions and outreach activity, the Annual Report summarizes the State & Alternative Fuel Provider Program accomplishments during FY2003/FY2004.

  15. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... observations also indicate much of the offshore use is dominated by seasonal migration activity and that small, remote islands are being used as stopover habitats during migration. ...

  16. Discovering an Active Subspace in a Single-Diode Solar Cell Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Discovering an Active Subspace in a Single-Diode Solar Cell Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovering an Active Subspace in a Single-Diode Solar ...

  17. Uncharted Microbial World: Microbes and Their Activities in the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwood, Caroline; Buckley, Merry.

    2007-12-31

    Microbes are the foundation for all of life. From the air we breathe to the soil we rely on for farming to the water we drink, everything humans need to survive is intimately coupled with the activities of microbes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of disease and the use of microorganisms in the industrial production of drugs, food products and wastewater treatment. However, our understanding of many complicated microbial environments (the gut and teeth), soil fertility, and biogeochemical cycles of the elements is lagging behind due to their enormous complexity. Inadequate technology and limited resources have stymied many lines of investigation. Today, most environmental microorganisms have yet to be isolated and identified, let alone rigorously studied. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium in Seattle, Washington, in February 2007, to deliberate the way forward in the study of microorganisms and microbial activities in the environment. Researchers in microbiology, marine science, pathobiology, evolutionary biology, medicine, engineering, and other fields discussed ways to build on and extend recent successes in microbiology. The participants made specific recommendations for targeting future research, improving methodologies and techniques, and enhancing training and collaboration in the field. Microbiology has made a great deal of progress in the past 100 years, and the useful applications for these new discoveries are numerous. Microorganisms and microbial products are now used in industrial capacities ranging from bioremediation of toxic chemicals to probiotic therapies for humans and livestock. On the medical front, studies of microbial communities have revealed, among other things, new ways for controlling human pathogens. The immediate future for research in this field is extremely promising. In order to optimize the effectiveness of community research efforts in the future, scientists should include manageable systems with features like clear physical boundaries, limited microbial diversity, and manipulability with the goal of understanding fundamental principles that may apply to more complex systems. A great deal of microbial genetic and phenotypic diversity remains to be explored, and the commercial and medical potential locked up in these unknowns should compel the field to move forward. Future microbiology research will build on the successes of the past using new techniques and approaches. Uncultivated microbes hold great promise for industry, medicine, and the recycling of precious resources, and research and technology must make inroads in overcoming the barriers that prevent their study. In many cases, we will no longer be able to rely on isolated, pure cultures of microorganisms, but must use communities of microorganisms, which presently are poorly understood. Indeed, community-level studies can benefit from deconstructing microbial communities and analyzing the component members separately, but this is not feasible in every system. The effects of perturbation on microbial communities also require study. Humans rely on the services of microbes in innumerable ways, but we have little or no predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to disturbance. Research must address current limitations in detecting microscale interactions among microbes by enhancing current technologies and fostering new microscopic tools, biosensors, and gas sensors for appropriate small scales. Genomics, which has enabled great progress in microbiology research of individual species, must be applied to communities of microorganisms. This will require improved methods of DNA extraction and amplification from environmental samples and improved strategies for DNA sequence assembly. In the future, genome sequencing efforts should continue the exploration of evolutionarily diverse microbes, as well as help reveal the mechanisms by which closely related microbes evolve. Technological advances have spurred every great leap in microbial biology, and in order to move forward, new m

  18. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC3115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC3115, with an H? luminosity of L {sub H?} = (4.2 0.4) 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ?0.''29 0.''05 (corresponding to ?14.3 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  19. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia; He, Hao

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  20. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcys law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  1. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb...

  2. LANL ACTIVITIES IN THE FIELD OF RF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Jason, Andy; Kelley, Patrick J.; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Liu, Jianfei; Schrage, Dale L.; Shapiro, Alan H.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Peterson,, Dean E.

    2003-07-29

    This report briefly summarizes activities, including: tests of elliptical cavities; design and testing of high-power couplers and cryomodules; design, procurement, and tests of 2-gap spoke cavities. It also summarizes critical technology issues.

  3. Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy Savings Performance Contract Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are four major measurement and verification (M&V) activities in the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) procurement process.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  5. WATER ACTIVITY DATA ASSESSMENT TO BE USED IN HANFORD WASTE SOLUBILITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    The purpose of this report is to present and assess water activity versus ionic strength for six solutes:sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate, sodium sulfate, and potassium nitrate. Water activity is given versus molality (e.g., ionic strength) and temperature. Water activity is used to estimate Hanford crystal hydrate solubility present in the waste.

  6. Activities of the U. S. Department of Energy in education. Annual status report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The energy-related education activities administered in FY 1979 by DOE are described: projections for FY 1980 are also given. This document provides assistance for DOE program managers who wish to use the educational process in their operations, and it provides guidance and information to educators and the general public about DOE energy-related education activities. The education activities are classified as energy information (curriculum packages, studies, workshops and forums conferences, other materials), energy skills development, institutional resource enhancement, and other activities. A chart gives the category of activity, type of audience, and type of services provided. (RWR)

  7. Catalyst activator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  8. A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector (October 2005) | Department of Energy A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) This document is a compilation of the activities and initiatives concerning control system security that are influencing the standards process in the development of secure communication protocols and systems. Also contained in this report is a comparison of

  9. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-05-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  10. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  11. Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    waves from microearthquake data Abstract Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems...

  12. Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrically active Er doping in InAs, Insub 0.53Gasub 0.47As, and GaAs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrically active Er doping in InAs, Insub 0.53Gasub ...

  13. Possible changes for mudflow and avalanche activity in former Soviet Union due to the global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazovskaya, T.G.; Sidorova, T.L.; Seliverstov, Y.G.

    1996-12-31

    Past research, as well as laboratory evidence have revealed a relationship between climate, mudflow, and avalanche activity. It is possible to predict changes in mudflow and avalanche activity by using climate models. In this study, the GFDL model was used which contained data on mean monthly air temperature, precipitation, and carbon dioxide concentrations.

  14. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  15. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weibin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 ; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  16. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  17. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the understanding of volcanoes by being the method which is most sensitive to change in temperature and, therefore, can best map heat budget and hydrological character to aid in...

  18. Matter effects in active-sterile solar neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, C.; Li, Y. F.

    2009-12-01

    The matter effects for solar neutrino oscillations are studied in a general scheme with an arbitrary number of sterile neutrinos, without any constraint on the mixing, assuming only a realistic hierarchy of neutrino squared-mass differences in which the smallest squared-mass difference is effective in solar neutrino oscillations. The validity of the analytic results are illustrated with a numerical solution of the evolution equation in three examples of the possible mixing matrix in the simplest case of four-neutrino mixing.

  19. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  20. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  1. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  2. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    material (PFM) in fusion reactor Development of tungsten coating on PFM (such as F82H) Bulk W is heavy Influences density control of fusion plasma, and safety ...

  3. Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and seismogenic deformation above the shallow BDT may contribute to development of permeability in the geothermal reservoir, and provide pathways for upward circulation of...

  4. Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field- Eastern California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and seismogenic deformation above the shallow BDT may contribute to development of permeability in the geothermal reservoir, and provide pathways for upward circulation of...

  5. IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Vehicle Exhaust Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a ...

  6. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue by treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue.

  7. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned with respect to time and power to moderate plasma damage to the photo-generating layer. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition and thickness of the emitter layers. AFM studies showed conformal growth on the GaAs substrates. Measurements at SLAC on the photoemitted electrons from high polarization substrates coated with amorphous silicon germanium indicated an ~10% relative drop in spin-polarization at the wavelength corresponding to the maximum spin-polarization when compared to the uncoated material,

  8. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  9. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocata...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of site specific OER overpotentials using DFT+U reveals the origin of enhanced OER activity in Fe-doped -NiOOH, in which Fe sites have near-optimum binding energies for...

  10. Methods for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    2008-03-18

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method comprises the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention also provides a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  11. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  12. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  13. Photocatalyst activation in a pulsed low pressure discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rousseau, A.; Guaitella, O.; Gatilova, L.; Thevenet, F.; Guillard, C.; Roepcke, J.; Stancu, G.D.

    2005-11-28

    The effect of combining plasma and photocatalyst for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) removal was investigated in a pulsed low-pressure dc discharge. The photocatalyst was TiO{sub 2} while the VOC was acetylene (1000 ppm) diluted in dry air. The temporal evolution of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} concentration was measured by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) in the mid-infrared region during the plasma pulse (one second). The contribution of external ultraviolet radiation and plasma exposure were quantified, both with and without a photocatalyst. The synergetic effect was clearly demonstrated.

  14. Update on CMM/CBM development activity in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-01-15

    Current coal mine methane (CMM) and coalbed methane (CBM) development efforts in Ukraine are reviewed. These include the Donetsk CMM/CBM project and the Ukraine Methane Group CMM project (15 MW power production). 4 figs.

  15. Department of Energy Implementation Activities in the Case of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a communications system that includes microwave, VHF radio, and state-of-the-art fiber optics. In the event of a lapse of appropriations and the exhaustion of available balances,...

  16. Simulations for Tracking Cosmogenic Activation in Germanium and Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-11-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in copper cryostats and shielding materials are used in measurements of the extraordinarily rare nuclear decay process, neutrinoless double-beta decay (0???), and for dark matter searches. Cosmogenic production of 68Ge and 60Co in the germanium and copper represent an irreducible background to these experiments as the subsequent decays of these isotopes can mimic the signals of interest. These radioactive isotopes can be removed by chemical and/or isotopic separation, but begin to grow-in to the material after separation until the material is moved deep underground. This work is motivated by the need to have a reliable, experimentally benchmarked simulation tool for evaluating shielding materials used during transportation and near-surface manufacturing of experiment components. The resulting simulations tool has been used to enhance the effectiveness of an existing transport shield used to ship enriched germanium from the separations facility to the detector manufacturing facility.

  17. Application Of Active Audiomagnetotellurics (Aamt) In The Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    short periods). The final result is a three-layer model in good agreement with known geology and resistivity models from other authors. Authors J. Otten and G. Musmann...

  18. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

    1991-06-01

    From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Preliminary study on hydrogeology in tectonically active areas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Lappin, Allen R.; Gettemy, Glen L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Lee, Moo Yul; Meier, Diane A.

    2006-09-01

    This report represents the final product of a background literature review conducted for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Internationally, research of hydrological and transport processes in the context of high level waste (HLW) repository performance, has been extensive. However, most of these studies have been conducted for sites that are within tectonically stable regions. Therefore, in support of NUMO's goal of selecting a site for a HLW repository, this literature review has been conducted to assess the applicability of the output from some of these studies to the geological environment in Japan. Specifically, this review consists of two main tasks. The first was to review the major documents of the main HLW repository programs around the world to identify the most important hydrologic and transport parameters and processes relevant in each of these programs. The review was to assess the relative importance of processes and measured parameters to site characterization by interpretation of existing sensitivity analyses and expert judgment in these documents. The second task was to convene a workshop to discuss the findings of Task 1 and to prioritize hydrologic and transport parameters in the context of the geology of Japan. This report details the results and conclusions of both of these Tasks.

  20. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous

  1. DOE/NREL supported wind energy activities in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drouilhet, S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three wind energy related projects which are underway in Indonesia. The first is a USAID/Winrock Wind for Island and Nongovernmental Development (WIND) project. The objectives of this project are to train local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the siting, installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. Then to install up to 20 wind systems to provide electric power for productive end uses while creating micro-enterprises which will generate enough revenue to sustain the wind energy systems. The second project is a joint Community Power Corporation/PLN (Indonesian National Electric Utility) case study of hybrid power systems in village settings. The objective is to evaluate the economic viability of various hybrid power options for several different situations involving wind/photovoltaics/batteries/diesel. The third project is a World Bank/PLN preliminary market assessment for wind/diesel hybrid systems. The objective is to estimate the size of the total potential market for wind/diesel hybrid power systems in Indonesia. The study will examine both wind retrofits to existing diesel mini-grids and new wind-diesel plants in currently unelectrified villages.

  2. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-02

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to establish corrosion rates and component lifetimes. Finally, it is unlikely that the aluminum-based neutron absorber materials that are commonly used in existing DPCs would survive for 10,000 years in disposal environments, because the aluminum will act as a sacrificial anode for the steel. We recommend additional testing of borated and Gd-bearing stainless steels, to establish general and localized corrosion resistance in repository-relevant environmental conditions.

  3. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  4. Measurements in large pool fires with an actively cooled calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The pool fire thermal test described in Safety Series 6 published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) in the United States is one of the most difficult tests that a container for larger ``Type B`` quantities of nuclear materials must pass. If retests of a container are required, costly redesign and project delays can result. Accurate measurements and modeling of the pool fire environment will ultimately lower container costs by assuring that containers past the pool fire test on the first attempt. Experiments indicate that the object size or surface temperature of the container can play a role in determining local heat fluxes that are beyond the effects predicted from the simple radiative heat transfer laws. An analytical model described by Nicolette and Larson 1990 can be used to understand many of these effects. In this model a gray gas represents soot particles present in the flame structure. Close to the container surface, these soot particles are convectively and radiatively cooled and interact with incident energy from the surrounding fire. This cooler soot cloud effectively prevents some thermal radiation from reaching the container surface, reducing the surface heat flux below the value predicted by a transparent medium model. With some empirical constants, the model suggested by Nicolette and Larson can be used to more accurately simulate the pool fire environment. Properly formulated, the gray gas approaches also fast enough to be used with standard commercial computer codes to analyze shipping containers. To calibrate this type of model, accurate experimental measurements of radiative absorption coefficients, flame temperatures, and other parameters are necessary. A goal of the calorimeter measurements described here is to obtain such parameters so that a fast, useful design tool for large pool fires can be constructed.

  5. Carbon activation process for increased surface accessibility in electrochemical capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Eisenmann, Erhard T. (Belpre, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A process for making carbon film or powder suitable for double capacitor electrodes having a capacitance of up to about 300 F/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. This is accomplished by treating in aqueous nitric acid for a period of about 5 to 15 minutes thin carbon films obtained by carbonizing carbon-containing polymeric material having a high degree of molecular directionality, such as polyimide film, then heating the treated carbon film in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a non-graphitizing temperature of at least 350.degree. C. for about 20 minutes, and repeating alternately the nitric acid step and the heating step from 7 to 10 times. Capacitors made with this carbon may find uses ranging from electronic devices to electric vehicle applications.

  6. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; Renholm, J.; Hettich, R. L.; Pollard, W. H.; Omelon, C. R.; Medvigy, David M.; Pffifner, Susan M.; Whyte, L. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH?)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH? emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH?-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH? uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH? sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineral cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH? feedback.

  7. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH₄)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH₄ emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH₄-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH⁺ uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH₄ sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore » cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH₄ feedback.« less

  8. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Ignition Facility (Conference) | SciTech Connect Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility Authors: Grim, Gary P. [1] ; Rundberg, Robert S. [1] ; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [1] ; Jungman, Gerard [1] ; Boswell, Melissa [1] ; Klein, Andreas [1] ; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [1] ; Tonchev,

  9. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration

  10. MEK1-independent activation of MAPK and MEK1-dependent activation of p70 S6 kinase by stem cell factor (SCF) in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lian; Institute of Immunology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 ; Zhang, Xin; Du, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoning; Hou, Nan; Zhao, Di; Sun, Jianzhi; Li, Li; Wang, Xiuwen; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-05-01

    We discovered a stem cell factor (SCF)-triggered, MEK1-independent, and PI3K-dependent MAPK activation pathway in the Kit-expressing ovarian cancer cell line HEY. When we knocked down MEK1 with RNA interference (RNAi) to study the function of MEK1 on the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells, we found that impaired cell growth still occurred after MEK1 expression had been suppressed, although MAPK activation remained intact. This suggests that there is MEK1-independent activation of MAPK in the SCF-induced ovarian cancer cell growth process, and that MEK1 still plays a crucial role in maintaining the malignant properties of ovarian cancer cells even when it fails to activate MAPK as expected.

  11. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents {beta}-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C. . E-mail: ninestr@genes.bio.puc.cl; Godoy, Juan A.; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Koenig, Cecilia S.; Bronfman, Miguel

    2005-03-10

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-{beta}-peptide (A{beta}), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPAR{gamma} is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPAR{gamma} by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPAR{gamma} agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic A{beta}-induced rise in bulk-free Ca{sup 2+}. (4) PPAR{gamma} activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPAR{gamma} prevents A{beta}-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPAR{gamma} and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPAR{gamma} attenuated A{beta}-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective.

  13. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  14. Environmental-control-technology activities of the Department of Energy in FY 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report provides an annual identification and summarization of environmental control RD and D activities and associated funding conducted by DOE in conjunction with developing environmentally acceptable energy technologies. Environmental control technology is an integral part of the DOE energy technology R, D, and D effort. As the third in a series of annual reports on environmental control R, D, and D activities within DOE, this report may serve as a basis for evaluating program trends. The report presents background material that contributes to the capability to evaluate and assess the environmental control accomplishments, issues, gaps, and overlaps associated with energy development within DOE, in conjunction with other agencies, and in the private sector. A measure of the change in emphasis in the environmental control technology activities within DOE is also presented, indicating shifts, if any, in funding levels for each of the energy technologies. Total DOE FY 1979 budget outlay allocated to environmental control activities was $421,533,000, or 5.0% of the total FY 1979 DOE budget. This report summarizes the inputs received from the energy technology areas. These inputs were submitted in accordance with a description of environmental control related activities, which are those activities directed at research, development, and demonstration of processes, procedures, systems, subsystems, and strategies that directly or indirectly eliminate, minimize, or mitigate environmental impacts. 25 references, 10 figures, 40 tables.

  15. Report on the Status of the UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research at SNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, Kevin A.

    2015-08-25

    The following summaries are provided as fulfillment of milestone M4FT-15SN0811021 and represent international collaboration activities in disposal research funded by the US DOE Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign during Fiscal Year 2015.

  16. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 615 717 624 481...

  17. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. A Designed Supramolecular Protein Assembly with in-Vivo Enzymatic Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource A Designed Supramolecular Protein Assembly with in-Vivo Enzymatic Activity Thursday, April 30, 2015 A major goal in molecular design and engineering is the creation of new enzymes from scratch. However, the design of 3-dimensional protein architectures from first principles represents a formidable challenge, and as a result, the generation of new enzymatic activities has primarily relied on repurposing the interiors of pre-existing protein folds

  19. A Revealing Look Inside Passive and Active DPF Regeneration: In-Situ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optical Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport | Department of Energy A Revealing Look Inside Passive and Active DPF Regeneration: In-Situ Optical Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport A Revealing Look Inside Passive and Active DPF Regeneration: In-Situ Optical Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport Presents results from comprehensive evaluations with optically accessibleDPFs showing the processes controlling formation, transport, and interaction of the soot and ash deposits over range

  20. IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY SURFACTANT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DISPERSION OR SOLVENT EXTRACT OF A REFERENCE DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATERIAL | Department of Energy IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY SURFACTANT DISPERSION OR SOLVENT EXTRACT OF A REFERENCE DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATERIAL IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY SURFACTANT DISPERSION OR SOLVENT EXTRACT OF A REFERENCE DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATERIAL Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by

  1. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared

  2. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  4. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  5. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  6. MAGNETIC ENERGY AND HELICITY IN TWO EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-12-20

    The magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in two emerging solar active regions, AR 11072 and AR 11158, are studied. They are computed by integrating over time the energy and relative helicity fluxes across the photosphere. The fluxes consist of two components: one from photospheric tangential flows that shear and braid field lines (shear term), the other from normal flows that advect magnetic flux into the corona (emergence term). For these active regions: (1) relative magnetic helicity in the active-region corona is mainly contributed by the shear term, (2) helicity fluxes from the emergence and the shear terms have the same sign, (3) magnetic energy in the corona (including both potential energy and free energy) is mainly contributed by the emergence term, and (4) energy fluxes from the emergence term and the shear term evolved consistently in phase during the entire flux emergence course. We also examine the apparent tangential velocity derived by tracking field-line footpoints using a simple tracking method. It is found that this velocity is more consistent with tangential plasma velocity than with the flux transport velocity, which agrees with the conclusion by Schuck.

  7. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  8. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gasesHe, Ne, and Aras additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  9. ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

    2012-02-13

    This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

  10. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  11. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  12. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-03

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material. 23 figs.

  13. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  14. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  15. Effects of fluoride emissions on enzyme activity in metabolism of agricultural plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeri, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of fluoride on the activity of malatedehydrogenase (MDH) in rape seed and rye grass have been investigated. Fluoride, which has been absorbed from the air, seems to act differently from fluoride added to the soil. The action of airborne fluoride compounds resorbed by the plant on the activity of MDH significantly correlated with the distance from an aluminum plant, crop yield, and fluoride content. 5 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Rino; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Yamada, Yuko; Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites in enterocytes. Moreover, bezafibrate treatment suppressed postprandial lipidemia after oral administration of olive oil to the mice. These findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia through enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes, suggesting that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activity is a novel target of PPAR{alpha} agonist for decreasing circulating levels of lipids under postprandial conditions.

