National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activities field test

  1. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    edition (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in

  2. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the

  3. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  4. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience This presentation, which was the opening session of the NREL 2013 Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop ...

  5. Interagency Field Test & Evaluation: Field Test 2 Public Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Connor

    2013-03-30

    This fact sheet summarizes the second field tests of technologies intended to address wind turbine interference with land-based surveillance radar, which took place in Lubbock, TX.

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - UAV Field Test IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : UAV Field Test IOP 1993.10.01 - 1993.10.31 Lead Scientist : John Vitko For data sets, see below. Abstract The UAV ...

  7. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Controller Field Tests on the NREL CART2 Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossanyi, E.; Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01

    This document presents the results of the field tests carried out on the CART2 turbine at NREL to validate individual pitch control and active tower damping.

  9. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Design and field test results from the SMART Rotor project, a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of the rotor aerodynamics.

  10. SNL Begins Field Testing on First SMART Blades | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    began field testing a set of wind turbine blades with active load control capabilities. ... control during peak loads experienced by the turbine blades and drivetrain components. ...

  11. Test Proposal Document for Phased Field Thermal Testing in Salt |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Test Proposal Document for Phased Field Thermal Testing in Salt Test Proposal Document for Phased Field Thermal Testing in Salt The document summarizes how a new round of staged thermal field testing will help to augment the safety case for disposal of heat generating nuclear waste in salt. The objectives of the proposed test plan are to: (1) address features, events, and processes (FEPs), (2) build scientific and public confidence, (3) foster international

  12. Activated sludge stress testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, F.H.; Darida, C.J. ); Alam, A.M.Z.; Chien, T. )

    1991-11-01

    In 1989 and 1990, the Middlesex County Utilities Authority (MCUA) conducted a facilities planning study to expand the capacity of the existing 5.2-m{sup 3}/s (120-mgd) treatment plant for treating projected wastewater flows up to the year 2020. As a part of this study, MCUA stress-tested the existing plant facilities - specifically, the UNOX activated sludge reactors and aerobic sludge digesters - to determine the dependable treatment capacity of each unit process. Before establishing expansion needs, it was necessary to determine the real treatment capacities of existing treatment plant facilities and process units as compared to plant design criteria and the effectiveness of the existing treatment systems and their operations, increased plant capacity, and reduced future plant expansion needs and associated construction costs.

  13. E3T Emerging Technology Field Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Test 1 February 5, 2015 Brown Bag Mira Vowles, BPA Wesley Saway, BPA 2 BPA is seeking utilities to participate in an ET Field Test that will fully fund up to 30 retrofits of...

  14. Longwall dust control field tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-14

    Following are highlights of the observations and conclusions drawn from the certain field tests: The use of Kaiser's wing curtain significantly reduced the average air velocity around the face corner, particularly when the gob curtain was removed (Kaiser's existing procedure). The velocity reduction will result in a lessened tendency for headgate cutout dust to be blown directly into the walkway negatively impacting the operator's exposure. Dust will be more effectively channeled around the face corner and downstream past the shearer body. At shield No. 10, average air velocities were within 15 percent of each other over all four of the curtain configurations tested. This indicated that curtain usage had a minimal effect on airflow levels along the face for Kaiser's given condition of gob consolidation. The high air velocity (spot) readings occurring just downstream of the installed wing curtain were due to leakage through gaps in the curtain around the stageloader. The volume of leakage was not significant, but proved to be helpful in sweeping the downstream headgate region clean of contaminants and preventing recirculation. Kaiser's curtain system design has proven to be very rugged, practical and effective and would be suitable for use in many coal mines. Used in conjunction with the semipermanent stageloader curtain, the wing curtain can remain in position for nearly 30 to 40 feet of face advance before needing to be repositioned. The stageloader curtain itself could be mounted directly to the stageloader for automatic advance with headgate equipment. This would only be feasible if the headgate roof horizon was consistent. Kaiser currently hangs the curtain independently and repositions it as required.

  15. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  16. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and

  17. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: ...

  18. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  19. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  20. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  1. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which was the opening session of the NREL 2013 Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop held on February 26, 2013 in Golden, CO, was presented by John Wohlgemuth. Entitled "Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience -- What Do They All Mean?" the presentation details efforts to develop accelerated stress tests beyond the qualification test levels, which are necessary to predict PV module wear-out. The commercial success of PVs is ultimately based on the long-term reliability and safety of the deployed PV modules.

  2. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design and Field Test SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Wind Turbine Rotor. This work ...

  3. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  4. NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Field Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Testing Photo of an aerial view of the Outdoor Test Facility and array field. The Outdoor Test Facility forms the backbone of our field-testing capabilities. Photo of some of ...

  5. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  6. Results of the fourth Hanna field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covell, J. R.; Wojdac, L. F.; Barbour, F. A.; Gardner, G. W.; Glass, R.; Hommert, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The second phase (Hanna IVB) of a coal gasification experiment near Hanna, Wyoming, was completed in September 1979. The experiment attempted to link and gasify coal between process wells spaced 34.3 meters apart. Intermediate wells were positioned between the process wells so that the link could be relayed over shorter distances. Reverse combustion linking was attempted over a 22.9-meter and a 11.4-meter distance of the total well spacing. Thermal activity was generally noted in the upper 3 meters of the coal seam during the link. Two attempts to gasify over the 34.3-meter distance resulted in the propagation of the burn front at the coal overburden interface. Post-burn evaluation indicates fractures as major influencing factors of the combustion process. The Hanna IVB field test provided much insight into influence that geologic features have on in situ coal combustion. The influence of these faults, permeable zones, and cleats, on the air flow patterns can drastically change the overall results of a gasification experiment and should be studied further. The overall results of Hanna IVB were discouraging because of the rapid decline in the heating values for the production gas and the amount of coal gasified. With more complete geologic characerization prior to experimentation and proper well completions, it is believed that most of the subsurface operational problems encountered during Hanna IV could have been avoided.

  7. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  8. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test edition (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  9. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  10. INTERAGENCY FIELD TEST & EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE - RADAR INTERFEREN...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    INTERAGENCY FIELD TEST & EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE - RADAR INTERFERENCE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES INTERAGENCY FIELD TEST & EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE - RADAR INTERFERENCE MITIGATION ...

  11. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Paper presented at the Waste Management 2011 Conference. ...

  12. DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 ...

  13. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, ...

  14. Project Impact Assessments … Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Assessments - Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support 2014 Building ... 9302014 Key Milestones : 1. Launch Field Test Best Practices web- based facilitated ...

  15. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support ...

  16. Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Provides and overview of ...

  17. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies October 6, ...

  18. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  19. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  20. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel

  1. FIELD INVESTIGATION AT THE FAULTLESS SITE CENTRAL NEVADA TEST

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FIELD INVESTIGATION AT THE FAULTLESS SITE CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA DOEINV10845--T3 DE93 ... at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area An evaluation of groundwater ...

  2. FIELD TEST AND EVALUATION OF RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TEST AND EVALUATION OF RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS USING ALTERNATIVE VERTICAL-BORE GROUND HEAT EXCHANGERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FIELD TEST AND ...

  3. Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar May 1, 2012 - 2:56pm Addthis The Department ...

  4. Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned May 20, 2009 - 1:00pm ...

  5. Geothermal Testing Facilities in an Oil Field

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Engineered Geothermal Systems, Low Temp, Exploration Demonstration. The proposed project is to develop a long term testing facility and test geothermal power units for the evaluation of electrical power generation from low-temperature and co-produced fluids. The facility will provide the ability to conduct both long and short term testing of different power generation configurations to determine reliability, efficiency and to provide economic evaluation data.

  6. Field Testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... simulate actual decontamination activities. + to shake down the new IUOE test facilities. ... words about the implications of the test results to DoE missions. Acknowledgments ...

  7. Geothermal Testing Facilities in an Oil Field - Rocky Mountain Oil Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Center; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report | Department of Energy Field - Rocky Mountain Oil Field Testing Center; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Geothermal Testing Facilities in an Oil Field - Rocky Mountain Oil Field Testing Center; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review lowtemp_014_johnson.pdf (258.37 KB) More Documents & Publications Electrical Power Generation Using

  8. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  9. Video: Appliance Standards Testing Ensures Level Playing Field | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Video: Appliance Standards Testing Ensures Level Playing Field Video: Appliance Standards Testing Ensures Level Playing Field August 3, 2016 - 11:45am Addthis The Intertek testing laboratory in Cortland, NY tests products for the U.S. Department of Energy to ensure that consumers are getting the savings promised by its federal Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Mike Mueller Senior Digital Content Strategist, EERE Communications Learn more about standards & test

  10. IFT&E Field Test 2 Public Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation of Wind Turbine - Radar Interference Mitigation Technologies PUBLIC RELEASE ASR-11 Campaign at Abilene, TX Test: October 18-28, 2012. Report: March 2013 Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release (April 30, 2013). Approved for Public Release IFT&E Field Test Report 2: ASR-11 2 Purpose of this Fact Sheet: This document includes background information and a summary of the second of three tests on the effectiveness of

  11. NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utility-scale turbines tested at the NWTC include those manufactured by Siemens, GE, Gamesa, and Alstom. For more information, contact: David Simms, 303-384-6942. Printable Version ...

  12. DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology November 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A promising post combustion membrane technology that can separate and capture 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from a pulverized coal plant has been successfully demonstrated and received Department of Energy (DOE) approval to advance to a larger-scale field test. In an $18.75 million

  13. Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_newhouse.pdf (5.48 MB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Field Performance, and Certification International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings CNG and Hydrogen Tank

  14. NWTC Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems to Increase Performance, Decrease ... damage that increase maintenance costs and shorten the life of a turbine or wind plant. ...

  15. Demonstrating Strong Electric Fields in Liquid Helium for Tests...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Image courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory The Medium Scale High Voltage Test apparatus in TA-53 Building 10 allowed scientists to test electric fields in liquid helium, a ...

  16. Field Test Best Practices Website | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    man standing in front of a door performing a blower door test. The Field Test Best Practices website is a start-to-finish best practice guide for building science researchers ...

  17. UPS multifuel stratified charge engine development program - Field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The multifuel, stratified charge engine program launched by United Parcel Service in 1978 has progressed through two years of field tests. The mechanical and electronic experience with the field test engine is covered in detail, with problems and causes identified and solutions described. Also included are reports on research initiated as a consequence of problems that appeared in the field test engines. All aspects of engine performance are covered, including fuel economy, multifuel experience, emissions testing and tuning, maintenance expectations and driver reactions. The original 350-engine field test was run with many components newly designed or modified, and relatively untested. Component and reliability problems identified in the field test have prompted modifications, and the engines are being reworked for the start of a new 200-engine field test. Research studies conducted on the field test engine have produced very encouraging emissions data, which suggests that the low-load hydrocarbon problem historically associated with this technology is not a barrier to commercial application. The engine appears capable of passing the heavy duty gasoline engine transient test.

  18. IFT&E Field Test 1 Public Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet on the First Test Results of Interagency Field Test &Evaluation of Wind-Radar Mitigation Technologies PUBLIC RELEASE CARSR Campaign at Tyler, MN Test Period: April 23-May 4, 2012. Report: October 2012 Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release October 31, 2012. Approved for Public Release IFT&E Field Test Report 1: CARSR Purpose of this Fact Sheet: This document includes background information and a summary of the first of three tests on the effectiveness of mature

  19. Type 4 Tank Testing, Certification and Field Performance Data | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Type 4 Tank Testing, Certification and Field Performance Data Type 4 Tank Testing, Certification and Field Performance Data These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_wong.pdf (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Tank Testing R&D CNG and Hydrogen Tank Safety, R&D, and Testing Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs)

  20. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience - What Do They All Mean? (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses the need for a set of tests for modules that would predict their long term-field performance.

  1. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  2. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Lieko Earle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The goal of this project is for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to provide extensive, hands-on technical support to Building America teams in the areas of experiment

  3. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    edition. [Includes glossary] (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary] × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit

  4. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    edition. [Includes glossary] (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary] × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit

  5. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate | Department of Energy Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation devised an experiment to build and instrument unvented test roofs using air-permeable insulation (dense-pack cellulose and fiberglass) in a cold climate (Chicago, Illinois

  6. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  7. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. ); Joshi, S.D. )

    1991-08-05

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  8. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Resor, Brian R.; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  9. Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and...

  10. Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

  11. Sludge formation in engine testing and field service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, R.T.; Copan, W.G.; Kornbrekke, R.E.; Murphy, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship of engine test sludge to field sludge was investigated by a variety of analytical techniques. Engine oil drains and sludges are suspensions of aggregated, resinous particles in oil. The sludges, in particular, contain large particle networks which are readily broken under shear. The resinous phase itself contains highly oxidated fuel fragments, and is enriched in aromatics, acidic species, and additive elements relative to the bulk oil. Field sludge and drain oil samples from the U.S., Europe, and the Far East are shown to be chemically similar to sequence VE engine test sludge and drain oil. Fleet test drain oils from vehicles powered by the Daimler Benz M102E engine are shown to be chemically similar to M102E engine test drain oils.

  12. Gas characterization system 241-AN-105 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AN-105. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  13. Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  14. High performance CLSM field mixing and pumping test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendran, N.; Langton, C.A.

    1997-05-14

    An improved low bleed water CLSM mix was field tested on May 13, 1997 at the Throop portable auger batching plant. Production and pumping tests were very successful. The four cubic yards of material pumped into a ply wood form where it flowed 48 feet (the entire length of the form). The CLSM slurry was very uniform, self leveling, cohesive, showed no segregation, and had no bleed water. Properties of the High Performance CLSM were the same for material collected at the auger and at the end of the pipeline except for the air content which was 5.5% at the auger and 3.2% at the end of the pipeline. This is exactly what was expected and indicates that this CLSM is easy to mix and pump in the Throop/BSRI equipment. CLSM Mix TW-10 is recommended for Tank Closure based on the field batching and pumping tests.

  15. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  16. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications AVTA HEV, NEV, BEV and HICEV Demonstrations and Testing AVTA PHEV Demonstrations and Testing Advanced Vehicle Benchmarking of HEVs and PHEVs

  17. LANL ACTIVITIES IN THE FIELD OF RF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Jason, Andy; Kelley, Patrick J.; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Liu, Jianfei; Schrage, Dale L.; Shapiro, Alan H.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Peterson,, Dean E.

    2003-07-29

    This report briefly summarizes activities, including: tests of elliptical cavities; design and testing of high-power couplers and cryomodules; design, procurement, and tests of 2-gap spoke cavities. It also summarizes critical technology issues.

  18. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  19. A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry ... The standard procedures and test specifications are used to test and collect data from ...

  1. Wind Program Announces $2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces 2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies Wind Program Announces 2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact ...

  2. Mathematical model of testing of pipeline integrity by thermal fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaganova, Nataliia

    2014-11-18

    Thermal fields testing at the ground surface above a pipeline are considered. One method to obtain and investigate an ideal thermal field in different environments is a direct numerical simulation of heat transfer processes taking into account the most important physical factors. In the paper a mathematical model of heat propagation from an underground source is described with accounting of physical factors such as filtration of water in soil and solar radiation. Thermal processes are considered in 3D origin where the heat source is a pipeline with constant temperature and non-uniform isolated shell (with 'damages'). This problem leads to solution of heat diffusivity equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. Approaches to analysis of thermal fields are considered to detect damages.

  3. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders regarding the program’s activities and priorities in MHK environmental monitoring and field testing opportunities.

  4. Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cogeneration Package, 2008 Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active Desiccant Hybrid Rooftop Systems Combined with a Natural Gas Driven Cogeneration ...

  5. Field test comparison of natural gas engine exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bicknell, W.B.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N.; Statler, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    As part of a product improvement program, an extensive spark-ignited, turbocharged, natural gas engine exhaust valve test program was conducted using laboratory and field engines. Program objectives were to identify a valve and seat insert combination that increased mean time between overhauls (MTBO) while reducing the risk of premature valve cracking and failure. Following a thorough design review, a large number of valve and seat insert configurations were tested in a popular 900 RPM, 166 BHP (0.123 Mw) per cylinder industrial gas engine series. Material, head geometry, seat angle and other parameters were compared. Careful in-place measurements and post-test inspections compared various configurations and identified optimal exhaust valving for deployment in new units and upgrades of existing engines.

  6. Pretest Caluculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-07-17

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J {center_dot} m{sup -3} {center_dot} K{sup -1}), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result.

  7. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Above is the video recording for the webinar, "Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction ...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Results | Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). This effort collects performance data from a wide range of light-duty alternative fuel and advanced

  9. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  10. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  11. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

  12. Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A.

    1995-07-31

    A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

  13. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  14. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  15. Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the field testing task, using lysimeter arrays, is to expose samples of solidified resin waste to the actual physical, chemical, and microbiological conditions of disposal enviroment. Wastes used in the experiment include a mixture of synthetic organic ion exchange resins and a mixture of organic exchange resins and an inorganic zeolite. Solidification agents used to produce the 4.8-by 7.6-cm cylindrical waste forms used in the study were Portland Type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene. Seven of these waste forms were stacked end-to-end and inserted into each lysimeter to provide a 1-L volume. There are 10 lysimeters, 5 at ORNL and 5 at ANL-E. Lysimeters used in this study were designed to be self-contained units which will be disposed at the termination of the 20-year study. Each is a 0.91-by 3.12-m right-circular cylinder divided into an upper compartment, which contains fill material, waste forms, and instrumentation, and an empty lower compartment, which collects leachate. Four lysimeters at each site are filled with soil, while a fifth (used as a control) is filled with inert silica oxide sand. Instrumentation within each lysimeter includes porous cup soil-water samplers and soil moisture/temperature probes. The probes are connected to an on-site data acquisition and storage system (DAS) which also collects data from a field meteorological station located at each site. 9 refs.

  16. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  17. Field Lysimeter Test Facility status report IV: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, G.W.; Felmy, D.G.; Ritter, J.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Downs, J.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kirkham, R.R.; Link, S.O.

    1993-10-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, a unique facility, the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is used to measure drainage from and water storage in soil covers. Drainage has ranged from near zero amounts to more than 50% of the applied water, with the amount depending on vegetative cover and soil type. Drainage occurred from lysimeters with coarse soils and gravel covers, but did not occur from capillary barrier-type lysimeters (1.5 m silt loam soil over coarse sands and gravels) except under the most extreme condition tested. For capillary barriers that were irrigated and kept vegetation-free (bare surface), no drainage occurred in 5 of the past 6 years. However, this past year (1992--1993) a record snowfall of 1,425 mm occurred and water storage in the irrigated, bare-surfaced capillary barriers exceeded 500 mm resulting in drainage of more than 30 mm from these barriers. In contrast, capillary barriers, covered with native vegetation (i.e., shrubs and grasses) did not drain under any climatic condition (with or without irrigation). In FY 1994, the FLTF treatments will be increased from 11 to 17 with the addition of materials that will simulate portions of a prototype barrier planned for construction in 1994 at the Hanford Site. The 17 FLTF treatments are designed to test the expected range of surface soil, vegetation, and climatic conditions encountered at the Hanford Site and will assist in evaluating final surface barrier designs for a waste disposal facility.

