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1

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

2

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

3

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A better understanding of active volcanic areas in the United States through electromagnetic geophysical studies received foundation from the many surveys done for geothermal exploration in the 1970's. Investigations by governmental, industrial, and academic agencies include (but are not limited to) mapping of the Cascades. Long Valley/Mono area, the Jemez volcanic field, Yellowstone Park, and an area in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity,

4

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

5

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

Htun, K.M.

1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A system is proposed for the monitoring of changes in the underground structure of an active volcano over time by applying a transient electromagnetic method. The monitoring system is named ACTIVE, which stands for Array of Controlled Transient-electromagnetics for Imaging Volcano Edifice. The system consists of a transmitter dipole used to generate a controlled transient electromagnetic (EM) field and an array of receivers used to measure the vertical component of the transient magnetic

8

Advances in the remote sensing of volcanic activity and hazards, with special consideration to applications in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of remote sensing for studies of volcanic activity and hazards have developed rapidly in the past 40 years. This has facilitated the observation of volcanic processes, such as ground deformation and thermal emission changes, lava flows, ...

G. G. J. Ernst; M. Kervyn; R. M. Teeuw

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Organising software in active environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the use of logic-based multi-agent systems for modelling active environments. Our case study is an intelligent support system for a so-called “active museum”. We show the approach of structuring the “agent ...

Benjamin Hirsch; Michael Fisher; Chiara Ghidini; Paolo Busetta

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

11

The Origin of High-Enthalpy Geothermal of Non-Volcanic Environment---As a Case Study of Yangbajing Geothermal Field at Qinghai-Tibet Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among global high-enthalpy geothermal resources, geothermal fields within Tibet are located in non-volcanic environment only. Results of the PTt(pressure-temperature-time) trajectory calculation of the Plateau uplifting gave a comparatively satisfactory ...

Jin Shenghai; Yao Zujin; Yin Miying

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sensor networks for high-resolution monitoring of volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed and deployed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcán Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The ...

Matt Welsh; Geoff Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee...

15

The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment.

M. Guedel

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-¹). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

Pontbriand, Claire Willis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique...

18

Segmenting sensor data for activity monitoring in smart environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within a smart environment, sensors have the ability to perceive changes of the environment itself and can therefore be used to infer high-level information such as activity behaviours. Sensor events collected over a period of time may contain several ... Keywords: Activity detection, Evidential modelling, Smart environments, Time series sensor segmentation

Xin Hong; Chris D. Nugent

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

Crowe, B.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Neutron activation analysis applied to energy and environment  

SciTech Connect

Neutron activation analysis was applied to a number of problems concerned with energy production and the environment. Burning of fossil fuel, the search for new sources of uranium, possible presence of toxic elements in food and water, and the relationship of trace elements to cardiovascular disease are some of the problems in which neutron activation was used. (auth)

Lyon, W.S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Duration of hydrothermal activity at Steamboat Springs, Nevada, from ages of spatially associated volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steamboat Springs is a presently active equivalent of epithermal gold-silver ore-forming systems. Hot-spring sinter deposits contain small amounts of gold, silver, mercury, antimony, and arsenic. Hot-spring activity probably started before extrusion of the basaltic andesite of Steamboat Springs. Old sinter from the Steamboat Springs system occurs in gravels above and below the basaltic andesite. Intense hydrothermal alteration, including almost complete replacement by hydrothermal potassium-feldspar, has affected the basaltic andesite. Three plagioclase separates of differing potassium content from fresh basaltic andesite yielded potassium-argon ages of 2.52 to 2.55 m.y. Basaltic andesite almost completely replaced by potassium-feldspar yielded an age of 1.1 m.y. The source of energy for the thermal convection system is probably a large rhyolitic magma chamber that supplied the pumice and from which the rhyolite domes were emplaced. Sanidine and obsidian from four of the rhyolite domes yielded potassium-argon ages of 1.15 to 1.52 m.y. and obsidian from one of the northeastern domes yielded apparent ages of 2.97 and 3.03 m.y. The data indicate that hydrothermal activity has occurred at Steamboat Springs, possibly intermittently, for more than 2-1/2 m.y. These data agree with other radiogenic age studies indicating 1- and 2-m.y. lifetimes for the hydrothermal systems that generate epithermal gold-silver deposits.

Silberman, M.L.; White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Dockter, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Children's physical activity and parents' perception of the neighborhood environment: neighborhood impact on kids study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health: The built environment: Designing communities toRosenberg DE: Neighborhood environment and physical activity455. 3. Impact of the built environment on health. http://

Tappe, Karyn A; Glanz, Karen; Sallis, James F; Zhou, Chuan; Saelens, Brian E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Hanson, Gregory R [ORNL; Sexton, Angela Kay [ORNL; Jones Jr, J P [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cnse.albany.edu cnse.albany.edu Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments Dr. Michael A. Carpenter College of NanoScale Science and Engineering Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center University at Albany - SUNY Dr. Sang-Hyun Oh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 6/11/13 ! Oh group, University of Minnesota Carpenter Group, CNSE cnse.albany.edu Harsh Environment Chemical Sensors Nanocomposite Materials * Optical analysis of Au SPR bands * YSZ, TiO 2 , CeO 2 matrix materials * 500-800°C operating environment * SOFC, Jet engines, turbines * CO, H 2 , NO x , R x S Goals of Research are Two-Fold 1. Develop prototype nanorod materials for use in next generation sensing devices

26

Fluorine gettering by activated charcoal in a radiation environment  

SciTech Connect

Activated charcoal has been shown to be an effective gettering agent for the fluorine gas that is liberated in a radiation environment. Even though activated charcoal is a commonly used getter, little is known about the radiation stability of the fluorine-charcoal product. This work has shown that not only is the product stable in high gamma radiation fields, but also that radiation enhances the capacity of the charcoal for the fluorine. The most useful application of this work is with the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt because the radioactive components (fission products and actinides) cause radiolytic damage to the solid LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (64.5, 30.3, 5.0, 0.13 mol %, respectively) resulting in the liberation of fluorine gas. This work has also demonstrated that the maximum damage to the fuel salt by approx.3 /times/ 10/sup 7/ R/h gamma radiation is approximately 2%, at which point the rate of recombination of fluorine with active metal sites within the salt lattice equals the rate of fluorine generation. The enhanced reactivity of the activated charcoal and radiation stability of the product ensures that the gettered fluorine will stay sequestered in the charcoal.

Felker, L.K.; Toth, L.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

28

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic National Park Geothermal Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related

29

Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469â??476...

30

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 LANL has a strategy to clean up the past, control current operations, and move toward a sustainable future in which waste is minimized and other effects on the environment are reduced or eliminated. We work safely, securely, ethically, and in a manner that protects the environment We understand that the health and viability of the Laboratory depend in part on a record of environmental performance, building confidence of the public and our regulators. To gain the right to do what we do, we must work

31

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment Photo Gallery A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area

32

Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

73 Federal Register 73 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 48 / Monday, March 12, 2012 / Rules and Regulations adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. This rule does not use technical standards. Therefore, we did not consider the use of voluntary consensus standards. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321-4370f), and have concluded this action is one of a category of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This rule is categorically excluded, under figure 2-1, paragraph (34)(g), of the Instruction. This rule

33

Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morgan, Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Paul Morgan, Wendell Duffield, John Sass, Tracey Felger (2003) Searching For An Electrical-Grade Geothermal Resource In Northern Arizona To Help Geopower The West Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_San_Francisco_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Morgan,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510822" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

34

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Despite several episodes of ground deformation and intense seismic activity starting in 1978, the Long Valley, California, volcanic area has not produced clearly recognized volcanic tremor. Instead, a variety of atypical microearthquakes have been recorded during these episodes, including events dominated by low-frequency (long-period) or mixed high and low-frequency (hybrid) signals. During a 1997 episode, a number of unusual microearthquakes occurred within a temporary 40-station

35

Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

Kiselev, Daniela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Operating Permits for LBNL Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operating Permits for LBNL Activities Operating Permits for LBNL Activities LBNL Main Site Agency Expiration Date Certified Unified Program Agency Permit and Registration Hazardous Materials Release Response Plan (Hazardous Materials Business Plan) Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plan Underground Storage Tank Program Hazardous Waste Generator Program Tiered Permit Program for Onsite Treatment of Hazardous Wastes City of Berkeley March 1, 2014 Fuel Dispensing Sources at Building 76: E85 Unleaded Bay Area Air Quality Management District July 1, 2014 Stationary Air Emission Sources (28 permits): Diesel-powered Emergency Standby Generators: Buildings 2, 31, 37(2), 48, 50A, 50B, 55, 62, 64(2), 66, 67, 68, 70, 70A, 72, 74, 77, 84B, 85 and three (3) portable units

37

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In this study, we propose a numerical modeling technique which restores the gravity anomaly of tectonic origin and identifies the gravity low of caldera origin. The identification is performed just by comparing the restored gravity anomalies with the observed gravity anomalies, thus we

38

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over Yellowstone National Park (YNP) show contrasting patterns reflecting differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene, Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, a series of mostly altered, andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks partially exposed in mountains on the eastern margin of YNP, produces high-amplitude, positive magnetic

39

Stay Active this Summer (and Save Energy, Money, and the Environment too!)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active this Summer (and Save Energy, Money, and the Active this Summer (and Save Energy, Money, and the Environment too!) Stay Active this Summer (and Save Energy, Money, and the Environment too!) August 8, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Many of us are looking to spend more time outdoors. Like many Americans, I'm thinking about ways to stay physically active and seize the sunny day. Here are five easy things that you can do this summer that will not only help keep you active and get you some Vitamin D, but save money, energy, and the environment too: Bike or walk to work instead of driving. This is a great way to get exercise and save money on gas costs and parking fees, as well as reduce carbon emissions. Walk, run, or exercise outside instead of using a treadmill or

40

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

42

The Environment of Active Galaxies in the SDSS-DR4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the environment of active galaxies and compare it with that of star forming and normal galaxies. We extracted from the Fourth Data Release (DR4) of the Sloan Digitaly Sky Survey (SDSS) the galaxies in the redshift range 0.05 \\le z \\le 0.095 and with M(r) \\le -20.0 (that is M* + 1.45). Emission line ratios and/or widths are used to separate Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) from Star-Forming Galaxies (SFGs); AGN are classified as Seyfert-1 and Seyfert-2 galaxies according to emission line widths. The environmental properties, as defined by a density parameter and the number of companions, are compared for the different types of galaxies, taking into account the morphological type of the host galaxies. We find no difference in the large-scale environment of Seyfert-1 and Seyfert-2 galaxies; however, a larger fraction of Seyfert-2 (~2%) than Seyfert-1 (~1%) is found in systems which are smaller than r_{max} \\le 100 kpc, mainly in low-density environments (pairs or triplets); for comparison, this fraction is ~2% for star forming galaxies and ~1% for normal galaxies. We find no evidence for a relation between large-scale environment properties and activity. If activity and environment are related, this more likely occurs on small scales (e.g. galaxy interaction, merging).

G. Sorrentino; M. Radovich; A. Rifatto

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

45

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

46

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Miocene volcanic complex of the Takashibiyama Formation consists largely of subalkali, subaqueous basalt to andesite lavas and andesite to dacite subaqueous volcaniclastic flow deposits. Most of subaqueous lavas are moderately to intensely brecciated with rugged rough surfaces and ramp structures similar to subaerial block lava. Volcaniclastic flow deposits commonly include basalt to andesite lava fragments and/or pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal

49

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity (Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15_15 km) are reliably

50

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

51

An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The expert system approach enables geochemical evidence to be integrated with geological, petrological and mineralogical evidence in identifying the eruptive setting of ancient volcanic rocks. This paper explains the development of ESCORT, an Expert System for Characterization of Rock Types. ESCORT uses as its knowledge base a set of dispersion matrices derived from a geochemical data bank of some 8000 immobile element analyses, together with tables of magma-type membership probabilities based

52

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lassen Volcanic National Park Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

53

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

54

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Applications Of The Vlf Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The very low-frequency (VLF) induction method has found exceptional utility in studying various volcanic processes of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii because: (1) significant anomalies result exclusively from ionically conductive magma or still-hot intrusions (> 800°C) and the attendant electrolytically conductive hot groundwater; (2) basalt flows forming the bulk of Kilauea have very high resistivities at shallow depths that result in low geologic noise levels and relatively deep depths of

55

Equipment Availability in the Home and School Environment: Its Relationship on Physical Activity in Children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past three decades, instances of childhood obesity have tripled in the United States and are recognized as a serious public concern that requires action. Environmental factors have been identified as potential influences on the physical activity behavior of children; availability of equipment is one of these factors. The overall purpose of this dissertation was to examine availability of equipment as an environmental influence on a child’s physical activity behavior. The two environments where children spend the major of time, home and school, were evaluated for equipment availability and increased physical activity. Three studies were conducted to complete this purpose. In Manuscript 1, a systematic literature review was conducted, which included electronic databases as well as reference lists and author’s works as relevant. Only studies which measured home and school environments as factors in physical activity of children ages 5-12 were included. The review was conducted to determine the theoretical framework most used. Of the thirty-one studies reviewed, 67% showed little or no theoretical framework driving the study. Theoretical framework and models based on theory is needed to advance the field and this body of literature. In Manuscript 2, a systematic literature review was conducted which included electronic databases as well as reference lists and author’s works as relevant. Only studies which measured home and school environments and highlighted the availability of equipment as a factor in physical activity of children ages 5-12 were included. Of the twenty-one studies reviewed, only 14% clearly defined “equipment” and how it was measured for the particular study. With multiple definitions and confusion when comparing studies, standardization in this area is desperately needed. Manuscript 3, analyzed data from a larger study, NIH, Student Wellness Assessment and Advocacy Project (SWAAP), conducted in Waller county Texas, 2010. The results demonstrated which pieces of equipment in the home environment were available and the percentage of use. School environments were measured for availability of equipment and facilities. A linear regression analysis determined that being of Hispanic race was significant in less physical activity in an average seven day period. Given that children spend up to 80% of their day at home or school, influences in these two environments are extremely important to the development of physical activity behaviors. Future studies involving the availability and use of equipment should clearly define the type of equipment used or observed. In cases of intervention studies type and amount need to be clearly defined as well as assessment of its effect on physical activity in children. Several studies have been conducted for the specific age group of 6-12 year olds and their physical activity and multiple factors involved availability of opportunities for physical activity. Of those factors equipment availability has been shown to influence physical activity as well as not influence these opportunities. Standardization of the term equipment and how it is measured will allow researchers to have a clearer picture of the role that equipment plays in opportunities for children to be physically active.