  17. In vitro - in vivo correlations for endocrine activity of a mixture of currently used pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Hadrup, Niels; Boberg, Julie; Axelstad, Marta; Bossi, Rossana; Bonefeld-Jrgensen, Eva Cecilie; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-11-01

    Two pesticide mixtures were investigated for potential endocrine activity. Mix 3 consisted of bitertanol, propiconazole, and cypermethrin, and Mix 5 included malathion and terbuthylazine in addition to the three pesticides in Mix 3. All five single pesticides and the two mixtures were investigated for their ability to affect steroidogenesis in vitro in H295R cells. The pesticides alone and both mixtures affected steroidogenesis with both mixtures causing increase in progesterone and decrease in testosterone. For Mix 5 an increase in estradiol was seen as well, indicating increased aromatase activity. The two mixtures were also investigated in pregnant rats dosed from gestational day 7 to 21, followed by examination of dams and fetuses. Decreased estradiol and reduced placental testosterone were seen in dams exposed to Mix 5. Also a significant increase in aromatase mRNA-levels in female adrenal glands was found for Mix5. However, either of the two mixtures showed any effects on fetal hormone levels in plasma or testis, or on anogenital distance. Overall, potential aromatase induction was found for Mix 5 both in vitro and in vivo, but not for Mix 3, an effect likely owed to terbuthylazine in Mix 5. However, the hormonal responses in vitro were only partly reflected in vivo, probably due to some toxicokinetic issues, as the pesticide levels in the amniotic fluid also were found to be negatively affected by the number of compounds present in the mixtures. Nonetheless, the H295R assay gives hints on conceivable interference with steroidogenesis, thus generating hypotheses on in vivo effects. - Highlights: The study examines the endocrine disrupting potential of mixtures of pesticides. All single pesticides and both mixtures affected steroidogenesis in vitro. Potential aromatase induction was found for Mix 5 both in vitro and in vivo. The hormonal responses in vitro were only partly reflected in vivo.

  18. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  19. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  20. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2?}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  1. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive ?-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of ?-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 25), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-? and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  2. Reciprocal regulation of LXR? activity by ASXL1 and ASXL2 in lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Ui-Hyun; Seong, Mi-ran [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Joo; Hur, Wonhee; Kim, Sung Woo [Department of Molecular Biology, BK21 Graduate Program, Dankook University, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Molecular Biology, BK21 Graduate Program, Dankook University, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Kew [The Catholic University Liver Research Center and WHO Collaborating Center of Viral Hepatitis, The Catholic University, College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [The Catholic University Liver Research Center and WHO Collaborating Center of Viral Hepatitis, The Catholic University, College of Medicine, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Soo-Jong, E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, BK21 Graduate Program, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: ASXL1 and ASXL2 directly interact with ligand-bound LXR?. Ligand-induced LXR? activity is repressed by ASXL1 and activated by ASXL2. ASXL1 and ASXL2 bind to the LXRE of the LXR? target promoter. ASXL1 and ASXL2 reciprocally regulate lipogenesis in liver cells. -- Abstract: Liver X receptor alpha (LXR?), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays a pivotal role in hepatic cholesterol and lipid metabolism, regulating the expression of genes associated with hepatic lipogenesis. The additional sex comb-like (ASXL) family was postulated to regulate chromatin function. Here, we investigate the roles of ASXL1 and ASXL2 in regulating LXR? activity. We found that ASXL1 suppressed ligand-induced LXR? transcriptional activity, whereas ASXL2 increased LXR? activity through direct interaction in the presence of the ligand. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed ligand-dependent recruitment of ASXLs to ABCA1 promoters, like LXR?. Knockdown studies indicated that ASXL1 inhibits, while ASXL2 increases, lipid accumulation in H4IIE cells, similar to their roles in transcriptional regulation. We also found that ASXL1 expression increases under fasting conditions, and decreases in insulin-treated H4IIE cells and the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Overall, these results support the reciprocal role of the ASXL family in lipid homeostasis through the opposite regulation of LXR?.

  3. Assessment of industrial activity in the utilization of biomass for energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this report is to help focus the federal programs in biomass energy, by identifying the status and objectives of private sector activity in the biomass field as of mid-1979. In addition, the industry's perceptions of government activities are characterized. Findings and conclusions are based principally on confidential interviews with executives in 95 companies. These included forest products companies, agricultural products companies, equipment manufacturers, electric and gas utilities petroleum refiners and distributors, research and engineering firms, and trade organizations, as listed in Exhibit 1. Interview findings have been supplemented by research of recent literature. The study focused on four key questions: (1) what is the composition of the biomass industry; (2) what are the companies doing; (3) what are their objectives and strategies; and (4) what are the implications for government policy. This executive summary provides highlights of the key findings and conclusions. The summary discussion is presented in seven parts: (1) overview of the biomass field; (2) structure of the biomass industry today; (3) corporate activities in biomass-related areas; (4) motivations for these activities; (5) industry's outlook on the future for energy-from-biomass; (6) industry's view of government activities; and (7) implications for Federal policy.

  4. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  5. Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safety Reports Series No. 11, Developing Safety Culture in Nuclear Activities: Practical Suggestions to Assist Progress, International Atomic Energy Agency

  6. Network Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics Network Activity Network Activity PDSF Network Uplinks to NERSC (dual 10 Gbps) NERSC Uplink to ESnet Last edited: 2011-03-31 22:20:59...

  7. New Directions in Active and Tunable Metamaterials. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect New Directions in Active and Tunable Metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Directions in Active and Tunable Metamaterials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Brener, Igal ; Chen, Hou-Tong Publication Date: 2013-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1083695 Report Number(s): SAND2013-4752C 456261 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: CLEO held June 10-14, 2013 in san jose, CA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation

  8. NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (EISA) of 2007 | Department of Energy NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 Revitalizing the electric power grid has become one of our Nation's top priorities, promising to reduce our dependence on oil and to meet the anticipated 1.1% annual increase in demand for electricity1. In his New Energy for America plan, President-elect Obama calls for increased

  9. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental consulting and engineering firm Stantec is observing patterns in offshore bat activity and species composition in the Gulf of Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions.

  10. Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been

  11. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Pattou, Francois; Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital, Lille; U859 Biotherapies for Diabetes, INSERM, Lille ; Staels, Bart; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  12. Methane activation using Kr and Xe in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Lee, Dae Hoon Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Woo Seok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-10-15

    Methane has interested many researchers as a possible new energy source, but the high stability of methane causes a bottleneck in methane activation, limiting its practical utilization. To determine how to effectively activate methane using non-thermal plasma, the conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—Ar, Kr, and Xe—as additives. In addition to the methane conversion results at various applied voltages, the discharge characteristics such as electron temperature and electron density were calculated through zero-dimensional calculations. Moreover, the threshold energies of excitation and ionization were used to distinguish the dominant particle for activating methane between electrons, excited atoms, and ionized atoms. From the experiments and calculations, the selection of the additive noble gas is found to affect not only the conversion of methane but also the selectivity of product gases even under similar electron temperature and electron density conditions.

  13. Quadrature conductivity: A quantitative indicator of bacterial abundance in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi Zhang; Andre Revil; Yoshiko Fujita; Junko Munakata-Marr; George Redden

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and growth stages of bacteria in subsurface porous media affect the concentrations and distributions of charged species within the solid-solution interfaces. Therefore, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements can be used to monitor changes in bacterial biomass and growth stage. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the SIP response of bacteria present in a porous material. Bacterial cell surfaces possess an electric double layer and therefore become polarized in an electric field. We performed SIP measurements over the frequency range of 0.11 kHz on cell suspensions alone and cell suspensions mixed with sand at four pore water conductivities. We used Zymomonas mobilis at four different cell densities (in- cluding the background). The quadrature conductivity spectra exhibited two peaks, one around 0.050.10 Hz and the other around 110 Hz. Because SIP measurements on bacterial suspensions are typically made at frequencies greater than 1 Hz, these peaks have not been previously reported. In the bac-terial suspensions in growth medium, the quadrature conduc-tivity at peak I was linearly proportional to the density of the bacteria. For the case of the suspensions mixed with sands, we observed that peak II presented a smaller increase in the quadrature conductivity with the cell density. A comparison of the experiments with and without sand grains illustrated the effect of the porous medium on the overall quadrature con- ductivity response (decrease in the amplitude and shift of the peaks to the lower frequencies). Our results indicate that for a given porous medium, time-lapse SIP has potential for mon- itoring changes in bacterial abundance within porous media.

  14. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  15. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  16. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  17. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Fast Neutrons from Induced Fission in Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani

    2014-02-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutron to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials.

  18. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  19. LANL participates in the "Next Big Idea" activities on September 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL participates in the "Next Big Idea" Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit LANL participates in the "Next Big Idea" activities on September 15 The Bradbury Science Museum is holding activities to dazzle and delight. September 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email There will be a

  20. Active control of low frequency sound in a gas turbine compressor installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinbanks, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of active attenuators has progressed from theoretical analysis, through laboratory experiments of increasing sophistication to the stage where their practical application to certain large scale industrial sources has finally become reality. This paper outlines some features which the author has investigated in the laboratory, and concludes with a description of the results achieved in applying these techniques to an 11 M.W. Avon Gas Turbine Compressor Installation. The active control hardware necessary to achieve these results represented a very considerable cost saving compared to the estimated cost of achieving similar performance by passive means.

  1. Activation of small alkanes in Ga-exchanged zeolites: A quantum chemical study of ethane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frash, M.V.; Santen, R.A. van

    2000-03-23

    Quantum chemical calculations on the mechanism of ethane dehydrogenation catalyzed by Ga-exchanged zeolites have been undertaken. Two forms of gallium, adsorbed dihydride gallium ion GaH{sub 2}+Z{sup {minus}} and adsorbed gallyl ion [Ga=O]{sup +}Z{sup {minus}}, were considered. It was found that GaH{sub 2}{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} is the likely active catalyst. On the contrary, [Ga=O]{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} cannot be a working catalyst in nonoxidative conditions, because regeneration of this form is very difficult. Activation of ethane by GaH{sub 2}{sup +}Z{sup {minus}} occurs via an alkyl mechanism and the gallium atom acts as an acceptor of the ethyl group. The carbenium activation of ethane, with gallium abstracting a hydride ion, is much (ca. 51 kcal/mol) more difficult. The catalytic cycle for the alkyl activation consists of three elementary steps: (1) rupture of the ethane C-H bond; (2) formation of dihydrogen from the Bronsted proton and hydrogen bound to Ga; and (3) formation of ethene from the ethyl group bound to Ga. The best estimates (MP2/6--311++G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6--31G*) for the activation energies of these three steps are 36.9, ca. 0, and 57.9 kcal/mol, respectively.

  2. Department of Energy Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill At the request of the President, Secretary Chu and Secretary Salazar traveled to Houston and participated in meetings today with DOE and national lab staff, industry officials and other engineers and scientists involved in finding solutions to cap the flow of oil and contain the spill. Secretary Chu assembled a group of top scientific experts from inside and outside of government to join in today's discussions in Houston about possible

  3. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-30

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint comprising a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including a deterministic data communications network, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  4. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-08-11

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint comprising a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including a deterministic data communications network, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  5. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-02

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  6. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-09

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  7. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  8. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  9. NSNFP Activities in Support of Repository Licensing for Disposal of DOE SNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry H. Loo; Brett W.. Carlsen; Sheryl L. Morton; Larry L. Taylor; Gregg W. Wachs

    2004-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is in the process of preparing the Yucca Mountain license application for submission to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the nations first geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste. Because the DOE SNF will be part of the license application, there are various components of the license application that will require information relative to the DOE SNF. The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) is the organization that directs the research, development, and testing of treatment, shipment, and disposal technologies for all DOE SNF. This report documents the work activities conducted by the NSNFP and discusses the relationship between these NSNFP technical activities and the license application. A number of the NSNFP activities were performed to provide risk insights and understanding of DOE SNF disposal as well as to prepare for anticipated questions from the regulatory agency.

  10. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  11. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice President, Transmission KEMA Honorable Lauren Azar Commissioner Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission Frederick Butler President & Chief Executive Officer Butler Advisory Services Richard Cowart Principal Regulatory Assistance Project and Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Roger Duncan General Manager (Ret.)

  12. RHESSI AND TRACE OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE FLARE ACTIVITY IN AR 10656 AND ASSOCIATED FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Cho, K.-S.; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2013-07-01

    We present Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations of multiple flare activity that occurred in the NOAA active region 10656 over a period of 2 hr on 2004 August 18. Out of four successive flares, three were class C events, and the final event was a major X1.8 solar eruptive flare. The activities during the pre-eruption phase, i.e., before the X1.8 flare, are characterized by three localized episodes of energy release occurring in the vicinity of a filament that produces intense heating along with non-thermal emission. A few minutes before the eruption, the filament undergoes an activation phase during which it slowly rises with a speed of {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The filament eruption is accompanied by an X1.8 flare, during which multiple hard X-ray (HXR) bursts are observed up to 100-300 keV energies. We observe a bright and elongated coronal structure simultaneously in E(UV) and 50-100 keV HXR images underneath the expanding filament during the period of HXR bursts, which provides strong evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. This phase is accompanied by very high plasma temperatures of {approx}31 MK, followed by the detachment of the prominence from the solar source region. From the location, timing, strength, and spectrum of HXR emission, we conclude that the prominence eruption is driven by the distinct events of magnetic reconnection occurring in the current sheet below the erupting prominence. These multi-wavelength observations also suggest that the localized magnetic reconnections associated with different evolutionary stages of the filament in the pre-eruption phase play an important role in destabilizing the active-region filament through the tether-cutting process, leading to large-scale eruption and X-class flare.

  13. MRG15 activates the cdc2 promoter via histone acetylation in human cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, AndreAna N.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M.; Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

    2011-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling is required for transcriptional activation and repression. MRG15 (MORF4L1), a chromatin modulator, is a highly conserved protein and is present in complexes containing histone acetyltransferases (HATs) as well as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Loss of expression of MRG15 in mice and Drosophila results in embryonic lethality and fibroblast and neural stem/progenitor cells cultured from Mrg15 null mouse embryos exhibit marked proliferative defects when compared with wild type cells. To determine the role of MRG15 in cell cycle progression we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with an antibody to MRG15 on normal human fibroblasts as they entered the cell cycle from a quiescent state, and analyzed various cell cycle gene promoters. The results demonstrated a 3-fold increase in MRG15 occupancy at the cdc2 promoter during S phase of the cell cycle and a concomitant increase in acetylated histone H4. H4 lysine 12 was acetylated at 24 h post-serum stimulation while there was no change in acetylation of lysine 16. HDAC1 and 2 were decreased at this promoter during cell cycle progression. Over-expression of MRG15 in HeLa cells activated a cdc2 promoter-reporter construct in a dose-dependent manner, whereas knockdown of MRG15 resulted in decreased promoter activity. In order to implicate HAT activity, we treated cells with the HAT inhibitor anacardic acid and determined that HAT inhibition results in loss of expression of cdc2 mRNA. Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation with Tip60 localizes the protein to the same 110 bp stretch of the cdc2 promoter pulled down by MRG15. Additionally, we determined that cotransfection of MRG15 with the known associated HAT Tip60 had a cooperative effect in activating the cdc2 promoter. These results suggest that MRG15 is acting in a HAT complex involving Tip60 to modify chromatin via acetylation of histone H4 at the cdc2 promoter to activate transcription.

  14. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  15. Performance measures for evaluating public participation activities in DOE`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.; Schweitzer, M.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.; Munro, J.F.

    1996-08-01

    Public participation in decision-making in the United States has become a dominant theme throughout the public sector and is increasingly used in the private sector. Recent reports by the National Research Council and the Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, set up jointly by the White House and Congress, conclude that risk decisions must increasingly be structured in such a manner as to involve stakeholders meaningfully in the processes and activities leading to decisions and, perhaps, through decision implementation. Both of these reports indicate that decisions may take longer but be better if officials: (1) bring all interested and affected parties to the table at the beginning of the risk-discussion process; (2) identify relevant concerns, losses, exposures and other information the parties have; (3) address significant concerns through appropriate research; and (4) present findings in an understandable, accessible way. This report is intended to facilitate subsequent evaluations of public participation activities and programs.

  16. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 4872 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NF?B. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein?1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase?2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ? Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ? Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ? Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated early after ozone. ? Oxidative stress may contribute to regulating macrophage phenotype and function.

  17. Oxidative stress induced lipid accumulation via SREBP1c activation in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiya, Mika; Hiraishi, Ako; Touyama, Maiko [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Sakamoto, Kazuichi [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)], E-mail: sakamoto@biol.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2008-10-31

    SREBP1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c) is a metabolic-syndrome-associated transcription factor that controls fatty acid biosynthesis under glucose/insulin stimulation. Oxidative stress increases lipid accumulation, which promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, we know little about the role of oxidative stress in fatty acid biosynthesis. To clarify the action of oxidative stress in lipid accumulation via SREBP1c, we examined SREBP1c activity in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated mammalian cells. We introduced a luciferase reporter plasmid carrying the SREBP1c-binding site into HepG2 or COS-7 cells. With increasing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose, SREBP1c transcriptional activity increased in HepG2 cells but declined in COS-7 cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of SREBP1c gene or of SREBP1c-regulated genes rose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose-dependently in HepG2 cells but dropped in COS-7 cells. Lipid accumulation and levels of the nuclear form of SREBP1c increased in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HepG2 cells. ROS may stimulate lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells via SREBP1c activation.

  18. The factory and the beehive. II. Activity and rotation in Praesepe and the Hyades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, S. T.; Ageros, M. A.; Bowsher, E. C.; Lemonias, J. J.; Fierroz, D. F.; Covey, K. R.; Bochanski, J. J.; Cargile, P. A.; Kraus, A.; Law, N. M.; Arce, H. G.; Kundert, A.

    2014-11-10

    Open clusters are collections of stars with a single, well-determined age, and can be used to investigate the connections between angular-momentum evolution and magnetic activity over a star's lifetime. We present the results of a comparative study of the relationship between stellar rotation and activity in two benchmark open clusters: Praesepe and the Hyades. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ?600 Myr. We have compiled a sample of 720 spectramore than half of which are new observationsfor 516 high-confidence members of Praesepe; we have also obtained 139 new spectra for 130 high-confidence Hyads. We have also collected rotation periods (P {sub rot}) for 135 Praesepe members and 87 Hyads. To compare H? emission, an indicator of chromospheric activity, as a function of color, mass, and Rossby number R{sub o} , we first calculate an expanded set of ? values, with which we can obtain the H? to bolometric luminosity ratio, L {sub H?}/L {sub bol}, even when spectra are not flux-calibrated and/or stars lack reliable distances. Our ? values cover a broader range of stellar masses and colors (roughly equivalent to spectral types from K0 to M9), and exhibit better agreement between independent calculations, than existing values. Unlike previous authors, we find no difference between the two clusters in their H? equivalent width or L {sub H?}/L {sub bol} distributions, and therefore take the merged H? and P {sub rot} data to be representative of 600 Myr old stars. Our analysis shows that H? activity in these stars is saturated for R{sub o}?0.11{sub ?0.03}{sup +0.02}. Above that value activity declines as a power-law with slope ?=?0.73{sub ?0.12}{sup +0.16}, before dropping off rapidly at R{sub o} ? 0.4. These data provide a useful anchor for calibrating the age-activity-rotation relation beyond 600 Myr.

  19. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

    2010-09-30

    An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

  20. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Frances H. (Pasadena, CA); Moore, Jeffrey C. (Pasadena, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  1. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Frances H. (Pasadena, CA); Moore, Jeffrey C. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  2. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases. These enzymes exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  3. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1999-05-25

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  4. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L.

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells and that its increased expression in tumors may result in estrogen-independent ER activation, thereby reducing estrogen dependence and response to anti-estrogen therapy.

  5. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Yi; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 ; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 ; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ? Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ? Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ? Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ? Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  6. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Yuji Yamauchi, Marco Armando, Naoto Nihei, Yuji Nobuta, Tomoaki Hino Division of Quantum Science and Engineering Faculty of engineering, Hokkaido University 1 Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University Background 2 INTRODUCTION 1 Tungsten (W) Good candidate as plasma-facing material (PFM) in fusion reactor Development of tungsten coating on PFM (such as F82H) Bulk W is heavy  Influences density control of

  7. Seismic Vulnerability Evaluations Within The Structural And Functional Survey Activities Of The COM Bases In Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuccaro, G.; Cacace, F.; Albanese, V.; Mercuri, C.; Papa, F.; Pizza, A. G.; Sergio, S.; Severino, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes technical and functional surveys on COM buildings (Mixed Operative Centre). This activity started since 2005, with the contribution of both Italian Civil Protection Department and the Regions involved. The project aims to evaluate the efficiency of COM buildings, checking not only structural, architectonic and functional characteristics but also paying attention to surrounding real estate vulnerability, road network, railways, harbours, airports, area morphological and hydro-geological characteristics, hazardous activities, etc. The first survey was performed in eastern Sicily, before the European Civil Protection Exercise 'EUROSOT 2005'. Then, since 2006, a new survey campaign started in Abruzzo, Molise, Calabria and Puglia Regions. The more important issue of the activity was the vulnerability assessment. So this paper deals with a more refined vulnerability evaluation technique by means of the SAVE methodology, developed in the 1st task of SAVE project within the GNDT-DPC programme 2000-2002 (Zuccaro, 2005); the SAVE methodology has been already successfully employed in previous studies (i.e. school buildings intervention programme at national scale; list of strategic public buildings in Campania, Sicilia and Basilicata). In this paper, data elaborated by SAVE methodology are compared with expert evaluations derived from the direct inspections on COM buildings. This represents a useful exercise for the improvement either of the survey forms or of the methodology for the quick assessment of the vulnerability.