  18. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  19. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Johnson, Christian D.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.

    2008-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen) and chromate, and thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier. This report summarizes the initial results from field testing of an in situ biological treatment zone implemented through injection of a soluble substrate. The field test is divided into operational phases that include substrate injection, process monitoring, and performance monitoring. The results summarized herein are for the substrate injection and process monitoring phase encompassing the first approximately three months of field testing. Performance monitoring is ongoing at the time this report was prepared and is planned to extend over approximately 18 months. As such, this report is an interim data summary report for the field test. The treatability testing has multiple objectives focused on evaluating the performance of biostimulation as a reducing barrier for nitrate, oxygen, and chromate. The following conclusions related to these objectives are supported by the data provided in this report. Substrate was successfully distributed to a radius of about 15 m (50 ft) from the injection well. Monitoring data indicate that microbial growth initiated rapidly, and this rapid growth would limit the ability to inject substrate to significantly larger zones from a single injection well. As would be expected, the uniformity of substrate distribution was impacted by subsurface heterogeneity. However, subsequent microbial activity and ability to reduce the targeted species was observed throughout the monitored zone during the process monitoring

  20. Active diffraction gratings: Development and tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonora, S.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L. [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, National Council for Research of Italy, via Trasea, 7, Padova 35131 (Italy); Zanchetta, E.; Della Giustina, G.; Brusatin, G. [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We present the realization and characterization of an active spherical diffraction grating with variable radius of curvature to be used in grazing-incidence monochromators. The device consists of a bimorph deformable mirror on the top of which a diffraction grating with laminar profile is realized by UV lithography. The experimental results show that the active grating can optimize the beam focalization of visible wavelengths through its rotation and focus accommodation.

  1. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  2. NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative: Comparing In-Field Gearbox Response to Different Dynamometer Test Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; van Dam, J.; Wallen, R.; McNiff, B.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the results of NREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative comparison of dynamometer tests conducted on a 750-kW gearbox to field testing.

  3. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007 Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, ...

  5. Field Test Best Practices: A Dynamic Web Tool for Practical Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    o perated b y t he A lliance f or S ustainable E nergy, L LC. Field Test Best Practices ... Difficult to find general guidelines and examples of well-designed field test plans No ...

  6. High-Voltage Broadband-Over-Powerline (HV-BPL) Field Test Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Voltage Broadband-Over-Powerline (HV-BPL) Field Test Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: High-Voltage Broadband-Over-Powerline (HV-BPL) Field Test...

  7. Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar May 1, 2012 - 2:56pm Addthis The Department of Energy and federal agency partners recently completed the first in a series of three radar technology field tests and demonstrations. The Interagency Field Test and Evaluation of Wind-Radar Mitigation Technologies is an $8 million demonstration initiative co-funded by the Energy Department,

  8. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. raft_river_peer2013.pdf (3.68 MB) More Documents & Publications Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho track 4: enhanced geothermal

  9. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, S.E.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  10. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    : identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  11. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  12. Severe Accident Test Station Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing safety margins in light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents is currently the focus of a number of international R&D programs. The current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system is particularly susceptible since the Zr-based cladding experiences rapid oxidation kinetics in steam at elevated temperatures. Therefore, alternative cladding materials that offer slower oxidation kinetics and a smaller enthalpy of oxidation can significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident. In the U.S. program, the high temperature steam oxidation performance of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding solutions has been evaluated in the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2012. This report summarizes the capabilities of the SATS and provides an overview of the oxidation kinetics of several candidate cladding materials. A suggested baseline for evaluating ATF candidates is a two order of magnitude reduction in the steam oxidation resistance above 1000ºC compared to Zr-based alloys. The ATF candidates are categorized based on the protective external oxide or scale that forms during exposure to steam at high temperature: chromia, alumina, and silica. Comparisons are made to literature and SATS data for Zr-based alloys and other less-protective materials.

  13. Field test and evaluation of the passive neutron coincidence collar for prototype fast reactor fuel subassemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, H.O.; Keddar, A.

    1982-08-01

    The passive neutron Coincidence Collar, which was developed for the verification of plutonium content in fast reactor fuel subassemblies, has been field tested using Prototype Fast Reactor fuel. For passive applications, the system measures the /sup 240/Pu-effective mass from the spontaneous fission rate, and in addition, a self-interrogation technique is used to determine the fissile content in the subassembly. Both the passive and active modes were evaluated at the Windscale Works in the United Kingdom. The results of the tests gave a standard deviation 0.75% for the passive count and 3 to 7% for the active measurement for a 1000-s counting time. The unit will be used in the future for the verification of plutonium in fresh fuel assemblies.

  14. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technique | Department of Energy Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique," held March 12, 2013. Presenters were Shyam S. Kocha, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Yannick Garsany, Naval Research

  15. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 30 ... LABORATORY; PERFORMANCE; PERFORMANCE TESTING; RECOMMENDATIONS; SIMULATION; ...

  16. Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heaters | Department of Energy Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters heat_pump_water_heater_testing.pdf (565.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid

  17. Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

  18. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work

  19. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  20. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA); Woolman, Joseph N. (Davis, CA); Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  1. Steam atmosphere dryer project: System development and field test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the use of a superheated steam atmosphere dryer as a highly improved alternative to conventional hot air-drying systems, the present industrial standard method for drying various wet feedstocks. The development program plan consisted of three major activities. The first was engineering analysis and testing of a small-scale laboratory superheated steam dryer. This dryer provided the basic engineering heat transfer data necessary to design a large-scale system. The second major activity consisted of the design, fabrication, and laboratory checkout testing of the field-site prototype superheated steam dryer system. The third major activity consisted of the installation and testing of the complete 250-lb/hr evaporation rate dryer and a 30-kW cogeneration system in conjunction with an anaerobic digester facility at the Village of Bergen, NY. Feedstock for the digester facility at the Village of Bergen, NY. Feedstock for the digester was waste residue from a nearby commercial food processing plant. The superheated steam dryer system was placed into operation in August 1996 and operated successfully through March 1997. During this period, the dryer processed all the material from the digester to a powdered consistency usable as a high-nitrogen-based fertilizer.

  2. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance to IEC 61400- 12-1 and MEASNET * Mechanical loads to IEC 61400-13 * Power quality to IEC 61400-21 and MEASNET * Duration testing to IEC 61400-2 * Safety and function ...

  3. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    test roofs using air-permeable insulation (dense-pack cellulose and fiberglass) in a cold climate (Chicago, Illinois area, zone 5A) and to analyze the moisture effects over time. ...

  4. Active test of separation facility at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iseki, Tadahiro; Inaba, Makoto; Takahashi, Naoki

    2007-07-01

    During the second and third steps of Active Test at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), the performances of the Separation Facility have been checked; (A) diluent washing efficiency, (B) plutonium stripping efficiency, (C) decontamination factor of fission products and (D) plutonium and uranium leakage into raffinate and spent solvent. Test results were equivalent to or better than expected. (authors)

  5. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database | Department of Energy Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Building America Research Tools: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database March 18, 2015 Lieko Earle, Senior

  6. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Minimization Technologies | Department of Energy and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies October 6, 2014 - 1:33pm Addthis On October 6, EERE's Wind Program announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity entitled "Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities." This funding would help address

  7. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Priority | Department of Energy Classroom Update: Making Clean Energy Upgrades a Back-to-School Priority Solar Classroom Update: Making Clean Energy Upgrades a Back-to-School Priority August 21, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis Watch as Aaron Sebens, a fourth-grade teacher in Durham, North Carolina, gives an update on his student's solar-powered classroom project. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Clean Energy Resources Watch our first

  8. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  9. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  10. Rooftop unit embedded diagnostics: Automated fault detection and diagnostics (AFDD) development, field testing and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Kim, Woohyun; Lutes, Robert G.; Underhill, Ronald M.

    2015-09-30

    This report documents the development, testing and field validation of the integrated AFDD and advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controls using a single controller in buildings.

  11. Design and field test of collaborative tools in the service of an innovative organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Beler, N.; Parfouru, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the design process of collaborative tools, based on ICT, aiming at supporting the tasks of the team that manages an outage of an energy production plant for maintenance activities. The design process follows an iterative and multidisciplinary approach, based on a collective tasks modeling of the outage management team in the light of Socio Organizational and Human (SOH) field studies, and on the state of the art of ICT. Field test of the collaborative tools designed plays a great place in this approach, allowing taking into account the operational world but involves also some risks which must be managed. To implement tools on all the production plants, we build an 'operational concept' with a level of description which authorizes the evolution of tools and allows some local adaptations. The field tests provide lessons on the ICT topics. For examples: the status of the remote access tools, the potential of use of a given information input by an actor for several individual and collective purposes, the actors perception of the tools meaning, and the requirements for supporting the implementation of change. (authors)

  12. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  13. A Test Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Of The Transiel Method On The Travale Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Test Of The Transiel Method On The...

  14. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper

  16. Current status of active tests at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nago, Toshihide; Ishihara, Noriyuki; Ohtou, Yoshihiro

    2007-07-01

    At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), the first commercial reprocessing plant in Japan, the test operation has been carried out step by step with 'water and steam', 'chemical products', 'depleted uranium' and 'spent fuels' toward the planned start of the commercial operation. Water Test was performed as the final stage of plant construction work and functioning of each equipment was tested with water and steam. In Chemical Test the performance of each equipment and unit was verified with chemical products such as nitric acid. In Uranium Test with depleted uranium, function and performance of equipment such as the sharing machine and the dissolver was verified. All its tests were completed by 22 January 2006. Active Test has been performed with spent fuels for the verification of safety functions and performances of equipment and facilities related to the processing of fission products and of plutonium, which had not been tested previously. Active Test which has been in progress since 31 March 2006 is divided into 5 steps, and Step 1, Step 2 and Step 3 are already completed. (authors)

  17. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  18. INTERAGENCY FIELD TEST & EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE – RADAR INTERFERENCE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents include a final report on the Interagency Field Test & Evaluation (IFT&E) program and summaries of three field tests designed to measure the impact of wind turbines on current air surveillance radars and the effectiveness of private sector technologies in mitigating that interference.

  19. Field Testing of Thermoplastic Encapsulants in High-Temperature Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Moseley, John M.; Shah, Qurat A.; Tamizhmani, Govindasamy; Sakurai, Keiichiro; Inoue, Masanao; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi; Samuels, Sam L.; Vanderpan, Crystal E.

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in using thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules, but concerns have been raised about whether these would be mechanically stable at high temperatures in the field. This has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. We constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials, of which only two were formulated to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with thermal insulation on the back side in Mesa, Arizona, in the summer (hot-dry), and an identical module set was exposed in environmental chambers. High-precision creep measurements (±20 μm) and electrical performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials operating in the melt or rubbery state during outdoor deployment, no significant creep was seen because of their high viscosity, lower operating temperature at the edges, and/or the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants with age despite the absence of a crosslinking agent. Only an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant formulated without a peroxide crosslinking agent crept significantly. When the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced creep further and was not detectable even for the EVA without peroxide. Because of the propensity of some polymeric materials to crosslink as they age, typical thermoplastic encapsulants would be unlikely to result in creep in the vast majority of installations.

  20. Field Testing of Thermoplastic Encapsulants in High-Temperature Installations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Moseley, John M.; Shah, Qurat A.; Tamizhmani, Govindasamy; Sakurai, Keiichiro; Inoue, Masanao; Doi, Takuya; et al

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in using thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules, but concerns have been raised about whether these would be mechanically stable at high temperatures in the field. This has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. We constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials, of which only two were formulated to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with thermal insulation on the back side in Mesa, Arizona, in the summer (hot-dry), and an identicalmore » module set was exposed in environmental chambers. High-precision creep measurements (±20 μm) and electrical performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials operating in the melt or rubbery state during outdoor deployment, no significant creep was seen because of their high viscosity, lower operating temperature at the edges, and/or the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants with age despite the absence of a crosslinking agent. Only an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulant formulated without a peroxide crosslinking agent crept significantly. When the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced creep further and was not detectable even for the EVA without peroxide. Because of the propensity of some polymeric materials to crosslink as they age, typical thermoplastic encapsulants would be unlikely to result in creep in the vast majority of installations.« less

  1. Testing a Stakeholder Participation Framework for Fielding Bioremediation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anex, Robert P.; Focht, Will

    2004-03-17

    This research is investigating stakeholder attitudes about the use of bioremediation technologies with the objective of reducing conflict among stakeholders. The research protocol includes four closely related components. First, we are testing a framework for stakeholder participation that prescribes appropriate stakeholder involvement strategies based on stakeholders trust of the other parties involved in technology deployment decision-making. Second, we are assessing conflict among stakeholders regarding the acceptability of in situ bioremediation as a means to reduce risks posed by radionuclides and metals in the environment. Third, we are assessing the role that awareness of risk exposure plays in the willingness of stakeholders to engage in problem-solving and making risk tradeoffs. Fourth, we are assessing the potential of using the results of these first three components to forge consensus among stakeholders regarding the use and oversight of bioremediation technologies and stakeholder involvement in the decision process. This poster presents preliminary results of a Q methodological survey of stakeholders who are familiar with radionuclide and heavy metal contamination and DOE efforts to remediate that contamination at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Hanford reservations. The Q study allows the research team to diagnose conflict among stakeholders and discover opportunities for consensus.

  2. Field test of platinized titanium anodes for hypochlorite cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaki, T.; Kamegaya, Y.; Takayasu, K.

    1985-08-01

    The demand for chlorine for water and waste treatment is increasing because of the increase of water consumption, a large amount of waste water discharge, and governmental regulations. Transportation and handling of chlorine cylinders and containers are strictly controlled to avoid hazard. As a result, on-site electrolytic production of hypochlorite becomes important for disinfection of drinking water, oxidation of sewage, chlorination of cooling water in process plants, and other uses. There are now a number of publications and patents on hypochlorite cells and the electrodes to be used. A hypochlorite cell must be simple in operation with minimum maintenance for a year or more. The energy consumption is also an important factor. In an electric power station located by the sea, saline water containing some 3% NaCl is fed to the hypochlorite cell and is chlorinated prior to being sent to the heat exchangers in the plant. Because of the low salt concentration, oxygen evolution occurs, and this reduces chlorine current efficiency. Also, sea water contains Mg and Ca ions, which deposit at the cathode, resulting in high cell voltage. Periodic acid cleaning removes the scale, but affects the electrodes, especially the anode coating, and in some cases the electrode activity is not restored. Pretreatment of sea water prior to electrolysis is preferable, but it is expensive and complicated. Therefore, durable anodes having such characteristics as low chlorine overvoltage and high oxygen overvoltage in sea water must be developed to improve the operating performance of hypochlorite cells.

  3. Active Test of Purification Facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iseki, Tadahiro; Tsujimura, Akino; Nitta, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    During the second and third steps of Active Test of the Plutonium Purification unit, the extraction and reextraction performances of pulsed columns and mixer-settlers have been checked. Plutonium losses into wastes have been also checked. As a result, it was confirmed that the expected performances had been achieved. (authors)

  4. Field testing of a high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.; Hoyer, M.C.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) System has been operated as a field test facility for the past six years. Four short-term and two long-term cycles have been completed to data providing a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. A third long-term cycle is currently being planned to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact on the aquifer from heated waste storage cycles. The most critical activities in the preparation for the next cycle have proved to be the applications for the various permits and variances necessary to conduct the third cycle and the matching of the characteristics of the ATES system during heat recovery with a suitable adjacent building thermal load.

  5. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  6. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  7. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2004-10-01

    PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its

  8. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Gehre, D.; Kleizer, G.; Raj, P.; Rovni, I.; Ruecker, Tom

    2014-08-21

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  9. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Field Scale Test and Verification of a PureComfort® 240M Combined Heat and Power System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco

  10. DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy has demonstrated that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented.

  11. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing

  12. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blough, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  13. Engineering test plan for field radionuclide migration experiments in climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Stone, R.; Lord, D.; Rector, N.; Failor, R.

    1982-05-01

    This Engineering Test Plan (ETP) describes field studies of radionuclide migration in fractured rock designed for the Climax grainite at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the ETP is to provide a detailed written document of the method of accomplishing these studies. The ETP contains the experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan, system schematics, a description of the test facility, and a brief outline of the laboratory support studies needed to understand the chemistry of the rock/water/radionuclide interactions. Results of our initial hydrologic investigations are presented along with pretest predictions based on the hydrologic test results.

  14. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  15. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A.

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  16. Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, J.B.

    1983-07-01

    A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

  17. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  18. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  19. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  20. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management

  1. Field test and evaluation of the IAEA coincidence collar for the measurement of unirradiated BWR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, H.O.; Keddar, A.

    1982-12-01

    The neutron coincidence counter has been field tested and evaluated for the measurement of boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies at the ASEA-ATOM Fuel Fabrication Facility. The system measures the /sup 235/U content per unit length of full fuel assemblies using neutron interrogation and coincidence counting. The /sup 238/U content is measured in the passive mode without the AmLi neutron interrogatioin source. The field tests included both standard production movable fuel rods to investigate enrichment and absorber variations. Results gave a response standard deviation of 0.9% for the active case and 2.1% for the passive case in 1000-s measurement times. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  2. A new test statistic for climate models that includes field and spatial dependencies using Gaussian Markov random fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nosedal-Sanchez, Alvaro; Jackson, Charles S.; Huerta, Gabriel

    2016-07-20

    A new test statistic for climate model evaluation has been developed that potentially mitigates some of the limitations that exist for observing and representing field and space dependencies of climate phenomena. Traditionally such dependencies have been ignored when climate models have been evaluated against observational data, which makes it difficult to assess whether any given model is simulating observed climate for the right reasons. The new statistic uses Gaussian Markov random fields for estimating field and space dependencies within a first-order grid point neighborhood structure. We illustrate the ability of Gaussian Markov random fields to represent empirical estimates of fieldmore » and space covariances using "witch hat" graphs. We further use the new statistic to evaluate the tropical response of a climate model (CAM3.1) to changes in two parameters important to its representation of cloud and precipitation physics. Overall, the inclusion of dependency information did not alter significantly the recognition of those regions of parameter space that best approximated observations. However, there were some qualitative differences in the shape of the response surface that suggest how such a measure could affect estimates of model uncertainty.« less

  3. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  4. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  5. Field kit and method for testing for the presence of gunshot residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodacy, Philip J.; Walker, Pamela K.

    2003-09-02

    A field test kit for gunshot residue comprises a container having at least compartments separated by a barrier. A surface is tested by wiping it with a swab and placing the swab in a first compartment. The barrier is then breached, permitting reagent in the second compartment to flow onto the swab. The first compartment is transparent, and a color change will be observed if the reagent reacts with gunshot residue.