Montandon, Kristi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The onset of volcanism in the Neapolitan area and the tensile tectonics of the Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain have been related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Basin, which may have resulted in horizontal asthenosphere flows giving rise, in turn, to crustal distension, local mantle upwellings and ensuing volcanism. Geological and structural data were taken into consideration: the existence of a shallow crust-mantle discontinuity in the Neapolitan area, the onset of volcanism in a

57

A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At Rakiraki in northeastern Viti Levu, the Pliocene Ba Volcanic Group comprises gently dipping, pyroxene-phyric basaltic lavas, including pillow lava, and texturally diverse volcanic breccia interbedded with conglomerate and sandstone. Three main facies associations have been identified: (1) The primary volcanic facies association includes massive basalt (flows and sills), pillow lava and related in-situ breccia (pillow-fragment breccia, autobreccia, in-situ hyaloclastite, peperite).

58

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

59

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

First-Principles Simulation of the Active Sites and Reaction Environment in Electrocatalysis  

SciTech Connect

Electrocatalysis is controlled by the interplay between the active catalytic sites and the influence of their complex environment at the electrified aqueous/metal interface. The most active electrocatalytic materials exquisitely integrate the atomic assembly of the active metal sites responsible for the elementary bond making and breaking steps, together with the carbon support to carry out efficient electron transer, and polymer electrolyte and water to facilitate proton transfer, thus establishing an optimal three-phase interface. Understanding the elementary catalytic processes along with the atomic scale features that control them, however, is obscured by the complexity of this three-phase interface and the dynamic changes that occur to it under operating conditions.

Janik, Michael J.; Wasileski, Sally A.; Taylor, Christopher D.; Neurock, Matthew

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the level of maturation of the Fruitland Formation coals, and time-dependet temperature models, based on heat-flow data in the San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal

63

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

64

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Property:VolcanicAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:VolcanicAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name VolcanicAge Property Type String Description Describes the time of the most recent volcanism by epoch, era, or period per available data. Subproperties This property has the following 7 subproperties: E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Pages using the property "VolcanicAge" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + No volcanism + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + No volcanism +

67

Volcanic Contributions to the Stratospheric Sulfate Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have detected the transport of volcanic sulfate through the tropical tropopause. This is particularly noteworthy because the source volcanic eruption was only of modest intensity and, therefore, not normally thought to be of stratospheric ...

Ronald W. Fegley; Howard T. Ellis; J. L. Heffter

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

69

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

70

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

71

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

72

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

73

DOE-STD-1120-2005; Integration of Environment Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20-2005 20-2005 Volume 1 of 2 April 2005 DOE STANDARD INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH INTO FACILITY DISPOSITION ACTIVITIES Volume 1 of 2: Documented Safety Analysis for Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE TS i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

74

Supercomputer modeling of volcanic eruption dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our specific goals are to: (1) provide a set of models based on well-defined assumptions about initial and boundary conditions to constrain interpretations of observations of active volcanic eruptions--including movies of flow front velocities, satellite observations of temperature in plumes vs. time, and still photographs of the dimensions of erupting plumes and flows on Earth and other planets; (2) to examine the influence of subsurface conditions on exit plane conditions and plume characteristics, and to compare the models of subsurface fluid flow with seismic constraints where possible; (3) to relate equations-of-state for magma-gas mixtures to flow dynamics; (4) to examine, in some detail, the interaction of the flowing fluid with the conduit walls and ground topography through boundary layer theory so that field observations of erosion and deposition can be related to fluid processes; and (5) to test the applicability of existing two-phase flow codes for problems related to the generation of volcanic long-period seismic signals; (6) to extend our understanding and simulation capability to problems associated with emplacement of fragmental ejecta from large meteorite impacts.

Kieffer, S.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Woo, Mahn-Ling [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A region of crustal extension, the Azores Plateau contains excellent examples of submarine volcanic edifices constructed over a wide range of ocean depths along the Pico Ridge. Using bathymetric data and Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric development of a submarine ridge. Our analysis and interpretation of the measurement and

76

Global Relationships among the Earth's Radiation Budget, Cloudiness, Volcanic Aerosols, and Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of Cess are extended to consider global relationships among the earth's radiation budget (including solar insulation and changes in optically active gass), cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature. ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle; Douglas Hoyt

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

79

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Both fluid and gas isotopic analysis. References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

80

Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log profiles made 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

82

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

83

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

Wehrli, Bernhard

85

Summary of recent volcanic activity - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 6, 1985 ... (Aleutian Islands) on December 10. The cloud was probably mainly steam with only minor amounts of ash. The volcano has been steaming ...

86

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to:...

88

Home environment relationships with children's physical activity, sedentary time, and screen time by socioeconomic status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9-88 Cite this article as: Tandon et al. : Home environmentTandon et al. International Journal of Behavioral Nutritionsocioeconomic status Pooja S Tandon 1,2* , Chuan Zhou 1,2 ,

Tandon, Pooja S; Zhou, Chuan; Sallis, James F; Cain, Kelli L; Frank, Lawrence D; Saelens, Brian E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

GIS-based method for the environmental vulnerability assessment to volcanic ashfall at Etna Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of environment to ashfall was evaluated aiming at defining the vulnerability in the areas surrounding Mt. Etna volcano, Sicily. The two utilized scenarios assume different thickness of ashfall, over distances comparable with those covered ... Keywords: Corine land cover, Environmental vulnerability, GIS, Volcanic risk

Silvia Rapicetta; Vittorio Zanon

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The volcanic rocks investigated in a cross-section between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Nicaragua - with the exception of Recent and some Pleistocene lavas - are incipiently to strongly altered. Alteration patterns on different scales can be discerned in the Tertiary sequences: (i) a regional burial diagenesis or very low-grade burial metamorphism at the low-temperature end of the zeolite facies (mordenite subfacies) with an inferred thermal gradient of < 50°C/km, grading into (ii) a geothermal

92

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

93

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitot—static systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

97

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

98

Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Statistical data mining of streaming motion data for activity and fall recognition in assistive environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of human motion data is interesting in the context of activity recognition or emergency event detection, especially in the case of elderly or disabled people living independently in their homes. Several techniques have been proposed for ... Keywords: Cumulative sum (CUSUM) algorithm, Fall detection, Streaming motion data, Visual data

S. K. Tasoulis; C. N. Doukas; V. P. Plagianakos; I. Maglogiannis

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat flow, but do show a correlation with magma-based thermal activity and reservoir fluid temperature (or total convective heat discharge). Gases from high-T (> 200°C) reservoirs have 3He/4He > 2 _ the atmospheric value, with high He

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Paleomagnetism of the Quaternary Cerro Prieto, Crater Elegante, and Salton Buttes volcanic domes in the northern part of the Gulf of California rhombochasm  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deviating thermomagnetic directions in volcanics representing the second and fifth or sixth pulse of volcanism suggest that the Cerro Prieto volcano originated about 110,000 years B.P. and continued to be active intermittently until about 10,000 years ago.

de Boer, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Case Study of Severe Storm Development along a Dryline within a Synoptically Active Environment. Part I: Dryline Motion and an Eta Model Forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a case study approach the motion of a dryline (on 16 May 1991) within a synoptically active environment in the southern plains, along which severe storms ultimately developed, is examined in detail. Observations from research aircraft, ...

Carl E. Hane; Michael E. Baldwin; Howard B. Bluestein; Todd M. Crawford; Robert M. Rabin

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Case Study of Severe Storm Development along a Dryline within a Synoptically Active Environment. Part II: Multiple Boundaries and Convective Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dryline that occurred on 16 May 1991 within a synoptically active environment is examined in detail using research aircraft, radar, surface, satellite, and upper air observations. The work focuses on multiple boundaries in the dryline ...

Carl E. Hane; Robert M. Rabin; Todd M. Crawford; Howard B. Bluestein; Michael E. Baldwin

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Comments on ``Failures in detecting volcanic ash from a satellite-based technique''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active vol- canism (pp. 45­64). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union. Davies, M. A., & Rose, W. I inter- national symposium on volcanic ash and aviation safety, Seattle, WA. Washington, DC: US GPO. US, causing severe restrictions to air traffic for many hours. This cloud was tracked without any split-window

Bluth, Gregg

105

Multiple activation pathways of benzene leading to products with varying genotoxic characteristics. Environ Health Perspect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benzene and 13 potential metabolites were investigated for genotoxicity in Salmonella typhimurium and V79 Chinese hamster cells. In the presence of NADPH-fortified hepatic postmitochondrial fraction (S9 mix), benzene reverted his- S. typhimurium strains. The effect was strongest in strain TA1535. Among the potential metabolites, only the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol, in the presence of S9 mix, and the diol epoxides, in the presence and absence of S9 mix, proved mutagenic in this strain. The anti-diol epoxide was more potent than the syndiastereomer. Both enantiomers of the anti-diastereomer showed similar activities. S9 mix did not appreciably affect the mutagenicity of the anti-diol epoxide. However, detoxification was observed when purified rat liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.20) was used at concentrations comparable to that present in the liver. The (1S)-anti-diol epoxide was a much better substrate than the (1R)-enantiomer, as was true also for (iS)versus (1R)-trans-1,2-dihydrodiol. The anti-diol epoxide reverted all six strains of S. typhimurium used and induced all four genotoxic effects studied in V79 cells (sister chromatid exchange> acquisition of 6-thioguanine resistance, acquisition of ouabain resistance, micronuclei). However, other potential benzene metabolites showed genotoxic effects in V79 cells, as well: sister chromatid exchange was induced by the syn-diol epoxide, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene, hydroquinone, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene. Elevated frequencies of micronucleated cells were observed after treatment with hydroquinone, 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene,

Hansruedi Glatt; Robert Padykula; Glenn A. Berchtold; T Gabriele Ludewig; Karl L. Platt; Jochen Klein; Franz Oesch

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Emergency Medical Support System for Extravehicular Activity Training Held at Weightless Environment Test Building (WETS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides extravehicular activity (EVA) training to astronauts in a weightless environment test building (WETS) located in Tsukuba City. For EVA training, Tsukuba Medial Center Hospital (TMCH) has established ... Keywords: Extravehicular activity, Helicopter transportation after the decompression, Helmet diving

Isao Nakajima; Masakazu Tachibana; Noriyoshi Ohashi; Hiroshi Imai; Yasushi Asari; Shigenori Matsuyama

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analysis of fractures in volcanic cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County, southern Nevada, was the location of 828 announced underground nuclear tests, conducted between 1951 and 1992. Approximately one-third of these tests were detonated near or below the water table. An unavoidable consequence of these testing activities was introducing radionuclides into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. Groundwater flows beneath the NTS almost exclusively through interconnected natural fractures in carbonate and volcanic rocks. Information about these fractures is necessary to determine hydrologic parameters for future Corrective Action Unit (CAU)-specific flow and transport models which will be used to support risk assessment calculations for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Underground Test Area (UGTA) remedial investigation. Fracture data are critical in reducing the uncertainty of the predictive capabilities of CAU-specific models because of their usefulness in generating hydraulic conductivity values and dispersion characteristics used in transport modeling. Specifically, fracture aperture and density (spacing) are needed to calculate the permeability anisotropy of the formations. Fracture mineralogy information is used qualitatively to evaluate diffusion and radionuclide retardation potential in transport modeling. All these data can best be collected through examination of core samples.

Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Prothro, L.B.; Roberson, K.E. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.  

SciTech Connect

A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

Balasingam, Pirahas (University of Arizona); Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

111

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

112

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

113

Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to:...