  8. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ? (C/EBP?) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBP? and PPAR?. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBP? and C/EBP? was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  9. MAGNETIC NONPOTENTIALITY IN PHOTOSPHERIC ACTIVE REGIONS AS A PREDICTOR OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xiao; Lin Ganghua; Zhang Hongqi; Mao Xinjie

    2013-09-10

    Based on several magnetic nonpotentiality parameters obtained from the vector photospheric active region magnetograms obtained with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station over two solar cycles, a machine learning model has been constructed to predict the occurrence of flares in the corresponding active region within a certain time window. The Support Vector Classifier, a widely used general classifier, is applied to build and test the prediction models. Several classical verification measures are adopted to assess the quality of the predictions. We investigate different flare levels within various time windows, and thus it is possible to estimate the rough classes and erupting times of flares for particular active regions. Several combinations of predictors have been tested in the experiments. The True Skill Statistics are higher than 0.36 in 97% of cases and the Heidke Skill Scores range from 0.23 to 0.48. The predictors derived from longitudinal magnetic fields do perform well, however, they are less sensitive in predicting large flares. Employing the nonpotentiality predictors from vector fields improves the performance of predicting large flares of magnitude {>=}M5.0 and {>=}X1.0.

  10. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2010-03-15

    A literature survey has been conducted to collect information on the International R&D activities in the extraction of uranium from seawater for the period from the 1960s till the year of 2010. The reported activities, on both the laboratory scale bench experiments and the large scale marine experiments, were summarized by country/region in this report. Among all countries where such activities have been reported, Japan has carried out the most advanced large scale marine experiments with the amidoxime-based system, and achieved the collection efficiency (1.5 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 30 days soaking in the ocean) that could justify the development of industrial scale marine systems to produce uranium from seawater at the price competitive with those from conventional uranium resources. R&D opportunities are discussed for improving the system performance (selectivity for uranium, loading capacity, chemical stability and mechanical durability in the sorption-elution cycle, and sorption kinetics) and making the collection of uranium from seawater more economically competitive.

  11. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-?B expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ? Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ? MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ? MP and EP decreased TNF-? and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ? MP and EP reduced NF-?B expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ? MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  13. LLNL's Big Science Capabilities Help Spur Over $796 Billion in U.S. Economic Activity Sequencing the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S.

    2015-07-28

    LLNLs successful history of taking on big science projects spans beyond national security and has helped create billions of dollars per year in new economic activity. One example is LLNLs role in helping sequence the human genome. Over $796 billion in new economic activity in over half a dozen fields has been documented since LLNL successfully completed this Grand Challenge.

  14. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  16. The black hole binary V4641 Sagitarii: Activity in quiescence and improved mass determinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle; Cantrell, Andrew G.; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Kennedy-Shaffer, Ross; Orosz, Jerome A.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.

    2014-03-20

    We examine ?10 yr of photometric data and find that the black hole X-ray binary V4641 Sgr has two optical states, passive and active, during X-ray quiescence. The passive state is dominated by ellipsoidal variations and is stable in the shape and variability of the light curve. The active state is brighter and more variable. Emission during the active state varies over the course of the orbital period and is redder than the companion star. These optical/infrared states last for weeks or months. V4641 Sgr spends approximately 85% of X-ray quiescence in the passive state and 15% in the active. We analyze passive colors and spectroscopy of V4641 Sgr and show that they are consistent with a reddened B9III star (with E(B V) = 0.37 0.19) with little or no contribution from the accretion disk. We use X-ray observations with an updated ephemeris to place an upper limit on the duration of an X-ray eclipse of <8.3 in phase (?1.6 hr). High-resolution spectroscopy yields a greatly improved measurement of the rotational velocity of the companion star of V {sub rot}sin i = 100.9 0.8 km s{sup 1}. We fit ellipsoidal models to the passive state data and find an inclination angle of i = 72.3 4.1, a mass ratio of Q = 2.2 0.2, and component masses for the system of M {sub BH} = 6.4 0.6 M {sub ?} and M {sub 2} = 2.9 0.4 M {sub ?}. Using these values we calculate an updated distance to V4641 Sgr of 6.2 0.7 kpc.

  17. The Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in leading the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (DOE) is actively involved in leading the development of advanced applications and tools to more effectively operate the electricity delivery system by enabling advanced analysis, visualization, monitoring and alarming, and decision support capabilities for grid operators. These applications use-and greatly increase the value of-data coming from high-resolution electrical measuring devices known as phasor measurement units (PMUs), whose deployment is being facilitated by the North American

  18. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  19. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) coreshell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  20. Interactive Activity Detection Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Detection Tools Interactive Activity Detection Tools Tools for detecting specified activities in video data provide a key intelligence capability. High numbers of false alarms, however, reduce tool effectiveness and analyst patience. User feedback reduces false alarms * This project will reduce the number of false alarms generated by activity detection tools (including single vehicle start / stop, multi-vehicle meetings and coordinated driving patterns) by exploiting user feedback in a

  1. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custdio, Jos B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  2. Cognitive tasks in information analysis: Use of event dwell time to characterize component activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Slavich, Antoinette L.; Littlefield, Rik J.; Littlefield, Janis S.; Cowley, Paula J.

    2004-09-28

    Technology-based enhancement of information analysis requires a detailed understanding of the cognitive tasks involved in the process. The information search and report production tasks of the information analysis process were investigated through evaluation of time-stamped workstation data gathered with custom software. Model tasks simulated the search and production activities, and a sample of actual analyst data were also evaluated. Task event durations were calculated on the basis of millisecond-level time stamps, and distributions were plotted for analysis. The data indicate that task event time shows a cyclic pattern of variation, with shorter event durations (< 2 sec) reflecting information search and filtering, and longer event durations (> 10 sec) reflecting information evaluation. Application of cognitive principles to the interpretation of task event time data provides a basis for developing cognitive signatures of complex activities, and can facilitate the development of technology aids for information intensive tasks.

  3. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  4. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in acrolein-induced endothelial activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberzettl, Petra; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Srivastava, Sanjay [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Bhatnagar, Aruni [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)], E-mail: aruni@louisville.edu

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 {mu}M acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2{alpha} within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2-4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone - phenylbutyric acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and an increase in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased expression of cytokine genes and NF-{kappa}B activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-{kappa}B activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production.

  5. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhang, C., E-mail: chizhang@tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Z. G. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ji, Y. Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zang, H. [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Shen, T. L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300500?nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ?840?nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  6. Renewable Energy Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol (4 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know where it comes from. This module uses a series of four activities to show how energy and mass are converted from one form to another. It focuses on the conversion of light energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis, then goes on to show how the chemical energy in plant sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol. Finally, the reasons for using ethanol as a fuel are discussed.

  7. Public involvement in the regulatory activities regarding nuclear fuel cycle facilities: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reviews the involvement of a community-based organization in the activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding a uranium conversion facility that operated near Gore, Oklahoma from 1970 until 1992. Effective participation requires access to decision making. Access is a complex phenomenon that includes: (1) opportunity, both procedural and physical, (2) a common language, and (3) time and resources. The paper describes how both the community organization and the NRC responded to these requirements for access, the strategies that were most effective in securing meaningful public involvement in the decision making, and the impacts of that involvement on the organization.

  8. Inverse antagonist activities of parabens on human oestrogen-related receptor ? (ERR?): In vitro and in silico studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Hu, Ying; Jiao, Jian; Hu, Jianying

    2013-07-01

    Parabens are p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters that have been used extensively as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, drugs and toiletries. These intact esters are commonly detected in human breast cancer tissues and other human samples, thus arousing concern about the involvement of parabens in human breast cancer. In this study, an in vitro nuclear receptor coactivator recruiting assay was developed and used to evaluate the binding activities of parabens, salicylates and benzoates via antagonist competitive binding on the human oestrogen-related receptor ? (ERR?), which is known as both a diagnostic biomarker and a treatment target of breast cancer. The results showed that all of the test parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and benzylparaben) possessed clear inverse antagonist activities on ERR?, with a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) of 10{sup ?7} M and the 50% relative effective concentrations (REC50) varying from 3.09 10{sup ?7} to 5.88 10{sup ?7} M, whereas the salicylates possessed much lower activities and the benzoates showed no obvious activity. In silico molecular docking analyses showed that parabens fitted well into the active site of ERR?, with hydrogen bonds forming between the p-hydroxyl group of parabens and the Glu275/Arg316 of ERR?. As the paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues are commonly higher than the LOELs observed in this study, parabens may play some role via ERR? in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. In addition, parabens may have significant effects on breast cancer patients who are taking tamoxifen, as ERR? is regarded as a treatment target for tamoxifen. - Highlights: An oestrogen-related receptor ? coactivator recruiting assay was developed. Strong binding activities of parabens with oestrogen-related receptor ? were found. The paraben levels reported in breast cancer tissues were higher than their LOELs. Parabens may play some role via ERR? in the carcinogenesis of human breast cancer. Parabens may have significant effects in breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen.

  9. Unexpected Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC Oxides Cycled below the Activation Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yan; Bareno, Javier; Bettge, Martin; Abraham, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    A common feature of lithium-excess layered oxides, nominally of composition xLi2MnO3(1-x)LiMO2 (M = transition metal) is a high-voltage plateau (~4.5 V vs. Li/Li+) in their capacity-voltage profile during the first delithiation cycle. This plateau is believed to result from activation of the Li2MnO3 component, which makes additional lithium available for electrochemical cycling. However, oxides cycled beyond this activation plateau are known to display voltage fade which is a continuous reduction in their equilibrium potential. In this article we show that these oxides display gradual voltage fade even on electrochemical cycling in voltage ranges well below the activation plateau. The average fade is ~0.08 mV-cycle-1 for Li1.2Ni0.15Mn0.55Co0.1O2 vs. Li cells after 20 cycles in the 24.1 V range at 55C; a ~54 mV voltage hysteresis, expressed as the difference in average cell voltage between charge and discharge cycles, is also observed. The voltage fade results from a gradual accumulation of local spinel environments in the crystal structure. Some of these spinel sites result from lithium deficiencies during oxide synthesis and are likely to be at the particle surfaces; other sites result from the migration of transition metal atoms in the partially-delithiated LiMO2 component into the lithium planes during electrochemical cycling. The observed rate of voltage fade depends on a combination of factors that includes the phase equilibrium between the layered and spinel components and the kinetics of transition metal migration.

  10. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurlio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Mrcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  11. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocatalytic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Splitting | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocatalytic Water Splitting Thursday, April 30, 2015 Operando XAS showing structural changes at Fe dopants in Ni(OH)2/NiOOH host structure. Ni(OH)2 is oxidized into γ-NiOOH under OER operating conditions, inducing significant M-O bond contraction at both Ni and Fe sites. Theoretical modeling of site specific OER overpotentials using DFT+U reveals the origin of

  12. Mutagenic activity and chemical analysis of airborne particulates collected in Pisa (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellosi, R.; Fiorio, R.; Rosellini, D.; Bronzetti, G. ); Vannucchi, C.; Ciacchini, G.; Giaconi, V. ); Bianchi, F. )

    1994-03-01

    In the last few years there has been much concern about the problem connected to the exposure to mutagens present in the environment of industrialized countries. Particularly, the mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter has been studied by many investigators and correlated with elevated lung cancer mortality rates. In most cases the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome test has been used for these studies. This short-term test, which is the most validated among the short-term genotoxicity tests, provides an important indication on the carcinogenic potential of environmental pollutants. That are complex mixtures containing a wide variety of compounds potentially capable of causing additive, antagonistic or synergistic genotoxic response in living organisms. Several studies have suggested that diverse factors, such as traffic and meteorological conditions, could affect the levels of pollutants in the air. In our work, we have investigated three different areas in Pisa, where the intensity and the kind of the road traffic were different. Airborne particles have been collected during a year and the genotoxic activity has been studied using TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-04-10

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

  14. Tracking Dynamics of Plant Biomass Composting by Changes in Substrate Structure, Microbial Community, and Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, H.; Tucker, M. P.; Baker, J. O.; Harris, M.; Luo, Y. H.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  15. Surface activity and oscillation amplitudes of red giants in eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaulme, P.; Jackiewicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Mosser, B.

    2014-04-10

    Among the 19 red-giant stars belonging to eclipsing binary systems that have been identified in Kepler data, 15 display solar-like oscillations. We study whether the absence of mode detection in the remaining 4 is an observational bias or possibly evidence of mode damping that originates from tidal interactions. A careful analysis of the corresponding Kepler light curves shows that modes with amplitudes that are usually observed in red giants would have been detected if they were present. We observe that mode depletion is strongly associated with short-period systems, in which stellar radii account for 16%-24% of the semi-major axis, and where red-giant surface activity is detected. We suggest that when the rotational and orbital periods synchronize in close binaries, the red-giant component is spun up, so that a dynamo mechanism starts and generates a magnetic field, leading to observable stellar activity. Pressure modes would then be damped as acoustic waves dissipate in these fields.

  16. MHD SIMULATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS IN A DYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendygral, P. J.; Jones, T. W.; Dolag, K.

    2012-05-10

    We present a pair of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of intermittent jets from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a galaxy cluster extracted from a high-resolution cosmological simulation. The selected cluster was chosen as an apparently relatively relaxed system, not having undergone a major merger in almost 7 Gyr. Despite this characterization and history, the intracluster medium (ICM) contains quite active 'weather'. We explore the effects of this ICM weather on the morphological evolution of the AGN jets and lobes. The orientation of the jets is different in the two simulations so that they probe different aspects of the ICM structure and dynamics. We find that even for this cluster, which can be characterized as relaxed by an observational standard, the large-scale, bulk ICM motions can significantly distort the jets and lobes. Synthetic X-ray observations of the simulations show that the jets produce complex cavity systems, while synthetic radio observations reveal bending of the jets and lobes similar to wide-angle tail radio sources. The jets are cycled on and off with a 26 Myr period using a 50% duty cycle. This leads to morphological features similar to those in 'double-double' radio galaxies. While the jet and ICM magnetic fields are generally too weak in the simulations to play a major role in the dynamics, Maxwell stresses can still become locally significant.

  17. Mangiferin exerts antitumor activity in breast cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and ?-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongzhong; Huang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Xiang, Tingxiu; Yin, Xuedong; Peng, Weiyan; Cheng, Wei; Wan, Jingyuan; Luo, Fuling; Li, Hongyuan; Ren, Guosheng

    2013-10-01

    Although mangiferin which is a naturally occurring glucosylxanthone has exhibited promising anticancer activities, the detailed molecular mechanism of mangiferin on cancers still remains enigmatic. In this study, the anticancer activity of mangiferin was evaluated in breast cancer cell line-based in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that mangiferin treatment resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that mangiferin induced decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and -9, and reversal of epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, it was demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibited the activation of ?-catenin pathway. Subsequent experiments showed that inhibiting ?-catenin pathway might play a central role in mangiferin-induced anticancer activity through modulation of MMP-7 and -9, and EMT. Consistent with these findings in vitro, the antitumor potential was also verified in mangiferin-treated MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice where significantly decreased tumor volume, weight and proliferation, and increased apoptosis were obtained, with lower expression of MMP-7 and -9, vimentin and active ?-catenin, and higher expression of E-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that mangiferin might be used as an effective chemopreventive agent against breast cancer. - Highlights: Mangiferin inhibits growth and metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Mangiferin down-regulates MMP-7 and -9 in breast cancer cells. Mangiferin induces the reversal of EMT in metastatic breast cancer cells. Mangiferin inhibits the activation of ?-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Inhibiting ?-catenin is responsible for the antitumor activity of mangiferin.

  18. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] ?6548/H?, [O III] ?5007/H?) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  19. Correlating Local Structure with Electrochemical Activity in Li2MnO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nanda, Jagjit; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dixit, Hemant M.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pezeshki, Alan M.; Ruther, Rose E.

    2015-07-31

    Li2MnO3 is of interest as one component of the composite lithium-rich oxides, which are under development for high capacity, high voltage cathodes in lithium ion batteries. Despite such practical importance, the mechanism of electrochemical activity in Li2MnO3 is contested in the literature, as are the effects of long-term electrochemical cycling. Here, Raman spectroscopy and mapping are used to follow the chemical and structural changes that occur in Li2MnO3. Both conventional slurry electrodes and thin films are studied as a function of the state of charge (voltage) and cycle number. Thin films have similar electrochemical properties as electrodes prepared from slurries,more » but allow for spectroscopic investigations on uniform samples without carbon additives. Spectral changes correlate well with electrochemical activity and support a mechanism whereby capacity is lost upon extended cycling due to the formation of new manganese oxide phases. Raman mapping of both thin film and slurry electrodes charged to different voltages reveals significant variation in the local structure. Poor conductivity and slow kinetics associated with a two-phase reaction mechanism contribute to the heterogeneity.« less

  20. Numerical studies of active current profile control in the reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    studies of active current profile control in the reversed-field pinch This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2007 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 183 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/49/2/008) Download details: IP Address: 128.104.166.214 The article was downloaded on 13/10/2010 at 22:13 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search

  1. Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL Preprint January 2001 * NREL/CP-500-29164 D.M. Heimiller S.R. Haymes To be presented at the 39 th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Reno, Nevada January 8-11, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted

  2. Global confinement and discrete dynamo activity in the MST reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement and discrete dynamo activity in the MST reversed-field pinch* S. Hokin,+ A. Almagri, S. Assadi, J. Beckstead, G. Chartas, N. Cracker, M. Cudzinovic, D. Den Hat-tog, FL Dexter, D. Holly, S. Prager, T. Rempel, J. Sarff, E. Scime, W. Shen, C. Spragins, C. Sprott, G. Starr, M. Stoneking, and C. Watts University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53 706 R. Nebel Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (Received 10 December 1990; accepted 1 April 199 1) Results obtained

  3. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Surveying (Number of Elements) Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2003 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

  4. US/Japan Cooperation in High Energy Physics. Review of activities, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-16

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988--1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  5. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung, M C; Jiao, Y

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  6. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; Nevin, K.P.; Franks, A.; Englert, A.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-11-15

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density ({<=}50 mA/m{sup 2}) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control electrode not exposed to acetate produced low, steady currents ({<=}0.2 mA/m{sup 2}). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode, and these results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. Thus it is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  7. Human serum activates CIDEB-mediated lipid droplet enlargement in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singaravelu, Ragunath; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 ; Lyn, Rodney K.; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 ; Srinivasan, Prashanth; Delcorde, Julie; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 ; Steenbergen, Rineke H.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne; Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, Katz Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 ; Pezacki, John P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: Human serum induced differentiation of hepatoma cells increases cellular lipid droplet (LD) size. The observed increase in LD size correlates with increased PGC-1? and CIDEB expression. Induction of CIDEB expression correlates with rescue of VLDL secretion and loss of ADRP. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB impairs the human serum mediated increase in LD size. This system represents a cost-efficient model to study CIDEBs role in lipid biology. -- Abstract: Human hepatocytes constitutively express the lipid droplet (LD) associated protein cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB). CIDEB mediates LD fusion, as well as very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) maturation. However, there are limited cell culture models readily available to study CIDEBs role in these biological processes, as hepatoma cell lines express negligible levels of CIDEB. Recent work has highlighted the ability of human serum to differentiate hepatoma cells. Herein, we demonstrate that culturing Huh7.5 cells in media supplemented with human serum activates CIDEB expression. This activation occurs through the induced expression of PGC-1?, a positive transcriptional regulator of CIDEB. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy revealed a correlation between CIDEB levels and LD size in human serum treated Huh7.5 cells. Human serum treatment also resulted in a rapid decrease in the levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Furthermore, individual overexpression of CIDEB was sufficient to down-regulate ADRP protein levels. siRNA knockdown of CIDEB revealed that the human serum mediated increase in LD size was CIDEB-dependent. Overall, our work highlights CIDEBs role in LD fusion, and presents a new model system to study the PGC-1?/CIDEB pathways role in LD dynamics and the VLDL pathway.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej; Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes (from 0.88 {+-} 0.04 to 1.29 {+-} 0.12 nmol/min/mg protein, P < 0.05), and this effect was attenuated by Compound C. Our results suggested that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activated the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake via AMPK in cultured rat podocytes. This signaling may play a potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance under conditions associated with oxidative stress.

  9. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-09-02

    Eager send data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints that specify a client, a context, and a task, including receiving an eager send data communications instruction with transfer data disposed in a send buffer characterized by a read/write send buffer memory address in a read/write virtual address space of the origin endpoint; determining for the send buffer a read-only send buffer memory address in a read-only virtual address space, the read-only virtual address space shared by both the origin endpoint and the target endpoint, with all frames of physical memory mapped to pages of virtual memory in the read-only virtual address space; and communicating by the origin endpoint to the target endpoint an eager send message header that includes the read-only send buffer memory address.

  10. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-09-16

    Eager send data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints that specify a client, a context, and a task, including receiving an eager send data communications instruction with transfer data disposed in a send buffer characterized by a read/write send buffer memory address in a read/write virtual address space of the origin endpoint; determining for the send buffer a read-only send buffer memory address in a read-only virtual address space, the read-only virtual address space shared by both the origin endpoint and the target endpoint, with all frames of physical memory mapped to pages of virtual memory in the read-only virtual address space; and communicating by the origin endpoint to the target endpoint an eager send message header that includes the read-only send buffer memory address.

  11. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  12. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  13. Measurement and prediction of copper ion activity in Lake Orta, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camusso, M.; Tartari, G. ); Zirino, A. )

    1991-04-01

    A commercial Cu ion selective electrode (ISE) mounted on a field conductivity, temperature, depth probe (CTD) equipped with pH and oxygen sensors was used to measure a profile of Cu ion activity ({alpha}(Cu{sup 2+})) in Lake Orta, Italy. Lake Orta water contains approximately 32-34 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} Cu from anthropogenic sources. Below the mixed layer, {alpha}-(Cu{sup 2+}) was directly related to the pH of the lake water. In the body of the hypolimnion, measurements of {alpha}(Cu{sup 2+}) obtained from total Cu concentrations. The pH dependence of the activity/concentration of free Cu{sup 2+} was modeled with a simple ion association model of the lake water. The results of the model were verified by a potentiometric titration of a sample of lake water using Cu, pH, and NH{sub 3} ISEs. The titration simulated a forthcoming chemical treatment now in progress.