  6. High Field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of ...

  7. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  8. Ultrathin Palladium Membranes Prepared by a Novel Electric Field Assisted Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Samhun; Ko, Joon Ho; Oyama, S. Ted

    2011-03-01

    Ultra-thin Pd composite membranes with a thickness of 1 ?m were prepared by a novel electric-field assisted activation technique followed by electroless deposition of Pd on a hollow-fiber ?-alumina support. The novel activation method places Pd precursors and a reducing agent on opposite sides of a porous substrate and uses an electric field to cause migration of Pd ions to the outer surface where they are reduced to form seeds in high density in a narrow spatial region. The resulting membranes showed a high hydrogen permeance in the range of 4.05.0 10{sup ?6} mol m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} Pa{sup ?1} and stable H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 30009000 during stability tests for 150 h at 733 K with H{sub 2} flow. The formation of the thin, defect-less and robust Pd layer can be ascribed to the evenly distributed Pd seeds on the support layer and the enhanced bonding between the Pd layer and the support layer resulting from the strong anchoring of the Pd seeds onto the support in the new activation step.

  9. Wind Turbine Blade Flow Fields and Prospects for Active Aerodynamic Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that can cause adverse aerodynamic loading and can impact active aerodynamic control methodologies currently contemplated for wind turbine applications.

  10. Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    waves from microearthquake data Abstract Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems...

  11. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition ...

  12. Active and passive acoustic imaging inside a large-scale polyaxial hydraulic fracture test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, S.D.; Dudley, J.W. II; Shlyapobersky, J.

    1999-07-01

    An automated laboratory hydraulic fracture experiment has been assembled to determine what rock and treatment parameters are crucial to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of field hydraulic fractures. To this end a large (460 mm cubic sample) polyaxial cell, with servo-controlled X,Y,Z, pore pressure, crack-mouth-opening-displacement, and bottom hole pressure, was built. Active imaging with embedded seismic diffraction arrays images the geometry of the fracture. Preliminary tests indicate fracture extent can be imaged to within 5%. Unique embeddible high-fidelity particle velocity AE sensors were designed and calibrated to allow determination of fracture source kinematics.

  13. Development and testing of a mixed neutron-photon-beta field thermoluminescent dosimeter for personnel monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zummo, J.J.; Liu, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    A new four element Lithium Fluoride (LiF) badge and analysis algorithm have been developed and tested to better characterize personnel exposure in mixed radiation fields. The new badge is based on a commercially available chip card with three {sup 7}LiF elements and one {sup 6}LiF element. The badge holder is also based on a commercially available design, with modified filtration elements. The new algorithm takes advantage of the high temperature peak characteristics of the {sup 6}LiF element to better quantify neutron dose. The prototype badge was tested by using various mixtures of two fields typically used for dosimeter performance testing, as well as mixtures of three fields to better simulate actual operating conditions. The badge gave superior performance, based on the tolerance levels, when using the new algorithm as compared to an algorithm that did not use the high temperature peak methodology. The badge and algorithm are limited in that the approximate energy spectra of the neutron and beta field components must be characterized in advance.

  14. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  15. Development and field testing of a rapid and ultra-stable atmospheric carbon dioxide spectrometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wehr, R. A.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2014-12-15

    We present field test results for a new spectroscopic instrument to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision (0.02 μmol mol-1, or ppm at 1 Hz) and demonstrate high stability (within 0.1 ppm over more than 8 months), without the need for hourly, daily, or even monthly calibration against high-pressure gas cylinders. The technical novelty of this instrument (ABsolute Carbon dioxide, ABC) is the spectral null method using an internal quartz reference cell with known CO2 column density. Compared to a previously described prototype, the field instrument has better stability and benefits from more precise thermal control of themore » optics and more accurate pressure measurements in the sample cell (at the mTorr level). The instrument has been deployed at a long-term ecological research site (the Harvard Forest, USA), where it has measured for 8 months without on-site calibration and with minimal maintenance, showing drift bounds of less than 0.1 ppm. Field measurements agree well with those of a commercially available cavity ring-down CO2 instrument (Picarro G2301) run with a standard calibration protocol. This field test demonstrates that ABC is capable of performing high-accuracy, unattended, continuous field measurements with minimal use of reference gas cylinders.« less

  16. Development and field testing of a rapid and ultra-stable atmospheric carbon dioxide spectrometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiang, B.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wehr, R.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2014-08-05

    We present field test results for a new spectroscopic instrument to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with high precision (0.02 ppm at 1 Hz) and demonstrate high stability (within 0.1 ppm over more than 8 months), without the need for hourly, daily, or even monthly calibration against high-pressure gas cylinders. The technical novelty of this instrument (ABsolute Carbon dioxide, ABC) is the spectral null method using an internal quartz reference cell with known CO2 column density. Compared to a previously described prototype, the field instrument has better stability and benefits from more precise thermal control of the optics and moremore » accurate pressure measurements in the sample cell (at the mTorr level). The instrument has been deployed at a long-term ecological research site (the Harvard Forest, USA), where it has measured for eight months without on-site calibration and with minimal maintenance, showing drift bounds of less than 0.1 ppm. Field measurements agree well with those of another commercially available cavity ring-down CO2 instrument (Picarro G2301) run with a standard calibration protocol. This field test demonstrates that ABC is capable of performing high-accuracy, unattended, continuous field measurements with minimal use of calibration cylinders.« less

  17. Support to DHS Chemical Detection Field Testing and Countermeasures Studies: Report to Sponsors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, Michael; Black, Douglas; Delp, William

    2011-09-01

    This document reports on work that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performed to support the Department of Homeland Security's testing of ARFCAM and LACIS systems. In the sections that follow, LBNL lists the scope of work, field analyses conducted, and preliminary results. LBNL developed a model of the Port Gaston building at the Nevada Test Site and calibrated it using data from field experiments, both blower door and tracer gas tests. Model development and comparison to data show very good agreement. The model was developed to (1) support the interpretation of data from field trials performed by Signature Science LLC, (2) support the placement of sampler equipment, and (3) predict if meteorological differences between the Wet-Run/Dry-Run and the Hot-Run might adversely affect the development of the Hot Run Test Plan. LBNL reported its findings on each task to the experiment team at scheduled planning meetings. In the end, we note that the model was used limitedly because the data from the Wet-Run/Dry Run were if such high quality. Lastly, LBNL conducted a research experiment at the end of the Wet-Run/Dry-Run to study if, and to what degree, specific TICs sorb and desorb on indoor surfaces. We found that several of the TICs either sorb onto surfaces or are lost through chemical reactions. These findings may have important implications on determining sheltering-in-place concepts of operation.

  18. Field Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred

    2015-12-21

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP) aimed at developing Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage. The technology field-tested in this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), which utilizes a biologically-based process to precipitate calcium carbonate. If properly controlled MICP can successfully seal fractures, high permeability zones, and compromised wellbore cement in the vicinity of wellbores and in nearby caprock, thereby improving the storage security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide. This report describes an MICP sealing field test performed on a 24.4 cm (9.625 inch) diameter well located on the Gorgas Steam Generation facility near Jasper, Alabama. The research was aimed at (1) developing methods for delivering MICP promoting fluids downhole using conventional oil field technologies and (2) assessing the ability of MICP to seal cement and formation fractures in the near wellbore region in a sandstone formation. Both objectives were accomplished successfully during a field test performed during the period April 1-11, 2014. The test resulted in complete biomineralization sealing of a horizontal fracture located 340.7 m (1118 feet) below ground surface. A total of 24 calcium injections and six microbial inoculation injections were required over a three day period in order to achieve complete sealing. The fractured region was considered completely sealed when it was no longer possible to inject fluids into the formation without exceeding the initial formation fracture pressure. The test was accomplished using conventional oil field technology including an 11.4 L (3.0 gallon) wireline dump bailer for injecting the biomineralization materials downhole. Metrics indicating successful MICP sealing included reduced injectivity during seal formation, reduction in pressure falloff, and

  19. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-09-01

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  20. Field Testing and Demonstration of the Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System (SMDS) for Packaged Air-Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Brambley, Michael R.; Huang, Yunzhi; Lutes, Robert G.; Gilbride, Spencer P.

    2015-05-29

    This documents results of a project focused on testing and demonstrating both the hardware and software versions of the smart monitoring and diagnostic system (SMDS) under field conditions.

  1. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 Peer Review Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Principal Investigators: J. Moore and J. McLennan Organization: University of Utah Track Name: EGS Demonstration Projects Project Officer: W. Vandermeer Total Project Funding: $10,214,987 April 22, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research 1. Develop and demonstrate

  2. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho, for the Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects and Low Temperature Exploration and Demonstrations Project Track. Objective to Develop and demonstrate the techniques required to form and sustain EGS reservoirs including combined thermal and hydraulic stimulation and numerical modeling and Improve the performance and output of the Raft

  3. Field pilot tests for tertiary recovery using butane and propane injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, E.F.; Garcia, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    This work describes a pilot project for tertiary recovery of liquid hydrocarbons through LPG injection in water-out sections of the Bolivar reservoir in La Pena Field, Santa Cruz, Boliva. The promising results obtained in the initial field miscibility tests, as well as the results from a mathematical model built to stimulate and evaluate the tertiary recovery project, directed subsequent work into a cyclic scheme for enhanced recovery. This scheme is explained and injection production data is presented. Field facilities built to handle both the injected LPG and the produced oil-LPG mixture are described. The oil/LPG ratio and the LPG recovered/injected fraction are the main factors measured in this to make further considerations for a full scale project.

  4. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  5. LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

    2014-04-03

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although

  6. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Kim, Juhan E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter ? {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without bias. Our method is complementary to the baryon acoustic oscillation or topology methods as it depends on D{sub AH} , the product of the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter.

  7. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  8. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved

  9. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  10. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  11. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  12. Recent Test Results of the High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-19

    The 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, represents a step towards the development of block-type accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The magnet design features two coil modules composed of two layers wound around a titanium-alloy pole. The layer 1 pole includes a round cutout to provide room for a bore tube with a clear aperture of 36 mm. After a first series of tests where HD2 reached a maximum bore field of 13.8 T, corresponding to an estimated peak field on the conductor of 14.5 T, the magnet was disassembled and reloaded without the bore tube and with a clear aperture increased to 43 mm. We describe in this paper the magnet training observed in two consecutive tests after the removal of the bore tube, with a comparison of the quench performance with respect to the previous tests. An analysis of the voltage signals recorded before and after training quenches is then presented and discussed, and the results of coil visual inspections reported.

  13. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rotating Disk-Electrode Aqueous Electrolyte Accelerated Stress Tests for PGM ElectrocatalystSupport Durability Evaluation Performance Measurement of MEAs Catalysis Working Group ...

  14. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test

  15. In situ destruction of contaminants via hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation. Visalia Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, Robin L.; Aines, Roger D.; Knauss, Kevin; Leif, Roald; Chiarappa, Marina; Hudson, Bryant; Carrigan, Charles; Tompson, Andy; Richards, Jim; Eaker, Craig; Weidner, Randall; Sciarotta, Terry

    1998-12-01

    A field test of hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) was conducted during the summer of 1997, during a commercial application of thermal remediation (Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS)) at the Visalia Pole Yard (a super-fund site) in southern California. At Visalia, Southern California Edison Co. is applying the DUS thermal remediation method to clean up a large (4.3 acre) site contaminated with pole-treating compounds. This is a full-scale cleanup, during which initial extraction of contaminants is augmented by combined steam/air injection in order to enhance the destruction of residual contaminants by HPO. Laboratory results indicate that the contaminants at Visaha react at similar rates to TCE, which has been the focus of extensive laboratory work (Knauss et al., 1998a-c). Field experimental results from this application yield valuable information (1) confirming the destruction of contaminants in soil and groundwater by HPO, (2) validating the predictive models used to design HP0 steam injection systems, (3) demonstrating that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells and (4) obtaining a reasonable prediction of the cost and effectiveness of HPO, working at a commercial scale and with commercial partners. The goal of our additional study and demonstration in conjunction with Edison has been to obtain early proof of hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation in the field, and validate our predictive models and monitoring strategies. This demonstration provides valuable economic and practicability data obtained on a commercial scale, with more detailed field validation than is commonly available on a commercially-conducted cleanup. The results of LLNL' s field experiments constrain the destruction rates throughout the site, and enable site management to make accurate estimates of total in situ destruction based on the recovered carbon. As of October, 1998, over 900,000 lb of contaminant have been removed from the

  16. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  17. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Benchmark Testing of the Chevrolet Volt Onboard Charger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Carlson

    2012-04-01

    This is a report for public consumption, for the AVTA website, detailing the testing and analysis of the benchmark testing conducted on the Chevrolet Volt on-board charger.

  18. An integrated approach to monitoring a field test of in situ contaminant destruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Carrigan, C; Chiarappa, M; Eaker, C; Elsholtz, A; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; Newmark, R L

    1998-12-01

    The development of in situ thermal remediation techniques requires parallel development of techniques capable of monitoring the physical and chemical changes for purposes of process control. Recent research indicates that many common contaminants can be destroyed in situ by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO), eliminating the need for costly surface treatment and disposal. Steam injection, combined with supplemental air, can create the conditions in which HP0 occurs. Field testing of this process, conducted in the summer of 1997, indicates rapid destruction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previous work established a suite of underground geophysical imaging techniques capable of providing sufficient knowledge of the physical changes in the subsurface during thermal treatment at sufficient frequencies to be used to monitor and guide the heating and extraction processes. In this field test, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) and temperature measurements provided the primary information regarding the temporal and spatial distribution of the heated zones. Verifying the in situ chemical destruction posed new challenges. We developed field methods for sampling and analyzing hot water for contaminants, oxygen, intermediates and products of reaction. Since the addition of air or oxygen to the contaminated region is a critical aspect of HPO, noble gas tracers were used to identify fluids from different sources. The combination of physical monitoring with noble gas identification of the native and injected fluids and accurate fluid sampling resulted in an excellent temporal and spatial evaluation of the subsurface processes, from which the amount of in situ destruction occurring in the treated region could be quantified. The experimental field results constrain the destruction rates throughout the site, and enable site management to make accurate estimates of total in situ destruction based on the recovered carbon. As of October, 1998, over 400,000 kg (900

  19. Field Test of High Temperature Corrosion Sensors in a Waste to Energy Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthes, S.A.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Williamson, K.M.

    2008-03-16

    A field trial of electrochemical corrosion rate sensors was conducted over a five month period to monitor fireside corrosion in a waste to energy (WTE) plant. The unique 3-electrode air-cooled corrosion sensors, each including a thermocouple to monitor sensor temperature, were installed in four different ports at approximately the same level of the WTE boiler. A total of twelve sensors were tested, six with electrodes using the carbon steel boiler tube material, and six using the nickel-chromium weld overlay alloy for the electrodes. Corrosion rates and temperatures of the sensors were monitored continuously through the trial. Measurements of sensor thickness loss were used to calibrate the electrochemical corrosion rates. Air cooling of the sensors was found to be necessary in order to bring the sensors to the temperature of the boiler tubes, to better match the corrosion rate of the tubes, and to increase survivability of the sensors and thermocouples. Varying the temperature of the sensors simulated corrosion rates of boiler tubes with steam temperatures above and below that in the actual WTE plant. Temperatures of two of the sensors were successfully held at various controlled temperatures close to the steam temperature for a three hour test period. Corrosion rates of the two materials tested were similar although of different magnitude. An expression relating the corrosion rate of the boiler tube material to the corrosion rate of weld overlay was determined for a 7 day period in the middle of the field trial. Results from the field trial suggest that corrosion rate sensors controlled to the outer waterwall temperature can successfully monitor fireside corrosion in WTE plants and be used as a process control variable by plant operators.

  20. Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

    2004-05-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

  1. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  2. Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy 16_cunningham_2012_o.pdf (1.72 MB) More Documents & Publications Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity

  3. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  4. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicable in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.

  5. Field testing of linear individual pitch control on the two-bladed controls advanced research turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Solingen, Edwin; Fleming, Paul A.; Scholbrock, Andrew; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2015-04-17

    This paper presents the results of field tests using linear individual pitch control (LIPC) on the two-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine 2 (CART2) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). LIPC has recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional individual pitch control (IPC) strategy for two-bladed wind turbines. The main advantage of LIPC over conventional IPC is that it requires, at most, only two feedback loops to potentially reduce the periodic blade loads. In previous work, LIPC was designed to implement blade pitch angles at a fixed frequency (e.g., the once-per-revolution (1P) frequency), which made it only applicablemore » in above-rated wind turbine operating conditions. In this study, LIPC is extended to below-rated operating conditions by gain scheduling the controller on the rotor speed. With this extension, LIPC and conventional IPC are successfully applied to the NREL CART2 wind turbine. Lastly, the field-test results obtained during the measurement campaign indicate that LIPC significantly reduces the wind turbine loads for both below-rated and above-rated operation.« less

  6. Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

    2012-01-01

    A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 μm ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

  7. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  8. Design and preliminary test results of the 40 MW power supply at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boenig, H.J.; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C.; Ferner, J.A.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Rumrill, R.H.; Rumrill, R.S.

    1993-11-01

    Four highly stabilized, steady-state, 10 MW power supplies have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL. Each supply consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors and freewheeling diodes, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply is 17 kA and each supply has a one hour overload capability of 20 kA. The power supply output bus system, including a reversing switch at the input and 2 {times} 16 disconnect switches at the output, connects each supply to 16 different magnet cells. The design of the power supply is described and preliminary test results with a supply feeding a 10 MW resistive load are presented.

  9. Combined cosmological tests of a bivalent tachyonic dark energy scalar field model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á. E-mail: gergely@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2014-11-01

    A recently investigated tachyonic scalar field dark energy dominated universe exhibits a bivalent future: depending on initial parameters can run either into a de Sitter exponential expansion or into a traversable future soft singularity followed by a contraction phase. We also include in the model (i) a tiny amount of radiation, (ii) baryonic matter (Ω{sub b}h{sup 2} = 0.022161, where the Hubble constant is fixed as h = 0.706) and (iii) cold dark matter (CDM). Out of a variety of six types of evolutions arising in a more subtle classification, we identify two in which in the past the scalar field effectively degenerates into a dust (its pressure drops to an insignificantly low negative value). These are the evolutions of type IIb converging to de Sitter and type III hitting the future soft singularity. We confront these background evolutions with various cosmological tests, including the supernova type Ia Union 2.1 data, baryon acoustic oscillation distance ratios, Hubble parameter-redshift relation and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) acoustic scale. We determine a subset of the evolutions of both types which at 1σ confidence level are consistent with all of these cosmological tests. At perturbative level we derive the CMB temperature power spectrum to find the best agreement with the Planck data for Ω{sub CDM} = 0.22. The fit is as good as for the ΛCDM model at high multipoles, but the power remains slightly overestimated at low multipoles, for both types of evolutions. The rest of the CDM is effectively generated by the tachyonic field, which in this sense acts as a combined dark energy and dark matter model.