114

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric...

115

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

116

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to:...

117

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation-Creede caldera, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous clastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier (1987) concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus (``moat``) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovoleanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for clastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCormick, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of tectonism and volcanism on a radioactive waste repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most estimates of the time required for safe isolation of radioactive wastes from the biosphere range from 100,000 to 1,000,000 years. For such long time spans, it is necessary to assess the potential effects of geologic processes such as volcanism and tectonic activity on the integrity of geologic repositories. Predictions of geologic phenomena can be based on probabilistic models, which assume a random distribution of events. The necessary historic and geologic records are rarely available to provide an adequate data base for such predictions. The observed distribution of volcanic and tectonic activity is not random, and appears to be controlled by extremely complex deterministic processes. The advent of global plate tectonic theory in the past two decades has been a giant step toward understanding these processes. At each potential repository site, volcanic and tectonic processes should be evaluated to provide the most thorough possible understanding of those deterministic processes. Based on this knowledge, judgements will have to be made as to whether or not the volcanic and tectonic processes pose unacceptable risk to the integrity of the repository. This report describes the potential hazards associated with volcanism and tectonism, and the means for evaluating these processes.

Not Available

1980-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mechanisms Linking Volcanic Aerosols to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of the climate system to volcanic aerosol forcing in the third climate configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (HadCM3). The main test case was based on the 1880s when there were several volcanic eruptions,...

Alan M. Iwi; Leon Hermanson; Keith Haines; Rowan T. Sutton

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Dictionary.png Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

124

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

125

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Nevada National Security Site - January 11-13, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUBJECT: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health SUBJECT: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Nevada National Security Site - January 11-13, 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Nevada Site Office (NSO) and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) from January 11-13, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, initiate the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities.

126

Evaluation of the neighborhood environment walkability scale in Nigeria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petticrew M: The physical environment and physical activity:BE, Handy SL: Built environment correlates of walking: aBergman P: Neighborhood environments and physical activity

Oyeyemi, Adewale L; Sallis, James F; Deforche, Benedicte; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Van Dyck, Delfien

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

128

Community, Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment community-environmentassetsimagesicon-community.jpg Community, Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico...

129

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

130

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion ...

131

Seasonally Modulated Tropical Drought Induced by Volcanic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic events with a high loading of stratospheric aerosol have long been known to cause cooling, but their impact on precipitation has only recently been emphasized, especially as an analog for potential geoengineering of climate. Here, ...

Renu Joseph; Ning Zeng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Major Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: A Critical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines whether major volcanic eruptions of the past century have had a significant impact on surface land and ocean temperatures surface pressure and precipitation. Both multieruption composites and individual eruption time series ...

Clifford F. Mass; David A. Portman

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Effect of Explosive Tropical Volcanism on ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the response of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) to massive volcanic eruptions in a suite of coupled general circulation model (CGCM) simulations utilizing the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3). The authors ...

Shayne McGregor; Axel Timmermann

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Quality-Driven Volcanic Earthquake Detection Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power-hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ...

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1982). Evidence based on measurements of S and Cl in erupted rocks, glass inclusions, gas samples, and atmospheric samples collected for both Mount St. Helens and Fuego...

138

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity, magnetic, and seismic, as well as electromagnetic methods have all been used in an...

139

Interactive collaborative media environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual reality (VR) provides a revolutionary interface between man and machine. However, present display and interface peripherals limit the potential of virtual environments within many activities or scenarios. Mainstream immersive VR is centred on ...

D. M. Traill; J. D. Bowshill; P. J. Lawrence

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Context: Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Decision Tree for Global Environmental Impact Screening.. ... United Nations Environment Programme's Role in Eliminating Halon Dependency in ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

User Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You may NOT modify the .bashrc or .cshrc files. These are set to read-only on NERSC systems and specify system specific customizations. Instead you should modify a file called .bashrc.ext or .cshrc.ext. Learn more about the global homes user environment. Important Environment Variables

142

Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Siebe, C.; Delgado, H. [Univ. Nactional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Environment ref  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Support to the identification of potential risks for the environment and human health arising from hydrocarbons operations involving hydraulic fracturing in Europe Report for

Issue Number C; Andrew Lelland

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Spectral properties and reflectance curves of the revealed volcanic rocks in Syria using radiometric measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed at studying the spectral reflectance intensity of different exposed volcanic rocks in Syria, and drawing their curves by radiometer measurements. In order to reach this goal, we have studied different kinds of volcanic rocks related ...

M. Rukieh; A. M. Al-Kafri; A. W. Khalaf

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Dictionary.png Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Sedimentary-hosted volcanic-related resources are special in that the

150

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Waterproofing and Strengthening Volcanic Tuff in Waste Repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste repositories from surface trenches and shafts at Los Alamos to drilled tunnels at Yucca Mountain are being built in volcanic Tuff, a soft compacted material that is permeable to water and air. US Department of Energy documents on repository design identify the primary design goal of 'preventing water from reaching the waste canisters, dissolving the canisters and carrying the radioactive waste particles away from the repository'. Designers expect to achieve this by use of multiple barriers along with careful placement of the repository both well above the water table and well above the ground level in a mountain. Though repositories are located in areas that have a historically dry climate to minimize the impact of rainfall infiltration, global warming phenomena may have the potential to alter regional climate patterns - potentially leading to higher infiltration rates. Conventional methods of sealing fractures within volcanic tuff may not be sufficiently robust or long lived to isolate a repository shaft from water for the required duration. A new grouting technology based on molten wax shows significant promise for producing the kind of long term sealing performance required. Molten wax is capable of permeating a significant distance through volcanic tuff, as well as sealing fractures by permeation that is thermally dependent instead of chemically or time dependent. The wax wicks into and saturates tuff even if no fractures are present, but penetrates and fills only the heated area. Heated portions of the rock fill like a vessel. The taffy-like wax has been shown to waterproof the tuff, and significantly increase its resistance to fracture. This wax was used in 2004 for grouting of buried radioactive beryllium waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, chiefly to stop the water based corrosion reactions of the waste. The thermoplastic material contains no water and does not dry out or change with age. Recent studies indicate that this kind of wax material may be inherently resistant to bio-degradation. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition...

154

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Interpretation of Accurate UV Polarization Lidar Measurements: Application to Volcanic Ash Number Concentration Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate UV polarization measurements are performed on a volcanic ash cloud after long-range transport at Lyon, France (45.76°N, 4.83°E). The volcanic particles are released from the mid-April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull ...

A. Miffre; G. David; B. Thomas; M. Abou Chacra; P. Rairoux

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The distributed development environment for SDSS software  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration.

Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects Professor Gerta Keller Princeton University Presentation: WC13FEB2014_GKeller.pptx The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether one, or several large bolide impacts, the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) or a combination of the two were the primary mechanisms driving the environmental changes that are universally regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Recent years have seen a revolution in our understanding of interplanetary

158

Assessing process-centered software engineering environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-centered software engineering environments (PSEEs) are the most recent generation of environments supporting software development activities. They exploit an representation of the process (called the process model that specifies ... Keywords: CASE, enabling technology, process modeling languages, process-centered software engineering environments, software process

Vincenzo Ambriola; Reidar Conradi; Alfonso Fuggetta

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Visit at the LANL CMRR Project Facility Construction Site, November 1-5, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Visit at the LANL CMRR Project Facility Construction Site, November 1-5, 2010 The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit on November 1-5, 2010, at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) project site at the Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the visit was to determine ways in which HSS would be able to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities with respect to this project in a method that encourages integration with DOE-LANL. The orientation visit was conducted by the HSS LANL Site Lead and an HSS contractor.

160

Human activity recognition in indoor environments by means of fusing information extracted from intensity of WiFi signal and accelerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we propose an activity recognition system based on the use of a topology-based WiFi localization system combined with accelerometers for body posture recognition. The WiFi localization system is developed using a fuzzy rule-based classifier ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic, Human activity recognition, Interpretability-accuracy trade-off

Alberto Alvarez-Alvarez; Jose M. Alonso; Gracian Trivino

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PRIDE (Prediction In Dynamic Environments)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coordination. USARSim is an open source simulation environment which provides realistic environments. The environments ...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

162

Active security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce active security, a new methodology which introduces programmatic control within a novel feedback loop into the defense infrastructure. Active security implements a unified programming environment which provides interfaces ... Keywords: central management, digital forensics, network security

Ryan Hand, Michael Ton, Eric Keller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modular, automated software testing environment  

SciTech Connect

A software development methodology has been developed with Softool's Change and Configuration Control (CCC) environment. Fundamental to this approach is the exclusion of all development activities from the CCC data base. The contents of the CCC data base are restricted to software which has passed appropriate reviews. Development activities are performed in the host operating system account of various programmers. A set of CCC macros and VUS command files support this methodology, thereby allowing the configuration manager to transfer files between the development and configuration management environments. 3 refs.

Cort, G.; Nelson, R.O.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On Numerical Simulation of the Global Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol Produced by a Large Volcanic Eruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the earth's atmosphere and have a relatively big influence on potential fluctuations of the atmospheric variables on both subclimatic and climatic scales. The objective of ...

J. A. Pudykiewicz; A. P. Dastoor

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Inside Volcanic Clouds: Remote Sensing of Ash Plumes Using Microwave Weather Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical and dynamical features of volcanic tephra due to Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions can be quantitatively monitored by using ground-based microwave weather radars. The methodological rationale and unique potential of this remote-sensing ...

Frank S. Marzano; Errico Picciotti; Mario Montopoli; Gianfranco Vulpiani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effects of the Mount St. Helens Volcanic Cloud on Turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and meteorological measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were ...

Edward Ryznar; Michael R. Weber; Thomas S. Hallaron

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

Suckale, Jenny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Volcanic and Solar Forcing of Climate Change during the Preindustrial Era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate response to variability in volcanic aerosols and solar irradiance, the primary forcings during the preindustrial era, is examined in a stratosphere-resolving general circulation model. The best agreement with historical and proxy data ...

Drew T. Shindell; Gavin A. Schmidt; Ron L. Miller; Michael E. Mann

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effect of Volcanic Eruptions on the Vertical Temperature Profile in Radiosonde Data and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both observed and modeled upper-air temperature profiles show the tropospheric cooling and tropical stratospheric warming effects from the three major volcanic eruptions since 1960. Detailed comparisons of vertical profiles of Radiosonde ...

Melissa Free; John Lanzante

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of the El Chichon Volcanic Cloud on Direct and Diffuse Solar Irradiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct normal and diffuse solar irradiances and 500 nm aerosol optical depths measured at the University of Michigan departed far from normal on 26 October 1982, when it is concluded that the main stratospheric cloud from the El Chichon volcanic ...

C. Bruce Baker; William R. Kuhn; Edward Ryznar

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Impact of Strong Tropical Volcanic Eruptions on ENSO Simulated in a Coupled GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of strong tropical volcanic eruptions (SVEs) on the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its phase dependency is investigated using a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). This paper investigates the response of ENSO to an ...

Masamichi Ohba; Hideo Shiogama; Tokuta Yokohata; Masahiro Watanabe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Satellite Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature in the Presence of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation studies have shown that volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere, such as those produced by the eruption of El Chichón, significantly affect satellite measurements in the three AVHRR thermal window channels centered at 3.7, 11 and 12 ?m. ...

Charles Walton

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Polarization Lidar and Synoptic Analyses of an Unusual Volcanic Aerosol Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over an unusually brief three-day period in early August 1989, spectacular twilight effects indicative of a stratospheric volcanic cloud were seen at Salt Lake City, Utah. Concurrent polarization lidar observations detected an aerosol layer at ...

Kenneth Sassen; John D. Horel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Response of Summer Precipitation over Eastern China to Large Volcanic Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of large volcanic eruptions on regional climate so far have focused mostly on temperature responses. Previous studies using proxy data suggested that coherent droughts over eastern China are associated with explosive low-...