  14. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balliou, A.; Douvas, A. M.; Normand, P.; Argitis, P.; Glezos, N.; Tsikritzis, D.; Kennou, S.

    2014-10-14

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW₁₂O₄₀³⁻, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  15. Effect of packing material on methane activation in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-12-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), and ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1620 mesh). Investigations on the surface properties and shape of the three packing materials clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by the material used. Capacitances inside the discharge gap are estimated from chargevoltage plots, and a comparison of the generated and transferred charges for different packing conditions show that the difference in surface properties between ?- and ?-phase Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects the discharge characteristics. Moreover, all packing conditions show different charge characteristics that are related to the electron density. Finally, the packing material's shape affects the local electron temperature, which is strongly related to methane conversion. The combined results indicate that both microscale and macroscale variations in a packing material affect the discharge characteristics, and a packing material should be considered carefully for effective methane activation.

  16. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; van Benthem, Klaus; Li, Sa; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Pennycook, Stephen J; Jena, Puru; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by meltspinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an organometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 oC and 20 bar on Pd- ACF exceeded the expected capacity based solely on Pd hydride formation and hydrogen physisorption on the microporous carbon support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub- ngstrom spatial resolution provided unambiguous identification of isolated Pd atoms occurring in the carbon matrix that coexist with larger Pd particles. First principles calculations revealed that each single Pd atom can form Kubas-type complexes by binding up to three H2 molecules in the pressure range of adsorption measurements. Based on Pd atom concentration determined from STEM images, the contribution of various mechanisms to the excess hydrogen uptake measured experimentally was evaluated. With consideration of Kubas binding as a viable mechanism (along with hydride formation and physisorption to carbon support) the role of hydrogen spillover in this system may be smaller than previously thought.

  17. Drivers` activities and information needs in an automated highway system. Working paper, August 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitan, L.; Bloomfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In most visions of the AHS--including that of the National Automated Highway System Consortium--it has been assumed that when a vehicle was under automated control, the driver would be allowed to engage in any of a variety of activities not related to driving (e.g, working, reading, sleeping). The objective of the first study reported here--one of the noncommuter studies--was to determine what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and whether the age of and/gender or the driver and/or the intrastring gap have an influence on those activities. One the objectives of the commuter experiment--of relevance for this report--was to determine whether what drivers do when traveling under automated control changes as a function of experience with the AHS (i.e., across trials). As conceptualization of the AHS proceeds, the details of the interface between the driver and the in-vehicle system will become more important. One part of that interface will be information supplied by the AHS to the driver, perhaps about such things as traffic conditions ahead predicted trip time to the driver`s selected exit, and so on. To maximize the utility of that information, it is important to determine what it is that drivers would like to know when traveling under automated control. The objective of the third study reported here--the second of the five noncommuter experiments--was to provide a first investigation of that issue.

  18. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  19. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-11-12

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer composed of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, each compute node including application processors that execute the parallel application and at least one management processor dedicated to gathering information regarding data communications. The PAMI is composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint composed of a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources. Embodiments function by gathering call site statistics describing data communications resulting from execution of data communications instructions and identifying in dependence upon the call cite statistics a data communications algorithm for use in executing a data communications instruction at a call site in the parallel application.

  20. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective opeartion through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  1. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2015-11-19

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  2. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Kristan D.; Faraj, Daniel A.

    2014-07-22

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and ranges of message sizes so that each algorithm is associated with a separate range of message sizes; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint, the data communications message characterized by a message size; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and ranges, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the message size; and transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  3. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  4. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Kristan D; Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-09

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and ranges of message sizes so that each algorithm is associated with a separate range of message sizes; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint, the data communications message characterized by a message size; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and ranges, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the message size; and transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  5. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-16

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  6. Resonant activation in a colored multiplicative thermal noise driven closed system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Mondal, Debasish

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that resonant activation (RA) is possible even in a thermodynamically closed system where the particle experiences a random force and a spatio-temporal frictional coefficient from the thermal bath. For this stochastic process, we have observed a hallmark of RA phenomena in terms of a turnover behavior of the barrier-crossing rate as a function of noise correlation time at a fixed noise variance. Variance can be fixed either by changing temperature or damping strength as a function of noise correlation time. Our another observation is that the barrier crossing rate passes through a maximum with increase in coupling strength of the multiplicative noise. If the damping strength is appreciably large, then the maximum may disappear. Finally, we compare simulation results with the analytical calculation. It shows that there is a good agreement between analytical and numerical results.

  7. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y.

    2015-08-11

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  8. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  9. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  10. Active stabilization of rotating stall in a three-stage axial compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, J.M.; Hendricks, G.J.; Epstein, A.H. . Gas Turbine Lab.)

    1994-04-01

    A three-stage, low-speed axial research compressor has been actively stabilized by damping low-amplitude circumferentially traveling waves, which can grow into rotating stall. Using a circumferential array of hot-wire sensors, and an array of high-speed individually positioned control vanes as the actuator, the first and second spatial harmonics of the compressor were stabilized down to a characteristic slope of 0.9, yielding an 8 percent increase in operating flow range. Stabilization of the third spatial harmonic did not alter the stalling flow coefficient. The actuators were also used open loop to determine the forced response behavior of the compressor. A system identification procedure applied to the forced response data then yielded the compressor transfer function. The Moore-Greitzer two-dimensional stability model was modified as suggested by the measurements to include the effect of blade row time lags on the compressor dynamics. This modified Moore-Greitzer model was then used to predict both the open and closed-loop dynamic response of the compressor. The model predictions agreed closely with the experimental results. In particular, the model predicted both the mass flow at stall without control and the design parameters needed by, and the range extension realized from, active control.

  11. X-ray microtomography shows pore structure and tortuosity in alkali-activated binders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provis, John L.; Myers, Rupert J.; White, Claire E.; Rose, Volker; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2012-06-15

    Durability of alkali-activated binders is of vital importance in their commercial application, and depends strongly on microstructure and pore network characteristics. X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) offers, for the first time, direct insight into microstructural and pore structure characteristics in three dimensions. Here, {mu}CT is performed on a set of sodium metasilicate-activated fly ash/slag blends, using a synchrotron beamline instrument. Segmentation of the samples into pore and solid regions is then conducted, and pore tortuosity is calculated by a random walker method. Segmented porosity and diffusion tortuosity are correlated, and vary as a function of slag content (slag addition reduces porosity and increases tortuosity), and sample age (extended curing gives lower porosity and higher tortuosity). This is particularly notable for samples with {>=} 50% slag content, where a space-filling calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate gel provides porosity reductions which are not observed for the sodium aluminosilicate ('geopolymer') gels which do not chemically bind water of hydration.

  12. Foliated breccias in the active Portuguese Bend landslide complex, California: bearing on melange genesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larue, D.K.; Hudleston, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    The active portion of the Portuguese Bend landslide complex is approximately 3 km/sup 2/ in area and 30-50 m thick. Measured displacement rates range from less than one to greater than 30 mm/day on different parts of the landslide, with total displacements over the last 30 yrs ranging from about 10 to greater than 150 m. Six types of breccia, each locally with a foliated matrix, were recognized in the active landslide complex and are absent outside the landslide complex. Slide-body breccias are of two types, the first formed by extensional fracturing during bulk pure shear at the top of the landslide (slide-top breccia) and the second by flow of tuffaceous shales and fracture of embedded siliceous shales during simple shear deep in the landslide to the basal decollement (slide-bottom breccias). Slide-margin breccias, also in simple shear, are produced on the lateral margins of individual slide blocks accompanying wrench-fault motion. Other breccias (fault-ramp breccias) are formed during motion over ramps. Colluvial deposits within tension gashes (crack-fill breccias) and at the toe of the slide (slide-toe breccias) represent a fifth breccia type. Diapirs originating from over-pressured zones at the slide base also contain breccia. Recognition of different breccia types in ancient rocks would be difficult, because fabrics in the different types are similar. Foliations are defined by: scaly cleavage, compositional banding and color banding (in shear zones), stretched mud clasts, and aligned hard grains. Foliated breccias are synonymous with melanges. The authors regard the six breccia types described herein as representing the principal types of melange that occur in ancient accretionary settings.

  13. Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme activity dynamics in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, NG14, and RUT-C30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Culley, David E.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Zink, Erika M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Magnuson, Jon M.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-12-01

    Development of alternative, non-petroleum based sources of bioenergy that can be applied in the short-term find great promise in the use of highly abundant and renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass.1 This material obtained from different feedstocks, such as forest litter or agricultural residues, can yield liquid fuels and other chemical products through biorefinery processes.2 Biofuels are obtained from lignocellulosic materials by chemical pretreatment of the biomass, followed by enzymatic decomposition of cellulosic and hemicellulosic compounds into soluble sugars that are converted to desired chemical products via microbial metabolism and fermentation.3, 4 To release soluble sugars from polymeric cellulose multiple enzymes are required, including endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and ?-glucosidase.5, 6 However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose into soluble sugars remains a significant limiting factor to the efficient and economically viable utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for transport fuels.7, 8 The primary industrial source of cellulose and hemicellulases is the mesophilic soft-rot fungus Trichoderma reesei,9 having widespread applications in food, feed, textile, pulp, and paper industries.10 The genome encodes 200 glycoside hydrolases, including 10 cellulolytic and 16 hemicellulolytic enzymes.11 The hypercellulolytic catabolite derepressed strain RUT-C30 was obtained through a three-step UV and chemical mutagenesis of the original T. reesei strain QM6a,12, 13 in which strains M7 and NG14 were intermediate, having higher cellulolytic activity than the parent strain but less activity and higher catabolite repression than RUT-C30.14 Numerous methods have been employed to optimize the secreted enzyme cocktail of T. reesei including cultivation conditions, operational parameters, and mutagenesis.3 However, creating an optimal and economical enzyme mixture for production-scale biofuels synthesis may take thousands of experiments to identify.

  14. Determination of uranium and thorium in semiconductor memory materials by high fluence neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Northcutt, K.J.; Scott, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and thorium were measured by absolute neutron activation analysis in high-purity materials used to manufacture semiconductor memories. The main thrust of the study concerned aluminum and aluminum alloys used as sources for thin film preparation, evaporated metal films, and samples from the Czochralski silicon crystal process. Average levels of U and Th were found for the source alloys to be approx. 65 and approx. 45 ppB, respectively. Levels of U and Th in silicon samples fell in the range of a few parts per trillion. Evaporated metal films contained about 1 ppB U and Th, but there is some question about these results due to the possibility of contamination.

  15. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-29

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by an instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance with the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint.

  16. Effective activation energy in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, S.; Shi, D.; Wang, Z.; Smith, M.; McGinn, P.J.

    1992-08-01

    Magnetic relaxation in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems has been investigated in a wide temperature regime. Previously reported studies of the effective activation energy, U, have been controversial in terms of temperature and field dependence of the critical current density, j{sub c}. We have considered the temperature dependence of j{sub c} and constructed the U-j (or M) curves for the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. We found that at a constant driving force and temperature, U is considerably higher for 2245 samples than for 2223 samples. This enhancement can be attributed to the flux pinning from finely dispersed calcium- and copper- rich precipitates.

  17. Effective activation energy in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, S.; Shi, D.; Wang, Z.; Smith, M. ); McGinn, P.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Magnetic relaxation in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems has been investigated in a wide temperature regime. Previously reported studies of the effective activation energy, U, have been controversial in terms of temperature and field dependence of the critical current density, j[sub c]. We have considered the temperature dependence of j[sub c] and constructed the U-j (or M) curves for the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. We found that at a constant driving force and temperature, U is considerably higher for 2245 samples than for 2223 samples. This enhancement can be attributed to the flux pinning from finely dispersed calcium- and copper- rich precipitates.

  18. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  19. Hazard categorization of 100K East and 100K West in-basin fuel characterization program activities. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwardt, L.D.

    1995-02-28

    This report provides a hazard categorization of the 105 K East and 105 K West in-basin activities associated with the fuel sampling and transport preparations. It is limited to those characterization activities performed in the 105 KE and 105 KW fuel storage basin structures. The methodology of DOE standard DOE-STD-10227-92 is used. The report documents the determination that the in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program are classified as Hazard Category 3 (hazard analysis shows the potential for only significant localized consequences).

  20. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of olmesartan medoxomil ameliorate experimental colitis in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagib, Marwa M.; Tadros, Mariane G.; ELSayed, Moushira I.; Khalifa, Amani E.

    2013-08-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) driven through altered immune responses with production of proinflammatory cytokines. Many therapies are used, but side effects and loss of response limit long-term effectiveness. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed for patients who don't respond to current treatments. Recently, there is suggested involvement of the proinflammatory hormone angiotensin II in inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM-M), an angiotensin II receptor blocker in ameliorating ulcerative colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water for 5 days. OLM-M (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) was administered orally during 21 days prior to the induction of colitis, and for 5 days after. Sulfasalazine (500 mg/kg) was used as reference drug. All animals were tested for changes in colon length, disease activity index (DAI) and microscopic damage. Colon tissue concentration/activity of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-?), myeloperoxidase (MPO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. Results showed that the OLM-M dose-dependently ameliorated the colonic histopathological and biochemical injuries, an effect that is comparable or even better than that of the standard sulfasalazine. These results suggest that olmesartan medoxomil may be effective in the treatment of UC through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: Olmesartan medoximil reduced dextran sodium sulphate- induced colitis. Mechanism involved anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects dose- dependently. It suppressed malondialdehyde and restored reduced glutathione levels. It reduced inflammatory markers levels and histological changes.

  1. The discovery of cometary activity in near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mommert, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Hora, Joseph L.; Smith, Howard A.; Reach, William T.; Emery, Joshua P.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Mueller, Michael; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbo, Marco

    2014-01-20

    The near-Earth object (NEO) population, which mainly consists of fragments from collisions between asteroids in the main asteroid belt, is thought to include contributions from short-period comets as well. One of the most promising NEO candidates for a cometary origin is near-Earth asteroid (3552) Don Quixote, which has never been reported to show activity. Here we present the discovery of cometary activity in Don Quixote based on thermal-infrared observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope in its 3.6 and 4.5 ?m bands. Our observations clearly show the presence of a coma and a tail in the 4.5 ?m but not in the 3.6 ?m band, which is consistent with molecular band emission from CO{sub 2}. Thermal modeling of the combined photometric data on Don Quixote reveals a diameter of 18.4{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.3} km and an albedo of 0.03{sub ?0.01}{sup +0.02}, which confirms Don Quixote to be the third-largest known NEO. We derive an upper limit on the dust production rate of 1.9 kg s{sup 1} and derive a CO{sub 2} gas production rate of (1.1 0.1) 10{sup 26} molecules s{sup 1}. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopic observations indicate the presence of fine-grained silicates, perhaps pyroxene rich, on the surface of Don Quixote. Our discovery suggests that CO{sub 2} can be present in near-Earth space over a long time. The presence of CO{sub 2} might also explain that Don Quixote's cometary nature remained hidden for nearly three decades.

  2. Interaction of interleukin-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic BCL1 cells and its implication in biological activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuruoka, N.; Funakoshi, K.; Kodama, S.; Tsujimoto, M. (Suntory Institute for Biomedical Research, Mishima, Osaka (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    Interaction of interleukin (IL)-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic cell line, BCL1 cells was examined. {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant murine IL-5(rmIL-5) bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on BCL1 cells. rmIL-5, which was about 2500-fold more active than recombinant human IL-5(rhIL-5) in IgM-inducing activity on BCL1 cells, also showed about 5000-fold higher affinity to receptors. These results suggest that the bioactivity of IL-5 correlates with its receptor-binding activity. When disulfide bond formation was blocked, rmIL-5 dissociated into a monomer and lost its biological activity. This monomeric form of rmIL-5 also lost its ability to bind to cells, suggesting that dimer formation is essential for the biological activity of IL-5.

  3. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  4. THE INCIDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN PURE DISK GALAXIES: THE SPITZER VIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyapal, S.; Mcalpine, W.; Gliozzi, M. [George Mason University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS 3F3, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Boeker, T. [ESA/ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Abel, N. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Heckman, T., E-mail: satyapal@physics.gmu.ed [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2009-10-10

    Using the Spitzer telescope, we have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study of 18 bulgeless (Hubble type of Sd or Sdm) galaxies that show no definitive signatures of nuclear activity in their optical spectra. This is the first systematic mid-infrared (MIR) search for weak or hidden active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a statistically significant sample of bulgeless (Sd/Sdm) disk galaxies. Based on the detection of the high-ionization [Ne V] 14.3 mum line, we report the discovery of an AGN in 1 out of the 18 galaxies in the sample. This galaxy, NGC 4178, is a nearby edge-on Sd galaxy, which likely hosts a prominent nuclear star cluster (NSC). The bolometric luminosity of the AGN inferred from the [Ne V] line luminosity is approx8 x 10{sup 41} ergs s{sup -1}. This is almost 2 orders of magnitude greater than the luminosity of the AGN in NGC 4395, the best studied AGN in a bulgeless disk galaxy. Assuming that the AGN in NGC 4178 is radiating below the Eddington limit, the lower mass limit for the black hole is approx6 x 10{sup 3} M {sub sun}. The fact that none of the other galaxies in the sample shows any evidence for an AGN demonstrates that while the AGN detection rate based on MIR diagnostics is high (30%-40%) in optically quiescent galaxies with pseudobulges or weak classical bulges (Hubble type Sbc and Sc), it drops drastically in Sd/Sdm galaxies. Our observations, therefore, confirm that AGNs in completely bulgeless disk galaxies are not hidden in the optical but truly are rare. Of the three Sd galaxies with AGNs known so far, all have prominent NSCs, suggesting that in the absence of a well-defined bulge, the galaxy must possess an NSC in order to host an AGN. On the other hand, while the presence of an NSC appears to be a requirement for hosting an AGN in bulgeless galaxies, neither the properties of the NSC nor those of the host galaxy appear exceptional in late-type AGN host galaxies. The recipe for forming and growing a central black hole in a bulgeless galaxy therefore remains unknown.

  5. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energys FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  6. Anti-hierarchical evolution of the active galactic nucleus space density in a hierarchical universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2014-10-10

    Recent observations show that the space density of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) peaks at higher redshifts than that of faint AGNs. This downsizing trend in the AGN evolution seems to be contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario. In this study, we present the AGN space density evolution predicted by a semi-analytic model of galaxy and AGN formation based on the hierarchical structure formation scenario. We demonstrate that our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the AGN space density evolution. The reason for the downsizing trend in our model is a combination of the cold gas depletion as a consequence of star formation, the gas cooling suppression in massive halos, and the AGN lifetime scaling with the dynamical timescale. We assume that a major merger of galaxies causes a starburst, spheroid formation, and cold gas accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We also assume that this cold gas accretion triggers AGN activity. Since the cold gas is mainly depleted by star formation and gas cooling is suppressed in massive dark halos, the amount of cold gas accreted onto SMBHs decreases with cosmic time. Moreover, AGN lifetime increases with cosmic time. Thus, at low redshifts, major mergers do not always lead to luminous AGNs. Because the luminosity of AGNs is correlated with the mass of accreted gas onto SMBHs, the space density of luminous AGNs decreases more quickly than that of faint AGNs. We conclude that the anti-hierarchical evolution of the AGN space density is not contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario.

  7. Performance Measures for Evaluating Public Participation Activities in the Office of Environmental Management (DOE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, S.A.

    2001-02-15

    Public participation in Office of Environmental Management (EM) activities throughout the DOE complex is a critical component of the overall success of remediation and waste management efforts. The challenges facing EM and its stakeholders over the next decade or more are daunting (Nuclear Waste News 1996). Achieving a mission composed of such challenges will require innovation, dedication, and a significant degree of good will among all stakeholders. EM's efforts to date, including obtaining and using inputs offered by EM stakeholders, have been notable. Public participation specialists have accepted and met challenges and have consistently tried to improve their performance. They have reported their experiences both formally and informally (e.g., at professional conferences and EM Public Participation Network Workshops, other internal meetings of DOE and contractor public participation specialists, and one-on-one consultations) in order to advance the state of their practice. Our research, and our field research in particular (including our interactions with many representatives of numerous stakeholder groups at nine DOE sites with diverse EM problems), have shown that it, is possible to develop coherent results even in a problem domain as complex as that of EM. We conclude that performance-based evaluations of public participation appear possible, and we have recommended an approach, based on combined and integrated multi-stakeholder views on the attributes of successful public participation and associated performance indicators, that seems workable and should be acceptable to diverse stakeholders. Of course, as an untested recommendation, our approach needs the validation that can only be achieved by application (perhaps at a few DOE sites with ongoing EM activities). Such an application would serve to refine the proposed approach in terms of its clarity, its workability, and its potential for full-scale use by EM and, potentially, other government agencies and private sector concerns.

  8. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-11-18

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a SEND instruction, the SEND instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a first target endpoint; transmitting from the origin endpoint to the first target endpoint a Request-To-Send (`RTS`) message advising the first target endpoint of the location and size of the transfer data; assigning by the first target endpoint to each of a plurality of target endpoints separate portions of the transfer data; and receiving by the plurality of target endpoints the transfer data.

  9. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') or a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution of a compute node, including specification of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance witht the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoin to the target endpoint.

  10. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2015-02-03

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a SEND instruction, the SEND instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a first target endpoint; transmitting from the origin endpoint to the first target endpoint a Request-To-Send (`RTS`) message advising the first target endpoint of the location and size of the transfer data; assigning by the first target endpoint to each of a plurality of target endpoints separate portions of the transfer data; and receiving by the plurality of target endpoints the transfer data.