  10. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique, originally presented on March 12, 2013.

  11. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02

    local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short

  13. DTE Energy Technologies With Detroit Edison Co. and Kinectrics Inc.: Distributed Resources Aggregation Modeling and Field Configuration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Summarizes the work of DTE Energy Technologies, Detroit Edison, and Kinectrics, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop distributed resources aggregation modeling and field configuration testing.

  14. Further evaluation of the CSNI separate effect test activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Auria, F.; Aksan, S.N.; Glaeser, H.

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed Separate Effect Test (SET) Validation Matrix for the thermalhydraulic system codes has been established by a subgroup of the Task Group on Thermalhydraulic System Behaviour as requested by OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behavior. The construction of such matrix constituted an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data to select for code validation. As a final result, 67 phenomena have been identified and characterized, roughly 200 facilities have been considered and more than 1000 experiments have been selected as useful for the validation of the codes. The objective of the present paper is to provide additional evaluation of the obtained data base and to supply an a-posteriori judgement in relation to (a) the data base adequacy, (b) the phenomenon, and (c) the need for additional experiments. This has been provided independently by each of the authors. The main conclusions are that large amount of data are available for certain popular phenomena e.g. heat transfer, but data are severely lacking in more esoteric areas e.g. for characterizing phenomena such as parallel channel instability and boron mixing and transport.

  15. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M.

    2010-08-20

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

  17. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smart, John

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  18. An overview of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project field test program for evaluating seal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a participant in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, is responsible for implementing the repository sealing program. One aspect of this program is the definition and fielding of tests related to sealing components which comprise the sealing subsystem. The sealing components are identified in the Site Characterization Plan (U.S. DOE, 1988) and Fernandez et al. (1987). These include an anchor-to-bedrock plug, single dams (or single bulkheads with not settlement), general shaft fill, drift backfill, station and shaft plugs, double bulkheads, backfilled sumps, and channels in a backfilled room. The materials used to create these components are cementitious and earthen. Earthen materials will be used for as many applications as possible to minimize potential degradation of physical properties and potential adverse effects on ground-water chemistry in the repository environment. In places where low strength is acceptable, earthen materials may be used. The most likely application for cementitious materials is where high strength and low deformability may be required. (Hinkebein and Fernandez, 1989). The basis for performing seal component testing is divided into two parts: regulatory requirements and technical requirements. The regulatory requirements are derived primarily from Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (10 CFR 60) (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1986). The technical requirements are defined by the uncertainties associated with seal performance and seal emplacement. Both categories of requirements are discussed below.

  19. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  20. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: Semivost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final project report, August 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    The candidate methods for semivolatile organic compounds are SW-846 Sampling Method 0010 and Analytical Method 8270, which are applicable to stationary sources. Two field tests were conducted using quadruple sampling trains with dynamic spiking were performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. The first field test was performed at a site with low levels of moisture. The second test reported here was conducted at a chemical manufacturing facility where chemical wastes were burned in a coal-fired boiler. Poor recoveries obtained for the spiked analytes at the second test were attributed to wet sorbent from the sampling train, use of methanol to effect complete transfer of wet sorbent from the sampling module, and use of extraction techniques which did not effect a complete separation of methylene chloride from methanol. A procedure to address problems with preparation of samples from Method 0010 is included in the report.

  1. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  2. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field ...

  3. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2003-05-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic

  4. Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James O'Brien

    2012-09-01

    This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during JanuaryAugust 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

  5. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  6. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  7. Results of Active Test of Uranium-Plutonium Co-denitration Facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Numao, Teruhiko; Nakayashiki, Hiroshi; Arai, Nobuyuki; Miura, Susumu; Takahashi, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tanaka, Izumi

    2007-07-01

    In the U-Pu co-denitration facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), Active Test which composes of 5 steps was performed by using uranium-plutonium nitrate solution that was extracted from spent fuels. During Active Test, two kinds of tests were performed in parallel. One was denitration performance test in denitration ovens, and expected results were successfully obtained. The other was validation and calibration of non-destructive assay (NDA) systems, and expected performances were obtained and their effectiveness as material accountancy and safeguards system was validated. (authors)

  8. Field lysimeter investigations - test results. Low-level waste data base development program: Test results for fiscal years 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Findlay, M.W.; Davis, E.C.; Jastrow, J.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the first 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  9. Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

  10. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  11. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  12. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Date: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Innovation for Our Energy Future Shyam S. Kocha: NREL Yannick Garsany: EXCET/NRL Deborah Myers: ANL https://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/webinars.html Outline 1) Background 2) Experimental Aspects of RDE Testing 3) Basic Measurement Technique & Analysis 4) Parameters Affecting RDE Activity Measurements 1) Impact of Film Deposition & Drying Techniques 2) Impact

  13. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  14. Validation testing a contaminant transport and natural attenuation simulation model using field data. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flier, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    This research extends the work begun by Enyeart (1994) which evaluated the process of intrinsic bioremediation, and which developed a model for predicting the velocity of an aerobic degradation front, as it traverses the length of a JP-4 contaminant plume. In the present work, Enyeart`s model was validity tested by comparing its output prediction with field measured values. A methodology was developed to compare the model output with field measured data. The results were analyzed, and the results of this first stage of validity testing show a reasonable basis for accepting the model.

  15. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Farnham, Irene

    2015-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1D, Change 1, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2013a); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). If a participant’s requirement document differs from this QAP, the stricter requirement will take precedence. NNSA/NFO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  16. 16th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference. CDIF - activation completion and initial MHD test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staats, G.E.; DeJong, V.J.; Karvinen, R.J.; Carrington, R.A.; Bauman, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) is one of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) experimental test facilities. The scope of this paper is limited to a brief description of the facility activation and results from the initial MHD testing using an oil fired ash injected combustor (AIC) and a supersonic channel. 1 ref.

  17. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin; Juneau, Stephanie; McLean, Ian S.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor

    2013-01-20

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  18. Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-10-30

    The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

  19. Field air injection tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization at Yucca Mountain, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at ...

  20. Field Test and Evaluation Report Five Photovoltaic Power Systems for the City of Tucson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Members of the DOE solar energy Tiger Team tested five municipally owned, grid connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems for the City of Tucson on March 26 and 27, 2008. The five PV systems tested were Southeast Service Center, Clements Fitness Center, and Thonydale water treatment plant systems 1, 2, and 3. During all tests, skies were virtually cloudless with only occasional, high cirrus present, and none during array testing.

  1. Testing quantum superpositions of the gravitational field with Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner, Netanel H.; Peres, Asher

    2005-02-01

    We consider the gravity field of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a quantum superposition. The gravity field then is also in a quantum superposition, which is in principle observable. Hence we have 'quantum gravity' far away from the so-called Planck scale.

  2. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William; Basso, Thomas; Coddington, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  3. US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Chamorro, Leonardo; Hill, Craig; Gunawan, Budi; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

  4. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have been shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The impact

  5. Energy Department selects Battelle team for a deep borehole field test in North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected a Battelle Memorial Institute-led team to drill a test borehole of over 16,000 feet into a crystalline basement rock formation near Rugby, North Dakota.

  6. Air-injection field tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, air-injection ...

  7. 9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  8. Deep in Data. Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes progress toward developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite using home energy consumption and building description data. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This could allow for modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data.

  9. Boost of plasma current with active magnetic field shaping coils in rotamak discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xiaokang; Goss, Jermain; Kalaria, Dhara; Huang, Tian Sen

    2011-08-15

    A set of magnetic shaping coils is installed on the Prairie View (PV) rotamak for the study of active plasma shape control in the regimes with and without toroidal field (TF). In the spherical tokamak regime (with TF), plasma current I{sub p} can be boosted by 200% when all five shaping coils (connected in series) are energized. The enhancement of current drive efficiency is mainly attributed to the radial compression and the substantially axial extension of the plasma column; this in turn improves the impedance matching and thus increases antenna input power. In the field-reversed configuration (without TF), plasma current can be boosted by 100% when one middle coil is used; the appearance of radial shift mode limits the achievable value of I{sub p}. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the plasma shape control plays a role in effectively driving plasma current in rotamaks.

  10. Performance of a solar heating system on the LSU field house determined from test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, D.; Whitehouse, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Performance data was collected and analyzed for a solar heating system installed on the Field House at Louisiana State University. The solar system performed as expected for periods that it operated. Problems encountered are discussed. Efficiency of flat-plate collectors used was determined. 2 refs.

  11. Results from field tests of the one-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-09-01

    A series of field experiments were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the one dimensional time encoded imaging system. The significant detection of a Cf252 fission radiation source was demonstrated at a stand-off of 100 meters. Extrapolations to different quantities of plutonium equivalent at different distances are made. Hardware modifications to the system for follow on work are suggested.

  12. Black-start and restoration of a part of the Italian HV network: Modelling and simulation of a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfino, B.; Denegri, G.B.; Invernizzi, M.; Morini, A.; Bonini, E.C.; Marconato, R.; Scarpellini, P.

    1996-08-01

    ENEL (Italian Electricity Board) planned a set of operator guidelines for the restoration of parts of the national grid starting from selected hydro power plants and progressively reaching thermal units. In order to improve system restoration reliability, ENEL periodically executes field tests taking advantage of the maintenance outages of the thermal groups. The paper concerns with modelling and simulation of an experimental test performed on the Italian HV network near the French border. The study makes use of a stability code provided with user defined model facilities, enabling an accurate description of loads and regulation equipment during the restoration process.

  13. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  14. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2005-03-01

    This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.

  15. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_depetrillo.pdf (184.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Sub-50 HP Engines with Low Exhaust Temperature

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a

  17. Characteristics of enriched cultures for bio-huff-`n`-puff tests at Jilin oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiu-Yuan Wang; Gang Dai; Yan-Fen Xue; Shu-Hua Xie

    1995-12-31

    Three enriched cultures (48, 15a, and 26a), selected from more than 80 soil and water samples, could grow anaerobically in the presence of crude oil at 30{degrees}C and could ferment molasses to gases and organic acids. Oil recovery by culture 48 in the laboratory model experiment was enhanced by 25.2% over the original reserves and by 53.7% over the residual reserves. Enriched culture 48 was composed of at least 4 species belonging to the genera Eubacterium, Fusobacterium, and Bacteroides. This enriched culture was used as inoculum for MEOR field trials at Jilin oil field with satisfactory results. The importance of the role of these isolates in EOR was confirmed by their presence and behavior in the fluids produced from the microbiologically treated reservoir.

  18. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review egs_007_moore.pdf (181.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest Geysers Geothermal Field, California; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Feasibility of EGS Development at Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Repo

  19. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  20. DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind.

  1. Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

    2010-12-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    This case study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Building Science Corporation is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, Florida; zone 2A), insulated with air-permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass).

  3. Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

    2006-06-30

    A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

  4. Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ueno and J. Lstiburek

    2015-09-01

    Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a "control" vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. All roofs except the vented cathedral assembly experienced wood moisture contents and RH levels high enough to constitute failure. Disassembly at the end of the experiment showed that the unvented fiberglass roofs had wet sheathing and mold growth. In contrast, the cellulose roofs only had slight issues, such as rusted fasteners and sheathing grain raise.

  6. Field Testing Unvented Roofs with Asphalt Shingles in Cold and Hot-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta; Lstiburek, Joseph W.

    2015-09-01

    Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a control vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. The Houston-area roof was an unvented attic insulated with spray-applied fiberglass. Most ridges and hips were built with a diffusion vent detail, capped with vapor permeable roof membrane. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions at the roof peak in wintertime, but during the summer, RHs and MCs were higher than the unvented roof (albeit in the safe range).

  7. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Ken C; Naus, Dan J

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45? pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  8. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PD Meyer; RJ Serne

    1999-12-21

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

  9. Copper and organisms in the Fly River: Linking laboratory testing and field responses to copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.E.W.; Ahsanullah, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Ok Tedi copper mine has operated in the headwaters of the Fly River system in Papua New Guinea since 1984, and has discharged both tailings and waste rock into the river system. ANCOVA modelling of total catches of fish by standardized effort indicated that the suspended particulate copper concentration was negatively correlated with fish catches, but that the concentrations of suspended solids and dissolved copper were not significantly related to fish catches. Multivariate analyses of fish catch compositions have indicated that the effects caused by dissolved and particulate copper have differed, and that the observed changes in fish catch composition have trended in a direction similar to the particulate copper vectors. The types of catch composition changes do not match the natural assemblages found to be associated with high uncontaminated suspended solids concentrations. Laboratory toxicity testing of native fish, prawns, cladocerans, mayflies, algae and higher plants has demonstrated that the dissolved copper concentrations in the Fly River system ({approximately}up to 20 pg/L) have low bioavailability and would not be expected to cause acute toxicity. Provided the dissolved copper concentration is in this range, particulate copper, as derived from mine wastes, has low acute and chronic toxicity at concentrations up to 8.5 times observed levels. Hypotheses put forward to explain the apparent paradox include: total particulate copper is a better measure of the toxic fraction of dissolved copper than is the concentration of copper passing a 0.45 {micro}m filter; or that fish are able to avoid particulate copper when the associated dissolved copper concentrations are less than the detectable threshold. Behavioral toxicity testing is being used to test these hypotheses.

  10. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  11. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  12. Testing and Commissioning of a Multifunctional Tool for the Dismantling of the Activated Internals of the KNK Reactor Shaft - 13524

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothschmitt, Stefan; Graf, Anja; Bauer, Stefan; Klute, Stefan; Koselowski, Eiko

    2013-07-01

    The Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor Facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype reactor to demonstrate the Fast Breeder Reactor Technology in Germany, was in operation from 1971 to 1991. The dismantling activities started in 1991. The project aim is the green field in 2020. Most of the reactor internals as well as the primary and secondary cooling loops are already dismantled. The total contaminated sodium inventory has already been disposed of. Only the high activated reactor vessel shielding structures are remaining. Due to the high dose rates these structures must be dismantled remotely. For the dismantling of the primary shielding of the reactor vessel, 12 stacked cast iron blocks with a total mass of 90 Mg and single masses up to 15.5 Mg, a remote-controlled multifunctional dismantling device (HWZ) was designed, manufactured and tested in a mock-up. After successful approval of the test sequences by the authorities, the HWZ was implemented into the reactor building containment for final assembling of the auxiliary equipment and subsequent hot commissioning in 2012. Dismantling of the primary shielding blocks is scheduled for early 2013. (authors)

  13. NREL Launches Collaborative Resource for Field Test Best Practices (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic portal documents and shares state-of-the-art residential field test tools and techniques. Field testing is a science and an art-a tricky process that develops through a lot of trial and error. Researchers in the Advanced Residential Buildings group at the National Renewable Energy Labora- tory (NREL) regularly conduct field experiments and long-term monitoring in occupied and unoc- cupied houses throughout the United States. The goal is to capture real-world performance of energy-

  14. Field Testing Unvented Roofs with Asphalt Shingles in Cold and Hot-Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, Kohta; Lstiburek, Joseph W.

    2015-09-01

    Insulating roofs with dense-pack cellulose (instead of spray foam) has moisture risks, but is a lower cost approach. If moisture risks could be addressed, buildings could benefit from retrofit options, and the ability to bring HVAC systems within the conditioned space. Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a control vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. All roofs except the vented cathedral assembly experienced wood moisture contents and RH levels high enough to constitute failure. Disassembly at the end of the experiment showed that the unvented fiberglass roofs had wet sheathing and mold growth. In contrast, the cellulose roofs only had slight issues, such as rusted fasteners and sheathing grain raise. The Houston-area roof was an unvented attic insulated with spray-applied fiberglass. Most ridges and hips were built with a diffusion vent detail, capped with vapor permeable roof membrane. Some ridge sections were built as a conventional unvented roof, as a control. In the control unvented roofs, roof peak RHs reached high levels in the first winter; as exterior conditions warmed, RHs quickly fell. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions at the roof peak in wintertime, but during the summer, RHs and MCs were higher than the unvented roof (albeit in the safe range).

  15. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

    2002-06-01

    This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

  16. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  17. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. In conclusion, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  18. Active test of head-end facility at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kawabe, Shuji; Kamada, Yoshiaki

    2007-07-01

    During the first step, the second and the third step of Active Test (AT) at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), the performances of the Head-end Facility were checked, mainly for shearing and dissolution: shearing force and shearing time were the values as expected and concentration of U and Pu in dissolution solution were the values as expected. And safety requirement for acidity in dissolution solution was satisfied. (authors)

  19. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  20. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  1. Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in TWRS active catch tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-05-20

    The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

  2. Field measurements to support IAEA procedures development for fuel assembly and fuel rod active length verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.L.; Cooley, J.N.; Whitaker, J.M.

    1992-07-17

    The activities performed in verification of reactor fuel rods and assemblies by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors include measurements of the length of the enriched uranium sections in fuel assemblies and fuel rods. These measurements are normally made with the IAEA hand-held gamma monitor (HM-4) on fuel elements containing only enriched uranium. Many fuel rods currently in use contain natural uranium end sections and several different [sup 235]U enrichment zones. To support development of standard procedures for IAEA nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, a field measurement campaign was carried out to evaluate the FM-4 measurements and to investigate the feasibility of extending the HM-4 measurements to fuel rods and assemblies containing both natural and enriched uranium sections. The results show that the enriched fuel length can be measured to within [plus minus] 1 to 2 cm in the presence of natural uranium sections and to within [plus minus] 0.5 = when only enriched uranium is present. Based on the results from these measurements, a standard procedure, Measurement of Active Fuel Length in Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rods Using the HM-4,'' has been drafted for review by the IAEA.

  3. Field measurements to support IAEA procedures development for fuel assembly and fuel rod active length verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.L.; Cooley, J.N.; Whitaker, J.M.

    1992-07-17

    The activities performed in verification of reactor fuel rods and assemblies by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors include measurements of the length of the enriched uranium sections in fuel assemblies and fuel rods. These measurements are normally made with the IAEA hand-held gamma monitor (HM-4) on fuel elements containing only enriched uranium. Many fuel rods currently in use contain natural uranium end sections and several different {sup 235}U enrichment zones. To support development of standard procedures for IAEA nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, a field measurement campaign was carried out to evaluate the FM-4 measurements and to investigate the feasibility of extending the HM-4 measurements to fuel rods and assemblies containing both natural and enriched uranium sections. The results show that the enriched fuel length can be measured to within {plus_minus} 1 to 2 cm in the presence of natural uranium sections and to within {plus_minus} 0.5 = when only enriched uranium is present. Based on the results from these measurements, a standard procedure, ``Measurement of Active Fuel Length in Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rods Using the HM-4,`` has been drafted for review by the IAEA.