Youbing Peng; Caiming Shen; Wei-Chyung Wang; Ying Xu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or as pdf files. The user interface provides stepwise guides with built-in checks for efficient entry of required input data on fuels of interest to allow a successful execution of the model. The model was developed with data from several fuels selected by the sponsors, including bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and petroleum coke (petcoke). The data from these fuels were obtained using small pilot-scale entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasifiers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The CABRE III model is expected to further advance the knowledge base for the NCHT® Program and, more importantly, allow for prediction of the slagging and fouling characteristics of fuels in reducing environments. The information obtained from this program will potentially also assist in maintaining prolonged gasifier operation free from failure or facilitate troubleshooting to minimize downtime in the event of a problem.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Activity-based divergent supply chain planning for competitive advantage in the risky global environment: A DEMATEL-ANP fuzzy goal programming approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply chain management allows modern enterprises to relax their own capacities and produce in a more flexible manner for diversified consumer demands. However, for an enterprise with divergent supply chain (DSC) and multiple product lines, to plan the ... Keywords: Activity-based costing and management, Analytic network process (ANP), DEMATEL, Divergent supply chain (DSC) planning, Five forces analysis, Fuzzy goal programming (FGP), Value-at-risk (VaR)

Shih-Jieh Hung

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Pantex Plant - October 26-28, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Pantex Orientation Visit to the Pantex Plant - October 26-28, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Pantex Site Office (PXSO) and the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, from October 26-28, 2010. The purpose of the visit was to increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of Pantex Plant activities and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities in a way that encourages a partnership with PXSO. PXSO and Pantex Plant staff provided HSS personnel with detailed tours of plant facilities, including warehouses, vaults, shipping and receiving docks, bays, cells, and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the Nevada National Security Site - January 11-13, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orientation Visit to the Nevada National Orientation Visit to the Nevada National Security Site - January 11-13, 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE Nevada Site Office (NSO) and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) from January 11-13, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, initiate the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and to determine how HSS can carry out its independent oversight and mission support responsibilities. Staff from NSO, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided HSS personnel with detailed

182

Energy and Environment Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy and Environment Division. ... Selected Publications. Measurement Science Roadmap for Net-Zero Energy Buildings. ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

184

Retrieval of volcanic ash and ice cloud physical properties together with gas concentration from IASI measurements using the AVL model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation and tracking of volcanic aerosols are important for preventing possible aviation hazards and determining the influence of aerosols on climate. The useful information primary includes the concentration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40Ar-39Ar Geochronology Of Magmatic Activity, Magma Flux And Hazards At Ruapehu Volcano, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have determined precise eruption ages for andesites from Ruapehu volcano in the Tongariro Volcanic Centre of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) using 40Ar/39Ar furnace step-heating of separated groundmass concentrates. The plateau ages indicate several eruptive pulses near 200, 134, 45, 22 and <15 ka and, based on our and previous field mapping confirm the lavas of the Te Herenga Formation as the oldest exposed part of the

186

Yucca Mountain and The Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project places a high priority on protecting the environment. To ensure compliance with all state and federal environmental laws and regulations, the Project established an Environmental Management System. Important elements of the Environmental Management System include the following: (1) monitoring air, water, and other natural resources; (2) protecting plant and animal species by minimizing land disturbance; (3) restoring vegetation and wildlife habitat in disturbed areas; (4) protecting cultural resources; (5) minimizing waste, preventing pollution, and promoting environmental awareness; and (6) managing of hazardous and non-hazardous waste. Reducing the impacts of Project activities on the environment will continue for the duration of the Project.

NA

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

and environments and natural hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the curriculum is to provide basic knowledge and understanding of marine debris and its hazardous impact on the marine and coastal ecosystems as well as human health and safety. The primary goal of the curriculum is to provide activities which help students understand the impact of their actions on the marine environment and themselves. The curriculum will provide several hands-on activities and graphing opportunities using Microsoft Excel. The activities and graphing exercises may be modified for other grade levels.

Created Matthew Brim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Volcanic forcing improves Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model scaling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) simulations of the twentieth century climate, which account for anthropogenic and natural forcings, make it possible to study the origin of long-term temperature correlations found in the observed records. We study ensemble experiments performed with the NCAR PCM for 10 different historical scenarios, including no forcings, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol, ozone, solar, volcanic forcing and various combinations, such as it natural, anthropogenic and all forcings. We compare the scaling exponents characterizing the long-term correlations of the observed and simulated model data for 16 representative land stations and 16 sites in the Atlantic Ocean for these scenarios. We find that inclusion of volcanic forcing in the AOGCM considerably improves the PCM scaling behavior. The scenarios containing volcanic forcing are able to reproduce quite well the observed scaling exponents for the land with exponents around 0.65 independent of the station dista...

Vyushin, D; Havlin, S; Bunde, A; Brenner, S; Vyushin, Dmitry; Zhidkov, Igor; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Brenner, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Population and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Coastal and Marine Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Energy, Air Pollution or growth. Indeed, an overlay of graphs depicting global trends in population, energy consumption, carbon; coastal and marine environments; and energy, air pollu- tion, and climate change. In the concluding

190

Computing environment logbook  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

192

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by various geophysical anomalies that are evidently related to an active hot-water geothermal system. This system apparently is heated by a reservoir of silicic magma...

193

NERSC Modules Software Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment » Modules Environment Environment » Modules Environment Modules Software Environment NERSC uses the module utility to manage nearly all software. There are two huge advantages of the module approach: NERSC can provide many different versions and/or installations of a single software package on a given machine, including a default version as well as several older and newer versions; and Users can easily switch to different versions or installations without having to explicitly specify different paths. With modules, the MANPATH and related environment variables are automatically managed. Users simply ``load'' and ``unload'' modules to control their environment. The module utility consists of two parts: the module command itself and the modulefiles on which it operates. Module Command

194

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

195

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region K. J. Anchukaitis,1 B. M throughout much of monsoon Asia. Here, we use long and wellvalidated proxy reconstructions of Asian droughts on the climate of the Asian monsoon region, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22703, doi:10.1029/ 2010GL044843. 1

Smith, Frederick

196

Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume, Clifton, Karachi 75600, Pakistan A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 28 October

Clift, Peter

198

A Daytime Complement to the Reverse Absorption Technique for Improved Automated Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated volcanic cloud detection algorithm that utilizes four spectral channels (0.65, 3.75, 11, and 12 ?m) that are common among several satellite-based instruments is presented. The new algorithm is physically based and globally applicable ...

Michael J. Pavolonis; Wayne F. Feltz; Andrew K. Heidinger; Gregory M. Gallina

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 20–21 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chichon volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chicho´n volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history and fine ash fallout of distal fallout samples collected soon after eruption. Although, about half of the mass of silicate from the volcano are mostly \\62 lm in diameter. The most plausible expla- nation for rapid fallout

Rose, William I.

202

GCM Simulations of Volcanic Aerosol Forcing. Part I: Climate Changes Induced by Steady-State Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Climate Model II to simulate the response of the climate system to a spatially and temporally constant forcing by volcanic aerosols having an optical depth of 0.15. The climatic ...

James B. Pollack; David Rind; Andrew Lacis; James E. Hansen; Makiko Sato; Reto Ruedy

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Diffusion in the Lower Stratosphere as Determined from Lidar Measurements of Volcanic Aerosol Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar measurements of the stratospheric aerosol layer from the Fuego volcanic eruption in 1974 are analyzed to yield estimates of effective vertical mixing coefficients Kz. The data at 19°N latitude give Kz=6.6×102 cm2 s?1 for the altitude range ...

Ellis E. Remsperg

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

Buckley, R.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Factors Influencing Volcanic Ash Dispersal from the 1995 and 1996 Eruptions of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of the dispersal of volcanic ash from events such as the Ruapehu eruptions of 1995 and 1996 is important, not only for civil-defense authorities who need to warn people in downwind areas, but for airline companies that have to ...

Richard Turner; Tony Hurst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

Fleskes, Joe

207

Fusion-based volcanic earthquake detection and timing in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ... Keywords: Volcano monitoring, data fusion, earthquake detection, wireless sensor network

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Parking Infrastructure and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affects energy demand, the environment, and the social costEngineering and the Built Environment, and A ffiliatespread throughout the built environment. However, LCA is a

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

STAR Test Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables defined when you do this (and it will probably be much quicker than usual, too). Do a manual STAR login If you want to modify what test environment you use copy the test login scripts to your own working area: cp -r /common/star/startest /path/to/myworkdir/. If you don't want to modify these files you can source them directly from

210

Fermi UNIX trademark environment  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of UNIX at Fermilab involves multiple platforms and multiple vendors. Additionally, a single user may have to use more than one platform. This heterogeneity and multiplicity makes it necessary to define a Fermilab environment for UNIX so that as much as possible the systems look and feel'' the same. We describe our environment, including both the commercial products and the local tools used to support it. Other products designed for the UNIX environment are also described. 19 refs.

Nicholls, J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

212

Environment/Climate Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... exercises for environmental contaminants in marine specimens were administered in 2007/2008 by the … more. >> see all Environment/Climate ...

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Ideal Environment - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... would surely thrive within the conditions outlined above. That said, there are formidable difficulties to providing and maintaining such an ideal environment.

214

Environment | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Atmospheric and Climate Science Ecological Resources and Systems Environmental Security and Restoration Land and Renewable Resources Radiation and Chemical Risk...

215

Transportation and handling environment  

SciTech Connect

The elements of the environment relating to transportation and handling include temperature, solar radiation, precipitation, humidity, pressure, shock, and vibration. While each of these deserves consideration, the latter two, shock and vibration, are perhaps the least understood. The report discusses all of these elements, but concentrates largely on shock and vibration. Emphasis is upon the necessity of understanding both the product and the environment. To that end, descriptions of the environment which have been derived statistically are discussed. Land, sea, and air transport are considered. Current knowledge of the handling environment is indicated.

Gens, M.B.

1972-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Environment and Climate in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory's work in the areas of environment and climate ... soil, atmosphere, marine and aquatic environments, and environmental threats, and ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

E3: Economy, Energy Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E3: Economy, Energy, and Environment. "Our goal is to ... in 2012. Download E3: Economy, Energy, Environment. For more ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) (Redirected from Stockholm Environment Institute) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stockholm Environment Institute Name Stockholm Environment...

219

Comprehensive environment, health, and safety program report, FY 1978  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the environment, health, and safety research, development, and demonstration activities carried out and in progress. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: a comprehensive environment, health, and safety program: concept and implementation approach; the DOE Office of Environment - program and selected activities; environmental, health, and safety activities of other DOE offices; and, environmental, health, and safety activities of other federal agencies; titles of the four appendixes are: definition of research categories; summary of energy-related environment, health, and safety concerns; environment, health, and safety laws and regulations governing activities of the Department of Energy; and environmental, health, and safety activities of federal agencies participating in the Federal Inventory. (JGB)

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Volcanic Eruptions, Large-Scale Modes in the Northern Hemisphere, and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author analyzes the impact of 13 major stratospheric aerosol producing volcanic eruptions since 1870 on the large-scale variability modes of sea level pressure in the Northern Hemisphere winter. The paper focuses on the Arctic Oscillation (AO)...

Bo Christiansen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Airborne Asian dust: case study of long-range transport and implications for the detection of volcanic ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) 11- ? m image of the Aleutians and (b) corresponding T 4are for TOMS data over the Aleutian Islands (Figs. 9c,d). Ae.g. , the Kuril/Kamchatka/Aleutian volcanic chains, the

Simpson, James J; Hufford, G L; Servranckx, R; Berg, J; Pieri, D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Implementation and validation of a meteorological dispersion model applied on volcanic gas emission for studies of environmental impact.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model FLEXPART-WRF was implemented to model dispersion of volcanic gas emitted from the three volcanoes Popocatépetl in Mexico (lat: 19.02, lon:… (more)

Landgren, Oskar A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The 5–6 December 1991 FIRE IFO II Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 5–6 December 1992 Project FIRE IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols ...

Kenneth Sassen; David O'C. Starr; Gerald G. Mace; Michael R. Poellot; S.H. Melfi; Wynn L. Eberhard; James D. Spinhirne; E.W. Eloranta; Donald E. Hagen; John Hallett

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Edison Programming Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unless your code in some way relies on the PGI compilers. The default programming environment on Edison uses the Intel compiler suite. Cray and GNU compilers are also available....

228

Severe Convective Wind Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nontornadic thunderstorm winds from long-lived, widespread convective windstorms can have a tremendous impact on human lives and property. To examine environments that support damaging wind producing convection, sounding parameters from Rapid ...

Evan L. Kuchera; Matthew D. Parker

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development Languages and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It combines many of the best features of the standard UNiX working environment like C, sed, awk, csh and sh. Similar to sh and csh, it is used as a scripting ...

230

Environment Feature Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Environment Feature Stories /community-environment/_assets/images/icon_earthday.jpg Environment Feature Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will clean up the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. - 7/10/13 Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the

231

Visualization Design Environment  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

Crowe, B.; Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wells, S. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murrell, M.; Poths, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Environment induced incoherent controllability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the environment induced entanglement between two non interacting, two-dimensional quantum systems S and P can be used to control the dynamics of S by means of the initial state of P. Using a simple, exactly solvable model, we show that both accessibility and controllability of S can be achieved under suitable conditions on the interaction of S and P with the environment.

Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE O 458.1 Admin Chg 3, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation associated with radiological activities ...

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Droplet Charging Effects in the Space Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several applications exist for transiting liquid droplets through the near-Earth space environment. Numerical results are presented for the charging of liquid droplets of trimethyl pentaphenyl siloxane (DC705) in three different plasma environments: ionosphere, auroral, and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Nominal and high geomagnetic activity cases are investigated. In general, high levels of droplet charging (>100 V) exist only in GEO during periods of high geomagnetic or solar activity. An experiment was conducted to assess the charging of silicon-oil droplets due to photoemission. The photoemission yield in the 120-200 nm wavelength range was found to be approximately 0.06.