  11. A study of the stack relaxation in thermal batteries on activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    2000-04-17

    The stack-relaxation processes occurring in a thermal-battery upon activation and discharge were studied dynamically with a special test fixture that incorporated an internal load cell. The factors which were screened initially included stack diameter and height (number of cells), thickness and binder content of the separator, temperature, and closing pressure. A second series of more-detailed experiments included only those factors that were identified by the screening study as being important (as closing force, number of cells, and separator thickness). The resulting experimental data from this second series of experiments were used to generate a surface-response model based on these three factors. This model accounted for 94% of the variation in the response (final stack-relaxation pressure) over the range of conditions studied.

  12. Monotoring of mangrove ecosystem in relation with exploration and production activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alamsyah, C.; Dwistiadi, D.

    1996-11-01

    From Indonesia`s initial 13 million hectares of mangrove forests, presently only 2.6 million hectares remains which must be certainly protected. Mangrove swamps are of considerable ecological importance not only because of their use as spawning and feeding grounds for a many variety of fish and shrimps but also of economical importance and last but not least as coastal protection. In such a sensitive ecosystem, i.e. in the mangrove swamp area of Mahakam Delta in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, TOTAL Indonesie, an affiliate of the French oil company {open_quotes}TOTAL{close_quotes} and one of the production sharing contractors of PERTAMINA, the Indonesian owned state oil company, has undertaken its E&P operations since 1974. Realizing the sensitivity of the mangrove area, TOTAL Indonesie has undertaken continuous monitoring of the environment as part of its Environmental Management System. This monitoring is very important not only to measure the impact to the mangrove ecosystem in particular due to TOTAL Indonesie activities but also as a feed back for the environmental management. Physicochemical and biological aspects of the environment are monitored and various measurements are taken covering: (1) Hydrology and hydrodynamics of the water streams i.e. the water quality, productivity and flow characteristic of the region (2) Sedimentation and biodegradation (3) The influence of accidental and chronic pollution mangrove ecosystem (3) Sensitivity of the mangroves. The above monitoring has led to the conclusion that after more than 20 years of operation, there has significant adverse impact to the mangrove ecosystem by the exploration and production activities of Indonesie.

  13. Activities and Accomplishments in MY 2002/FY 2003: EPAct Fleet Information& Regulations Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01

    From vehicle acquisition and credit trading to exemptions and outreach activity, the Annual Report summarizes the State& Alternative Fuel Provider Program accomplishments during MY 2002/FY2003.

  14. Peru-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECN and Ecofys on supported mitigation activities such as NAMAs, low carbon development (LCD) strategies and technology innovation centers to bring a portfolio of projects from the...

  15. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  16. Diurnal activity of soil surface arthropods in agroecosystems: design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, A.Y.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap is presented. The basis of the mechanism is a rotary stepping solenoid powered by lantern batteries. Traps were utilized to sample soil surface arthropods at two hour intervals for five 24 hr periods in 1983. One trap each was placed in conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) agroecosystems. Soil arthropod surface activity was greatest in CT on 9 July during the dawn and dusk periods but the data did not indicate other dominant trends. Activity in NT was greatest during dusk on 27 June, but again no other dominant trends were evident. When CT and NT are combined over the sample dates, surface soil arthropod activity peaked during dusk, with a smaller activity peak at dawn. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Processing communications events in parallel active messaging interface by awakening thread from wait state

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-22

    Processing data communications events in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that execute a parallel application, with the PAMI including data communications endpoints, and the endpoints are coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through other data communications resources, including determining by an advance function that there are no actionable data communications events pending for its context, placing by the advance function its thread of execution into a wait state, waiting for a subsequent data communications event for the context; responsive to occurrence of a subsequent data communications event for the context, awakening by the thread from the wait state; and processing by the advance function the subsequent data communications event now pending for the context.

  18. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, Thomas N; Ammerman, Curtt N; Park, Gyu Hae; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R; Atterbury, Marie K

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  19. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Surveying (Number of Elements) Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2003 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  20. U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 NA NA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  1. U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 11 11 11 9 6 7 8 9 8 8 2001 7 7 9 9 8 7 8 8 9 10 10 9 2002 6 6 7 7 8 7 8 7 7 7 5 4 2003 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 3 5 2004 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 2005 4 4 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2006 5 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5

  2. U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 7 7 6 7 6 7 7 7 7 8 2001 9 8 9 9 9 9 8 7 6 9 7 8 2002 8 9 10 9 9 9 8 8 10 10 8 7 2003 8 8 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 5 4 5 2004 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 2 1 3 2005 5 5 6 6 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 2006 6 6 6 5 5 7 4 3 2 2 3 3

  3. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2001 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  4. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 36 36 34 37 39 40 39 41 40 41 2001 38 38 38 39 37 35 35 32 30 33 34 33 2002 32 31 26 25 24 23 26 26 28 30 27 22 2003 19 20 20 20 17 18 21 22 22 24 24 25 2004 25 27 27 27 26 30 30 31 32 34 33 32

  5. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 4 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 4 5 2001 5 6 6 7 7 6 6 8 8 5 7 7 2002 6 9 9 7 8 9 8 7 9 8 8 8 2003 8 9 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 2004 8 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 2005 8 8 6 8 8 9 8 8 7 6 5 6 2006 5 5 4 4 4 9 5 4 4 5 5 5 2007

  6. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.; Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Gehman, John D.; Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R.; Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 ; Duxson, Peter; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including fly ash geopolymers, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (CASH and NASH) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the NASH gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the CASH gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. These two gels respond differently to carbonation. Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  7. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muzio, Lawrence J. (Laguna Niguel, CA); Smith, Randall A. (Huntington Beach, CA)

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  8. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  9. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  10. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report

  11. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  12. EM international activities. February 1997 highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    EM International Highlights is a brief summary of on-going international projects within the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). This document contains sections on: Global Issues, activities in Western Europe, activities in central and Eastern Europe, activities in Russia, activities in Asia and the Pacific Rim, activities in South America, activities in North America, and International Organizations.

  13. Integrated analysis of particle interactions at hadron colliders Report of research activities in 2010-2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadolsky, Pavel M.

    2015-08-31

    The report summarizes research activities of the project ”Integrated analysis of particle interactions” at Southern Methodist University, funded by 2010 DOE Early Career Research Award DE-SC0003870. The goal of the project is to provide state-of-the-art predictions in quantum chromodynamics in order to achieve objectives of the LHC program for studies of electroweak symmetry breaking and new physics searches. We published 19 journal papers focusing on in-depth studies of proton structure and integration of advanced calculations from different areas of particle phenomenology: multi-loop calculations, accurate long-distance hadronic functions, and precise numerical programs. Methods for factorization of QCD cross sections were advanced in order to develop new generations of CTEQ parton distribution functions (PDFs), CT10 and CT14. These distributions provide the core theoretical input for multi-loop perturbative calculations by LHC experimental collaborations. A novel ”PDF meta-analysis” technique was invented to streamline applications of PDFs in numerous LHC simulations and to combine PDFs from various groups using multivariate stochastic sampling of PDF parameters. The meta-analysis will help to bring the LHC perturbative calculations to the new level of accuracy, while reducing computational efforts. The work on parton distributions was complemented by development of advanced perturbative techniques to predict observables dependent on several momentum scales, including production of massive quarks and transverse momentum resummation at the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD.

  14. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  15. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  16. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-10-01

    For more than three decades, Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. By measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate that the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1,000-fold along a 3,000-ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory-derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicate off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  17. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  20. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    86 Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Survey Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to ful- fill the data requirements necessary to meet Energy In- formation Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The requirements in- clude petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A,

  1. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Executive Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), Con- gress directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study every three years on elec- tric transmission congestion and constraints within the Eastern and Western Interconnections. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) further directed the Secretary to in- clude in the 2009 Congestion Study an analysis of significant potential sources of renewable energy that are constrained by lack of adequate

  2. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, Ian W.H.; Bergvall, Christoffer; Bottai, Matteo; Westerholm, Roger; Stenius, Ulla; Dreij, Kristian

    2013-02-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ? Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ? Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ? Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ? Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ? Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  3. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy coversmore » various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.« less

  4. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  5. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ? 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvish, B.; Mobasher, B.; Sales, L. V.; Sobral, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Best, P.; Smail, I.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected H? emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both H? emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of H? emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ? 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of H? star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  6. On the relationship between photospheric footpoint motions and coronal heating in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Berger, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    Coronal heating theories can be classified as either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) mechanisms, depending on whether the coronal magnetic field responds quasi-statically or dynamically to the photospheric footpoint motions. In this paper we investigate whether photospheric footpoint motions with velocities of 1-2 km s{sup 1} can heat the corona in active regions, and whether the corona responds quasi-statically or dynamically to such motions (DC versus AC heating). We construct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models for the Alfvn waves and quasi-static perturbations generated within a coronal loop. We find that in models where the effects of the lower atmosphere are neglected, the corona responds quasi-statically to the footpoint motions (DC heating), but the energy flux into the corona is too low compared to observational requirements. In more realistic models that include the lower atmosphere, the corona responds more dynamically to the footpoint motions (AC heating) and the predicted heating rates due to Alfvn wave turbulence are sufficient to explain the observed hot loops. The higher heating rates are due to the amplification of Alfvn waves in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that magnetic braiding is a highly dynamic process.

  7. Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation for NDT measurement of moisture in stone and brick

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R. A.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Grissom, C.; Aloiz, E.; Paul, R.

    2014-02-18

    The conservation of stone and brick architecture or sculpture often involves damage caused by moisture. The feasibility of a NDT method based on prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) for measuring the element hydrogen as an indication of water is being evaluated. This includes systematic characterization of the lithology and physical properties of seven building stones and one brick type used in the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. To determine the required dynamic range of the NDT method, moisture-related properties were measured by standard methods. Cold neutron PGNA was also used to determine chemically bound water (CBW) content. The CBW does not damage porous masonry, but creates an H background that defines the minimum level of detection of damaging moisture. The CBW was on the order of 0.5% for all the stones. This rules out the measurement of hygric processes in all of the stones and hydric processed for the stones with fine scale pore-size distributions The upper bound of moisture content, set by porosity through water immersion, was on the order of 5%. The dynamic range is about 1020. The H count rates were roughly 13 cps. Taking into account differences in neutron energies and fluxes and sample volume between cold PGNA and a portable PGNA instrument, it appears that it is feasible to apply PGNA in the field.

  8. Flux enhancement with powdered activated carbon addition in the membrane anaerobic bioreactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H.; Choo, K.H.; Lee, C.H.

    1999-10-01

    The effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition on the performance of a membrane-coupled anaerobic bioreactor (MCAB) was investigated in terms of membrane filterability and treatability through a series of batch and continuous microfiltration (MF) experiments. In both batch and continuous MF of the digestion broth, a flux improvement with PAC addition was achieved, especially when a higher shear rate and/or a higher PAC dose were applied. Both the fouling and cake layer resistances decreased continuously with increasing the PAC dose up to 5 g/L. PAC played an important role in substantially reducing the biomass cake resistance due to its incompressible nature and higher backtransport velocities. PAC might have a scouring effect for removing the deposited biomass cake from the membrane surface while sorbing and/or coagulating dissolved organics and colloidal particles in the broth. The chemical oxygen demand and color in the effluent were much removed with PAC addition, and the system was also more stable against shock loading.

  9. Hazard categorization of 100K east and 100K west in-basin fuel characterization program activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwardt, L.D.

    1994-11-16

    This report documents the determination that the in-basin activities at 105 K East (KE) and 105 K West (KW) on the Hanford Reservation associated with the fuel characterization program are classified as Hazard Category 3 (hazard analysis shows the potential for only significant localized consequences). Potential accident consequences, a description of significant activities around the site, and hazard identification and management were explored.

  10. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Active Management of Integrated GeothermalCO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk : FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  11. Heating mechanisms for intermittent loops in active region cores from AIA/SDO EUV observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Nigro, G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate intensity variations and energy deposition in five coronal loops in active region cores. These were selected for their strong variability in the AIA/SDO 94 Å intensity channel. We isolate the hot Fe XVIII and Fe XXI components of the 94 Å and 131 Å by modeling and subtracting the 'warm' contributions to the emission. HMI/SDO data allow us to focus on 'inter-moss' regions in the loops. The detailed evolution of the inter-moss intensity time series reveals loops that are impulsively heated in a mode compatible with a nanoflare storm, with a spike in the hot 131 Å signals leading and the other five EUV emission channels following in progressive cooling order. A sharp increase in electron temperature tends to follow closely after the hot 131 Å signal confirming the impulsive nature of the process. A cooler process of growing emission measure follows more slowly. The Fourier power spectra of the hot 131 Å signals, when averaged over the five loops, present three scaling regimes with break frequencies near 0.1 min{sup –1} and 0.7 min{sup –1}. The low frequency regime corresponds to 1/f noise; the intermediate indicates a persistent scaling process and the high frequencies show white noise. Very similar results are found for the energy dissipation in a 2D 'hybrid' shell model of loop magneto-turbulence, based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics, that is compatible with nanoflare statistics. We suggest that such turbulent dissipation is the energy source for our loops.

  12. Electrodic voltages in the presence of dissolved sulfide: Implications for monitoring natural microbial activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, L.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Yee, N.; O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Williams, K. H.

    2008-10-01

    There is growing interest in the development of new monitoring strategies for obtaining spatially extensive data diagnostic of microbial processes occurring in the earth. Open-circuit potentials arising from variable redox conditions in the fluid local-to-electrode surfaces (electrodic potentials) were recorded for a pair of silver-silver chloride electrodes in a column experiment, whereby a natural wetland soil containing a known community of sulfate reducers was continuously fed with a sulfate-rich nutrient medium. Measurements were made between five electrodes equally spaced along the column and a reference electrode placed on the column inflow. The presence of a sulfate reducing microbial population, coupled with observations of decreasing sulfate levels, formation of black precipitate (likely iron sulfide),elevated solid phase sulfide, and a characteristic sulfurous smell, suggest microbial-driven sulfate reduction (sulfide generation) in our column. Based on the known sensitivity of a silver electrode to dissolved sulfide concentration, we interpret the electrodic potentials approaching 700 mV recorded in this experiment as an indicator of the bisulfide (HS-) concentration gradients in the column. The measurement of the spatial and temporal variation in these electrodic potentials provides a simple and rapid method for monitoring patterns of relative HS- concentration that are indicative of the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our measurements have implications both for the autonomous monitoring of anaerobic microbial processes in the subsurface and the performance of self-potential electrodes, where it is critical to isolate, and perhaps quantify, electrochemical interfaces contributing to observed potentials.

  13. Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, Jas S.; Laraia, Michele; Dinner, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-line sharing of information and especially the creation of an on-line compendium of methods, tools, and techniques by which damaged fuel and other unique situations have been addressed can be addressed sooner and maintained as new problems and solutions arise and are resolved. The IAEA's new 'WEB 2.0 tool' CONNECT is expected to play a significant role in this and related information-sharing activities. The trend in some countries such as the United States has been to re-license the existing reactors for additional twenty years, beyond the original design life. Given the advances in technology over the past four decades, and considering that the newer designs incorporate significant improvements in safety systems, it may not be economical or technically feasible to retrofit enhancements into some of the older reactors. In such cases, the reactors may be retired from service and decommissioned. Overall, the energy demand in the world continues to rise, with sharp increases in the Asian countries, and nuclear power's role in the world's energy supply is expected to continue. Events at Fukushima have led to a re-examination on many fronts, including reactor design and regulatory requirements. Further changes may occur in these areas in the post-Fukushima era. These changes in turn will also impact the world-wide decommissioning scene and the decommissioning phase of the future reactors. (authors)

  14. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

  15. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention...

  16. WHAT GOVERNS THE BULK VELOCITY OF THE JET COMPONENTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai Bo; Cao Xinwu; Gu Minfeng E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-11-10

    We use a sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with measured black hole masses to explore the jet formation mechanisms in these sources. Based on Koenigl's inhomogeneous jet model, the jet parameters, such as the bulk motion Lorentz factor, magnetic field strength, and electron density in the jet, can be estimated with the very long baseline interferometry and X-ray data.. We find a significant correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample, while no significant correlation is present between the bulk Lorentz factor and the Eddington ratio. The massive black holes will be spun up through accretion, as the black holes acquire mass and angular momentum simultaneously through accretion. Recent investigation indeed suggested that most supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies have on average higher spins than the black holes in spiral galaxies, where random, small accretion episodes (e.g., tidally disrupted stars, accretion of molecular clouds) might have played a more important role. If this is true, then the correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components found in this work implies that the motion velocity of the jet components is probably governed by the black hole spin. No correlation is found between the magnetic field strength at 10R {sub S} (R {sub S} = 2GM/c {sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius) in the jets and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample. This is consistent with the black hole spin scenario, i.e., the faster moving jets are magnetically accelerated by the magnetic fields threading the horizon of more rapidly rotating black holes. The results imply that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism may dominate over the Blandford-Payne mechanism for the jet acceleration, at least in these radio-loud AGNs.

  17. Evidence of parsec-scale jets in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezcua, M.; Prieto, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    The nuclear radio emission of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) is often associated with unresolved cores. In this paper we show that most LLAGNs present extended jet radio emission when observed with sufficient angular resolution and sensitivity. They are thus able to power, at least, parsec-scale radio jets. To increase the detection rate of jets in LLAGNs, we analyze subarcsecond resolution data of three low-ionization nuclear emission regions. This yields the detection of extended jet-like radio structures in NGC 1097 and NGC 2911 and the first resolved parsec-scale jet of NGC 4594 (Sombrero). The three sources belong to a sample of nearby LLAGNs for which high-spatial-resolution spectral energy distribution of their core emission is available. This allows us to study their accretion rate and jet power (Q {sub jet}) without drawing on (most) of the ad hoc assumptions usually considered in large statistical surveys. We find that those LLAGNs with large-scale radio jets (>100 pc) have Q {sub jet} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup 1}, while the lowest Q {sub jet} correspond to those LLAGNs with parsec-scale (?100 pc) jets. The Q {sub jet} is at least as large as the radiated bolometric luminosity for all LLAGN, in agreement with previous statistical studies. Our detection of parsec-scale jets in individual objects further shows that the kinematic jet contribution is equally important in large- or parsec-scale objects. We also find that the Eddington-scaled accretion rate is still highly sub-Eddingtonian (<10{sup 4}) when adding the Q {sub jet} to the total emitted luminosity (radiated plus kinetic). This indicates that LLAGNs are not only inefficient radiators but that they also accrete inefficiently or are very efficient advectors.

  18. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  19. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  20. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  1. MEASURING X-RAY VARIABILITY IN FAINT/SPARSELY SAMPLED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allevato, V.; Paolillo, M.; Papadakis, I.; Pinto, C.

    2013-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of the normalized excess variance of variability process characterized by a ''red-noise'' power spectral density (PSD), as in the case of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We perform Monte Carlo simulations of light curves, assuming both a continuous and a sparse sampling pattern and various signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). We show that the normalized excess variance is a biased estimate of the variance even in the case of continuously sampled light curves. The bias depends on the PSD slope and on the sampling pattern, but not on the S/N. We provide a simple formula to account for the bias, which yields unbiased estimates with an accuracy better than 15%. We show that the normalized excess variance estimates based on single light curves (especially for sparse sampling and S/N < 3) are highly uncertain (even if corrected for bias) and we propose instead the use of an ''ensemble estimate'', based on multiple light curves of the same object, or on the use of light curves of many objects. These estimates have symmetric distributions, known errors, and can also be corrected for biases. We use our results to estimate the ability to measure the intrinsic source variability in current data, and show that they could also be useful in the planning of the observing strategy of future surveys such as those provided by X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN populations and, more in general, in the estimation of the variability amplitude of sources that will result from future surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 0.9 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Matsubayashi, K.; Riguccini, L.; Aida, Y.; Ideue, Y.; Murayama, T.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 as a function of the local galaxy density in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COSMOS 2 deg{sup 2} field. [O II] emitters are selected by the narrowband excess technique with the NB711-band imaging data taken with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. We carefully selected 614 photo-z-selected galaxies with M{sub U3500} < -19.31 at z = 0.901 - 0.920, which includes 195 [O II] emitters, to directly compare the results with our previous study at z {approx} 1.2. We found that the fraction is almost constant at 0.3 Mpc{sup -2} < {Sigma}{sub 10th} < 10 Mpc{sup -2}. We also checked the fraction of galaxies with blue rest-frame colors of NUV - R < 2 in our photo-z-selected sample, and found that the fraction of blue galaxies does not significantly depend on the local density. On the other hand, the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation predicted that the fraction of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 decreases with increasing projected galaxy density even if the effects of the projection and the photo-z error in our analysis were taken into account. The fraction of [O II] emitters decreases from {approx}60% at z {approx} 1.2 to {approx}30% at z {approx} 0.9 independent of galaxy environment. The decrease of the [O II] emitter fraction could be explained mainly by the rapid decrease of star formation activity in the universe from z {approx} 1.2 to z {approx} 0.9.

  3. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  4. An active sitetail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-09-23

    Citrate synthase from the thermophilic euryarchaeon T. acidophilum fused to a hexahistidine tag was purified and biochemically characterized. The structure of the unliganded enzyme at 2.2 resolution contains tailactive site contacts in half of the active sites. Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that close the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an open structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active sitetail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS.