  4. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  5. In-Field Performance Testing of the Fork Detector for Quantitative Spent Fuel Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, Ian C.; Hu, Jianwei; De Baere, P.; Vaccaro, S.; Schwalbach, P.; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Tobin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the framework of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel

  6. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  7. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  8. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection

  9. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  10. Prediction of solar activity from solar background magnetic field variations in cycles 21-23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V. E-mail: s.zharkov@hull.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  11. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  14. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  15. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-16

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

  16. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

  17. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  19. Field testing of feedforward collective pitch control on the CART2 using a nacelle-based Lidar scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlipf, David; Fleming, Paul; Haizmann, Florian; Scholbrock, Andrew; Hofsass, Martin; Wright, Alan; Cheng, Po Wen

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results from a field test of LIDAR assisted collective pitch control using a scanning LIDAR device installed on the nacelle of a mid-scale research turbine. A nonlinear feedforward controller is extended by an adaptive filter to remove all uncorrelated frequencies of the wind speed measurement to avoid unnecessary control action. Positive effects on the rotor speed regulation as well as on tower, blade and shaft loads have been observed in the case that the previous measured correlation and timing between the wind preview and the turbine reaction are accomplish. The feedforward controller had negative impact, when the LIDAR measurement was disturbed by obstacles in front of the turbine. This work proves, that LIDAR is valuable tool for wind turbine control not only in simulations but also under real conditions. Moreover, the paper shows that further understanding of the relationship between the wind measurement and the turbine reaction is crucial to improve LIDAR assisted control of wind turbines.

  20. Synergy between fast-ion transport by core MHD and test blanket module fields in DIII-D experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Collins, C. S.; Gray, T.; Grierson, B. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Lanctot, M.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Mclean, A. G.

    2015-07-21

    We measured fast-ion transport caused by the combination of MHD and a mock-up test-blanket module (TBM) coil in the DIII-D tokamak. The primary diagnostic is an infrared camera that measures the heat flux on the tiles surrounding the coil. The combined effects of the TBM and four other potential sources of transport are studied: neoclassical tearing modes, Alfvén eigenmodes, sawteeth, and applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields for the control of edge localized modes. A definitive synergistic effect is observed at sawtooth crashes where, in the presence of the TBM, the localized heat flux at a burst increases from 0.36±0.27 tomore » 2.6±0.5 MW/m-2.« less

  1. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVITY-RELATED MERIDIONAL FLOW MODULATION ON THE STRENGTH OF THE SOLAR POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R. H.; Schmitt, D.; Schuessler, M.; Isik, E.

    2010-07-01

    We studied the effect of the perturbation of the meridional flow in the activity belts detected by local helioseismology on the development and strength of the surface magnetic field at the polar caps. We carried out simulations of synthetic solar cycles with a flux transport model, which follows the cyclic evolution of the surface field determined by flux emergence and advective transport by near-surface flows. In each hemisphere, an axisymmetric band of latitudinal flows converging toward the central latitude of the activity belt was superposed onto the background poleward meridional flow. The overall effect of the flow perturbation is to reduce the latitudinal separation of the magnetic polarities of a bipolar magnetic region and thus diminish its contribution to the polar field. As a result, the polar field maximum reached around cycle activity minimum is weakened by the presence of the meridional flow perturbation. For a flow perturbation consistent with helioseismic observations, the polar field is reduced by about 18% compared to the case without inflows. If the amplitude of the flow perturbation depends on the cycle strength, its effect on the polar field provides a nonlinearity that could contribute to limiting the amplitude of a Babcock-Leighton type dynamo.

  2. The North Carolina Field Test: Field performance of the preliminary version of an advanced weatherization audit for the Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-06-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina`s current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68{degrees}F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups.

  3. Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

    2000-08-01

    Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx} 0.9 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Matsubayashi, K.; Riguccini, L.; Aida, Y.; Ideue, Y.; Murayama, T.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 as a function of the local galaxy density in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COSMOS 2 deg{sup 2} field. [O II] emitters are selected by the narrowband excess technique with the NB711-band imaging data taken with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. We carefully selected 614 photo-z-selected galaxies with M{sub U3500} < -19.31 at z = 0.901 - 0.920, which includes 195 [O II] emitters, to directly compare the results with our previous study at z {approx} 1.2. We found that the fraction is almost constant at 0.3 Mpc{sup -2} < {Sigma}{sub 10th} < 10 Mpc{sup -2}. We also checked the fraction of galaxies with blue rest-frame colors of NUV - R < 2 in our photo-z-selected sample, and found that the fraction of blue galaxies does not significantly depend on the local density. On the other hand, the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation predicted that the fraction of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 0.9 decreases with increasing projected galaxy density even if the effects of the projection and the photo-z error in our analysis were taken into account. The fraction of [O II] emitters decreases from {approx}60% at z {approx} 1.2 to {approx}30% at z {approx} 0.9 independent of galaxy environment. The decrease of the [O II] emitter fraction could be explained mainly by the rapid decrease of star formation activity in the universe from z {approx} 1.2 to z {approx} 0.9.

  5. Field Testing of LIDAR-Assisted Feedforward Control Algorithms for Improved Speed Control and Fatigue Load Reduction on a 600-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Avishek A.; Bossanyi, Ervin A.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul; Boquet, Mathieu; Krishnamurthy, Raghu

    2015-12-14

    A severe challenge in controlling wind turbines is ensuring controller performance in the presence of a stochastic and unknown wind field, relying on the response of the turbine to generate control actions. Recent technologies such as LIDAR, allow sensing of the wind field before it reaches the rotor. In this work a field-testing campaign to test LIDAR Assisted Control (LAC) has been undertaken on a 600-kW turbine using a fixed, five-beam LIDAR system. The campaign compared the performance of a baseline controller to four LACs with progressively lower levels of feedback using 35 hours of collected data.

  6. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  7. Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0

  8. Cyclic CO{sub 2} injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana. Final report, November 21, 1988--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1992-12-31

    The ultimate objectives of the research were to provide a base of knowledge on the cyclic CO{sub 2} stimulation (or CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff) process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil, and to demonstrate the utility of the process to the small independent producer. The project was divided into four subtasks: laboratory coreflood experiments, computer simulation, field testing, and technology transfer. Laboratory corefloods were performed to investigate important process parameters. Computer simulation was used to confirm and expand laboratory coreflood results. A field-test data base was constructed and analyzed to facilitate target reservoir screening and to identify successful operational practices. The laboratory coreflood results and data base evaluations were used in the design and implementation of a field test that was conducted in conjunction with the private sector. The results of laboratory and field studies were disseminated to the industry through presentations at technical conferences and publications in technical journals.

  9. The North Carolina Field Test: Field Performance of the Preliminary Version of an Advanced Weatherization Audit for the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina's current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68 F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups. Average

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by the Department of Energy's Energy Storage area at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the battery testing, design, and analysis activity.

  11. A Simple test for the existence of two accretion modes in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    By analogy to the different accretion states observed in black-hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), it appears plausible that accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGN) undergo a state transition between a radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flow. If the radiative efficiency changes at some critical accretion rate, there will be a change in the distribution of black hole masses and bolometric luminosities at the corresponding transition luminosity. To test this prediction, the author considers the joint distribution of AGN black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for a sample taken from the literature. The small number of objects with low Eddington-scaled accretion rates m < 0.01 and black hole masses M{sub BH} < 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} constitutes tentative evidence for the existence of such a transition in AGN. Selection effects, in particular those associated with flux-limited samples, systematically exclude objects in particular regions of the (M{sub BH}, L{sub bol}) plane. Therefore, they require particular attention in the analysis of distributions of black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, and derived quantities like the accretion rate. The author suggests further observational tests of the BHXB-AGN unification scheme which are based on the jet domination of the energy output of BHXBs in the hard state, and on the possible equivalence of BHXB in the very high (or steep power-law) state showing ejections and efficiently accreting quasars and radio galaxies with powerful radio jets.

  12. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hongbo; Vorobieff, Peter V.; Menicucci, David; Mammoli, Andrea A.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-01

    This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific

  14. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the

  15. Field testing of feedforward collective pitch control on the CART2 using a nacelle-based Lidar scanner

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schlipf, David; Fleming, Paul; Haizmann, Florian; Scholbrock, Andrew; Hofsass, Martin; Wright, Alan; Cheng, Po Wen

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results from a field test of LIDAR assisted collective pitch control using a scanning LIDAR device installed on the nacelle of a mid-scale research turbine. A nonlinear feedforward controller is extended by an adaptive filter to remove all uncorrelated frequencies of the wind speed measurement to avoid unnecessary control action. Positive effects on the rotor speed regulation as well as on tower, blade and shaft loads have been observed in the case that the previous measured correlation and timing between the wind preview and the turbine reaction are accomplish. The feedforward controller had negative impact, whenmore » the LIDAR measurement was disturbed by obstacles in front of the turbine. This work proves, that LIDAR is valuable tool for wind turbine control not only in simulations but also under real conditions. Moreover, the paper shows that further understanding of the relationship between the wind measurement and the turbine reaction is crucial to improve LIDAR assisted control of wind turbines.« less

  16. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 8. cloud radiation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, G.E.

    1985-04-01

    The object of this study was to measure the relationship between the spatial distribution of the radioactive fission products and the resultant radioactive field in an atomic-bomb cloud. Data obtained by the high-intensity rate meters and the jet impactors lead to the following conclusions: (1) There is a definite correlation between the particulate fission-particle density and the gamma-radiation intensity measured within the cloud; (2) The effective energy of the gamma radiation within the atomic bomb cloud is quite low, being of the order of 200 keV; (3) The structure of the atomic bomb cloud resembles a chimney with puffs of radioactive matter in the flue of the chimney; (4) The average roentgen dose accumulated by a plane passing through a cloud of the type tested in the Dog and Easy Shots 210 sec after bomb detonation is approximately 125 r. The average contamination on a plane after passing through a cloud is between 10 and 20 r/hr; no contamination could be detected within the plane; (5) The gamma-radiation effects extend beyond the limits of the particulate radioactive fission products; and, (6) The visible cloud adn the fission-product particulate cloud from the bomb do not coincide exactly; the visible cloud extended beyond the fission-product-cloud in those instances where data were obtained.

  17. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  18. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  19. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post

  20. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  1. Iodine adsorption on ion-exchange resins and activated carbons: batch testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows. The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine

  2. Design and experimental testing of air slab caps which convert commercial electron diodes into dual purpose, correction-free diodes for small field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles, P. H.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Pedrazzini, G.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Two diodes which do not require correction factors for small field relative output measurements are designed and validated using experimental methodology. This was achieved by adding an air layer above the active volume of the diode detectors, which canceled out the increase in response of the diodes in small fields relative to standard field sizes. Methods: Due to the increased density of silicon and other components within a diode, additional electrons are created. In very small fields, a very small air gap acts as an effective filter of electrons with a high angle of incidence. The aim was to design a diode that balanced these perturbations to give a response similar to a water-only geometry. Three thicknesses of air were placed at the proximal end of a PTW 60017 electron diode (PTWe) using an adjustable “air cap”. A set of output ratios (OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}}) for square field sizes of side length down to 5 mm was measured using each air thickness and compared to OR{sub Det}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n}} measured using an IBA stereotactic field diode (SFD). k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was transferred from the SFD to the PTWe diode and plotted as a function of air gap thickness for each field size. This enabled the optimal air gap thickness to be obtained by observing which thickness of air was required such that k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} was equal to 1.00 at all field sizes. A similar procedure was used to find the optimal air thickness required to make a modified Sun Nuclear EDGE detector (EDGEe) which is “correction-free” in small field relative dosimetry. In addition, the feasibility of experimentally transferring k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r

  3. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Krenzien, Susan

    2012-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). NNSA/NSO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  4. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  5. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's ...

  6. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF

  7. Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-09-23

    This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  8. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William

    2015-02-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  9. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silicaâ??s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and

  10. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the fines fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  11. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B

    2010-01-01

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  12. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  13. Complete active space self-consistent field calculations of the vibrational band strengths for C3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, U.G.; Almlof, J.; Siegbahn, P.E.M.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis; Stockholm Universitet )

    1989-08-01

    Complete active space self-consistent calculations of the energy and dipole moment functions were carried out for C3 in its electronic ground state. The absorption coefficient between 0.7 and 75 microns is calculated on the basis of the vibrational band strength of transitions between the 800 lowest states with v less than or equal to (4, 39, 3). In cool carbon stars with a high C/O ratio, C3 is found to be the most prevalent of the known opacity sources. 49 refs.

  14. High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors with Dielectric and Active Layers Printed Sequentially by Ultrasonic Spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Ming [ORNL; Sanjib, Das [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    High-performance, flexible organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are reported with PVP dielectric and TIPS-PEN active layers sequentially deposited by ultrasonic spray-coating on plastic substrate. OFETs fabricated in ambient air with a bottom-gate/top-contact geometry are shown to achieve on/off ratios of >104 and mobilities as high as 0.35 cm2/Vs. These rival the characteristics of the best solution-processible small molecule FETs fabricated by other fabrication methods such as drop casting and ink-jet printing.

  15. Dynamical mean-field theory and weakly non-linear analysis for the phase separation of active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speck, Thomas; Menzel, Andreas M.; Bialké, Julian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-06-14

    Recently, we have derived an effective Cahn-Hilliard equation for the phase separation dynamics of active Brownian particles by performing a weakly non-linear analysis of the effective hydrodynamic equations for density and polarization [Speck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 218304 (2014)]. Here, we develop and explore this strategy in more detail and show explicitly how to get to such a large-scale, mean-field description starting from the microscopic dynamics. The effective free energy emerging from this approach has the form of a conventional Ginzburg-Landau function. On the coarsest scale, our results thus agree with the mapping of active phase separation onto that of passive fluids with attractive interactions through a global effective free energy (motility-induced phase transition). Particular attention is paid to the square-gradient term necessary for the phase separation kinetics. We finally discuss results from numerical simulations corroborating the analytical results.

  16. Observation of tilting activities in translated field reversed configuration plasma using computer tomography at two different cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Okada, Shigefumi

    2007-11-15

    Tilting activities of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma were observed in translation experiments using computer tomography (CT) at two different cross sections in the FRC injection experiment (FIX) machine [S. Okada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 677 (2007)]. In these experiments, two sets of CT devices were installed at the upstream and downstream sides of the confinement chamber of the FIX. Each CT device was composed of three arrays of detectors sensitive to the near-infrared radiation. The peak of the reconstructed emission profile at one side was displaced from the center of the cross section of the chamber. On the other hand, the reconstructed profile at the other side was located around the center. This result suggests that the FRC plasma was tilting in the axial direction. The occurrence of the observed tilting activities had almost no effect on the lifetime of the FRC plasma.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. The Italian Activities in the Field of Nuclear Waste Management - 12439

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgiantoni, Giorgio; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Sepielli, Massimo [ENEA, C. R. Casaccia, Roma (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    The Italian situation in the field of nuclear waste management is characterized by a relative small quantity of wastes, as a consequence of the giving up of energy production by nuclear generation in 1986. Notwithstanding this situation, Italy is a unique case study since the country needs to undertake the final decommissioning of four shut-down NPPs (size 100-200 MWe), each one different from the others. Therefore all the regulatory, technical, and financial actions are needed in the same way as if there was actual nuclear generation. Furthermore, the various non-power generating applications of nuclear energy still require management, a legal framework, a regulatory body, an industrial structure, and technical know-how. Notwithstanding the absence of energy production from nuclear sources, the country has the burden of radioactive waste management from the previous nuclear operations, which obliges it to implement at first a robust legislative framework, then to explore all the complex procedures to achieve the localization of the national interim storage facility, not excluding the chance to have a European regional facility for geologic disposal, under the clauses of the Council Directive of 19 July 2011 'Establishing a Community Framework for the Responsible and Safe Management of Radioactive Waste'. Then, as far as industrial, medical and R and D aspects, the improvement of the legislative picture, the creation of a regulatory body, is a good start for the future, to achieve the best efficiency of the Italian system. (authors)

  19. Development of manufacturing capability for the fabrication of the Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor for the High Field Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, C R

    1981-01-01

    Construction of High Field Test Facility (HFTF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) requires an extended surface Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor cable of carrying currents in excess of 7500 amperes in a 12 Tesla magnetic field. This conductor consists of a 5.4 mm x 11.0 mm superconducting core onto whose broad surfaces are soldered embossed oxygen free copper strips. Two different core designs have been developed and the feasibility of each design evaluated. Equipment necessary to produce the conductor were developed and techniques of production were explored.

  20. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF RADIO SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolcic, V.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Schinnerer, E.; Bondi, M.; BIrzan, L.; Carilli, C. L.; Elvis, M.; Impey, C. D.; Trump, J. R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Merloni, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Paglione, T

    2009-05-01

    We explore the cosmic evolution of radio luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with low radio powers (L {sub 1.4GHz} {approx}< 5 x 10{sup 25} W Hz{sup -1}) out to z = 1.3 using to date the largest sample of {approx}600 low-luminosity radio AGN at intermediate redshift drawn from the VLA-COSMOS survey. We derive the radio-luminosity function for these AGNs, and its evolution with cosmic time assuming two extreme cases: (1) pure luminosity and (2) pure density evolution. The former and latter yield L {sub *} {proportional_to} (1 + z){sup 0.8} {sup {+-}} {sup 0.1}, and {phi}{sub *} {proportional_to} (1 + z){sup 1.1} {sup {+-}} {sup 0.1}, respectively, both implying a fairly modest change in properties of low-radio-power AGNs since z = 1.3. We show that this is in stark contrast with the evolution of powerful (L {sub 1.4GHz} > 5 x 10{sup 25} W Hz{sup -1}) radio AGN over the same cosmic time interval, constrained using the 3CRR, 6CE, and 7CRS radio surveys by Willot et al. We demonstrate that this can be explained through differences in black hole fueling and triggering mechanisms, and a dichotomy in host galaxy properties of weak and powerful AGNs. Our findings suggest that high- and low-radio-power AGN activities are triggered in different stages during the formation of massive red galaxies. We show that weak radio AGN occur in the most massive galaxies already at z {approx} 1, and they may significantly contribute to the heating of their surrounding medium and thus inhibit gas accretion onto their host galaxies, as recently suggested for the 'radio mode' in cosmological models.