Joslyn, Thomas B. [United States Air Force Academy, Department of Astronautics, USAF Academy, CO 80840 (United States); Ketsdever, Andrew D. [University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Colorado, Springs, CO 80918 (United States)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

GEMS in the environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEMS in the environment GEMS in the environment Name: de tar Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many years will it be before Genetically Engineered Microorganisms are released into the environment? Replies: Some already have been in controlled and government-approved tests. So have some non-micro organisms, mainly some food crop plants and cattle strains. moodywj In addition to the previous response, I might add that although there are several examples of GEMS which have been released for beneficial purposes, caution must be exercised in order that a potentially harmful organism does not escape into the environment without extremely careful supervision and complete control over its spread. An example of this is the engineered bacteria which make use of crude oil as a carbon source, patented for use on oil spills. Although spraying a solution with these organisms in it can help clean up spills and decrease the OIL'S impact on the environment, you have to be careful about knowing in advance what the organisms will turn to for food once the oil is gone -- will it attack the hydrocarbons of other living organisms?

237

United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: geodata.grid.unep.ch/ United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Screenshot References: UNEP Data[1] Overview "The GEO Data Portal is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global

238

NERSC User Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment NERSC User Environment Home Directories, Shells and Startup Files All NERSC systems (except PDSF) use global home directories, which are are pre-populated with startup files (also known as dot files) for all available shells. NERSC fully supports bash, csh, and tcsh as login shells. Other shells (ksh, sh, and zsh) are also available. The default shell at NERSC is csh. Changing Your Default Login Shell Use the NERSC Information management (NIM) portal if you want to to change your default login shell. To do this, select Change Shell from the NIM Actions pull-down menu. Managing Your Startup Files The "standard" dot-files are symbolic links to read-only files that NERSC controls. For each standard dot-file, there is a user-writable ".ext" file.

239

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Due to a recent Contract 31 action, the Necessary and Sufficient process...

240

Environment scattering in GADRAS.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Green's Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean James; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geoscience/Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience/Environment Geoscience/Environment Geoscience/Environment Print From the high pressures at the Earth's core to the vacuum of outer space, the ALS has tools for investigating samples from either environmental extreme. "Geoscience" at the ALS covers a wide range of topics, from carbon sequestration and air quality to cometary composition and the formation of the solar system. To narrow the focus a bit, the ALS has an important role to play in addressing a number of environmental issues, including environmental remediation, hazardous-waste management, global climate change, agricultural sustainability, and trace-element cycling in ecosystems. These problems present major scientific challenges, in part because natural systems are extremely complex at a range of scales. Moreover, the behavior of these systems is determined by a complex interplay of chemical, physical, and biological processes in spatially heterogeneous environments. The ALS can contribute to the knowledge base needed to address a variety of environmental issues by enabling a variety of investigations, including analytical chemistry, microscopy of heterogeneous media, and reaction kinetics in natural systems.

242

Environment analysis via ?CFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new program-analysis framework, based on CPS and procedure-string abstractions, that can handle critical analyses which the k-CFA framework cannot. We present the main theorems concerning correctness, show an application analysis, ... Keywords: CPS, continuations, delta-CFA, environment analysis, flow analysis, functional languages, inlining, lambda calculus, program analysis, super-beta

Matthew Might; Olin Shivers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The seamless computing environment  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) are in the midst of a project through which their supercomputers are linked via high speed networks. The goal of this project is to solve national security and scientific problems too large to run on a single machine. This project, as well as the desire to maximize the use of high performance computing systems, has provided the impetus to develop and implement software tools and infrastructure to automate the tasks associated with running codes on one or more heterogeneous machines from a geographically distributed pool. The ultimate goal of this effort is the Seamless Computing Environment (SCE). SCE is a production environment to which a user submits a job and receives results without having to worry about scheduling resources or even which resources the system uses. The compilation, data migration, scheduling, and execution will take place with minimal user intervention.

Sheehan, T.J.; Papadopoulos, P.M.; Alexander, R. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environment control system  

SciTech Connect

A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

Sammarone, Dino G. (Edgewood Borough, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geoscience/Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience/Environment Print Geoscience/Environment Print From the high pressures at the Earth's core to the vacuum of outer space, the ALS has tools for investigating samples from either environmental extreme. "Geoscience" at the ALS covers a wide range of topics, from carbon sequestration and air quality to cometary composition and the formation of the solar system. To narrow the focus a bit, the ALS has an important role to play in addressing a number of environmental issues, including environmental remediation, hazardous-waste management, global climate change, agricultural sustainability, and trace-element cycling in ecosystems. These problems present major scientific challenges, in part because natural systems are extremely complex at a range of scales. Moreover, the behavior of these systems is determined by a complex interplay of chemical, physical, and biological processes in spatially heterogeneous environments. The ALS can contribute to the knowledge base needed to address a variety of environmental issues by enabling a variety of investigations, including analytical chemistry, microscopy of heterogeneous media, and reaction kinetics in natural systems.

246

Galaxy Evolution and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of galaxies are strongly correlated with their environment, with red galaxies dominating galaxy clusters and blue galaxies dominating the general field. However, not all field galaxies are young: studies of the colors, line strengths, and M/L ratios of massive early-type galaxies at 0environment. There is good evidence that the growth of these galaxies does continue longer in the field than in clusters, via (nearly) dissipationless mergers of already old galaxies. These results are consistent with predictions of recent galaxy formation models, which incorporate AGN feedback to suppress star formation in the most massive halos. Systematic studies of the relation of galaxies with their environment beyond z=1 are difficult, and still somewhat contradictory. Intriguingly both the DEEP2 and VVDS surveys find that the color-density relation disappears at z~1.3, unfortunately just at the point where both surveys become highly incomplete. On the other hand, clustering studies at z~2.5 have shown that red galaxies cluster more strongly than blue galaxies, implying that the color-density relation was already in place at that redshift.

Pieter van Dokkum; Ryan Quadri

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessment of Long Valley as a site for drilling to the magmatic environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent earthquakes, ground uplift, and increased hydrothermal activity are only the most recent examples of intense tectonic and volcanic activity that has occurred at Long Valley caldera, CA, over the last 3 million years. A large number of geophysical experiments conducted by several hundred investigators over the past few years clearly indicates that a major body of magma exists within the central part of the caldera at drillable depths on the order of 5 km. Plans are underway to drill toward and eventually into this magma body. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Rundle, J.B.; Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Luth, W.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

WoldeGabriel, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The galactic environment of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interstellar cloud surrounding the solar system regulates the galactic environment of the Sun and constrains the physical characteristics of the interplanetary medium. This paper compares interstellar dust grain properties observed within the solar system with dust properties inferred from observations of the cloud surrounding the solar system. Properties of diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity are discussed to gain insight into the properties of the diffuse cloud complex flowing past the Sun. Evidence is presented for changes in the galactic environment of the Sun within the next 10$^4$--10$^6$ years. The combined history of changes in the interstellar environment of the Sun, and solar activity cycles, will be recorded in the variability of the ratio of large- to medium-sized interstellar dust grains deposited onto geologically inert surfaces. Combining data from lunar core samples in the inner and outer solar system will assist in disentangling these two effects.

P. C. Frisch

1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environment Induced Time Arrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

Janos Polonyi

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Nanotech/Environment, Health & Safety Portal. Programs and ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Resilient hosting in a continuously available virtualized environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe continuously available services and application hosting on the Events/IBM.com® Infrastructure (EI)-a continuously available virtualized environment based on three active data centers that has demonstrated 100-percent availability ...

R R. Scadden; R J. Bogdany; J. W. Clifford; H. D. Pearthree; R. A. Locke

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Designing smart environments: a paradigm based on learning and prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a learning and prediction based paradigm for designing smart home environments. The foundation of this paradigm lies in information theory as it manages uncertainties of the inhabitants’ contexts (e.g., locations or activities) in daily ...

Sajal K. Das; Diane J. Cook

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guest Editors' Introduction: Hostile Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pervasive computing technology can save lives by both eliminating the need for humans to work in hostile environments and supporting them when they do. In general, environments that are hazardous to humans are hard on ...

Lukowicz, Paul

256

ENVIRONMENT AL REVI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT AL REVI EW for CATEG ORI CAL EXCLUS ION DETE RMINATION Rocky Mo unta in Region, Weste rn A rea Power Administra tion Stru cture Replace ment Fla min g Go rge-Vern a l No.3 138-kV tra nsmiss ion lin e (Struct ure No. 25/6) Spr ing 201 2 A. Ilricf J)cscription of Proposal: Western Area Power Adm inistration (Western) proposes to replace Structure No. 25/6 on the Flaming Gorge-Vernal No.3 138-kV transmission line. The structure is located on Bureau of Land Management lands in Uintah County. Utah (Township 3S, Range 22E, Section 7; Donkey Flat 7.5' USGS quadrangle). Work consists of removal and in-kind replacement of the wood H-frame structure and anchors utilizing rubber tired vehicles. crane, bucket truck, pole trucks/trailers, auger rig. and pick-up trucks. All work will be conducted on Western's existing

257

Communication in hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect

Radios were investigated for use in hazardous environments where protective breathing equipment such as plastic suits and respirators interfere with communication. A radio system, manufactured by Communications-Applied technology (C-AT), was identified that was designed specifically for hazardous environment communications. This equipment had been used successfully by the US Army and NASA for several years. C-AT equipment was evaluated in plantwide applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) using temporary frequencies obtained by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR). Radios performed well in all applications, which included a tritium facility, high-level caves, a nuclear reactor building, tank farm, and a canyon building interior. Permanent frequencies were obtained by DOE-SR for two complete six-man C-AT systems at SRP. Because of the relatively short range of these systems, replicates will cover all applications of this type of equipment plantwide. Twelve radio systems are currently being used successfully in plantwide applications.

Rankin, W N; Herold, T R

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Building Environment Division Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy and Environment Division. Fire Research Division. Systems Integration Division. Intelligent Systems Division. Smart Grid Program Office. ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pattern recognition of volcanic tremor data on Mt. Etna (Italy) with KKAnalysis-A software program for unsupervised classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous seismic monitoring plays a key role in the surveillance of the Mt. Etna volcano. Besides earthquakes, which often herald eruptive episodes, the persistent background signal, known as volcanic tremor, provides important information on the volcano ... Keywords: Cluster analysis, Fuzzy C-means, K-means, Self-organizing map, Volcano monitoring, Volcano seismology

A. Messina; H. Langer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

SC e-journals, Environment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Environment Environment Acta hydrochimica et hydrobiologica Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Air, Soil and Water Research - OAJ American Journal of Environmental Sciences - OAJ Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Review of Environment and Resources Annual Review of Plant Biology Applied and Environmental Microbiology Applied and Environmental Soil Science - OAJ Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Aquatic Ecology Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment BioControl Biogeochemistry Biogeosciences - OAJ Biomass & Bioenergy Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering Bioresource Technology Biotechnology Advances BMC Ecology - OAJ Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environment, Safety & Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links ESSH Policy Site Environmental Reports Environmental Regulators Upton Ecological and Research Reserve Pollution Prevention Organizations ES&H Directorate Environmental Protection Division Environmental Restoration Division Safety & Health Services Other BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Environment, Safety & Health Brookhaven National Lab is committed to continual improvement in environmental, safety, security, and health (ESSH) performance. Full policy description. Restoration Projects Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor decommissioning, High Flux Beam Reactor decommissioning Groundwater Projects Peconic River Cleanup Peconic River Working Group Environmental Restoration Projects green tech ISB-inspired Greening Strategies for Your Home or Office Being green isn't rocket science. Several strategies that earned the ISB its LEED Gold certification can help reduce energy usage and make any building more environmentally friendly.

262

Virtual Environment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The levels of immersion and presence felt by users in a Virtual Environment (VE) are very important factors that dictate the quality of the Virtual Reality (VR) experience. Sensori-motor systems, both hardware and software, are the components of a VR system that contribute to generate the VEs and to create the feeling of being there. This paper reviews the different visualization hardware/software components that are at the heart of a VR system and provides means for assessing their performance in the context of various applications. Because of its historical and functional importance in the field of VR, visualization hardware is reviewed first (HMDs, VRDs, stereo glasses, CRT, LCD monitors and Plasma displays...). Then, a list of the most important insights, which should be addressed when designing and assembling a VR system, are discussed. Finally, visualization software is covered in the context of the available hardware components.

Sensori-Motor Activities Visualization; M. Mokhtari; F. Lemieux; F. Bernier; D. Ouellet; R. Drouin; D. Laurendeau; A. Branzan-albu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

264

Spanish Research Centre for Energy Environment and Technology CIEMAT | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Environment and Technology CIEMAT Energy Environment and Technology CIEMAT Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28040 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product CIEMAT, a Research Public Institution attached to the Ministry of Education and Science, is actively working on the research projects for PEM fuel cell, biofuel, solar and wind power. References Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) is a company located in Madrid, Spain . References ↑ "Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and

265

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION DIVISION HEAD E.Pollutants in Combustion Environments D. Lucas, N. Brown,Inc. , Energy/Environment Data Study, Cambridge, Mass. , May

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Constructing Commons in the Cultural Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commons in the Cultural Environment Michael J. MadisonCOMMONS IN THE CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT Draft of August 27, 2008Commons in the Cultural Environment ? Michael J. Madison, 1

Madison, Michael J.; Frischmann, Brett M.; Strandburg, Katherine J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stockholm Environment Institute Name Stockholm Environment Institute Address Kraftriket 2B, SE-106 91 Place...