  5. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  6. Modeling hot gas flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-02-20

    Based on the dynamical black hole (BH) mass estimates, NGC 3115 hosts the closest billion solar mass BH. Deep studies of the center revealed a very underluminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) immersed in an old massive nuclear star cluster. Recent 1 Ms Chandra X-ray visionary project observations of the NGC 3115 nucleus resolved hot tenuous gas, which fuels the AGN. In this paper we connect the processes in the nuclear star cluster with the feeding of the supermassive BH. We model the hot gas flow sustained by the injection of matter and energy from the stars and supernova explosions. We incorporate electron heat conduction as the small-scale feedback mechanism, the gravitational pull of the stellar mass, cooling, and Coulomb collisions. Fitting simulated X-ray emission to the spatially and spectrally resolved observed data, we find the best-fitting solutions with ?{sup 2}/dof = 1.00 for dof = 236 both with and without conduction. The radial modeling favors a low BH mass <1.3 10{sup 9} M {sub ?}. The best-fitting supernova rate and the best-fitting mass injection rate are consistent with their expected values. The stagnation point is at r {sub st} ? 1'', so that most of the gas, including the gas at a Bondi radius r{sub B} = 2''-4'', outflows from the region. We put an upper limit on the accretion rate at 2 10{sup 3} M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}. We find a shallow density profile n?r {sup ?} with ? ? 1 over a large dynamic range. This density profile is determined in the feeding region 0.''5-10'' as an interplay of four processes and effects: (1) the radius-dependent mass injection, (2) the effect of the galactic gravitational potential, (3) the accretion flow onset at r ? 1'', and (4) the outflow at r ? 1''. The gas temperature is close to the virial temperature T{sub v} at any radius.

  7. Light-induced hysteresis and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Park, Sung Kyu E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Hoon E-mail: skpark@cau.ac.kr

    2014-07-28

    In this report, photo-induced hysteresis, threshold voltage (V{sub T}) shift, and recovery behaviors in photochemically activated solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are investigated. It was observed that a white light illumination caused negative V{sub T} shift along with creation of clockwise hysteresis in electrical characteristics which can be attributed to photo-generated doubly ionized oxygen vacancies at the semiconductor/gate dielectric interface. More importantly, the photochemically activated IGZO TFTs showed much reduced overall V{sub T} shift compared to thermally annealed TFTs. Reduced number of donor-like interface states creation under light illumination and more facile neutralization of ionized oxygen vacancies by electron capture under positive gate potential are claimed to be the origin of the less V{sub T} shift in photochemically activated TFTs.

  8. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized ?- or ?-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an endless hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight molecule with the right kinetics. A novel hydrogen activation process has been developed

  9. Defect study in molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films with activated and unactivated arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izhnin, I. I.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Fitsych, O. I.; Pociask-Bialy, M.; Sheregii, E.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2014-04-28

    A defect study was performed on molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films in situ doped with arsenic. Doping was performed from either effusion cell or cracker cell, and studied were both as-grown samples and samples subjected to arsenic activation annealing. Electrical properties of the films were investigated with the use of ion milling as a means of stirring defects in the material. As a result of the study, it was confirmed that the most efficient incorporation of electrically active arsenic occurs at the cracking zone temperature of 700?C. Interaction between arsenic and tellurium during the growth was observed and is discussed in the paper.

  10. Final Technical Report for grant entitled "New Horizons in C-F Activation by Main Group Electrophiles"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozerov, Oleg V; Ozerov, Oleg V.

    2014-01-16

    We became interested in developing new methods for hydrodefluorination (HDF) and other types of C-F bond conversion in polyfluoroalkanes under mild conditions. We were attracted to an approach to C-F activation, where the key C-F cleavage proceeds by a Lewis acid abstraction of fluoride rather than a redox event. The efforts during the previous period were aimed at a) advancing the HDF reactivity with improvement in scope and catalyst longevity; b) extending C-F activation beyond HDF; c) generating insight about the elementary steps of the reaction and potential intermediates.

  11. Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando

    2009-02-15

    This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

  12. MOJAVE: Monitoring of jets in active galactic nuclei with VLBA experiments. XI. Spectral distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Kovalev, Yuri Y.; Pushkarev, Alexander B.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Homan, Daniel C.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2014-06-01

    We have obtained milliarcsecond-scale spectral index distributions for a sample of 190 extragalactic radio jets through the Monitoring of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with the VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) project. The sources were observed in 2006 at 8.1, 8.4, 12.1, and 15.4 GHz, and we have determined spectral index maps between 8.1 and 15.4 GHz to study the four-frequency spectrum in individual jet features. We have performed detailed simulations to study the effects of image alignment and (u, v)-plane coverage on the spectral index maps to verify our results. We use the spectral index maps to study the spectral index evolution along the jet and determine the spectral distributions in different locations of the jets. The core spectral indices are on average flat with a mean value of +0.22 0.03 for the sample, while the jet spectrum is in general steep with a mean index of 1.04 0.03. A simple power-law fit is often inadequate for the core regions, as expected if the cores are partially self-absorbed. The overall jet spectrum steepens at a rate of about 0.001 to 0.004 per deprojected parsec when moving further out from the core with flat spectrum radio quasars having significantly steeper spectra (mean 1.09 0.04) than the BL Lac objects (mean 0.80 0.05). However, the spectrum in both types of objects flattens on average by ?0.2 at the locations of the jet components indicating particle acceleration or density enhancements along the jet. The mean spectral index at the component locations of 0.81 0.02 corresponds to a power-law index of ?2.6 for the electron energy distribution. We find a significant trend that jet components with linear polarization parallel to the jet (magnetic field perpendicular to the jet) have flatter spectra, as expected for transverse shocks. Compared to quasars, BL Lacs have more jet components with perpendicular magnetic field alignment, which may explain their generally flatter spectra. The overall steepening of the spectra with distance can be explained with radiative losses if the jets are collimating or with the evolution of the high-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum if the jets are conical. This interpretation is supported by a significant correlation with the age of the component and the spectral index, with older components having steeper spectra.

  13. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  14. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  15. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young C. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: youckim@snu.ac.kr; Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae H. [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Y. [College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, 344-2 Shinyong-Dong, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards.

  16. In vivo tissue enzyme activities in the rosy barb (Barbus conchonius Hamilton) experimentally exposed to lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, T.S. ); Tewari, H.; Pande, J.; Lal, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is biologically nonessential and if present in excessive levels in the body, it can cause clinical disorders both in humans and animals. Pathologies associated with experimental Pb poisoning have been described in fishes, and several markers have been utilized to monitor effects of short- and long-term exposures. The specific aim of this study was to examine the effects of acute Pb poisoning on the enzymes concerned with membrane transport, neurotransmission, and energy metabolism in selected tissues of the rosy barb, Barbus conchonius, a freshwater fish.

  17. Lessons Learned In Technology Development for Supplemental Treatment of Low-Activity Waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biyani, R.K. [Washington State Department of Ecology, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Hanford needs supplemental technology treatment of low-activity waste (LAW) in addition to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The Washington State Department of Ecology requires that supplemental technology provide the same protection to human health and the environment as WTP LAW glass. In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) evaluated supplemental treatment technologies for LAW treatment and looked more closely at three: bulk vitrification (BV), steam reforming, and tailored cementitious stabilization. US DOE with Ecology's support chose to design and test BV because it believed BV would offer rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility. This paper will describe the path taken in choosing and developing technologies for additional LAW treatment capacity and, more importantly, the lessons learned along the way. In conclusion: Contractors' off-the-shelf vitrification technology that worked elsewhere may not apply easily to Hanford's waste challenges. The BV development process could have been improved by first identifying and then focusing on primary areas of concern. Continuing integrated tests at the Horn Rapids facility offers a convenient option to test both the dryer and the SMF. But the plan for development of the SMF must be short term with well defined success criteria. US DOE has the responsibility to carefully evaluate each proposal and make critical decisions that will make optimum use of limited funds. The ERP provided valuable technical guidance on improving BV's design. This must be complemented by a similar study of cost effectiveness of a process. We must have a better understanding of life cycle costs before a path for supplemental treatment is chosen. US DOE has now gained five years of experience in developing BV. It is time for US DOE to make defensible economic evaluations before further funding towards developing supplemental treatment. It must reevaluate if the projected advantages of rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility are still valid. The decision-making methodology US DOE uses to approve designs as part of its Critical Decision Process appears rigorous and useful. Looking ahead, Ecology expects US DOE will use lessons learned from BV and other testing in a concerted manner as part of their decision-making process. The success of Hanford's cleanup depends on it. (authors)

  18. Incorporation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mortars - Influence of microstructure in the hardened state properties and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, S.S.

    2013-01-15

    The environmental pollution in urban areas is one of the causes for poor indoor air quality in buildings, particularly in suburban areas. The development of photocatalytic construction materials can contribute to clean the air and improve sustainability levels. Previous studies have focused mainly in cement and concrete materials, disregarding the potential application in historic buildings. In this work, a photocatalytic additive (titanium dioxide) was added to mortars prepared with aerial lime, cement and gypsum binders. The main goal was to study the way that microstructural changes affect the photocatalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic activity was determined using a reactor developed to assess the degradation rate with a common urban pollutant, NO{sub x}. The laboratory results show that all the compositions tested exhibited high photocatalytic efficiency. It was demonstrated that photocatalytic mortars can be applied in new and old buildings, because the nanoadditives do not compromise the mortar hardened state properties.

  19. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossander, Lea H.; Zawacka, Natalia K.; Dam, Henrik F.; Krebs, Frederik C.; Andreasen, Jens W.

    2014-08-15

    The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  20. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  1. Leptin upregulates telomerase activity and transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, He; Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Wang, Jian; Yu, Ming; Hao, Jihui

    2010-03-26

    The aim was to analyze the mechanism of leptin-induced activity of telomerase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that leptin activated telomerase in a dose-dependent manner; leptin upregulated the expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) at mRNA and protein levels; blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation significantly counteracted leptin-induced hTERT transcription and protein expression; chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that leptin enhanced the binding of STAT3 to the hTERT promoter. This study uncovers a new mechanism of the proliferative effect of leptin on breast cancer cells and provides a new explanation of obesity-related breast cancer.

  2. Study Guides and Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for considering fossil energy education in your classroom curriculum. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy is excited to present printable study guides and activities...

  3. Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site Worker Evaluation Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying Activity-Level Worker Medical Clearance and Training. The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool (HSWET) provides line management an easy to use tool to determine if workers are medically cleared and trained to perform work safely.

  4. Supermassive black holes with high accretion rates in active galactic nuclei. II. The most luminous standard candles in the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai [Wise Observatory, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Fang [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011, Yunnan (China); Lu, Kai-Xing [Astronomy Department, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Collaboration: SEAMBH collaboration

    2014-10-01

    This is the second in a series of papers reporting on a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign to measure black hole (BH) mass in high accretion rate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The goal is to identify super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) and to use their unique properties to construct a new method for measuring cosmological distances. Based on theoretical models, the saturated bolometric luminosity of such sources is proportional to the BH mass, which can be used to obtain their distance. Here we report on five new RM measurements and show that in four of the cases, we can measure the BH mass and three of these sources are SEAMBHs. Together with the three sources from our earlier work, we now have six new sources of this type. We use a novel method based on a minimal radiation efficiency to identify nine additional SEAMBHs from earlier RM-based mass measurements. We use a Bayesian analysis to determine the parameters of the new distance expression and the method uncertainties from the observed properties of the objects in the sample. The ratio of the newly measured distances to the standard cosmological ones has a mean scatter of 0.14 dex, indicating that SEAMBHs can be use as cosmological distance probes. With their high luminosity, long period of activity, and large numbers at high redshifts, SEAMBHs have a potential to extend the cosmic distance ladder beyond the range now explored by Type Ia supernovae.

  5. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biomass Federal Biomass Activities Activities Dana Arnold Dana Arnold Office of the Federal Environmental Office of the Federal Environmental Executive Executive September 10, 2009 September 10, 2009 OFEE OFEE Established in the Clinton Administration Established in the Clinton Administration Part of the White House Council on Environmental Part of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Quality Works with Federal agencies to make the operations Works with Federal agencies to make the

  6. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; Khedr, D. M.; El-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R.

    2013-01-15

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  7. Observation of SOL Current Correlated with MHD Activity in NBI-heated DIII-D Tokamak Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.J. Schaffer; M.E. Austin; T.E. Evans; L.L. Lao; J.G. Watkins

    2004-03-26

    This work investigates the potential roles played by the scrape-off-layer current (SOLC) in MHD activity of tokamak plasmas, including effects on stability. SOLCs are found during MHD activity that are: (1) slowly growing after a mode-locking-like event, (2) oscillating in the several kHz range and phase-locked with magnetic and electron temperature oscillations, (3) rapidly growing with a sub-ms time scale during a thermal collapse and a current quench, and (4) spiky in temporal behavior and correlated with spiky features in Da signals commonly identified with the edge localized mode (ELM). These SOLCs are found to be an integral part of the MHD activity, with a propensity to flow in a toroidally non-axisymmetric pattern and with magnitude potentially large enough to play a role in the MHD stability. Candidate mechanisms that can drive these SOLCs are identified: (a) toroidally non-axisymmetric thermoelectric potential, (b) electromotive force (EMF) from MHD activity, and (c) flux swing, both toroidal and poloidal, of the plasma column. An effect is found, stemming from the shear in the field line pitch angle, that mitigates the efficacy of a toroidally non-axisymmetric SOLC to generate a toroidally non-axisymmetric error field. Other potential magnetic consequences of the SOLC are identified: (i) its error field can introduce complications in feedback control schemes for stabilizing MHD activity and (ii) its toroidally non-axisymmetric field can be falsely identified as an axisymmetric field by the tokamak control logic and in equilibrium reconstruction. The radial profile of a SOLC observed during a quiescent discharge period is determined, and found to possess polarity reversals as a function of radial distance.

  8. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-14

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  9. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-07

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  10. The Role of FeS in Initial Activation and Performance Degradation of Na-NiCl2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-12-25

    The role of iron sulfide (FeS) in initial cell activation and degradation in the Na-NiCl2 battery was investigated in this work. The research focused on identifying the effects of the FeS level on the electrochemical performance and morphological changes in the cathode. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study along with battery tests revealed that FeS plays a critical role in initial battery activation by removing passivation layers on Ni particles. It was also found that the optimum level of FeS in the cathode resulted in minimum Ni particle growth and improved battery cycling performance. The results of electrochemical characterization indicated that sulfur species generated in situ during initial charging, such as polysulfide and sulfur, are responsible for removing the passivation layer. Consequently, the cells containing elemental sulfur in the cathode exhibited similar electrochemical behavior during initial charging compared to that of the cells containing FeS.

  11. MOJAVE. X. PARSEC-SCALE JET ORIENTATION VARIATIONS AND SUPERLUMINAL MOTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, M. L.; Richards, J. L.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Homan, D. C.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We describe the parsec-scale kinematics of 200 active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets based on 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data obtained between 1994 August 31 and 2011 May 1. We present new VLBA 15 GHz images of these and 59 additional AGNs from the MOJAVE and 2 cm Survey programs. Nearly all of the 60 most heavily observed jets show significant changes in their innermost position angle over a 12-16 yr interval, ranging from 10 to 150 on the sky, corresponding to intrinsic variations of ?0.5 to ?2. The BL Lac jets show smaller variations than quasars. Roughly half of the heavily observed jets show systematic position angle trends with time, and 20 show indications of oscillatory behavior. The time spans of the data sets are too short compared to the fitted periods (5-12 yr), however, to reliably establish periodicity. The rapid changes and large jumps in position angle seen in many cases suggest that the superluminal AGN jet features occupy only a portion of the entire jet cross section and may be energized portions of thin instability structures within the jet. We have derived vector proper motions for 887 moving features in 200 jets having at least five VLBA epochs. For 557 well-sampled features, there are sufficient data to additionally study possible accelerations. We find that the moving features are generally non-ballistic, with 70% of the well-sampled features showing either significant accelerations or non-radial motions. Inward motions are rare (2% of all features), are slow (<0.1 mas yr{sup 1}), are more prevalent in BL Lac jets, and are typically found within 1 mas of the unresolved core feature. There is a general trend of increasing apparent speed with distance down the jet for both radio galaxies and BL Lac objects. In most jets, the speeds of the features cluster around a characteristic value, yet there is a considerable dispersion in the distribution. Orientation variations within the jet cannot fully account for the dispersion, implying that the features have a range of Lorentz factor and/or pattern speed. Very slow pattern speed features are rare, comprising only 4% of the sample, and are more prevalent in radio galaxy and BL Lac jets. We confirm a previously reported upper envelope to the distribution of speed versus beamed luminosity for moving jet features. Below 10{sup 26} W Hz{sup 1} there is a fall-off in maximum speed with decreasing 15 GHz radio luminosity. The general shape of the envelope implies that the most intrinsically powerful AGN jets have a wide range of Lorentz factors up to ?40, while intrinsically weak jets are only mildly relativistic.

  12. 2006 ALARA Activities at DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE 2006 Report 4- Section Four ALARA Activities at DOE 4 ALARA Activities at DOE In past years, the published annual report has included descriptions of ALARA activities at DOE for the purposes of sharing strategies and techniques that have shown promise in the reduction of radiation exposure. For 2006, these ALARA activity descriptions have been moved to the HSS REMS Web site to facilitate the dissemination among DOE radiation protection managers and others interested in these project

  13. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Key Activities Key Activities Key Activities Bringing Innovative Manufacturing Technologies and Materials to Full "To Scale" Industrial Use Innovation is inherent in all of AMO's investment activities helping small, medium, and large manufacturers develop cutting-edge clean energy products and technology that reduce energy consumption in every stage or place it is used in industry. Built upon a foundation of strong public-private partnerships, our support of advanced manufacturing

  14. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  15. Filter Replacement Activities Complete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2014 Filter Replacement Activities Complete This week, filter replacements were safely and successfully completed. The high efficiency filters on the second filter unit were replaced on June 20, and employees replaced the moderate filters on June 23. Decontamination and cleanup of the work areas in the filter building will complete all activities currently scheduled for WIPP's ventilation system. Employees are also restoring higher airflow levels now that both filter units are operational.

  16. WINDExchange: Deployment Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Deployment Activities Recent years have seen major growth in wind energy, and deployment projections indicate this trend will continue for all parts of the wind industry, from small distributed and community wind projects to massive land-based and offshore utility-scale facilities. Record numbers of Americans see wind energy as an important contributor to a secure and clean energy

  17. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  18. International Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation.

  19. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  20. PCB153 reduces telomerase activity and telomere length in immortalized human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) but not in human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthilkumar, P.K.; Robertson, L.W.; Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA ; Ludewig, G.

    2012-02-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are characterized by long term-persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification in the food chain. Exposure to PCBs may cause various diseases, affecting many cellular processes. Deregulation of the telomerase and the telomere complex leads to several biological disorders. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB153 modulates telomerase activity, telomeres and reactive oxygen species resulting in the deregulation of cell growth. Exponentially growing immortal human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and normal human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK) were incubated with PCB153 for 48 and 24 days, respectively, and telomerase activity, telomere length, superoxide level, cell growth, and cell cycle distribution were determined. In HaCaT cells exposure to PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth and increased intracellular superoxide levels from day 6 to day 48, suggesting that superoxide may be one of the factors regulating telomerase activity, telomere length and cell growth compared to untreated control cells. Results with NFK cells showed no shortening of telomere length but reduced cell growth and increased superoxide levels in PCB153-treated cells compared to untreated controls. As expected, basal levels of telomerase activity were almost undetectable, which made a quantitative comparison of treated and control groups impossible. The significant down regulation of telomerase activity and reduction of telomere length by PCB153 in HaCaT cells suggest that any cell type with significant telomerase activity, like stem cells, may be at risk of premature telomere shortening with potential adverse health effects for the affected organism. -- Highlights: ? Human immortal (HaCaT) and primary (NFK) keratinocytes were exposed to PCB153. ? PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity and telomere length in HaCaT. ? No effect on telomere length and telomerase activity was found in NFK. ? Increased intracellular superoxide levels and reduced cell growth was seen in both. ? PCB153 may damage telomerase expressing cells like stem cells.

  1. Observation of tilting activities in translated field reversed configuration plasma using computer tomography at two different cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Okada, Shigefumi

    2007-11-15

    Tilting activities of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma were observed in translation experiments using computer tomography (CT) at two different cross sections in the FRC injection experiment (FIX) machine [S. Okada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 677 (2007)]. In these experiments, two sets of CT devices were installed at the upstream and downstream sides of the confinement chamber of the FIX. Each CT device was composed of three arrays of detectors sensitive to the near-infrared radiation. The peak of the reconstructed emission profile at one side was displaced from the center of the cross section of the chamber. On the other hand, the reconstructed profile at the other side was located around the center. This result suggests that the FRC plasma was tilting in the axial direction. The occurrence of the observed tilting activities had almost no effect on the lifetime of the FRC plasma.

  2. Binding and Recognition in the Assembly of an Active BRCA1/BARD1 Ubiquitin-Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzovic, Peter S.; Keeffe, Jennifer R.; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Keiko; Fox, David; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ohta, Tomohiko; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2003-05-13

    BRCA1 is a breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor protein that associates with BARD1 to form a RING/RING heterodimer. The BRCA1/BARD1 RING complex functions as an ubiquitin (Ub) ligase with activity substantially greater than individual BRCA1 or BARD1 subunits. By using NMR spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, we have mapped the binding site on the BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer for the Ub-conjugating enzyme UbcH5c. The results demonstrate that UbcH5c binds only to the BRCA1 RING domain and not the BARD1 RING. The binding interface is formed by the first and second Zn2+-loops and central -helix of the BRCA1 RING domain, a region disrupted by cancer-predisposing mutations. Unexpectedly, a second Ub-conjugating enzyme, UbcH7, also interacts with the BRCA1/BARD1 complex with similar affinity, although it is not active in Ub-ligase activity assays. Thus, binding alone is not sufficient for BRCA1-dependent Ub-ligase activity.