  1. Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01

    An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

  2. A controlled in situ field evaluation of a new dynamic vacuum slug test method in unconfined aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauctes, B.A.; Schleyer, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    Most ground water site characterizations require initial estimates of the ground water flow velocity and potential downgradient extent of ground water contamination. The fundamental aquifer property, hydraulic conductivity, must be determined to make these essential estimates. Highly contaminated ground water often precludes conducting multi-well aquifer tests to evaluate hydraulic conductivity due to potential human health risks and ground water storage/treatment/disposal costs and logistics. Consequently, single-well slug tests are often sued, but the widely used pressure slug test method is not suitable for water table monitoring wells. As a result, a new slug test method was developed by GCL for unconfined aquifers. The new method was benchmarked against the widely used solid slug test method in a series of rising-head and falling-head slug tests. A statistical evaluation indicated no statistical difference (alpha = 0.05) between hydraulic conductivity values calculated from each method. The new dynamic vacuum method, designed specifically for use in water table monitoring wells, uses a continuous vacuum to draw air through the well screen exposed above the water table. The vacuum induces upwelling as air pressure inside the well casing drops below atmospheric pressure. Once upwelling equilibrates with the applied vacuum, the vacuum is released allowing the water to recover and the air pressure inside the casing to return to atmospheric pressure.

  3. Vertical ground heat exchanger borehole grouting: Field application studies and in-situ thermal performance testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.

    1998-05-01

    This report summarizes one of a series of EPRI- and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA)-sponsored research efforts on vertical ground heat exchanger grout and grouting techniques as applied to geothermal heat pumps. In particular, this effort studied actual in-field installation issues for various grout mixtures and types of grouting equipment in different parts of the country.

  4. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas; Herges, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  5. Tests of a Prototype for Assessing the Field Homogeneity of the Iseult/Inumac 11.7T Whole Body MRI Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quettier, Lionel

    2010-06-01

    A neuroscience research center with very high field MRI equipments has been opened in November 2006 by the CEA life science division. One of the imaging systems will require a 11.75 T magnet with a 900 mm warm bore, the so-call Iseult/Inumac magnet. Regarding the large aperture and field strength, this magnet is a challenge as compared to the largest MRI systems ever built, and is then developed within an ambitious R&D program. With the objective of demonstrating the possibility of achieving field homogeneity better than 1 ppm using double pancake windings, a 24 double pancakes model coil, working at 1.5 T has been designed. This model magnet has been manufactured by Alstom MSA and tested at CEA. It has been measured with a very high precision, in order to fully characterize the field homogeneity, and then to investigate and discriminate the parameters that influence the field map. This magnet has reached the bare magnet field homogeneity specification expected for Iseult and thus successfully demonstrated the feasibility of building a homogenous magnet with the double pancake winding technique.

  6. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  7. Field studies of the potential for wind transport of plutonium- contaminated soils at sites in Areas 6 and 11, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.; Metzger, S.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes and documents a series of field experiments carried out in Areas 6 and 11 of the Nevada Test Site in June and July 1994 to determine parameters of boundary layer winds, surface characteristics, and vegetation cover that can be used to predict dust emissions from the affected sites. Aerodynamic roughness of natural sites is determined largely by the lateral cover of the larger and more permanent roughness elements (shrubs). These provide a complete protection of the surface from wind erosion. Studies using a field-portable wind tunnel demonstrated that natural surfaces in the investigated areas of the Nevada Test Site are stable except at very high wind speeds (probably higher than normally occur, except perhaps in dust devils). However, disturbance of silty-clay surfaces by excavation devices and vehicles reduces the entrainment threshold by approximately 50% and makes these areas potentially very susceptible to wind erosion and transport of sediments.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  9. CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

    2012-03-30

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding.

  10. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-05-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S.A. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a 3 year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year 3 of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic temperature fluctuations.

  12. Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines through Field-Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P. A.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the structure of an ongoing controller comparison experiment at NREL's National Wind Technology Center; the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase of the experiment, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing. The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

  13. Activity testing of fine-particle size, iron catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Gugliotta, T.P.

    1993-10-01

    The use of fine-particle size (< 40 nm) unsupported catalysts in direct coal liquefaction may result in improved economics due to possible enhanced yields of desired products, the potential for decreasing reaction severity, and the possibility of using less catalyst. Sandia has developed a standard testing procedure for evaluating and comparing the fine-particle catalysts. The test procedure uses phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, the DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, and a statistical experimental design to enable evaluation of the catalysts over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt % on a dmmf coal basis). Product analyses include tetrahydrofuran (THF) conversion, heptane conversion, solvent recovery, and gas analyses. Phenanthrene as the solvent in the testing procedure yielded significant differences between thermal and catalytic reactions, whereas using a good hydrogen donor such as 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) showed no catalytic effects.

  14. W-026, acceptance test report imaging passive/active neutron(IPAN) (submittal {number_sign}54.3 - C3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-02-21

    In the Spring of 1996, Site Acceptance Tests were performed for the 2 Imaging Passive/Active Neutron (IPAN) assay systems installed in the WRAP I Facility. This report includes the test documentation and the completed test checklists, with comments and resolutions. All testing was completed, with comments resolved by August 1996.

  15. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Augmented Formulation Matrix Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Hansen, E.; Roberts, K.

    2015-07-20

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in Washington State. The HLW will be vitrified in the HLW facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. A portion (~35%) of the LAW will be vitrified in the LAW vitrification facility for disposal onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize all of the wastes destined for those facilities. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. Cast Stone, a cementitious waste form, is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW. A statistically designed test matrix was used to evaluate the effects of key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. For the processing properties, the water-to-dry-blend mix ratio was the most significant parameter in affecting the range of values observed for each property. The single shell tank (SST) Blend simulant also showed differences in measured properties compared to the other three simulants tested. A review of the testing matrix and results indicated that an additional set of tests would be beneficial to improve the understanding of the impacts noted in the Screening

  16. Passive Active Multi-Junction 3, 7 GHZ launcher for Tore-Supra Long Pulse Experiments. Manufacturing Process and Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilhem, D.; Achard, J.; Bertrand, B.; Bej, Z.; Bibet, Ph.; Brun, C.; Chantant, M.; Delmas, E.; Delpech, L.; Doceul, Y.; Ekedahl, A.; Goletto, C.; Goniche, M.; Hatchressian, J. C.; Hillairet, J.; Houry, M.; Joubert, P.; Lipa, M.; Madeleine, S.; Martinez, A.

    2009-11-26

    The design and the fabrication of a new Lower Hybrid (LH) actively cooled antenna based on the passive active concept is a part of the CIMES project (Components for the Injection of Mater and Energy in Steady-state). The major objectives of Tore-Supra program is to achieve 1000 s pulses with this LH launcher, by coupling routinely >3 MW of LH wave at 3.7 GHz to the plasma with a parallel index n{sub ||} = 1.7 {sup {+-}}{sup 0.2}. The launcher is on its way to achieve its validation tests--low power Radio Frequency (RF) measurements, vacuum and hydraulic leak tests--and will be installed and commissioned on plasma during the fall of 2009.

  17. Single well field injection test of humate to enhance attenuation of uranium and other radionuclides in an acidic plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents the impact of the injected humate on targeted contaminants over a period of 4 months and suggests it is a viable attenuation-based remedy for uranium, potentially for I-129, but not for Sr-90. Future activities will focus on issues pertinent to scaling the technology to full deployment.

  18. Field test of plutonium and thorium contaminated clay soils from the Mound Site using the ACT*DE*CON Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Swift, N.A.; Church, R.H.; Neff, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    A treatability test was run during the summer and fall of 1997 to demonstrate the effectiveness of ACT*DE*CON for removing plutonium and thorium from the clay soils around Mound. ACT*DE*CON is a proprietary solution patented by Selentec. The process utilized a highly selective dissolution of the contaminants by the use of a chemical wash. The pilot scale process involved pretreatment of the soil in an attrition scrubber with ACT*DE*CON solution. This blended solution was then passed through a counter-current extraction chamber where additional contact with ACT*DE*CON solution occurred, followed by a rinse cycle. During this process sand was added to aid contact of the solution with the soil particles. The sand is removed during the rinse step and reused. The chelating agent is separated from the contaminant and recycled back into the process, along with the reverse osmosis permeate. The resulting solution can be further treated to concentrate the contaminant. Three different types of environmental soils were tested -- plutonium and thorium contaminated soils with the natural clay content, and plutonium contaminated soils with a high percentage of fine clay particles. The goal of these tests was to reduce the plutonium levels from several hundreds of pCi/g to between 25 and 75 pCi/g and the thorium from a couple hundred pCi/g to less than 5 pCi/g. The results of these four tests are presented along with a discussion of the operating parameters and the lessons learned relating to full scale implementation at Mound as well as other potential applications of this process.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W.; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  20. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Lindh, Roland

    2015-07-28

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible.

  1. Communication: Smoothing out excited-state dynamics: Analytical gradients for dynamically weighted complete active space self-consistent field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, W. J.

    2014-11-07

    State averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) is a workhorse for determining the excited-state electronic structure of molecules, particularly for states with multireference character; however, the method suffers from known issues that have prevented its wider adoption. One issue is the presence of discontinuities in potential energy surfaces when a state that is not included in the state averaging crosses with one that is. In this communication I introduce a new dynamical weight with spline (DWS) scheme that mimics SA-CASSCF while removing energy discontinuities due to unweighted state crossings. In addition, analytical gradients for DWS-CASSCF (and other dynamically weighted schemes) are derived for the first time, enabling energy-conserving excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics in instances where SA-CASSCF fails.

  2. Investigating {sup 13}C+{sup 12}C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesneanu, Daniela Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-24

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the “Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the {sup 12}C+{sup 13}C reaction at beam energies E{sub lab}= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C over a wide energy range. A {sup 13}C beam with intensities 0.5–2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with {sup 24}Na from the {sup 12}C({sup 13}C,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from {sup 24}Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for E{sub lab} = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1–3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure {sup 12}C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β–γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  3. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 7. Science Applications, Incorporated field test facility preliminary design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary design of an SCEAS Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF is a 3600 m/sup 2/ fluid roof greenhouse with an inflated plastic film roof to maintain a clean environment for the fluid roof and to protect the inner glazing from hail and other small missiles. The objective of the design was the faithful scaling of the commercial facility to ensure that the ETF results could be extrapolated to a commercial facility of any size. Therefore, all major features, including the photovoltaic power system, an integral water desalination system and even the basic structural module have been retained. The design is described in substantial detail in the body of this report, with appendices giving the drawings and specifications.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  6. Activities to support the liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.; Routh, T.

    1997-03-01

    Approximately a hundred years ago the petrochemical industry was in its infancy, while the chemical industry was already well established. Today, both of these industries, which are almost indistinguishable, are a substantial part of the makeup of the U.S. economy and the lifestyle we enjoy. It is difficult to identify a single segment of our daily lives that isn`t affected by these industries and the products or services they make available for our use. Their survival and continued function in a competitive world market are necessary to maintain our current standard of living. The occurrence of accidents in these industries has two obvious effects: (1) the loss of product during the accident and future productivity because of loss of a portion of a facility or transport medium, and (2) the potential loss of life or injury to individuals, whether workers, emergency responders, or members of the general public. A great deal of work has been conducted at the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill test Facility (LGFSTF) on hazardous spills. WRI has conducted accident investigations as well as provided information on the research results via the internet and bibliographies.

  7. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  8. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant: Preliminary summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G. |; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.; Ikonomou, P.; Hosoya, M.; Scott, P.; Fager, J.; Sanders, C.; Colwell, D.; Joyner, C.J.

    1994-04-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. This report details a six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs which took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ``mailbox``. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by means of nondestructive assay equipment. The field test demonstrated the feasibility and practicality of key elements of the SNRI approach for a large LEU fuel fabrication plant.

  9. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Kosny, Jan; Kriner, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize

  10. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  11. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron

  12. Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

  13. Unique compressor passes field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Revolutionary pipeline compression concept has proved successful at a Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line facility in Alabama. In April 1992, the MOPICO electric drive compressor completed 5,000 hours of successful operation at Transcontinental Gas Pipeline's Station 100 at Billingsley, Ala. The revolutionary gas pipeline compression concept eliminates many of the traditional complexities of a pipeline compressor station and has benefits not possible with conventional compressor systems. This paper reports that this is accomplished through the integration of technologies developed over the past 10 years into a design concept unique in the industry. Ross Hill Controls Inc., Houston, provides the adjustable-speed variable frequency drive unit that allows the electric motor to operate at speeds from 6,2000 rpm to 10,000 rpm. Transco Energy Ventures, a division of Transco Energy, participated in the development and assisted in placing the prototype unit on the Transcontinental Gas Pipeline system.

  14. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-24

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  15. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  16. Independent Oversight Review of the Los Alamos Field Office Processes for Laboratory Oversight of Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, March 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Los Alamos Field Office Processes for Laboratory Oversight of Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 March 2014 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope

  17. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  18. Analytical gradients of complete active space self-consistent field energies using Cholesky decomposition: Geometry optimization and spin-state energetics of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delcey, Mickaël G.; Freitag, Leon; González, Leticia; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Aquilante, Francesco; Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, V. F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna ; Lindh, Roland; Uppsala Center for Computational Chemistry - UC3, Uppsala University, Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala

    2014-05-07

    We present a formulation of analytical energy gradients at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory employing density fitting (DF) techniques to enable efficient geometry optimizations of large systems. As an example, the ground and lowest triplet state geometries of a ruthenium nitrosyl complex are computed at the DF-CASSCF level of theory and compared with structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP, BP86, and M06L functionals. The average deviation of all bond lengths compared to the crystal structure is 0.042 Å at the DF-CASSCF level of theory, which is slightly larger but still comparable with the deviations obtained by the tested DFT functionals, e.g., 0.032 Å with M06L. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviation between the DF-CASSCF and best DFT coordinates, delivered by BP86, is only 0.08 Å for S{sub 0} and 0.11 Å for T{sub 1}, indicating that the geometries are very similar. While keeping the mean energy gradient errors below 0.25%, the DF technique results in a 13-fold speedup compared to the conventional CASSCF geometry optimization algorithm. Additionally, we assess the singlet-triplet energy vertical and adiabatic differences with multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using the DF-CASSCF and DFT optimized geometries. It is found that the vertical CASPT2 energies are relatively similar regardless of the geometry employed whereas the adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps are more sensitive to the chosen triplet geometry.

  19. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  20. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  1. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Kumar, R.M.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.

    1982-08-01

    Field operations, which were conducted as a cooperative effort between Conoco and Gruy Federal, began on January 16, 1980 when the well was spudded. The well was drilled to 3692 feet, and 18 cores recovered in 18 core-barrel runs (144 feet). Upon completion of the coring phase, the hole was drilled to a total depth of 4150 feet and a complete suite of geophysical logs was run. Logging was then followed by completion and testing by Concoco. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations. Residual oil saturation were 259 STB/acre-ft for the 4035 - 4055 feet interval, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the 3692 - 3718 feet interval. Nine BOPD was produced from the 4035 - 4055 feet interval and no oil was produced from 3692 to 3718 feet interval, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. 68 figures, 11 tables.

  2. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  3. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

  4. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The

  5. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  6. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

    1992-08-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

  7. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 252014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste...

  8. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field test edition (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize

  9. test and evaluation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Office of Test and Evaluation http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsstockpilestewardshiptestcapabilitiesand-eval

    field field-type-text...

  10. Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit a Spray Dryer and Fabric Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjostrom, Sharon; Amrhein, Jerry

    2009-04-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate the long-term mercury removal capability, long-term mercury emissions variability, and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with sorbent injection on a configuration being considered for many new plants. Testing was conducted by ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA) at Rocky Mountain Powers (RMP) Hardin Station through funding provided by DOE/NETL, RMP, and other industry partners. The Hardin Station is a new plant rated at 121 MW gross that was first brought online in April of 2006. Hardin fires a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and is configured with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx control, a spray dryer absorber (SDA) for SO2 control, and a fabric filter (FF) for particulate control. Based upon previous testing at PRB sites with SCRs, very little additional mercury oxidation from the SCR was expected at Hardin. In addition, based upon results from DOE/NETL Phase II Round I testing at Holcomb Station and results from similarly configured sites, low native mercury removal was expected across the SDA and FF. The main goal of this project was metsorbent injection was used to economically and effectively achieve 90% mercury control as measured from the air heater (AH) outlet to the stack for a period of ten months. This goal was achieved with DARCO Hg-LH, Calgon FLUEPAC-MC PLUS and ADA Power PAC PREMIUM brominated activated carbons at nominal loadings of 1.52.5 lb/MMacf. An economic analysis determined the twenty-year levelized cost to be 0.87 mills/kW-hr, or $15,000/lb Hg removed. No detrimental effects on other equipment or plant operations were observed. The results of

  11. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT FROM FULL STOKES ANALYSIS OF Si I 1082.7 nm AND He I 1083.0 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2012-04-20

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament in the photosphere and upper chromosphere are obtained from spectro-polarimetric observations recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We apply Milne-Eddington inversions on full Stokes vectors of the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm to obtain the magnetic field vector and velocity maps in two atmosphere layers. We find that (1) a complete filament was already present in H{alpha} at the beginning of the TIP II data acquisition. Only a partially formed one, composed of multiple small threads, was present in He I. (2) The AR filament comprises two sections. One shows strong magnetic field intensities, about 600-800 G in the upper chromosphere and 800-1000 G in the photosphere. The other exhibits only comparatively weak magnetic field strengths in both layers. (3) The Stokes V signal is indicative of a dip in the magnetic field strength close to the chromospheric PIL. (4) In the chromosphere, consistent upflows are found along the PIL flanked by downflows. (5) The transversal magnetic field is nearly parallel to the PIL in the photosphere and inclined by 20 Degree-Sign -30 Degree-Sign in the chromosphere. (6) The chromospheric magnetic field around the filament is found to be in normal configuration, while the photospheric field presents a concave magnetic topology. The observations are consistent with the emergence of a flux rope with a subsequent formation of a filament.

  12. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE EFFECT OF INJECTION ENERGY AND REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Li Shengtai; Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L. E-mail: hli@lanl.go E-mail: dcollins@physics.ucsd.ed

    2010-12-20

    We present a series of cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we investigate the influence of both the epoch of the AGN (z {approx} 3-0.5) and the AGN energy ({approx}3 x 10{sup 57}- 2 x 10{sup 60} erg) on the final magnetic field distribution in a relatively massive cluster (M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}). We find that as long as the AGN magnetic fields are ejected before the major mergers in the cluster formation history, magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and can be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence caused by hierarchical mergers during the cluster formation process. The total magnetic energy in the cluster can reach {approx}10{sup 61} erg, with micro Gauss fields distributed over the {approx}Mpc scale. The amplification of the total magnetic energy by the ICM turbulence can be significant, up to {approx}1000 times in some cases. Therefore even weak magnetic fields from AGNs can be used to magnetize the cluster to the observed level. The final magnetic energy in the ICM is determined by the ICM turbulent energy, with a weak dependence on the AGN injection energy. We discuss the properties of magnetic fields throughout the cluster and the synthetic Faraday rotation measure maps they produce. We also show that high spatial resolution over most of the magnetic regions of the cluster is very important to capture the small-scale dynamo process and maintain the magnetic field structure in our simulations.