268

Healing effects of the built environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Hospital garden environment: Utilization and consumerand testing of models. Environment and Behavior, 36, Bond,of language acquisition. Environment and Behavior, 29, 638-

Sherman, Sandra Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies Alendasocial realism, games, environment, ecology 1. INTRODUCTIONversions of the environment? The answer is multifaceted.

Chang, Alenda Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Market Design Test Environments  

SciTech Connect

Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fast neutron environments.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cellulolytic Microorganisms from Thermal Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal, anaerobic environments rich in decaying plant material are a potential source of novel cellulolytic bacteria. Samples collected from geothermal aquifers in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were used to select for cellulolytic thermophiles. Laboratory enrichments on dilute-acid pretreated plant biomass (switchgrass, Populus), and crystalline cellulose (Avicel) resulted in the isolation of 247 environmental clones. The majority of individual clones were affiliated with the cellulolytic bacteria of phylum Firmicutes, followed by xylanolytic and saccharolytic members of the phylum Dictyoglomi. Among the Firmicutes, the clones were affiliated with the genera Caldicellulosiruptor (54.4%), Caloramator (11.5%), Thermoanaerobacter (8.8%), Thermovenabulum (4.1%), and Clostridium (2.0%). From established anaerobic thermophilic enrichments a total of 81 single strains of the genera Caldicellulosiruptor (57%) and Thermoanaerobacter (43%) were isolated. With continuous flow enrichment on Avicel, increases in the relative abundance of Caloramator sp. was observed over clones detected from the Caldicellulosiruptor. Complex communities of interacting microorganisms bring about cellulose decomposition in nature, therefore using up-to-date approaches may yield novel cellulolytic microorganisms with high activity and a rapid rate of biomass conversion to biofuels.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Raman, Babu [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to assist Berkeley Lab supervisors and managers in conducting discussions on environment, safety and health topics with their staff. Each slide delivers focused talking...

276

ORISE: Contact Environment, Safety & Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Integrated Safety Management Voluntary Protection Program VPP Star Status Environment Work Smart Standards Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Contact Us Use the form...

277

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recommendations to the Laboratory Director on the development and implementation of Environment, Safety & Health (ES&H) policy, guidelines, codes and regulatory interpretation. It...

278

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concerns Training SubcontractorsVendors (SJHA) Waste Management What We Do The EnvironmentHealthSafety division helps Berkeley Lab staff perform their work safely and in an...

279

Stretched Polymers in Random Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Parallel Applications Development Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... configured his or her environment as described in Chapter 2 of this manual. ... output of these commands, scripts, or programs can be piped back to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

OpenEI Community - Environment  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

s-partner-expand-natural-gas-highwaycomments clean energy Clean Energy Fuels energy Environment Fuel GE Innovation Partnerships Technology Innovation & Solutions Transportation...

282

Recirculation of Materials and Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013... Chemical Manufacturing and Its Impact on Environment – A Review: Sergio Sanchez-Segado1; Animesh Jha1; 1University of Leeds

283

SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suspensions for Solar Energy Collection A. Hunt . . .Strategies for Active Solar Energy Systems M. Warren, S.ENVIRONMENT DIVISION SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM CHAPTER FROM THE

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluation of Surface Temperature and Emissivity Derived from ASTER Data: A Case Study Using Ground-Based Measurements at a Volcanic Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity (LSE) derived from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were evaluated in a low spectral contrast volcanic site at an altitude of 2000 m on the island of ...

África Barreto; Manuel Arbelo; Pedro A. Hernández-Leal; Laia Núñez-Casillas; María Mira; César Coll

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 Myr old in Arizona, New Mexico and the Trans-Pecos Area of West Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Pecos area of west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978).

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Multiscale Modeling of Interfacial Environments around ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiscale Modeling of Interfacial Environments around Carbon Nanotubes. ... can be significantly affected by the interfacial environment at the ...

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

The human agent virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a multi-agent simulation called the Human Agent Virtual Environment (or HAVE). HAVE is a test bed to explore agent-environment interaction in multi-agent simulation for defence applications. The primary research driver in the ... Keywords: agents and cognitive models, defence, multi-agent simulation and modeling

Michael Papasimeon; Adrian R. Pearce; Simon Goss

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Qualitative physics in virtual environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a new approach to the creation of virtual environments, which uses qualitative physics to implement object behaviour. We adopted Qualitative Process Theory as a qualitative reasoning formalism, due to its representational properties ... Keywords: intelligent virtual environments, modelling and simulation, qualitative physics

Marc Cavazza; Simon Hartley; Jean-Luc Lugrin; Mikael Le Bras

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Citation Environment of Angewandte Chemie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, aggregated journal-journal citation networks were made accessible from the perspective of each journal included in the Science Citation Index see (http://www.leydesdorff.net/). The local matrices can be used to inspect the relevant citation environment of a journal using statistical analysis and visualization techniques from social network analysis. The inspection gives an answer to the question what the local impact of this and other journals in the environment is. In this study the citation environment of Angewandte Chemie was analysed. Angewandte Chemie is one of the prime chemistry journals in the world. Its environment was compared with that of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The results of the environment analyses give a detailed insight into the field-embeddedness of Angewandte Chemie. The impacts of the German and international editions of this journal are compared.

Bornmann, Lutz; Marx, Werner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Independent Oversight Environment, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - June  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Environment, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - June 2006 Independent Oversight Environment, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - June 2006 June 2006 Inspection of the Environmental Management Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs for environmental management program activities at the DOE Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during May and June 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Some aspects of EM/OR, BJC, and FWENC ISM systems are conceptually sound, and many aspects are effectively implemented. For the most part, DOE, BJC, and FWENC managers and workers are well qualified and demonstrate their

291

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock-fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1982-August 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from the recent activities in Long Valley, California; theoretical study on a source model for the long-period events and volcanic tremor observed at Mount St. Helens; calculation of synthetic seismograms for the tremor source model; analysis of the Easter Island tremor records; testing and application of the Gaussian beam synthetic method to observations at Mount St. Helens; and field testing and development of a high-temperature borehole seismograph.

Aki, K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environment and safety research status report: 1993  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 status report discusses ongoing and planned research activities in the GRI Environment and Safety Program. The objectives and goals, accomplishments, and strategy along with the basis for each project area are presented for the supply, end use, and gas operations subprograms. Within the context of these subprograms, contract status summaries under their conceptual titles are given for the following project areas: Gas Supply Environmental and Safety Research, Air Quality Research, End Use Equipment Safety Research, Gas Operations Safety Research, Liquefied Natural Gas, Safety Research, and Gas Operations Environmental Research.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cyclogenesis in a Saturated Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of baroclinic wave growth in a saturated environment is examined using linear and nonlinear models employing a parameterization of latent heat release that assumes all rising air is saturated, and saturation equivalent potential ...

Jeffrey S. Whitaker; Christopher A. Davis

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Environment, Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health and Safety Program at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center Catherine Fiore PSFC Office of ES&H May 14, 2003 C Mod Alcator Design of the EHS system for...

295

Views of software development environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an abstract model of software development and then explores its implications for software development environments (SDEs). It explores the automation of engineering, i.e., what to automate, and the engineering of automation, ...

W. Stinson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Environment | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Home Jessi3bl's picture Submitted by Jessi3bl(15) Member 16 December, 2012 - 19:18 GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway clean energy Clean...

297

Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

P. Dixon

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

G.H. Nieder-Westermann

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

Priest, G.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A MATLAB® function for Network Environ Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Network Environ Analysis is a formal, quantitative methodology to describe an object's within system ''environ''ment [Patten, B.C., 1978a. Systems approach to the concept of environment. Ohio Journal of Science 78, 206-222]. It provides a perspective ... Keywords: Ecological Modelling, Ecological Network Analysis, Network Environ Analysis

Brian D. Fath; Stuart R. Borrett

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Human Footprints on the Global Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Footprints on the Global Environment. By Rosa A. Eugene,Footprints on the Global Environment. MIT Press, 2010. xi +of its own impact on the environment that surrounds its

Ferrara, Enzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health FE's 2011 ESS&H Annual Report The Office of Fossil Energy is committed to conducting our mission to achieve the greatest benefit for all our stakeholders, including our employees and the public, while actively adhering to the highest applicable standards for environment, security, safety and health (ESS&H). We are working to continuously improve our practices through effective integration of ESS&H into all facets of work planning and execution. We intend to make consistent, measurable progress in implementing this Commitment throughout our operations while striving to eliminate injuries, incidents, and environmental releases.

305

3.0 EXISTING ENVIRONMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 EXISTING ENVIRONMENT 0 EXISTING ENVIRONMENT This chapter describes various components of the existing environment that may be affected by the operation of the Mound glass melter. The proposed action pctentially impacts air quality. surface water quality. biological resources. and human health and safety. In order to evaluate impacts to these resources. information on existing conditions is required. Section 3.1 presents information on atmospheric resources (e.g., meteorology and existing air quality) . Section 3.2 presents data on water resources, and Section 3.3 provides a broad characterization of biological resources. 3.1 ATMOSPHERIC RESOURCES Emissions from the glass melter potentially affect local and regional air quality. To evaluate impacts to these receptors, data on meteorologic conditions (particularly wind

306

Ariane Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ariane Environment Ariane Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name Ariane Environment Place London, United Kingdom Zip W8 6JL Product String representation "Ariane Environm ... onmental value." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

307

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

308

Westminster Energy Environment Transport Forum | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westminster Energy Environment Transport Forum Jump to: navigation, search Name Westminster Energy, Environment & Transport Forum Place United Kingdom Product String representation...

309

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Environment Facility (GEF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Facility Address...

310

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Trade and the environment: Discussion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author presents a synopsis of several papers on the issue of international trade and the environment. The papers address the following topics: the complex interrelationships of international trade, environment, and poverty in developing countries; environmental aspects of economic relations between nations; and the debate between environmentalists and free trade advocates. The author also adds comments about the US embargo on Mexican yellow-fin tuna imports, concluding that this unilateral embargo action, while initially creating tentions, may have provided a useful impetus to working out a multinational environmental standard.

Lutz, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

BNL | Climate, Environment and Bisoscience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Environment, and Biosciences Climate, Environment, and Biosciences bioscience research Revealing Nature-from Microscopic to Atmospheric Scales With recognized expertise in plant sciences, imaging, and climate studies, Brookhaven Lab advances some of the most promising scientific methods of achieving a sustainable future. This cross-disciplinary research seeks to understand the relationships between climate change, sustainable energy initiatives, and the planet's natural ecosystems. As environmental and economic issues mount, this research will provide increasingly important guidance and opportunities for climate change management strategies, approaches to adaptation, and policy decisions. Building a Sustainable Future Major goals include: Significantly improving climate models based on high-quality data

313

Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 7   Pressure vessel steels for high-temperature service...composition Normal temperature range of usage Allowable stress at low end of usage temperature Allowable stress at high end of usage temperature °C °F MPa ksi MPa ksi SA 204, grade C 0.28% C max; 0.45â??0.60% Mo 430â??510 800â??950 130 18.8 57 8.2 SA 302, grade B 0.25% C max; 1.15â??1.50% Mn;...

314

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selectivity 2. Design and develop bulls-eye energy harvesting structures Need for new sensing technologies to meet the requirements for zero emission energy sources Why do...

315

Open grid computing environments: advanced gateway support activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe three case studies for providing advanced support for TeraGrid Science Gateways as part of our participation in the Advanced User Support (AUS) team. These case studies include providing workflow support, robust job management, and mass job ... Keywords: ASTA, OGCE software, science gateways workflow suite

Marlon Pierce; Suresh Marru; Raminder Singh; Archit Kulshrestha; Karthik Muthuraman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transportation environment data bank index  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to determine the environment intensities to which shipping containers will be exposed, a ''Data Bank'' of environmental information has been established by Sandia Laboratories, Division 1285 for the ERDA Division of Environmental Control Technology. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. (auth)

Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Empathy in virtual learning environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do we engage teachers and learners in the learning process and what are the benefits of this? How do we get students to learn? Many academic institutions of all levels are asking these questions. Throughout the years new teaching methodologies ... Keywords: Second Life, VLEs, e-learning, empathy, engagement, online learning, teaching methodologies, virtual learning environments

Judith Molka-Danielsen; Bryan W. Carter; Alastair Creelman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Virtual Human Problem Solving Environments  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Interest in complex integrated digital or virtual human modeling has seen a significant increase over the last decade. Coincident with that increased interest, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated the development of a human simulation tool, the Virtual Human. The Virtual Human includes a problem-solving environment (PSE) for implementing the integration of physiological models in different programming languages and connecting physiological function to anatomy. The Virtual Human PSE (VHPSE) provides the computational framework with which to develop the concept of a "Virtual Human." Supporting the framework is a data definition for modeling parameters, PhysioML, a Virtual Human Database (VHDB), and a Web-based graphical user interface (GUI) developed using Java. Following description of the VHPSE, we discuss four example implementations of models within the framework. Further expansion of a human modeling environment was carried out in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Virtual Soldier Project. SCIRun served as the Virtual Soldier problem solving environment (VSPSE). We review and compare specific developments in these projects that have significant potential for the future of Virtual Human modeling and simulation. We conclude with an evaluation of areas of future work that will provide important extensions to the VHPSE and VSPSE and make possible a fully-integrated environment for human anatomical and physiological modeling: the Virtual Human.