  3. A P-loop Mutation in G[alpha] Subunits Prevents Transition to the Active State: Implications for G-protein Signaling in Fungal Pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Willard, Francis S.; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Melinda D.; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-10-23

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches integral to a panoply of different physiological responses that many organisms make to environmental cues. The switch from inactive to active G{alpha}{beta}{gamma} heterotrimer relies on nucleotide cycling by the G{alpha} subunit: exchange of GTP for GDP activates G{alpha}, whereas its intrinsic enzymatic activity catalyzes GTP hydrolysis to GDP and inorganic phosphate, thereby reverting G{alpha} to its inactive state. In several genetic studies of filamentous fungi, such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, a G42R mutation in the phosphate-binding loop of G{alpha} subunits is assumed to be GTPase-deficient and thus constitutively active. Here, we demonstrate that G{alpha}(G42R) mutants are not GTPase deficient, but rather incapable of achieving the activated conformation. Two crystal structure models suggest that Arg-42 prevents a typical switch region conformational change upon G{alpha}{sub i1}(G42R) binding to GDP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -} or GTP, but rotameric flexibility at this locus allows for unperturbed GTP hydrolysis. G{alpha}(G42R) mutants do not engage the active state-selective peptide KB-1753 nor RGS domains with high affinity, but instead favor interaction with G{beta}{gamma} and GoLoco motifs in any nucleotide state. The corresponding G{alpha}{sub q}(G48R) mutant is not constitutively active in cells and responds poorly to aluminum tetrafluoride activation. Comparative analyses of M. oryzae strains harboring either G42R or GTPase-deficient Q/L mutations in the G{alpha} subunits MagA or MagB illustrate functional differences in environmental cue processing and intracellular signaling outcomes between these two G{alpha} mutants, thus demonstrating the in vivo functional divergence of G42R and activating G-protein mutants.

  4. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from ?0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from ?25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 0.007 (0.588 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  5. Report on Audit of Activities Designed to Recover the Taxpayers' Investment in the Clean Coal Technology Program, IG-0391

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 6, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of Department of Energy's Activities Designed to Recover the Taxpayers' Investment in the Clean Coal Technology Program" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: In 1985, the Congress directed the Department of Energy to implement a Clean Coal Technology Program. The purpose of this Departmental initiative is to successfully demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies. As a part of the program, the

  6. Curriculum & Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    link for up to date information on wind energy in BPA territory, including real-time animation showing current conditions. Energy Efficiency Washington Green Schools Cool School...

  7. Key Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts work in several key areas to advance the development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  8. MAS 10.1 Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Process in Maintenance Activities, 2/14/2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's ISMS process with regard to maintenance activities.  Surveillance activities encompass work planning and...

  9. Activation of ethane in the presence of solid acids: Sulfated zirconia, iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia, and zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Tsz-Keung; Gates, B.

    1997-06-01

    Ethane was activated in the presence of solid acids [sulfated zirconia (SZ), iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia (FMSZ), HZSM-5, and USY zeolite] at 1 atm, 200-450{degrees}C, and ethane partial pressures in the range 0.014.2 atm. The data were measured with a flow reactor at low conversions (<0.005) such that reaction of ethane took place in the near absence of alkenes. Catalysis was demonstrated for ethane conversion in the presence of FMSZ at 450{degrees}C and 0.2 atm ethane partial pressure, but the reactions were not shown to be catalytic for the other solid acids and other conditions. FMSZ was active for converting ethane into methane, ethene, and butane at an ethane partial pressure of 0.2 atm and at temperatures of 200-300{degrees}C; the other solid acids had no detectable activities under these conditions. At higher temperatures, each of the solid acids was active for conversion of ethane into ethene; butane and methane were also formed in the presence of FMSZ, HZSM-5, and USY zeolite, whereas methane was the only other hydrocarbon observed in the presence of SZ. The initial (5 min on stream) selectivities to ethene at approximately 0.1 % conversion, ethane partial pressure of 0.2 atm, and 450{degrees}C were approximately 98, 94, 97, and 99%, for SZ, FMSZ, HZSM-5, and USY zeolite, respectively. Under the same reaction conditions, the initial rates of ethane conversion were 0. 1 5 x 10{sup -8}, 3.5 x 10{sup -8} 3.9 x 10{sup -8}, and 0.56 x 10{sup -8} mol/(s {circ} g) for SZ, FMSZ, HZSM-5, and USY zeolite, respectively. The reactivities are consistent with chemistry analogous to that occurring in superacidic solutions and with the suggestion that FMSZ is a stronger acid than the others investigated here. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-28

    Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

  11. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  12. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  13. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  14. Public Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bird Watching Effective January 24, 2005 There are several great bird watching spots in the public areas on Fermilab's site. Driving is restricted to the roads within the public...

  15. Public Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Art Gallery The Art Gallery in Wilson Hall is only open to the public before and after Arts, Lectures and Film Series events. The Gallery is closed to unescorted visitors at all...

  16. Pathway modeling of microarray data: A case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Sen, Banalata; Euling, Susan Y.; Gaido, Kevin W.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data.

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Active Transit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Active Transit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts

  18. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  19. DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this technical standards list are those recorded as of May 1, 1999.

  20. DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document and to DOE Order 1300.2A. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this TSL are those recorded as of July 1, 1996.

  1. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence properties in a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Akitsugu; Kobayashi, Takashi Nagase, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Goushi, Kenichi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-26

    Using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we have investigated the temperature dependence of PL properties of 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyano-benzene (4CzIPN), which have a small energy gap between its singlet and triplet excited states and thus exhibits efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence [H. Uoyama et al., Nature 492, 235 (2012)]. Below around 100?K, PL quantum efficiency of 4CzIPN thin films is largely suppressed and strong photoexcitation intensity dependence appears. These features can be explained by using rate equations for the densities of singlet and triplet excited states considering a triplet-triplet annihilation process.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  3. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodrguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  4. In-situ activation of CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalysts in the liquid phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Dennis M. (Allentown, PA); Hsiung, Thomas H. (Emmaus, PA); Rao, Pradip (Allentown, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of activation of a CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst slurried in a chemically inert liquid. Successful activation of the catalyst requires the use of a process in which the temperature of the system at any time is not allowed to exceed a certain critical value, which is a function of the specific hydrogen uptake of the catalyst at that same time. This process is especially critical for activating highly concentrated catalyst slurries, typically 25 to 50 wt %. Activation of slurries of CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst is useful in carrying out the liquid phase methanol or the liquid phase shift reactions.

  5. Transfer Activity Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Last 8 Days Transfer Activity Last 8 Days These graphs show the transfer activity statistics for the past eight days with the most recent day shown first. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems)

  6. Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A. D.

    2010-07-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT), the marine boundary layer (MBL), and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV). These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV ({kappa} {approx} 0.2-0.25). FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in {kappa} with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6-0.8) found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions ({kappa}{sub org} {approx} 0.1-0.2). A comparison of CCN-derived {kappa} (for particles at the critical diameter) to H-TDMA-derived {kappa} (for particles at 100 nm diameter) showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived {kappa} values were significantly higher.

  7. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  8. Work Force Restructuring Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Force Restructuring Activities December 10, 2008 Note: Current updates are in bold # Planned Site/Contractor HQ Approved Separations Status General * LM has finalized the compilation of contractor management team separation data for the end of FY07 actuals and end of FY08 and FY09 projections. LM has submitted to Congress the FY 2007 Annual Report on contractor work force restructuring activities. The report has been posted to the LM website. *LM conducted a DOE complex-wide data call to the

  9. Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and additional activities in Germany Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and...

  10. Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Department of the Navy Bioeconomy Activity Chris Tindal, Director for Operational Energy, U.S. Department of Navy

  11. CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Article: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED POLYMERSOME FUSION: FACTORS AFFECTING FUSION. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CONTROL OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED...

  12. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition ...

  13. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field ...

  14. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ? DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ? No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ? A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ? Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ? A specific CYP17 assay is a valuable screening for effects early in steroidogenesis.

  15. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  16. The internal disruption as hard Magnetohydrodynamic limit of 1/2 sawtooth like activity in large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varela, J.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohdachi, S.

    2012-08-15

    Large helical device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations are unstable to resistive MHD pressure-gradient-driven modes. Sawtooth like activity was observed during LHD operation. The main drivers are the unstable modes 1/2 and 1/3 in the middle and inner plasma region which limit the plasma confinement efficiency of LHD advanced operation scenarios. The aim of the present research is to study the hard MHD limit of 1/2 sawtooth like activity, not observed yet in LHD operation, and to predict its effects on the device performance. Previous investigations pointed out this system relaxation can be an internal disruption [J. Varela et al., 'Internal disruptions and sawtooth like activity in LHD,' 38th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (2011), P5.077]. In the present work, we simulate an internal disruption; we study the equilibria properties before and after the disruptive process, its effects on the plasma confinement efficiency during each disruptive phase, the relation between the n/m = 1/2 hard MHD events and the soft MHD events, and how to avoid or reduce their adverse effects. The simulation conclusions point out that the large stochastic region in the middle plasma strongly deforms and tears the flux surfaces when the pressure gradient increases above the hard MHD limit. If the instability reaches the inner plasma, the iota profiles will be perturbed near the plasma core and three magnetic islands can appear near the magnetic axis. If the instability is strong enough to link the stochastic regions in the middle plasma (around the half minor radius {rho}) and the plasma core ({rho}<0.25), an internal disruption is driven.

  17. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about Secondary Energy Infobook, 19 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12.

  18. 1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  19. WIPP Begins Underground Decontamination Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used underground to direct or block ventilation flow in open panels. It is a low permeability polyethylene (plastic) cloth. These activities will continue for the next several...

  20. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  1. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4{sup +} MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC{sub 95} level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  2. Tracking a defined route for O[subscript 2] migration in a dioxygen-activating diiron enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Woon Ju; Gucinski, Grant; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Lippard, Stephen J. (MIT); (Pomona)

    2011-09-08

    For numerous enzymes reactive toward small gaseous compounds, growing evidence indicates that these substrates diffuse into active site pockets through defined pathways in the protein matrix. Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase is a dioxygen-activating enzyme. Structural analysis suggests two possible pathways for dioxygen access through the {alpha}-subunit to the diiron center: a channel or a series of hydrophobic cavities. To distinguish which is utilized as the O{sub 2} migration pathway, the dimensions of the cavities and the channel were independently varied by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The rate constants for dioxygen access to the diiron center were derived from the formation rates of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, generated upon treatment of the diiron(II) enzyme with O2. This reaction depends on the concentration of dioxygen to the first order. Altering the dimensions of the cavities, but not the channel, changed the rate of dioxygen reactivity with the enzyme. These results strongly suggest that voids comprising the cavities in toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase are not artifacts of protein packing/folding, but rather programmed routes for dioxygen migration through the protein matrix. Because the cavities are not fully connected into the diiron active center in the enzyme resting state, conformational changes will be required to facilitate dioxygen access to the diiron center. We propose that such temporary opening and closing of the cavities may occur in all bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases to control O{sub 2} consumption for efficient catalysis. Our findings suggest that other gas-utilizing enzymes may employ similar structural features to effect substrate passage through a protein matrix.

  3. Structural studies of conformational changes of proteins upon phosphorylation: Structures of activated CheY, CheY-N16-FliM complex, and AAA {sup +} ATPase domain of NtrC1 in both inactive and active states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seok-Yong

    2003-04-10

    Protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism for signal transduction as well as regulation of cellular function. Unlike phosphorylation in eukaryotic systems that uses Ser/Thr for the sites of modification, two-component signal transduction systems, which are prevalent in bacteria, archea, and lower eukaryotes, use an aspartate as the site of phosphorylation. Two-component systems comprise a histidine kinase and a receiver domain. The conformational change of the receiver domain upon phosphorylation leads to signal transfer to the downstream target, a process that had not been understood well at the molecular level. The transient nature of the phospho-Asp bond had made structural studies difficult. The discovery of an excellent analogue for acylphosphate, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, enabled structural study of activated receiver domains. The structure of activated Chemotaxis protein Y (CheY) was determined both by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These structures revealed the molecular basis of the conformational change that is coupled to phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the conserved Asp residue in the active site allows hydrogen bonding of the T87 O{gamma} to phospho-aspartate, which in turn leads to the rotation of Y106 into the ''in'' position (termed Y-T coupling). The structure of activated CheY complexed with the 16 N-terminal residues of FliM (N16-FliM), its target, was also determined by X-ray crystallography and confirmed the proposed mechanism of activation (Y-T coupling). First, N16-FliM binds to the region on CheY that undergoes a significant conformational change. Second, the ''in'' position of Y106 presents a better binding surface for FliM because the sidechain of Y106 in the inactive form of CheY (''out'' position) sterically interferes with binding of N16-FliM. In addition to confirmation of Y-T coupling, the structure of the activated CheY-N16-FliM complex suggested that the N16-FliM might be sandwiched between CheY and the remainder of FliM to change the direction of flagellar rotation.

  4. Correlating Local Structure with Electrochemical Activity in Li2MnO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanda, Jagjit; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dixit, Hemant M.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pezeshki, Alan M.; Ruther, Rose E.

    2015-07-31

    Li2MnO3 is of interest as one component of the composite lithium-rich oxides, which are under development for high capacity, high voltage cathodes in lithium ion batteries. Despite such practical importance, the mechanism of electrochemical activity in Li2MnO3 is contested in the literature, as are the effects of long-term electrochemical cycling. Here, Raman spectroscopy and mapping are used to follow the chemical and structural changes that occur in Li2MnO3. Both conventional slurry electrodes and thin films are studied as a function of the state of charge (voltage) and cycle number. Thin films have similar electrochemical properties as electrodes prepared from slurries, but allow for spectroscopic investigations on uniform samples without carbon additives. Spectral changes correlate well with electrochemical activity and support a mechanism whereby capacity is lost upon extended cycling due to the formation of new manganese oxide phases. Raman mapping of both thin film and slurry electrodes charged to different voltages reveals significant variation in the local structure. Poor conductivity and slow kinetics associated with a two-phase reaction mechanism contribute to the heterogeneity.

  5. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  6. Characterization of electrically-active defects in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with laser-based failure analysis techniques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, Mary A.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Edward I. Cole, Jr.

    2016-01-12

    In this study, laser-based failure analysis techniques demonstrate the ability to quickly and non-intrusively screen deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes(LEDs) for electrically-active defects. In particular, two laser-based techniques, light-induced voltage alteration and thermally-induced voltage alteration, generate applied voltage maps (AVMs) that provide information on electrically-active defect behavior including turn-on bias, density, and spatial location. Here, multiple commercial LEDs were examined and found to have dark defect signals in the AVM indicating a site of reduced resistance or leakage through the diode. The existence of the dark defect signals in the AVM correlates strongly with an increased forward-bias leakage current. This increasedmore » leakage is not present in devices without AVM signals. Transmission electron microscopyanalysis of a dark defect signal site revealed a dislocation cluster through the pn junction. The cluster included an open core dislocation. Even though LEDs with few dark AVM defect signals did not correlate strongly with power loss, direct association between increased open core dislocation densities and reduced LED device performance has been presented elsewhere [M. W. Moseley et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 095301 (2015)].« less

  7. Electrocatalytic Activity of Transition Metal Oxide-Carbon Composites for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Batteries and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Jayachandrababu, KC; Kindler, A; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-06-07

    Conductive transition metal oxides (perovskites, spinels and pyrochlores) are attractive as catalysts for the air electrode in alkaline rechargeable metal-air batteries and fuel cells. We have found that conductive carbon materials when added to transition metal oxides such as calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide, nickel cobalt oxide and calcium-doped lanthanum manganese cobalt oxide increase the electrocatalytic activity of the oxide for oxygen reduction by a factor of five to ten. We have studied rotating ring-disk electrodes coated with (a) various mass ratios of carbon and transition metal oxide, (b) different types of carbon additives and (c) different types of transition metal oxides. Our experiments and analysis establish that in such composite catalysts, carbon is the primary electro- catalyst for the two-electron electro-reduction of oxygen to hydroperoxide while the transition metal oxide decomposes the hydroperoxide to generate additional oxygen that enhances the observed current resulting in an apparent four-electron process. These findings are significant in that they change the way we interpret previous reports in the scientific literature on the electrocatalytic activity of various transition metal oxide- carbon composites for oxygen reduction, especially where carbon is assumed to be an additive that just enhances the electronic conductivity of the oxide catalyst. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. A monolithic white LED with an active region based on InGaN QWs separated by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F. Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Synitsin, M. A.; Sizov, V. S.; Zakgeim, A. L.; Mizerov, M. N.

    2010-06-15

    A new approach to development of effective monolithic white-light emitters is described based on using a short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice as a barrier layer in the active region of LED structures between InGaN quantum wells emitting in the blue and yellow-green spectral ranges. The optical properties of structures of this kind have been studied, and it is demonstrated that the use of such a superlattice makes it possible to obtain effective emission from the active region.

  9. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  10. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamisasanuki, Taro; Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 ; Tokushige, Saori; Terasaki, Hiroto; Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 ; Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kosai, Ken-ichiro

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis, and appears to be an effective and safe antiangiogenic approach. These results shed light on the biological roles of CD9 and may lead to novel antiangiogenic therapies.

  11. U-225: Citrix Access Gateway Plug-in for Windows nsepacom ActiveX Control Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities in Citrix Access Gateway Plug-in for Windows can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

  12. Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites Previous Next List E. D. Bloch, L. J. Murray, W. L. Queen, S. Chavan, S. N. Maximoff, J. P. Bigi, R. Krishna, V. K. Peterson, F. Grandjean, G. J. Long, B. Smit, S. Bordiga, C. M. Brown, and J. R. Long, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 (37), 14814 (2011) DOI:

  13. Radical advancement in multi-spectral imaging for autonomous vehicles (UAVs, UGVs, and UUVs) using active compensation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Brian F.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to demonstrate a compact, multi-spectral, refractive imaging systems using active optical compensation. Compared to a comparable, conventional lens system, our system has an increased operational bandwidth, provides for spectral selectivity and, non-mechanically corrects aberrations induced by the wavelength dependent properties of a passive refractive optical element (i.e. lens). The compact nature and low power requirements of the system lends itself to small platforms such as autonomous vehicles. In addition, the broad spectral bandwidth of our system would allow optimized performance for both day/night use, and the multi-spectral capability allows for spectral discrimination and signature identification.

  14. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names.

  15. DOE Technical Standards List: Directory of DOE and Contractor Personnel Involved in Non-Government Standards Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4-99 May 1999 Superseding DOE-TSL-4-98 May 1998 DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS LIST DIRECTORY OF DOE AND CONTRACTOR PERSONNEL INVOLVED IN NON- GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375,

  16. Study of new states in visible light active W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajjad, Ahmed Khan Leghari; Shamaila, Sajjad; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel. ? Oxygen vacancies are detected in the form of new linkages as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. ? W, N co-doped titania has new energy states which narrows the band gap effectively. ? Oxygen vacancies are proved to be the cause for high photo catalytic activity. ? W and N co-doping plays the major role to make the composite thermally stable. -- Abstract: The visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel method. New linkages of N, W and O are formed as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. Electron paramagnetic resonance illustrates the presence of oxygen vacancies in W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} acting as trapping agencies for electrons to produce active species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of new energy states. New linkages and oxygen vacancies are proved to be the main cause for the improved photo catalytic performances. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} has new energy states which narrow the band gap effectively. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} is thermally stable and retains its anatase phase up to 900 C. 4.5% W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} showed superior activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B and 2,4-dichlorophenol as compared to pure titania, Degussa P-25, traditional N-doped TiO{sub 2} and pure WO{sub 3}.

  17. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-?B signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-?B p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-?B-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. Gastrodin activates NF-?B activity in CD4 + T cells.

  18. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014.

  19. Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Germantown, Maryland on April 23-25, 2013.

  20. Department of Energy Implementation Activities in the Case of a Lapse of Appropriations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Learn more about the Department of Energy's plan for operating in the event of a lapse of appropriations.

  1. Conformational Changes in Guanylate Cyclase-Activating Protein 1 Induced by Ca2+ and N-Terminal Fatty Acid Acylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orban, T.; Bereta, G; Miyagi, M; Wang, B; Chance, M; Sousa, M; Palczewski, K

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal Ca{sup 2+} sensors (NCS) are high-affinity Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins critical for regulating a vast range of physiological processes. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) are members of the NCS family responsible for activating retinal guanylate cyclases (GCs) at low Ca{sup 2+} concentrations, triggering synthesis of cGMP and recovery of photoreceptor cells to the dark-adapted state. Here we use amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange and radiolytic labeling, and molecular dynamics simulations to study conformational changes induced by Ca{sup 2+} and modulated by the N-terminal myristoyl group. Our data on the conformational dynamics of GCAP1 in solution suggest that Ca{sup 2+} stabilizes the protein but induces relatively small changes in the domain structure; however, loss of Ca{sup 2+} mediates a significant global relaxation and movement of N- and C-terminal domains. This model and the previously described calcium-myristoyl switch proposed for recoverin indicate significant diversity in conformational changes among these highly homologous NCS proteins with distinct functions.