  13. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G. |; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.

    1995-05-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. Then a statistical inference can be made from verification results for items verified during SNRIs to the entire populations, i.e. the entire strata, even if inspectors were not present when many items were received or produced. A six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division during 1993. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ``mailbox``. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. They arrived unannounced at the plant, in most cases immediately after travel from Canada, where the IAEA maintains a regional office. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by meant of nondestructive assay equipment.

  14. The effect of E{sub r} on MSE measurements of q, a new technique for measuring E{sub r}, and a test of the neoclassical electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.

    1996-10-01

    Previous analysis of motional-Stark Effect (MSE) data to measure the q-profile ignored contributions from the plasma electric field. The MSE measurements are shown to be sensitive to the electric field and require significant corrections for plasmas with large rotation velocities or pressure gradients. MSE measurements from rotating plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirm the significance of these corrections and verify their magnitude. Several attractive configurations are considered for future MSE-based diagnostics for measuring the plasma radial electric field. MSE data from TFTR is analyzed to determine the change in the radial electric field between two plasmas. The measured electric field quantitatively agrees with the predictions of neoclassical theory. These results confirm the utility of a MSE electric field measurement.

  15. nuclear testing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    testing NNSA scientists find more effective ways to detect nuclear explosions near and far NNSA activities are vital to detecting nuclear explosions and helping verify compliance with the testing ban worldwide. Recent developments at NNSA's Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will help NNSA meet this commitment. Using computer-generated models and field experiments, LLNL simulates how

  16. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  17. Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakirev, Fedor F; Jaroszynski, J; Hunte, F; Balicas, L; Jo, Youn - Jung; Raicevic, I; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D C; Fang, L; Cheng, P; Jia, Y; Wen, H H

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

  18. Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; et al

    2014-06-27

    Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop a simple parametric description for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken to approximate the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developedmore » follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 μm diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A correction factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this correction factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization to the immersion

  19. Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; et al

    2015-01-13

    Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop an empirical parameterization for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken as a measure of the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterizationmore » developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 μm diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A calibration factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this calibration factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization, including calibration

  20. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  1. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  2. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau. Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Johnson, Christian D.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2015-09-01

    A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Program. The active desiccation portion of the test has been completed. Monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and are reported herein. This is an interim data summary report that includes about 4 years of post-desiccation monitoring data. The DOE field test plan proscribes a total of 5 years of post-desiccation monitoring.

  3. The magnetic field of active region 11158 during the 2011 February 12-17 flares: Differences between photospheric extrapolation and coronal forward-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang E-mail: xudongs@stanford.edu

    2014-04-10

    We developed a coronal nonlinear force-free field (COR-NLFFF) forward-fitting code that fits an approximate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution to the observed geometry of automatically traced coronal loops. In contrast to photospheric NLFFF codes, which calculate a magnetic field solution from the constraints of the transverse photospheric field, this new code uses coronal constraints instead, and this way provides important information on systematic errors of each magnetic field calculation method, as well as on the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. In this study we applied the COR-NLFFF code to NOAA Active Region 11158, during the time interval of 2011 February 12-17, which includes an X2.2 GOES-class flare plus 35 M- and C-class flares. We calculated the free magnetic energy with a 6 minute cadence over 5 days. We find good agreement between the two types of codes for the total nonpotential E{sub N} and potential energy E{sub P} but find up to a factor of 4 discrepancy in the free energy E {sub free} = E{sub N} – E{sub P} and up to a factor of 10 discrepancy in the decrease of the free energy ΔE {sub free} during flares. The coronal NLFFF code exhibits a larger time variability and yields a decrease of free energy during the flare that is sufficient to satisfy the flare energy budget, while the photospheric NLFFF code shows much less time variability and an order of magnitude less free-energy decrease during flares. The discrepancy may partly be due to the preprocessing of photospheric vector data but more likely is due to the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. We conclude that the coronal field cannot be correctly calculated on the basis of photospheric data alone and requires additional information on coronal loop geometries.

  4. Assuring the Quality of Test Results in the Field of Nuclear Techniques and Ionizing Radiation. The Practical Implementation of Section 5.9 of the EN ISO/IEC 17025 Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cucu, Daniela; Woods, Mike

    2008-08-14

    The paper aims to present a practical approach for testing laboratories to ensure the quality of their test results. It is based on the experience gained in assessing a large number of testing laboratories, discussing with management and staff, reviewing results obtained in national and international PTs and ILCs and exchanging information in the EA laboratory committee.According to EN ISO/IEC 17025, an accredited laboratory has to implement a programme to ensure the quality of its test results for each measurand. Pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical measures shall be applied in a systematic manner. They shall include both quality control and quality assurance measures.When designing the quality assurance programme a laboratory should consider pre-analytical activities (like personnel training, selection and validation of test methods, qualifying equipment), analytical activities ranging from sampling, sample preparation, instrumental analysis and post-analytical activities (like decoding, calculation, use of statistical tests or packages, management of results).Designed on different levels (analyst, quality manager and technical manager), including a variety of measures, the programme shall ensure the validity and accuracy of test results, the adequacy of the management system, prove the laboratory's competence in performing tests under accreditation and last but not least show the comparability of test results.Laboratory management should establish performance targets and review periodically QC/QA results against them, implementing appropriate measures in case of non-compliance.

  5. Summary of activities at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility, October 1, 1995 to January 31, 1997, and initial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.; Keck, K.N.

    1997-03-01

    Replicates of two engineered barrier designs (a thick soil barrier and a bio/capillary barrier) were constructed in the test plots of the facility. Prior to placement of any soil in the test plots, instruments were calibrated and attached to plot instrument towers, which were then installed in the test plots. Soil from Spreading Area B was installed in the test plots in lifts and compacted. Instruments attached to the instrument tower were placed in shallow trenches dug in the lifts and buried. Each instrument was checked to make sure it functioned prior to installation of the next lift. Soil samples were collected from each lift in one plot during construction for later determination of physical and hydraulic properties. After completion of the test plots, the data acquisition system was finalized, and data collection began. Appropriate instrument calibration equations and equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction techniques are described. Initial data show test plot soils drying throughout the summer and early fall. This corresponds to low rainfall during this period. Infiltration of water into the test plots was first detected around mid-November with several subsequent episodes in December. Infiltration was verified by corresponding measurements from several different instruments [time domain reflectometry (TDR), neutron probe, thermocouple psychrometers, and heat dissipation sensors]. Tensiometer data does not appear to corroborate data from the other instruments. Test plots were warmer on the side closest to the access trench indicating a temperature effect from the trench. This resulted in greater soil moisture freezing with less and shallower infiltration on the far side of the plots than on the side closest to the trench. At the end of this monitoring period, infiltration in all but two of the test plots has reached the 155-cm depth. Infiltration in test plots B2 and S3 has reached only the 140-cm depth. The monitored infiltration events have

  6. Quality assurance guidance for field sampling and measurement assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These documents support the EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) and are based on applicable regulatory requirements and DOE Orders. They address requirements in DOE Orders by providing guidance that pertains specifically to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. DOE 5700.6C Quality Assurance (QA) defines policy and requirements to establish QA programs ensuring that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized. This is accomplished through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks imposed by the facility and the project. Every organization supporting EM`s environmental sampling and analysis activities must develop and document a QA program. Management of each organization is responsible for appropriate QA program implementation, assessment, and improvement. The collection of credible and cost-effective environmental data is critical to the long-term success of remedial and waste management actions performed at DOE facilities. Only well established and management supported assessment programs within each EM-support organization will enable DOE to demonstrate data quality. The purpose of this series of documents is to offer specific guidance for establishing an effective assessment program for EM`s environmental sampling and analysis (ESA) activities.

  7. The National Fuel End-Use Efficiency Field Test: Energy Savings and Performance of an Improved Energy Conservation Measure Selection Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an advanced residential energy conservation measure (ECM) selection technique was tested in Buffalo, New York, to verify the energy savings and program improvements achieved from use of the technique in conservation programs and provide input into determining whether utility investments in residential gas end-use conservation are cost effective. The technique analyzes a house to identify all ECMs that are cost effective in the building envelope, space-heating system, and water-heating system. The benefit-to-cost ratio (BCR) for each ECM is determined and cost-effective ECMs (BCR > 1.0) are selected once interactions between ECMs are taken into account. Eighty-nine houses with the following characteristics were monitored for the duration of the field test: occupants were low-income, houses were single-family detached houses but not mobile homes, and primary space- and water-heating systems were gas-fired. Forty-five houses received a mix of ECMs as selected by the measure selection technique (audit houses) and 44 served as a control group. Pre-weatherization data were collected from January to April 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected from December 1988 to April 1989. Space- and waterheating gas consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the two winters. A house energy consumption model and regression analysis were employed to normalize the space-heating energy savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and a 68 F indoor temperature. Space and water-heating energy savings for the audit houses were adjusted by the savings for the control houses. The average savings of 257 therms/year for the audit houses was 17% of the average pre-weatherization house gas consumption and 78% of that predicted. Average space-heating energy savings was 252 therms/year (25% of pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption and 85% of the predicted value) and average water-heating savings was 5 therms/year (2% of pre

  8. Cranfield Thermosiphon test DTS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry Freifeld

    2015-01-19

    Thermal profile data acquired using Silixa Ultima Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) at Cranfield, MS field test

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1.2 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ideue, Y.; Nagao, T.; Sasaki, S.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Saito, T.; Murayama, T.; Trump, J. R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Aussel, H.; Ilbert, O.; Sanders, D. B.; McCracken, H.; Mobasher, B.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the relation between the star formation activity in galaxies and environment at z {approx_equal} 1.2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field, using the fraction of [O II] emitters and the local galaxy density. The fraction of [O II] emitters appears to be almost constant over the surface density of galaxies between 0.2 and 10 Mpc{sup -2}. This trend is different from that seen in the local universe where the star formation activity is weaker in higher density regions. To understand this difference between z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 0, we study the fraction of non-isolated galaxies as a function of local galaxy density. We find that the fraction of non-isolated galaxies increases with increasing density. Our results suggest that the star formation in galaxies at z {approx} 1 is triggered by galaxy interaction and/or mergers.

  10. Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

    2011-10-01

    Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  12. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic...

  13. THE CLUSTER AND FIELD GALAXY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION AT z = 1-1.5: EVIDENCE FOR A REVERSAL OF THE LOCAL ANTICORRELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND AGN FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Paul; Miller, E. D.; Bautz, M.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, R. C.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Galametz, A.; Norman, D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Brown, M. J. I.

    2013-05-01

    The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold interstellar medium at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and galaxies co-evolve. We present a new measurement of the AGN fraction in a sample of 13 clusters of galaxies (M {>=} 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) at 1 < z < 1.5 selected from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, as well as the field fraction in the immediate vicinity of these clusters, and combine these data with measurements from the literature to quantify the relative evolution of cluster and field AGN from the present to z {approx} 3. We estimate that the cluster AGN fraction at 1 < z < 1.5 is f{sub A} = 3.0{sup +2.4}{sub -1.4}% for AGNs with a rest-frame, hard X-ray luminosity greater than L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. This fraction is measured relative to all cluster galaxies more luminous than M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) + 1, where M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) is the absolute magnitude of the break in the galaxy luminosity function at the cluster redshift in the IRAC 3.6 {mu}m bandpass. The cluster AGN fraction is 30 times greater than the 3{sigma} upper limit on the value for AGNs of similar luminosity at z {approx} 0.25, as well as more than an order of magnitude greater than the AGN fraction at z {approx} 0.75. AGNs with L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} exhibit similarly pronounced evolution with redshift. In contrast to the local universe, where the luminous AGN fraction is higher in the field than in clusters, the X-ray and MIR-selected AGN fractions in the field and clusters are consistent at 1 < z < 1.5. This is evidence that the cluster AGN population has evolved more rapidly than the field population from z {approx} 1.5 to the present. This environment-dependent AGN evolution mimics the more rapid evolution of star-forming galaxies in clusters relative to the field.

  14. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Crane Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crane Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! Please enter your personal information in the spaces below. A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty day period. All fields are required to be filled in. Login: Login First Name: Last Name: Phone Number: Contact: 1. The first thing you should do when using the crane is to: a. verify the battery power on the remote control. b. drag the load to the desired

  16. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid ElectricTrolleys; Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    website and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT ◆ PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS Knoxville Area Transit PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS NREL/PIX 13795 KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT (KAT) is recognized nationally for its exceptional service to the City of Knoxville, Tennessee. KAT received the American Public Transportation Associa- tion's prestigious Outstanding Achievement Award in 2004. Award-winning accomplishments included KAT's increase in annual ridership

  17. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Well test report and CO/sub 2/ injection plan for the Little Knife Field CO/sub 2/ minitest Billings County, North Dakota. First annual report, September 1979-August 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upton, J.E.

    1981-11-01

    Gulf Oil Exploration and Production Company in conjunction with the Department of Energy is conducting a field test of the CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement process. The project is being conducted in the Mission Canyon Formation (lower Mississippian), a dolomitized carbonate reservoir which is currently in the middle stage of primary depletion. Location of the field is in west-central North Dakota at the approximate center of the Williston Basin. Four wells were drilled in an inverted four-spot configuration within the five-acre minitest. The central well is the injection well surrounded by three non-producing observation wells. Oriented cores were obtained from each well for detailed reservoir characterization and laboratory testing. In addition, pulse and injectivity tests were obtained. Results from these tests were used to upgrade two reservoir simulation models. Various parameters within the models were modified to determine the most efficient injection plan. A WAG-type injection sequence involving alternate slugs of water and CO/sub 2/ will be employed. The test is designed to establish the incremental recovery, over waterflooding, by a miscible CO/sub 2/ flood in an oil reservoir.

  19. ARM - Field Notes Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... I truly enjoyed writing about the daily field activities, participants' roles, their instruments, and the scientific issues related to the effects of air pollution on climate ...

  20. HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2013-11-10

    We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ∼1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6σ significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

  1. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Atomic Testing Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Atomic Testing Museum NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office NATIONAL ATOMIC TESTING MUSEUM Photograph of Atomic Testing Museum The Nevada Test Site ...

  2. A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martin G. De Kauwe; Serbin, Shawn P.; Lin, Yan -Shih; Wright, Ian J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ellsworth, David S.; Maire, Vincent; Prentice, I. Colin; Atkin, Owen K.; et al

    2015-12-31

    Here, simulations of photosynthesis by terrestrial biosphere models typically need a specification of the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax). Estimating this parameter using A–Ci curves (net photosynthesis, A, vs intercellular CO2 concentration, Ci) is laborious, which limits availability of Vcmax data. However, many multispecies field datasets include net photosynthetic rate at saturating irradiance and at ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration (Asat) measurements, from which Vcmax can be extracted using a ‘one-point method’.

  3. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Building Science Corporation is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, Florida; zone 2A), insulated with air-permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass).

  5. Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Insights from Thin Layers Deep Insights from Thin Layers March 13, 2014 - 4:08pm Addthis The Linac Coherent Light Source will create 3D images of single molecules using ultrafast pulses of very intense hard X-rays. | Image courtesy of SLAC. The Linac Coherent Light Source will create 3D images of single molecules using ultrafast pulses of very intense hard X-rays. | Image courtesy of SLAC. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) How does it work? A

  6. Quarterly geotechnical field data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Reports is to meet the US Department of Energy intent to provide geotechnical and related information from WIPP underground activities to interested persons or groups in a timely manner. This Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Report (GFDR) presents information obtained from the geotechnical studies at the WIPP site underground facilities from April 1 through June 30, 1985, as well as all previous data collected from the geomechanical instruments. During this period, the geotechnical activities at the site included maintaining and repairing instruments and monitoring previously installed geomechanical instruments in shafts, underground drifts, and test rooms. The data presented in this GFDR reflect the update of continuing measurements and monitoring. Also continuing and included in this report are preliminary geotechnical and structural analyses and interpretations of the data.

  7. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  8. Semivolatile organic (GC-MS) and inorganic analyses of groundwater samples during the hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) field test in Visalia, CA, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarappa, M; Knauss, K G; Kumamoto, G; Leif, R N; Newmark, R L

    1998-02-05

    Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation (HPO) is a novel, in situ, thermal-remediation technology that uses hot, oxygenated groundwater to completely oxidize a wide range of organic pollutants. A field demonstration of HPO was performed during the summer of 1997 at the Southern California Edison Pole Yard in Visalia, California, a site contaminated with creosote. The goal of the field experiment was to confirm the success of HPO under field remediation conditions. The groundwater was heated by steam injections, and oxygen was added by co-injection of compressed air. The progress of the HPO remediation process was evaluated by monitoring groundwater from multiple wells for dissolved oxygen, dissolved inorganic carbon, and dissolved organic contaminant levels. Analyses of groundwater chemistry allowed us to measure the concentrations of creosote components and to identify oxygenated intermediates produced by the HPO treatment. Dissolved organic carbon levels increased in response to steam injections because of the enhanced dissolution and mobilization of the creosote into the heated groundwater. Elevated concentrations of phenols and benzoic acid were measured in wells affected by the steam injections. Concentrations of other oxygenated compounds (i.e., fluorenone, anthrone, and 9,10-anthracenedione) increased in response to the steam injections. The production of these partially oxidized compounds is consistent with the aqueous-phase HPO reactions of creosote. Additional changes in the groundwater in response to steam injection were also consistent with the groundwater HPO chemistry. A drop in dissolved oxygen was observed in the aquifer targeted for the steam injections, and isotope shifts in the dissolved inorganic pool reflected the input of oxidized carbon derived from the creosote carbon.

  9. A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin G. De Kauwe; Serbin, Shawn P.; Lin, Yan -Shih; Wright, Ian J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ellsworth, David S.; Maire, Vincent; Prentice, I. Colin; Atkin, Owen K.; Rogers, Alistair; Niinemets, Ulo; Meir, Patrick; Uddling, Johan; Togashi, Henrique F.; Tarvainen, Lasse; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Evans, Bradley J.; Ishida, F. Yoko; Domingues, Tomas F.

    2015-12-31

    Here, simulations of photosynthesis by terrestrial biosphere models typically need a specification of the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax). Estimating this parameter using A–Ci curves (net photosynthesis, A, vs intercellular CO2 concentration, Ci) is laborious, which limits availability of Vcmax data. However, many multispecies field datasets include net photosynthetic rate at saturating irradiance and at ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration (Asat) measurements, from which Vcmax can be extracted using a ‘one-point method’.

  10. High field Nb/sub 3/Sn Axicell insert coils for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Scanlan, R.M.; Agarwal, K.L.; Bailey, R.E.; Burgeson, J.E.; Kim, I.K.; Magnuson, G.D.; Mallett, B.D.; Pickering, J.L.