Ward, Richard C [ORNL; Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; Fischer, Sarah Kathleen [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Towards a Generic Security Framework for Cloud Data Management Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing an adequate security level in Cloud Environments is currently an extremely active research area. More specifically, malicious behaviors targeting large-scale Cloud data repositories e.g., Denial of Service attacks may drastically degrade the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Storage Service, Denial of Service, Policy Enforcement, Security

Alexandra Carpen-Amarie; Alexandru Costan; Catalin Leordeanu; Cristina Basescu; Gabriel Antoniu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Transcranial Doppler: A Tool for Augmented Cognition in Virtual Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we propose the use of Transcranial Doppler Monitoring (TCD) as a tool to measure brain activity during the exposure to virtual environments (VE) that can be used in Augmented Cognition (AugCog) systems. The technique is non-invasive, and ... Keywords: Augmented Cognition, Cognitive State Assessment, Neurophysiological Data, Transcranial Doppler, Virtual Reality

Beatriz Rey; Mariano Alcañiz; Valery Naranjo; Jose Tembl; Vera Parkhutik

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Proposing a multi-touch interface for intrusion detection environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Network Intrusion Detection is a critical task in today's environment, where network attacks and intrusions are everyday occurrences and state-level cyber warfare is a major concern. At the same time, it is a very difficult task, in part due to the large ... Keywords: activity theory, cognitive task analysis, data exploration, natural user interfaces, network intrusion detection visualization

Jeffrey Guenther; Fred Volk; Mark Shaneck

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Predictability & criticality metrics for coordination in complex environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of coordinating the activities of a team of agents in a dynamic, uncertain, nonlinear environment. Bounded rationality, bounded communication, subjectivity and distribution make it extremely challenging to find effective strategies. ... Keywords: coordination, dynamism, multi-agent, scheduling, uncertainty

Rajiv T. Maheswaran; Pedro Szekely; M. Becker; S. Fitzpatrick; G. Gati; J. Jin; R. Neches; N. Noori; C. Rogers; R. Sanchez; K. Smyth; C. Vanbuskirk

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Motor transport of self-assembled cargos in crowded environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor transport of self-assembled cargos in crowded environments Leslie Conwaya , Derek Woodb is performed by multiple motors working in concert. However, the mechanism of motor association to cargos is unknown. It is also unknown how long individual motors stay attached, how many are active, and how

Ross, Jennifer

324

Integrating video games and robotic play in physical environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active Learning Environments with Robotic Tangibles (ALERT) are mixed reality video gaming systems that use sensors, vision systems, and robots to provide an engaging experience that may motivate hitherto underrepresented kinds of learners to become ... Keywords: embodied learning, mobile robots, participatory design, tangible media, video games

Byron Lahey; Winslow Burleson; Camilla Nørgaard Jensen; Natalie Freed; Patrick Lu

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environment/Climate Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... separate interlaboratory comparison exercises for environmental contaminants in ... Organic Contaminants in the Marine Environment Last Updated ...

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

Scaffold Gradients: Finding the Right Environment for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaffold Gradients: Finding the Right Environment for Developing Cells. For Immediate Release: May 25, 2010. ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic

328

Environment and Nuclear Programs | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Nuclear Programs Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment (GC-51) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear Programs (GC-52 ) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for International and National Security Programs (GC-53) Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) Office of Standard Contract Management (GC-55) Litigation and Enforcement Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment Civilian Nuclear Programs International and National Security Programs NEPA Policy and Compliance Standard Contract Management Technology Transfer and Procurement

329

The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Introduction The built environment expresses the changingThe Built Environment & Migration: A Case Study in MexicoEnvironment.

Ramirez, Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment Litigation and Enforcement Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment Civilian Nuclear Programs International...

331

M31* and its circumnuclear environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a multiwavelength investigation of the circumnuclear environment of M31. Based on Chandra/ACIS data, we tightly constrain the X-ray luminosity of M31*, the central supermassive black hole of the galaxy, to be L (0.3-7 keV)gas with a temperature of ~0.3 keV and a density of ~0.1 cm^{-3}. In the absence of an active SMBH and recent star formation, the most likely heating source for the hot gas is Type Ia SNe. The presence of cooler, dusty gas residing in a nuclear spiral has long been known in terms of optical line emission and extinction. We further reveal the infrared emission of the nuclear spiral and evaluate the relative importance of various possible ionizing sources. We show evidence for interaction between the nuclear spiral and the hot gas, probably via thermal evaporation. This mechanism lends natural understandings to 1) the inactivity of M31*, ...

Li, Zhiyuan; Wakker, Bart P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnetic structure of Loihi Seamount, an active hotspot volcano in the Hawaiian Island chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of geophysical techniques to image the interiors of active volcanoes can provide a better understanding of their structure and plumbing. The need for such information is especially critical for undersea volcanoes, whose environment makes them difficult to investigate. Because undersea volcanoes are made up of highly magnetic basaltic rock, it is possible to use variations in the magnetic field to explore the internal structure of such edifices. This study combines magnetic survey data from 12 research cruises to make a magnetic anomaly map of volcanically active Loihi, located in the Hawaiian Island chain. NRM intensities and susceptibility measurements were measured from recovered rock samples and suggest that magnetic properties of Loihi are widely varied (NRM intensities range from 1-157 A/m and susceptibilities from 1.26 x 10-3 to 3.62 x 10-2 S.I.). The average NRM intensity is 26 A/m. The size and strength of magnetic source bodies were determined by using various modeling techniques. A strongly magnetized shield can explain most of the anomaly with a large nonmagnetic zone inside, beneath the summit. Prominent magnetic highs are located along Loihi's north and south rift zone dikes and modeling solutions suggest strongly magnetized source bodies in these areas as well as a thin, magnetic layer atop the nonmagnetic zone. The strong magnetic anomalies found along the volcano's rift zones cannot be readily attributed to recent lava flows at the surface. Instead, the source bodies must continue several kilometers in depth to give reasonable magnetization values and are interpreted as dike intrusions. Nonmagnetic anomalies at the summit and south of the summit suggest the presence of a magma system. The model solution suggests Loihi is an inhomogeneously magnetized seamount with highly magnetic dike intrusions along the rift zones with a nonmagnetic body at its center overlain with a magnetic layer.

Lamarche, Amy J.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment  

SciTech Connect

Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Chapter 3 - Existing Environment, Pages 1-7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-1 3-1 CHAPTER 3 EXISTING ENVIRONMENT This chapter describes the existing environment at the three sites under consideration in this EA: the CEMRC in Carlsbad (the location where research activities would occur under the Proposed Action), the WIPP site (the location where research activities would occur under the WIPP Alternative), and LANL (the location where research activities would continue under the No Action Alternative). Descriptions of the CEMRC site were obtained from the CEMRC EA (DOE 1995c). Descriptions of the WIPP site were obtained from SEIS-II (DOE 1997) and the Final Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site (DOE 2001a). Finally, descriptions of the LANL site were obtained from the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued

335

NREL: Environment, Safety, Health and Quality - Environmental Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Environmental Protection Photo of tree silouhetted against pink clouds and blue sky. Credit: Steve Wilcox Protecting the environment is at the heart of NREL's mission to develop new renewable energy technologies. Workers have a responsibility to incorporate the principles of environmental stewardship and sustainability in their work activities. When planning activities and performing daily tasks, our staff considers the potential impacts to the environment: The amount and type of wastes generated and reduced, The potential release of contaminants to air, land, or water, and The effect activities might have on NREL's wildlife, vegetation, and other natural resources. Links to our most recent wildlife and vegetation surveys are below. NREL's Environmental Management System integrates the components of

336

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Noise-induced energy excitation by a general environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the effects that general environments, namely ohmic and non-ohmic, at zero and high temperature induce over a quantum Brownian particle. We state that the evolution of the system can be summarized in terms of two main environmental induced physical phenomena: decoherence and energy activation. In this article we show that the latter is a post-decoherence phenomenon. As the energy is an observable, the excitation process is a direct indication of the system-environment entanglement particularly useful at zero temperature.

Fernando C. Lombardo; Paula I. Villar

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with molten fluoride salt at 700 C (1,292 F) as part of a reactor cooling loop. The motor-pump combination during normal operation would be red-hot (Figure 1). This environment challenges every facet of the design including seals, wiring, magnetic materials, and sensors. In this paper, we discuss the challenges of sensor design in extreme environments and specifically the sensor design for a high-temperature fluoride salt coolant pump. This pump will be used as a test-bed for embedded I&C development and validation in extreme environments.

Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Deploying a wireless sensor network on an active volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augmenting heavy and power-hungry data collection equipment with lighter, smaller wireless sensor network nodes leads to faster,larger deployments. Arrays comprising dozens of wireless sensor nodes are now possible,allowing scientific studies that aren’t feasible with traditional instrumentation. Designing sensor networks to support volcanic studies requires addressing the high data rates and high data fidelity these studies demand. The authors ’ sensor-network application for volcanic data collection relies on triggered event detection and reliable data retrieval to meet bandwidth and data-quality demands. Wireless sensor networks — in which numerous resource-limited nodes are linked via low-bandwidth wireless radios — have been the focus of intense research during the past few years. Since their conception, they’ve excited a range of scientific communities because of their potential to facilitate data acquisition and scientific studies. Collaborations between computer scientists and other domain scientists have produced networks that can record data at a scale and resolution not previously possible. Taking this progress one step further, wireless sensor networks can potentially advance the pursuit of geophysical studies of volcanic activity. Two years ago, our team of computer scientists at Harvard University began collaborating with volcanologists at the University of North Carolina, the University of New Hampshire, and the Instituto

Konrad Lorincz; Matt Welsh; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Study of changes in the Solar Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that the local environment of the Sun is a complex one with the presence of several supernova shock bubbles and interstellar clouds. Even within this environment, the Sun is moving with a velocity of about 15 km/s toward the interior of the galaxy. We examine the changes in the local ISM environment experienced by the Sun in the past and then discuss the interaction of the Sun with these different environments. Lastly, we inquire how this must have changed the cosmic ray environment of the earth since this remains one of the few methods to test the changes in the local ISM environment over astronomical time scales. %

M N Vahia

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

From model conception to verification and validation, a global approach to multiphase Navier-Stoke models with an emphasis on volcanic explosive phenomenology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale volcanic eruptions are hazardous events that cannot be described by detailed and accurate in situ measurement: hence, little to no real-time data exists to rigorously validate current computer models of these events. In addition, such phenomenology involves highly complex, nonlinear, and unsteady physical behaviors upon many spatial and time scales. As a result, volcanic explosive phenomenology is poorly understood in terms of its physics, and inadequately constrained in terms of initial, boundary, and inflow conditions. Nevertheless, code verification and validation become even more critical because more and more volcanologists use numerical data for assessment and mitigation of volcanic hazards. In this report, we evaluate the process of model and code development in the context of geophysical multiphase flows. We describe: (1) the conception of a theoretical, multiphase, Navier-Stokes model, (2) its implementation into a numerical code, (3) the verification of the code, and (4) the validation of such a model within the context of turbulent and underexpanded jet physics. Within the validation framework, we suggest focusing on the key physics that control the volcanic clouds—namely, momentum-driven supersonic jet and buoyancy-driven turbulent plume. For instance, we propose to compare numerical results against a set of simple and well-constrained analog experiments, which uniquely and unambiguously represent each of the key-phenomenology. Key

Dartevelle, Sebastian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and when equilibrium is reached between the gas and liquid phases Natural silicate melts often contain two.3. Dynamics of reversible gas-driven eruptions through a fluid medium Because buoyancy plays an important roleEnergetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Y. Zhang* Department of Geological Sciences

Zhang, Youxue

344

Waste management practices used in the attempt to protect the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management is the collection, transport, processing, recycling or disposal, and monitoring of waste materials. The term usually relates to materials produced by human activity, and is generally undertaken to reduce their effect on health, the environment ... Keywords: effect on health, environment, gaseous or radioactive substances, liquid, solid, waste materials

Zorica Bacinschi; Cristiana Zizi Rizescu; Elena Valentina Stoian; Cezarina Necula

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Detecting coughing episodes passively from acoustic signals in a home environment: demo abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a passive cough monitoring system for in-home environments using acoustic sensors. Our system does not need the users to wear any device. It also works under the presence of typical sounds that may be common in a home environment. Keywords: activity monitoring, assisted living

Enamul Hoque; John A. Stankovic

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ambient kitchen: designing situated services using a high fidelity prototyping environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Kitchen is a high fidelity prototype for exploring the design of pervasive computing algorithms and applications for everyday environments. The environment integrates data projectors, cameras, RFID tags and readers, object mounted accelerometers, ... Keywords: kitchen tasks, multi-modal prompting, people with dementia, pervasive computing, prompting, sensor networks assistance in daily activities, ubiquitous computing

Patrick Olivier; Guangyou Xu; Andrew Monk; Jesse Hoey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Knowledge management in mobile environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many knowledge management activities occur in working places and in our daily activities. On such occasions, mobile devices are tools to connect people with knowledge bases. In the mobile scenarios, the important knowledge management issue is how to ... Keywords: handheld devices, knowledge applications, knowledge sharing, m-commerce, mobile commerce, mobile communications, mobile devices, mobile knowledge management

Xiaoqing Li; Te-Wei Wang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of work practices for nanoscale material activities at DOE Laboratories. Representatives from DOE line management organizations - the Office of Science (SC) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) - as well as nanoscale science subject matter experts from national laboratories and representatives from the HSS Office of Health and Safety, contributed to the Special Review.