  2. Highly Active Electrolytes for Rechargeable Mg Batteries Based on [Mg2(?-Cl)2]2+ Cation Complex in Dimethoxyethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Stolley, Ryan M.; Han, Kee Sung; Shao, Yuyan; Arey, Bruce W.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Helm, Monte L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Highly active electrolytes based on a novel [Mg2(?-Cl)2]2+ cation complex for reversible Mg deposition were developed and analyzed in this work. These electrolytes were formulated in dimethoxyethane through dehalodimerization of non-nucleophilic MgCl2 by reacting with either Mg salts (such as Mg(TFSI)2, TFSI= bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylimide) or Lewis acid salts (such as AlEtCl2 or AlCl3). The cation complex was identified for the first time as [Mg2(?-Cl)2(DME)4]2+ (DME=dimethoxyethane) and its molecular structure was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and NMR. The electrolyte synthesis process was studied and rational approaches for formulating highly active electrolytes were proposed. Through control of the anions, electrolytes with efficiency close to 100%, wide electrochemical window (up to 3.5V) and high ionic conductivity (> 6 mS/cm) were obtained. The electrolyte synthesis and understandings developed in this work could bring significant opportunities for rational formulation of electrolytes with the general formula [Mg2(?-Cl)2(DME)4][anion]x for practical Mg batteries.

  3. Mound activities in chemical and physical research: July-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-20

    Research is reported in the following areas: low-temperature research (kinetics of DT formation in D/sub 2/ + T/sub 2/ mixtures, calculation of charged particle density in tritium containing CT/sub 4/, deuterium triple point cell), separation research (liquid thermal diffusion of methyl chloride and bromine-81 in bromobenzene, separation of Ca and Zr isotopes, triple-pumped detector, magnesium two-phase chemical exchange, extraction columns for Ca isotope enrichment, reflux-electrochemical NO-HNO/sub 3/ chemical exchange for /sup 15/N enrichment, testing of boron phosphate for Pu adsorption), and metal hydride studies (prediction of nonmagnetic Kondo effect in metal hydrides). (DLC)

  4. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media Subsurface Biogeochemical Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colwell, Frederick; Wildenschild, Dorthe; Wood, Brian; Gerlach, Robin; Redden, George

    2014-08-29

    The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous media in order to achieve optimal calcite precipitation in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific objectives were to: (1) develop better tools for visually examining biofilms in porous media and calcium carbonate precipitation being mediated by microbes in porous media, and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of using that tool within a flow cell model system.

  5. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  6. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energys support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombias national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy, and the Ministry of Mines and Energy, including the Minister and Vice Minister.

  7. Activities in Support of Continuing the Service of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status provided. Operating experience related to performance of the concrete structures is presented. Basic components of a program to manage aging of the concrete structures are identified and described: (1) Degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; (2) Assessment and remediation: i.e., component selection, in- service inspection, non-destructive examinations, and remedial actions; and (3) Estimation of performance at present or some future point in time: i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk. Finally, areas are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  8. CARISMA: A Networking Project for High Temperature PEMFC MEA Activities in Europe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells was given at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  9. Key Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    About the Bioenergy Technologies Office » Key Activities Key Activities The Bioenergy Technologies Office's key activities are aimed at producing a viable, sustainable domestic biomass industry that produces renewable biofuels, bioproducts and biopower; enhances U.S. energy security; reduces U.S. oil dependence; provides environmental benefits (e.g., reduced greenhouse gas emissions); and creates nationwide economic opportunities. Meeting these goals requires significant and rapid advances in

  10. Outreach Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Conflict Prevention and Resolution » Outreach Activities Outreach Activities The OCPR staff engages in various outreach activities within the DOE complex and the greater federal ADR community to promote the use of alternative dispute resolution techniques. To that end, OCPR staff are members of the Interagency Alternative Dispute Resolution Working Group (IADRWG) Workplace Conflict Management Section ("Workplace Section"). This group provides guidance on "best

  11. A semisynthetic strategy leads to alteration of the backbone amidate ligand in the NiSOD active site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campecio, Julius O.; Dudycz, Lech W.; Tumelty, David; Berg, Volker; Cabelli, Diane E.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-07-01

    Computational investigations have implicated the amidate ligand in nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) in stabilizing Ni-centered redox catalysis and in preventing cysteine thiolate ligand oxidation. To test these predictions, we have used an experimental approach utilizing a semisynthetic scheme that employs native chemical ligation of a pentapeptide (HCDLP) to recombinant S. coelicolor NiSOD lacking these N-terminal residues, N?5-NiSOD. Wild-type enzyme produced in this manner exhibits the characteristic spectral properties of recombinant WT-NiSOD and is as catalytically active. The semisynthetic scheme was also employed to construct a variant where the amidate ligand was converted to a secondary amine, H1*-NiSOD, a novel strategy that retains a backbone N-donor atom. The H1*-NiSOD variant was found to have only ~1% of the catalytic activity of the recombinant wild-type enzyme, and had altered spectroscopic properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a four-coordinate planar site with N2S2-donor ligands, consistent with electronic absorption spectroscopic results indicating that the Ni center in H1*-NiSOD is mostly reduced in the as-isolated sample, as opposed to 50:50 Ni(II)/Ni(III) mixture that is typical for the recombinant wild-type enzyme. The EPR spectrum of as-isolated H1*-NiSOD accounts for ~11% of the Ni in the sample and is similar to WT-NiSOD, but more axial, with gz < gx,y. 14N-hyperfine is observed on gzin the Ni(III) complex. As a result, the altered electronic properties and implications for redox catalysis are discussed in light of predictions based on synthetic and computational models.

  12. Retrieval Activities - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farms Retrieval Activities Office of River Protection Tank Farms Retrieval Activities PHOENIX - Tank Monitoring Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant 222-S Laboratory 242-A...

  13. Status of Overseas Microgrid Programs:Microgrid Research Activities in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Marnay, Chris; Zhou, Nan

    2008-02-01

    Research on microgrids in the U.S. has taken a somewhat different path than parallel efforts in Japan and Europe, and this distinction is often noted in international research forums. In general, reliability and power quality in North America is poor compared to other developed countries. For example, in the U.S., the average annual expected outage duration is a few hours, whereas in Japan, it is only a few minutes. Power quality problems in the U.S. are both large scale, such as the August 2003 blackout, and local, such as damaging voltage sags. Meeting the increasingly demanding requirements of a modern digital economy would then seem to offer a more daunting challenge for the U.S. than elsewhere, and certainly, concern that the existing power delivery system will prove inadequate for future gourmet requirements has been a motivating driver of U.S. research. This objective tends to translate into a desire for microgrids to seamlessly island when grid power is interrupted or its quality is inadequate, and to (also seamlessly) reconnect when normal service has been restored. In a sense, the microgrid is perceived as acting as an uninterruptible power supply (UPS), and sometimes even as a competitor to existing UPS options. Nonetheless, this difference is often over-stated, and the other threads that motivate microgrid research also exist in the U.S., e.g. the desire to expand renewable generation and the need to increase the efficiency of fossil-fired generation by the useful local application of waste heat in combined heat and power (CHP) systems, Further, over time, the differences are blurring as concerns about climate change increasingly dominate objectives worldwide. This article describes the CERTS Microgrid, which is almost certainly the best known U.S. example, and also briefly mentions some other U.S. microgrid research.

  14. Local governments' efforts to implement environmental impact assessment requirements on development activities: Cause and effect in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Various government entities in North Carolina have seen the need to implement specific policy which requires organizations responsible for certain development activities to perform a detailed assessment of comprehensive environmental impacts. Some governments have enacted policy, and a number of others are evaluating the need for policy implementation. The consideration of environmental effects of the development action early in the project planning process is, in many cases, an effect of the implementation of such policies, rather than a purpose. This study evaluates the varying ideals and rationale upon which local leaders have based environmental policies. Also, this study assesses the effectiveness of a variety of policies currently enacted and compares the final results of projects which have had to comply with the policies. Through the use of a survey distributed to officials responsible for policy enactment, local government personnel responsible for implementation and others involved in both public and private development, a relative assessment of effectiveness of different policies is postulated.

  15. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

  16. Impact of zeolite aging in hot liquid water on activity for acid-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Fulton, John L.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-08-19

    The catalytic performance of zeolite in aqueous medium depends on a multitude of factors, such as the concentration and distribution of active sites and framework integrity. Al Kedge extended Xray absorption fine structure and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopies in combination with DFT calculations are used to determine the distribution of tetrahedral Al sites both qualitatively and quantitatively for both parent and 48 h 160 C water treated HBEA catalysts. There is no evidence of Al coordination modification after aging in water. The distribution and concentration of Al Tsites, active centers for the dehydration of cyclohexanol, do not markedly impact the catalytic performance in water, because the Brnsted acidic protons are present in the form of hydrated hydronium ions and thus have very similar acid properties. The results suggest that all Brnsted acid sites are equally active in aqueous medium. The decrease of zeolite catalytic performance after water treatment is attributed to the reduced concentration of Brnsted acid sites. Increasing the stability of pore walls and decreasing the rate of SiOSi group hydrolysis may result in improved apparent zeolite catalytic performance in aqueous medium. Authors thank B. W. Arey (PNNL) for HIM measurements, T. Huthwelker for support during Al XAFS measurements at the Swiss Light Source (PSI, Switzerland), J. Z. Hu and S. D. Burton (PNNL) for support during NMR experiments. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. MD acknowledges support by the Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales (MS3 Initiative) conducted under Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program at PNNL. HIM imaging and NMR experiments were performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract # DE-AC05-76RL0-1830

  17. Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

    2012-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

  18. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: 2.1.7.1Regulatory Assistance 2.1.7.2Stakeholder Outreach 2.1.7.3Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  19. Sulfur determination in blood from inhabitants of Brazil using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Laura C.; Zamboni, Cibele B.

    2013-05-06

    In this study the NAA technique was applied to analyze sulfur in blood from inhabitants of Brazil for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering lifestyle factors (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure) of Brazilian inhabitants. The influence of gender was also investigated considering several age ranges (18-29, 30-39, 40-49, >50 years). These data are useful in clinical investigations, to identify or prevent diseases caused by inadequate sulfur ingestion and for nutritional evaluation of Brazilian population.

  20. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Petti; Susana Reyes; Lee C. Cadwallader; Jeffery F. Latkowski

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  1. Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

    2014-09-30

    Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  2. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2011 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology.

  3. Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on...

  4. Longest-Serving Active Paper Mill in the Western United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Western United States Uncovers New Ways to Save Energy This case study describes how West Linn Paper Company's coated paper mill in West Linn, Oregon, saved nearly 58,200 MMBtu...

  5. Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to ... of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the ...

  6. Longest-Serving Active Paper Mill in the Western United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    While the mill does not have a formal energy man- agement policy, energy efficiency is a strong priority. In the late 1990s the mill's steam load averaged nearly 200,000 lbshour....

  7. Remediation of former uranium mining and milling activities in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggitt, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Several of the Central Asian countries of the former Soviet Union were involved in the uranium mining and milling industry from about 1945 for varying periods until the break up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and beyond. Some facilities are still producing in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. However, before the break up, many facilities had been abandoned and in only a few cases had any remediation been undertaken. Since 1991 the newly independent states of the region have been seeking assistance for the remediation of the multitude of tailings piles, waste rock stockpiles and abandoned, and often semi dismantled, production facilities that may be found throughout the region. Many of these sites are close to settlements that were established as service towns for the mines. Most towns still have populations, although the mining industry has departed. In some instances there are cases of pollution and contamination and in many locations there is a significant level of public concern. The IAEA has been undertaking a number of Technical Cooperation (TC) projects throughout the region for some time to strengthen the institutions in the relevant states and assist them to establish monitoring and surveillance programs as an integral part of the long term remediation process. The IAEA is liaising with other agencies and donors who are also working on these problems to optimise the remediation effort. The paper describes the objectives and operation of the main TC regional program, liaison efforts with other agencies, the achievements so far and the long term issues for remediation of these legacies of the 'cold war' era. (authors)

  8. Optically activated sub-millimeter dielectric relaxation in amorphous thin film silicon at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Rezwanur; Ohno, Tim R.; Taylor, P. C.; Scales, John A.

    2014-05-05

    Knowing the frequency-dependent photo-induced complex conductivity of thin films is useful in the design of photovoltaics and other semi-conductor devices. For example, annealing in the far-infrared could in principle be tailored to the specific dielectric properties of a particular sample. The frequency dependence of the conductivity (whether dark or photo-induced) also gives insight into the effective dimensionality of thin films (via the phonon density of states) as well as the presence (or absence) of free carriers, dopants, defects, etc. Ultimately, our goal is to make low-noise, phase-sensitive room temperature measurements of the frequency-dependent conductivity of thin films from microwave frequencies into the far-infrared; covering, the frequency range from ionic and dipole relaxation to atomic and electronic processes. To this end, we have developed a high-Q (quality factor) open cavity resonator capable of resolving the complex conductivity of sub-micron films in the range of 100350?GHz (0.10.35 THz, or 0.41?meV). In this paper, we use a low-power green laser to excite bound charges in high-resistivity amorphous silicon thin film. Even at room temperature, we can resolve both the dark conductivity and photo-induced changes associated with dielectric relaxation and possibly some small portion of free carriers.

  9. Federal Biomass Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Biomass Activities Federal Biomass Activities Statutory and executive order requirements for Bioproducts and Biofuels PDF icon federal_biomass_activities.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: Bioproducts in the Federal Bioeconomy Portfolio Webinar Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Federal Activities Report on the Bioeconomy

  10. Environmental Remediation Activities in Japan Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Incident - 12603

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W.; Kelley, J.L.; Marcial, M.R.; Yashio, Shoko; Kuriu, Nobou; Kamijo, Hiroaki; Jotatsu, Kato

    2012-07-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor power plant was crippled by the Great Pacific earthquake and subsequent tsunami. Much of the focus in the news was on the reactor site itself as the utility company (TEPCO), the Japanese government, and experts from around the world worked to bring the damaged plants into a safe shutdown condition and stem the release of radioactivity to the environment. Most of the radioactivity released was carried out to sea with the prevailing winds. Still, as weather patterns changed and winds shifted, a significant plume of radioactive materials released from the plant deposited in the environment surrounding the plant, contaminating large land areas of the Fukushima Prefecture. The magnitude of the radiological impact to the surrounding environmental is so large that the Japanese government has had to reevaluate the meaning of 'acceptably clean'. In many respects, 'acceptably clean' cannot be a one-size-fits-all standard. The economics costs of such an approach would make impossible what is already an enormous and costly environmental response and remediation task. Thus, the Japanese government has embarked upon an approach that is both situation-specific and reasonably achievable. For example, the determination of acceptably clean for a nursery school or kindergarten play yard may be different from that for a parking lot. The acceptably clean level of residual radioactivity in the surface soil of a rice paddy is different from that in a forested area. The recognized exposure situation (scenario) thus plays a large role in the decision process. While sometimes complicated to grasp or implement, such an approach does prioritize national resources to address environment remediation based upon immediate and significant risks. In addition, the Japanese government is testing means and methods, including advanced or promising technologies, that could be proven to be effective in reducing the amount of radioactivity in the environment beyond a fixed, concentration based limit. Essentially, the definition of acceptably clean includes the concept of reasonably achievable, given the available technology, means and methods, and the cost to implement such. The Japanese government recently issued three technology demonstration contracts expressly designed to test and evaluate the available technologies, means, and methods, which, if implemented, might produce the greatest risk reduction from environmental contamination for the best value. One of the Japanese contract holders, Obayashi JV, has teamed with AMEC to demonstrate the applicability and capabilities of the Orion ScanPlot{sup SM} and ScanSort{sup SM} technologies in radiologically impacted towns both inside and immediately outside the 20 km restricted zone. This presentation provides some unique images and informative insight into the environmental radioactive impacts in and around the exclusion zone. It will provide a look at one element of the Japanese government?s efforts to achieve the greatest risk reduction that is reasonably achievable. The Orion ScanPlot{sup SM} and ScanSort{sup SM} are being used with success on the Japan Town Demonstration Project to assess pre-remedial action contamination levels, document the post-remedial action contamination levels and to precisely measure and segregate excavated soils based on their radioactive content and the prescribed segregation limits (DCS). Initial results suggest that these technologies could provide capabilities to the remedial action efforts that would result in considerable improvements in field data certainty and compliance with remedial objectives while reducing overall costs. (authors)

  11. Fuel cycle centers revisited: Consolidation of fuel cycle activities in a few countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratzer, M.B.

    1996-07-01

    Despite varied expressions, the general impression remains that the international fuel cycle center concept, whatever its merits, is visionary. It also is quite possibly unattainable in light of strong national pressures toward independence and self-sufficiency in all things nuclear. Is the fuel cycle center an idea that has come and gone? Is it an idea whose time has not yet come? Or is it, as this paper suggests, an idea that has already arrived on the scene, attracting little attention or even acknowledgement of its presence? The difficult in answering this questions arises, in part, from the fact that despite its long and obvious appeal, there has been very little systematic analysis of the concept itself. Such obvious questions as how many and where fuel cycle centers should be located; what characteristics should the hot country or countries possess; and what are the institutional forms or features that endow the concept with enhanced proliferation protection have rarely been seriously and systematically addressed. The title of this paper focuses on limiting the geographic spread of fuel cycle facilities, and some may suggest that doing so does not necessarily call for any type of international or multinational arrangements applicable to those that exist. It is a premise of this paper, however, that a restriction on the number of countries possessing sensitive fuel cycle facilities necessarily involves some degree of multinationalization. This is not only because in every instance a nonproliferation pledge and international or multinational safeguards, or both, will be applied to the facility, but also because a restriction on the number of countries possessing these facilities implies that those in existence will serve a multinational market. This feature in itself is an important form of international auspices. Thus, the two concepts--limitation and multinationalization--if not necessarily one and the same, are at least de facto corollaries.

  12. A semisynthetic strategy leads to alteration of the backbone amidate ligand in the NiSOD active site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campeciño, Julius O.; Dudycz, Lech W.; Tumelty, David; Berg, Volker; Cabelli, Diane E.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-07-01

    Computational investigations have implicated the amidate ligand in nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) in stabilizing Ni-centered redox catalysis and in preventing cysteine thiolate ligand oxidation. To test these predictions, we have used an experimental approach utilizing a semisynthetic scheme that employs native chemical ligation of a pentapeptide (HCDLP) to recombinant S. coelicolor NiSOD lacking these N-terminal residues, NΔ5-NiSOD. Wild-type enzyme produced in this manner exhibits the characteristic spectral properties of recombinant WT-NiSOD and is as catalytically active. The semisynthetic scheme was also employed to construct a variant where the amidate ligand was converted to a secondary amine, H1*-NiSOD, a novel strategymore » that retains a backbone N-donor atom. The H1*-NiSOD variant was found to have only ~1% of the catalytic activity of the recombinant wild-type enzyme, and had altered spectroscopic properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a four-coordinate planar site with N2S2-donor ligands, consistent with electronic absorption spectroscopic results indicating that the Ni center in H1*-NiSOD is mostly reduced in the as-isolated sample, as opposed to 50:50 Ni(II)/Ni(III) mixture that is typical for the recombinant wild-type enzyme. The EPR spectrum of as-isolated H1*-NiSOD accounts for ~11% of the Ni in the sample and is similar to WT-NiSOD, but more axial, with gz < gx,y. 14N-hyperfine is observed on gz« less

  13. Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

  14. Act as NARSTO Management Coordinator and Conduct Research In Support of NARSTO Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennell, William T.

    2014-01-22

    This grant funded the position of NARSTO Management Coordinator. NARSTO was a public-private partnership with members from government, utilities, industry, and academe in Canada, the United States and Mexico. NARSTO planed and coordinated independently sponsored projects and tasks designed to identify and resolve policy-relevant science questions related to a) Anthropogenic and biogenic air-pollution sources and emissions, b) The complex physical and chemical processes affecting the accumulation of pollutants in the troposphere (including greenhouse gases and aerosols), c) The potential of certain pollutants to react and generate oxidants and fine particles in the troposphere, d) The development, intercomparison, and application of atmospheric models, e) The development of monitoring studies and methodologies needed to assess emission control effectiveness for selected greenhouse gases and aerosols, air pollutants and their precursors, and f) The attainment of the national air-quality and climate-stabilization goals and standards established by each member Nation

  15. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  16. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  17. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  18. Anodic activation of niobium and tantalum in phosphate-fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bairachnyi, B.I.; Stepanova, I.I.

    1988-01-10

    An analysis of the polarization curves for the anodic dissolution of niobium and tantalum in the coordinates showed they are described by Fafel's equation with a slop of the linear sections of -0.125 for niobium and -0.123 for tantalum. In solutions that contained hydrofluoric acid the anodic-anionic polarization of niobium and tantalum was accompanied by the destruction of the oxide film by the fluoride ions and dissolution of the metal phase. Effects of polishing and glossing of the surface of the investigated metals were observed at certain conditions.

  19. Directory of Solar Energy Research Activities in the United States: First Edition, May 1980. [1220 projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    Information covering 1220, FY 1978 and FY 1979 solar energy research projects is included. In addition to the title and text of project summaries, the directory contains the following indexes: subject index, investigator index, performing organization index, and supporting organization index. This information was registered with the Smithsonian Science Information Exchange by Federal, State, and other supporting organizations. The project summaries are categorized in the following areas: biomass, ocean energy, wind energy,photovoltaics, photochemical energy conversion, photobiological energy conversion, solar heating and cooling, solar process heat, solar collectors and concentrators, solar thermal electric generation, and other solar energy conversion. (WHK)

  20. Active electron energy distribution function control in direct current discharge using an auxiliary electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweigert, I. V.; George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 ; Kaganovich, I. D.; Demidov, V. I.; St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg

    2013-10-15

    The electron energy distribution functions are studied in the low voltage dc discharge with a constriction, which is a diaphragm with an opening. The dc discharge glows in helium and is sustained by the electron current emitted from a heated cathode. We performed kinetic simulations of dc discharge characteristics and electron energy distribution functions for different gas pressures (0.8 Torr-4 Torr) and discharge current of 0.1 A. The results of these simulations indicate the ability to control the shape of the electron energy distribution functions by variation of the diaphragm opening radius.