    1984-03-01

    Two 12-tesla superconducting insert coils are being designed by General Dynamics Convair Division for the axicell regions of MFTF-B for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A major challenge of this project is to ensure that combined fabrication and operational strains induced in the conductor are within stringent limitations of the relatively brittle Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor filaments. These coils are located in the axicell region of MFTF-B. They have a clear-bore diameter of 36.195cm (14.25 inches) and consist of 27 double pancakes (i.e., 54 pancakes per coil) would on an electrically insulated 304LN stainless steel/bobbin helium vessel. Each pancake has 57 turns separated by G-10CR insulation. The complete winding bundle has 4.6 million ampere-turns and uniform current density of 2007 A/cm/sup 2/. In conjunction with the other magnets in the system, they produce a 12-tesla central field and a 12.52-tesla peak field. A multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor was selected to meet these requirements. The conductor consists of a monolithic insert soldered into a copper stabilizer. Sufficient cross-sectional area and work-hardening of the copper stabilizer has been provided for the conductor to self-react the electromagnetic Lorentz force induced hoop stresses with normal operational tensile strains less than 0.07 percent.

  11. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  12. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

  13. Field Mapping (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping (Healy, 1970) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique...

  14. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  15. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  16. Effectiveness of 700{degrees}C thermal treatment on primary water stress corrosion sensitivity of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes: Laboratory tests and in field experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cattant, F.; Keroulas, F. de; Garriga-Majo, D.; Todeschini, P.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    In France, the steam generators of some 900 MWe reactors, and of all the 1 300 MWe reactors in service are equipped with heat treated Alloy 600 tubes. The purpose of the heat treatment, performed at 700{degrees}C, is to relieve the residual stresses. Generally, it also increases the SCC resistance of the alloy. A laboratory study has been carried out in order to gain a better understanding of the metallurgical factors influencing the PWSCC resistance of Alloy 600 after heat treatment. It has been shown that there are two kinds of tubes for which the heat treatment does not produce a microstructure having a potentially high resistance to SCC: tubes with a high carbon content (over 0.032%) or tubes mill-annealed at high temperatures and heavily cold-worked by the straightening. The analysis of the behaviour of french steam generators reveals that the heat treatment generally had the expected beneficial effect. However, the early cracking in service of some treated tubes led EDF (national power company) to proceed with removals. The majority of the cracked pulled-out tubes exhibit microstructures having a potentially high PWSCC sensibility in laboratory tests. It has been shown that these microstructures can be correlated to a high carbon content.

  17. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA)- Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  18. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  19. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  20. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouyang, Bing Xue, Jia-Dan Zheng, Xuming E-mail: zxm@zstu.edu.cn; Fang, Wei-Hai E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-21

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S{sub 2}(A′) state: the radiative S{sub 2,min} → S{sub 0} transition and the nonradiative S{sub 2} → S{sub 1} internal conversion via CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  1. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  2. Quarterly geotechnical field data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Reports is to meet the US Department of Energy intent to provide geotechnical and related information from WIPP underground activities to interested persons or groups in a timely manner. This Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Report (GFDR) presents information obtained from the geotechnical studies at the WIPP site underground facilities from April 1 through June 30, 1985, as well as all previous data collected from the geomechanical instruments. During this period, the geotechnical activities at the site included maintaining and repairing instruments and monitoring previously installed geomechanical instruments in shafts, underground drifts, and test rooms. The data presented in this GFDR reflect the update of continuing measurements and monitoring. Also continuing and included in this report are preliminary geotechnical and structural analyses and interpretations of the data. The GFDR is organized into two principal parts. The first part, Geotechnical Field Data, presents in graphical form all the data collected since April 1982 from the geomechanical instruments. Presented in the second part, Evaluation and Analyses, are preliminary interpretations and analyses of the data. In this report a reanalysis of the test room convergence data is presented, as well as continuing geotechnical assessments of all the facility features. The computational analyses section presents the analysis of a future storage room, and the refined results, based on in situ data, from analyses for the test rooms. Also included in the second part are separate sections on evaluation and interpretation of the instrumentation measurements, and an updated description and evaluation of observed behavior of the underground openings.

  3. Development, Testing and Validation of a Waste Assay System for the Measurement and Characterisation of Active Spent Fuel Element Debris From UK Magnox Reactors - 12533

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, John A.; Burke, Kevin J.; Looman, Marc R.; Towner, Antony C.N.; Phillips, Martin E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the development, testing and validation of a waste measurement instrument for characterising active remote handled radioactive waste arising from the operation of Magnox reactors in the United Kingdom. Following operation in UK Magnox gas cooled reactors and a subsequent period of cooling, parts of the magnesium-aluminium alloy cladding were removed from spent fuel and the uranium fuel rods with the remaining cladding were removed to Sellafield for treatment. The resultant Magnox based spent fuel element debris (FED), which constitutes active intermediate level waste (ILW) has been stored in concrete vaults at the reactor sites. As part of the decommissioning of the FED vaults the FED must be removed, measured and characterised and placed in intermediate storage containers. The present system was developed for use at the Trawsfynydd nuclear power station (NPS), which is in the decommissioning phase, but the approach is potentially applicable to FED characterisation at all of the Magnox reactors. The measurement system consists of a heavily shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with electromechanical cooling and a high count-rate preamplifier and digital multichannel pulse height analyser. The HPGe based detector system is controlled by a software code, which stores the measurement result and allows a comprehensive analysis of the measured FED data. Fuel element debris is removed from the vault and placed on a tray to a uniform depth of typically 10 cm for measurement. The tray is positioned approximately 1.2 meters above the detector which views the FED through a tungsten collimator with an inverted pyramid shape. At other Magnox sites the positions may be reversed with the shielded and collimated HPGe detector located above the tray on which the FED is measured. A comprehensive Monte Carlo modelling and analysis of the measurement process has been performed in order to optimise the measurement geometry and eliminate

  4. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Draft topical report for Task {number_sign}7.2 entitled ``Field scale test`` (January 10, 1996--December 31, 1997)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athmer, C.; Ho, S.V.; Hughes, B.M.

    1997-11-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task {number_sign}7.2 summarizes the Field Scale Test conducted by Monsanto Company, DuPont, and General Electric.

  5. Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpvnewhouse.pdf (5.48 MB) More Documents ...

  6. Demonstration and Field Test of airjacket technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Sullivan, D.P.

    1998-06-01

    There are approximately 600,000 paint spray workers in the United States applying paints and coatings with some type of sprayer. Approximately 5% of these spray workers are in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). These spray workers apply paints or other coatings to products such as bridges, houses, automobiles, wood and metal furniture, and other consumer and industrial products. The materials being sprayed include exterior and interior paints, lacquers, primers, shellacs, stains and varnishes. Our experimental findings indicate that the Airjacket does not significantly reduce the exposure of spray workers to paint fumes during HVLP spraying. The difference between ideal and actual spray paint procedures influence the mechanisms driving spray workers exposures to paint fumes and influence the viability of the Airjacket technology. In the ideal procedure, for which the Airjacket was conceived, the spray worker's exposure to paint fumes is due largely to the formation of a recirculating eddy between the spray worker and the object painted. The Airjacket ejects air to diminish and ventilate this eddy. In actual practice, exposures may result largely from directing paint upstream and from the bounce-back of the air/paint jet of the object being painted. The Airjacket, would not be expected to dramatically reduce exposures to paint fumes when the paint is not directed downstream or when the bounce-back of paint on the object creates a cloud of paint aerosols around the spray worker.

  7. Vehicle to Grid Communications Field Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. N HIGH-EXPLOSIVE FIELD TESTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Nuclear Agency, 26 September 1979. 28. Green, W.E., Airborne Sampling and Analysis of ... Slade, D.H., Ed, Meteorology and Atomic Energy 1968, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Air ...

  9. PREPRINT I Field Air Injection Tests

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... b) 21.tL In(re rb) k (4) wherePb istile borehole injection pressure, rbthe borehole radius, andre the effective radius, orradius atwhichthe pressure returns totheambient value Pe. ...

  10. Package DX Units: Performance Optimization & Field Tests

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Estimated 1.6 million legacy units operating at low efficiency levels 100,000 units at DoD facilities 20,000 buildings 100,000 units at USPS facilities 30,000 buildings ...

  11. E3T Emerging Technology Field Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Sector Outreach 1. Energy Efficiency (EE) project planning and marketing support 2. Site assessmentsenergy audits to evaluate customer opportunities for energy...

  12. Quarterly geotechnical field data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of the Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Reports is to meet the US Department of Energy intent to provide geotechnical and related information from WIPP underground activities to interested persons or groups in a timely manner. This Quarterly Geotechnical Field Data Report (GFDR) presents information obtained from the geotechnical studies at the WIPP site underground facilities from April 1 through June 30, 1985, as well as all previous data collected from the geomechanical instruments. During this period, the geotechnical activities at the site included maintaining and repairing instruments and monitoring previously installed geomechanical instruments in shafts, underground drifts, and test rooms. The data presented in this GFDR reflect the update of continuing measurements and monitoring. Also continuing and included in this report are preliminary geotechnical and structural analyses and interpretations of the data. The GFDR is organized into two principal parts. The first part, Geotechnical Field Data, presents in graphical form all the data collected since April 1982 from the geomechanical instruments. Presented in the second part, Evaluation and Analyses, are preliminary interpretations and analyses of the data. In this report, continuing geotechnical assessment of all the facility features is presented. 5 refs., 350 figs., 66 tabs.

  13. Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active Desiccant Hybrid Rooftop Systems Combined with a Natural Gas Driven Cogeneration Package, 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report summary of a research/demonstration project involving a custom 230 kW cogeneration package with four integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) systems

  14. Test plan for: TSAP bit qualification: Temperature criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ralston, G.L.

    1995-10-23

    This is the Test Plan for acquiring TSAP bit temperature performance data. Hanford Site waste tanks are currently being sampled by several methods. One of these, Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS), uses a cutting bit/sample tube arrangement to obtain core samples of tank contents. Recent efforts to improve sample recovery have resulted in a new bit/sample tube design. Prior to field use, bit performance in two key areas needs to be tested. These areas are: penetration into steel plate, and a temperature rise as a function of downforce, rpm, and time. A performance test in the above two areas was conducted in August, 1995. Based on a review of that test activity, selected follow-on testing is planned to confirm data obtained in the temperature area. The results of both test activities will then be released as a single test report.

  15. Stress Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stress Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Stress Test Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  16. Deputy Manager, Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is the lead Department of Energy office responsible for managing, planning, integrating, and implementing the National Transuranic (TRU) Program (NTP) activities...

  17. Field Mapping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mapping Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Mapping Details Activities (74) Areas (44) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  18. STUDY OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF ACTIVE REGION 11117 AROUND THE TIME OF A CONFINED FLARE USING A DATA-DRIVEN CESE-MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2012-11-10

    We apply a data-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare that occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma {beta}. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photosphere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria based on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory around the time of the flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most cases. The magnetic configuration changes very little during the studied time interval of 2 hr. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by {approx}10{sup 30} erg, which seems to be adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare.

  19. Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-07-01

    This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

  20. Hydrogeologic Site Characterization and Well Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories' Defense Waste Management Programs (DWMP) uses a combination of field systems, software and scientific expertise to perform characterization activities. Capabilities include groundwater testing and hydraulic response analysis to assess and understand subsurface conditions at a particular site or region. Hydrology as part of the Site Characterization Whether you are looking to site a petroleum production well, locate a new business, or select a site for a nuclear repository, a

  1. ZEST flight test experiments, Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii. Test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cenkci, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) is proposing to execute two ZEST flight experiments to obtain information related to the following objectives: validation of payload modeling; characterization of a high energy release cloud; and documentation of scientific phenomena that may occur as a result of releasing a high energy cloud. The proposed action is to design, develop, launch, and detonate two payloads carrying high energy explosives. Activities required to support this proposal include: (1) execution of component assembly tests at Space Data Division (SDD) in Chandler, Arizona and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and (2) execution of pre-flight flight test activities at Kauai Test Facility.

  2. Assessment of microorganisms from Indonesian Oil Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadarwati, S.; Udiharto, M.; Rahman, M.; Jasjfi, E.; Legowo, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum resources have been the mainstay of the national development in Indonesia. However, resources are being depleted after over a century of exploitation, while the demand continues to grow with the rapid economic development of the country. In facing the problem, EOR has been applied in Indonesia, such as the steamflooding project in Duri field, but a more energy efficient technology would be preferable. Therefore, MEOR has been recommended as a promising solution. Our study, aimed at finding indigenous microorganisms which can be developed for application in MEOR, has isolated microbes from some oil fields of Indonesia. These microorganisms have been identified, their activities studied, and the effects of their metabolisms examined. This paper describes the research carried out by LEMIGAS in this respect, giving details on the methods of sampling, incubation, identification, and activation of the microbes as well as tests on the effects of their metabolites, with particular attention to those with potential for application in MEOR.

  3. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  4. NREL: Wind Research - Regional Test Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To increase the availability of small wind turbine testing and share field expertise, the ... capable of providing certification testing services to the small wind turbine industry. ...

  5. Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  6. Field Mapping At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  7. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  8. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  9. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  10. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  11. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  12. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

  13. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  14. An atomic orbital-based formulation of analytical gradients and nonadiabatic coupling vector elements for the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, James W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-10-21

    We recently presented an algorithm for state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) orbital optimization that capitalizes on sparsity in the atomic orbital basis set to reduce the scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. Here, we extend those algorithms to calculate the analytic gradient and nonadiabatic coupling vectors for SA-CASSCF. Combining the low computational scaling with acceleration from graphical processing units allows us to perform SA-CASSCF geometry optimizations for molecules with more than 1000 atoms. The new approach will make minimal energy conical intersection searches and nonadiabatic dynamics routine for molecular systems with O(10{sup 2}) atoms.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Per Executive Order 13031, “Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership,” the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric

  16. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Annual report, February 24, 1993--February 23, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, V.J.

    1994-07-07

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the ``beach cone`` in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations, and six sites were actually used. Six hundred beach cones were installed at the six sites in late July and early August, 1992. An additional 109 cones were installed at an eighth site in December of 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. The average increase in elevation was about 7 inches (0. 18 in) with a maximum buildup of 3 ft. (I in). At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard of sand or approximately $500,000 per mile of beach, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced. The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is negligible, does not hinder their effectiveness. We do not yet have sufficient data to state the categorical success of the beach cones, but results to date are encouraging.

  17. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-08-08

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

  18. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  19. Documenting the Effectiveness of Cosorption of Airborne Contaminants by a Field-Installed Active Desiccant System: Final Report - Phase 2D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2003-01-23

    The final report for Phase 1 of this research effort (ORNL/SUB/94-SV004/1) concluded that a significant market opportunity would exist for active desiccant systems if it could be demonstrated that they can remove a significant proportion of common airborne contaminants while simultaneously performing the primary function of dehumidifying a stream of outdoor air or recirculated building air. If the engineering community begins to follow the intent of ASHRAE Standard 62, now part of all major building codes, the outdoor air in many major cities may need to be pre-cleaned before it is introduced into occupied spaces. Common air contaminant cosorption capability would provide a solution to three important aspects of the ASHRAE 62-89 standard that have yet to be effectively addressed by heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment manufacturers: (1) The ASHRAE standard defines acceptable outdoor air quality. If the outdoor air contains unacceptable levels of certain common outdoor air contaminants (e.g., sulfur dioxide, ozone), then the standard requires that these contaminants be removed from the outdoor air stream to reach compliance with the acceptable outdoor air quality guidelines. (2) Some engineers prefer to apply a filtration or prescriptive approach rather than a ventilation approach to solving indoor air quality problems. The ASHRAE standard recognizes this approach provided that the filtration technology exists to remove the gaseous contaminants encountered. The performance of current gaseous filtration technologies is not well documented, and they can be costly to maintain because the life of the filter is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, it is not easy to determine when the filters need changing. In such applications, an additional advantage provided by the active desiccant system would be that the same piece of equipment could control space humidity and provide filtration, even during unoccupied periods, if the active desiccant system

  20. Operation greenhouse, scientific director`s report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951, annex 9.2, Sandia Corporation Proving Ground Group. Part 3. Fuzing and firing activities, December 1951 (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    This report covers the activities of the Fuzing and Firing Team of Task Unit 3.1.4, the Weapons Assembly Organization. The Fuzing and Firing Team was directly responsible for the assembly and testing of the various fuzing and firing systems necessary to detonate the experimental weapons under test. Other responsibilities of this group included the supplying of fiducial signals from the firing sets for the transit-time experiments being conducted by other groups and a partial responsibility for the final arming of the weapons fired on the towers.

  1. Forklift Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forklift Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ... A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty ...

  2. Project W320 heel jet secondary catch mechanism lateral load test - test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This test report summarizes testing activities and documents the results of the lateral load test performed on the Heel Jet Secondary Catch Mechanism.

  3. Lustre Tests

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-31

    Lustre-tests is a package of regression tests for the Lustre file system containing I/O workloads representative of problems discovered on production systems.

  4. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and ... Testing Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity ...

  5. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  6. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougal, R.A.

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  7. Specific Heat of Ce{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}Al{sub 3} in Magnetic Fields: A Test of the Anisotropic Kondo Picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietri, R.; Ingersent, K.; Andraka, B.

    2001-02-05

    The specific heat C of Ce{sub 0.8}La {sub 0.2}Al{sub 3} has been measured as a function of temperature T in magnetic fields up to 14T. A large peak in C at 2.3K has recently been ascribed to an anisotropic Kondo effect in this compound. A 14-T field depresses the temperature of the peak by only 0.2K, but strongly reduces its height. The corresponding peak in C/T shifts from 2.1K at zero field to 1.7K at 14T. The extrapolated specific heat coefficient {gamma}=lim/T{yields}0 C/T increases with field over the range studied. We show that these trends are inconsistent with the anisotropic Kondo model.

  8. Golden Field Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - CASTINE DOE/EA-1792-S1 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed a Supplemental Environmental Assessment (Supplemental EA)

  9. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field ...

  10. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field ...

  11. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Johnson, Christian D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-09-01

    A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the deep vadose zone treatability test program. Desiccation technology relies on removal of water from a portion of the subsurface such that the resultant low moisture conditions inhibit downward movement of water and dissolved contaminants. Previously, a field test report (Truex et al. 2012a) was prepared describing the active desiccation portion of the test and initial post-desiccation monitoring data. Additional monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and is reported herein along with interpretation with respect to desiccation performance. This is an interim report including about 2 years of post-desiccation monitoring data.

  12. Net Test

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  13. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; McCabe, D.

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  14. Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-17

    International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

  15. Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  16. Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

  17. Field Mapping (Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Digital field mapping. References Francis C. Monastero, Mark F. Coolbaugh (2007) Advances In...

  18. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field...

  19. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  20. Energy Department selects Battelle team for a deep borehole field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Battelle team for a deep borehole field test in North Dakota Energy Department selects Battelle team for a deep borehole field test in North Dakota January 5, 2016 - 5:31pm ...