349

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 29, 2009 This guide is a subordinate document to the Independent Oversight Appraisal Process Protocols. While the protocols provide general guidance common to all appraisal activities, this document provides additional detail and guidance regarding procedures and methods specific to ES&H appraisals conducted by Independent Oversight. DOE Order 470.2B is an important reference document that defines program requirements and, in particular, defines processes for sites to respond to identified vulnerabilities and to develop corrective action plans. The processes described in this guide are used for all ES&H appraisals, including periodic inspections, special

350

Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate within the industry. Downhole electronics can provide a very cost-effective approach for well exploration and sustainment (data logging). However, the harsh environments are a 'game-changer' in terms defining materials, assembly processes and the long-term reliability of downhole electronic systems. The system-level approach will enable the integration of each of these contributors - materials, processes, and reliability - in order to deliver cost-effective electronics that meet customer requirements.

Vianco, Paul Thomas

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Evolving triggers for dynamic environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this work we address the problem of managing the reactive behavior in distributed environments in which data continuously changes over time, where the users may need to explicitly express how the triggers should be (self) modified. To enable this we propose the (ECA) 2 – Evolving and Context-Aware Event-Condition-Action paradigm for specifying triggers that capture the desired reactive behavior in databases which manage distributed and continuously changing data. Since both the monitored event and the condition part of the trigger may be continuous in nature, we introduce the concept of metatriggers to coordinate the detection of events and the evaluation of conditions. 1

Goce Trajcevski; Peter Scheuermann; Oliviu Ghica; Annika Hinze Agnes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced engineering environment pilot project.  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a concurrent engineering concept that enables real-time process tooling design and analysis, collaborative process flow development, automated document creation, and full process traceability throughout a product's life cycle. The AEE will enable NNSA's Design and Production Agencies to collaborate through a singular integrated process. Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) are working together on a prototype AEE pilot project to evaluate PTC's product collaboration tools relative to the needs of the NWC. The primary deliverable for the project is a set of validated criteria for defining a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution to deploy the AEE across the NWC.

Schwegel, Jill; Pomplun, Alan R.; Abernathy, Rusty (Parametric Technology Corporation, Needham, MA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses, and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. The work accomplished during Year 1 of this ongoing program is described in the present report. A brief overview of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is given. The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature, and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures. Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter. Finally, plans for future work are outlined.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Stevens, J.L.; Luu, L. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A study of learners' attitudes using TAM in a context-aware mobile learning environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a context-aware mobile learning (CAML) environment based on situated learning. Furthermore, we used the CAML to process an outdoor learning activity and evaluated the attitudes of learners. The participants involved in ...

Tzung-Shi Chen; Po-Sheng Chiu; Yueh-Ming Huang; Cheng-Sian Chang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quantum Darwinism in a hazy environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Darwinism recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the "systems of interest" indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Here, we show that information about a system can be acquired from a mixed-state, or hazy, environment, but the storage capacity of an environment fragment is suppressed by its initial entropy. In the case of good decoherence, the mutual information between the system and the fragment is given solely by the fragment's entropy increase. For fairly mixed environments, this means a reduction by a factor 1-h, where h is the haziness of the environment, i.e., the initial entropy of an environment qubit. Thus, even such hazy environments eventually reveal the state of the system, although now the intercepted environment fragment must be larger by ~1/(1-h) to gain the same information about the system.

Michael Zwolak; H. T. Quan; Wojciech H. Zurek

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but \\emph{does not} form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a "thermalized" form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

Kinjal Banerjee; Aseem Paranjape

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Tritium in the aquatic environment  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advanced Materials and Processes for Extreme Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments. Presentation Title, Advanced Materials and Processes for ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SMSD Microanalysis Research Group Environment Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment. Summary: Behavior and effects of environmental nanoparticles are analyzed using model systems and focused ion beam scanning ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nanocrystalline and Nanotwinned Metals under Extreme Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of nanostructured metals under extreme environment (high temperature, ... of Transport Phenomena for Enhanced Oil Recovery Applications .

363

Primary Production, Recycling, and Environment - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARTICLES: Selected Readings on Magnesium Production, Recycling and Environment Links to key papers on magnesium primary production, recycling and ...

364

Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics & Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics & Industry ... Electrochemical Optimization of TiO2 Nanotubular Structure Formation and ...

365

Radiation environment at high-mountains stations and onboard spacecraft  

SciTech Connect

Radiation environment has been studied at high-mountain observatories and onboard spacecraft. The most important contribution to this environment at high-mountain observatories represents cosmic radiation component. We have been studied this environment in two high-mountain observatories: one situated on the top of Lomnicky Stit, High Tatras, Slovakia, and another one close to the top of Moussala, Rila, Bulgaria (Basic Environment Observatory--BEO). The studies have been performed using: an energy deposition spectrometer with a Si-diode (MDU) developed at BAS, Sofia, permitting to estimate non-neutron as well as neutron component of the radiation field; other active equipment designated to measure natural radiation background, and thermoluminescent detectors as passive dosimeters. Basic dosimetry characteristics of these fields are presented, analyzed, and discussed; they are also compared with the estimation of cosmic radiation component as published in the Report of UNSCEAR 2000. Measuring instruments mentioned above, together with an LET spectrometer based on chemically etched track detectors have been also used to characterize radiation environment onboard spacecraft, particularly International Space Station. They have been exposed on the surface and/or inside a phantom. Some of results obtained are presented, and discussed.

Spurny, Frantisek; Ploc, Ondrej; Jadrmickova, Iva [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

ICT impact on competitiveness, innovation and environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of ICT on competitiveness, innovation and environment in the glass, ceramics and cement concrete industry. The results show that use of ICT seems to favor innovation and competitiveness. As for the effect on the environment, ... Keywords: Competitiveness, Environment, ICT, Innovation

Andrea Ollo-López; M. Elena Aramendía-Muneta

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Real illumination from virtual environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a method for actively controlling the illumination in a room so that it is consistent with a virtual world. In combination with a high dynamic range display, the system produces both uniform and directional illumination at intensity levels ...

Abhijeet Ghosh; Matthew Trentacoste; Helge Seetzen; Wolfgang Heidrich

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mirage: Mitigating Illicit Inventorying in a RFID Enabled Retail Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given its low dollar and maintenance cost, RFID is poised to become the enabling technology for inventory control and supply chain management. However, as an outcome of its low cost, RFID based inventory control is susceptible to pernicious security and privacy threats. A deleterious attack on such a system is corporate espionage, where attackers through illicit inventorying infer sales and restocking trends for products. In this paper, we first present plausible aftermaths of corporate espionage using real data from online sources. Second, to mitigate corporate espionage in a retail store environment, we present a simple lowcost system called Mirage. Mirage uses additional programmable low cost passive RFID tags called honeytokens to inject noise in retail store inven-torying. Using a simple history based algorithm that controls activation and de-activation of honeytokens, Mirage randomizes sales and restocking trends. We evaluate Mirage in a real warehouse environment using a commercial off-the-shelf Motoro...

White, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Summary of geothermal exploration activity in the State of Washington from 1978 to 1983. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activity is summarized with references to the publications produced. Project findings are reported as they relate to specific geothermal resource target areas. Some major projects of the goethermal exploration program are: thermal and mineral spring chemistry, heat flow drilling, temperature gradient measurements, Cascade Range regional gravity, geohydrology study of the Yakima area, low temperature geothermal resources, geology, geochemistry of Cascade Mountains volcanic rocks, and soil mercury studies. (MHR)

Korosec, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

371

Library software in supercomputing environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the status and nature of supercomputer is quite well known in the physical science communities (Devreese and Van Camp, 1985), the statistical community is only slightly involved in the use of supercomputers. Most computing statisticians have settled into a comfortable world: S on workstations, SAS on mainframes. For statisticians, this is the well-lit parlor of computing;I propose here to shine a flashlight around the back alley. I will first define supercomputers and describe the supercomputing environment. This material will make necessary some information on why anyone would use supercomputers. I will then describe the principal sources of (scientific) library software on supercomputers and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Next, some comparison timings will show what is brought by moving to a supercomputer, vectorizing, and further optimization. I will close with a harangue on future directions for statistical computing on supercomputers. 33 refs., 1 tab.

Durst, M.J.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Radiation effects in the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Gas Research Institute environment and safety research program. Status report  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 status report describes ongoing planned activities in the Environment and Safety Research Program. The objectives and goals, accomplishments, and strategies are discussed for the supply, end use, and gas operations subprograms. Contract status summaries are presented for the following project areas: Gas Supply Environmental and Safety Research, Air Quality Research, Combustion Systems Emissions Control, End Use Equipment Safety Research, Gas Operations Safety Research, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research, Gas Operations Environmental Research, and End Use Bioengineering.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

375

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

376

Global Environment Fund GEF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Fund GEF Environment Fund GEF Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Fund (GEF) Place Chevy Chase, Maryland Zip 20815 Product International investment management firm with around USD 800m under management. Invests in companies that make positive contributions to environmental quality, human health and sustainable management of resources. References Global Environment Fund (GEF)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Environment Fund (GEF) is a company located in Chevy Chase, Maryland . References ↑ "Global Environment Fund (GEF)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Environment_Fund_GEF&oldid=345910"

377

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Services Group (ESG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Services Group Environmental Services Group Whom To Call Operating Permits For LBNL Activities Publications Advisories Internal Documents Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration Program Weather Data Image of Chicken Creek The Environmental Services Group, within the Environment, Health and Safety Division, provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective environmental management services to Berkeley Lab by working with research and support staff. Services include: Your visit may be enhanced by upgrading or installing the latest Flash Player. ESG sampling activity Air and Water Quality Management Hazardous Materials Management Environmental Monitoring Radiological Dose and Environmental Risk Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration News & Updates

378

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHS A-Z Index A A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Accident Statistics Accident Statistics Archive Acronyms AccidentIncident Reporting Activity Hazard Document...

379

The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment Gal Hochman, StevenBiofuel, and the Environment ? Gal Hochman UC Berkeleyincorporates energy environment and agricultural sector to

Hochman, Gal; Sexton, Steven; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Health and Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Name Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Address 4300...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Policy 450.9 - Environment, Safety, and Health Policy (Last ReviewUpdate 11292011 ) LM...

382

Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications...

383

AN L-88-12 Environment. Safety and Health Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8-12 Environment. Safety and Health Department Environment. Safety and Health Department Environment. Safety and Hearth Department 4rivironment Safety and ni.r.prfrwTanf...

384

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

385

PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment...

386

Radionuclide behavior in the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project`s ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors` evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

software maintenance in Distributed, EVOLVing Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed applications in evolving environments are typically difficult to maintain. Currently, human intervention is needed to maintain the application and adapt it to its changed environment. We need to: deploy application software on the added devices (buses), replace application software on the changed devices (e.g. to support the new advertisement display), and remove application software when no longer useful (e.g. because it requires an advertisement display which is removed). When the distributed environment becomes too large, or changes too often, manual software maintenance is no longer a feasible option. Automation is required. This paper reports on our ongoing work on dEVOLVe, a new OSGi based middleware platform which will automate some software maintenance tasks in ’distributed evolving environments’. dEVOLVe will detect changes in the distributed environment and will adapt the application accordingly. This way, the user is free from software maintenance tasks caused by the environment evolution.

Bart Elen; Sam Michiels; Wouter Joosen; Pierre Verbaeten; Bart Elen; Sam Michiels; Wouter Joosen; Pierre Verbaeten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Distributed virtual environment scalability and security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

here. I define a virtual environment (VE) as a computer simulation typically involving space and time. This definitely restricts our examination to computerized systems, where otherwise it could rightly include war simulations going back thousands... in the Manhattan Project to model nuclear detonation, implementing a narrowly scoped, non-real-time virtual environment. In subsequent years computer capacity has grown, and with it the scope and responsiveness of virtual environments. VEs are still used...

Miller, John

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keating, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

Warren, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Publishing Organisation: Environment Agency Rio House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.environment-agency.gov.uk The Environment Agency is the leading public body protecting and improving the environment in England and Wales. It’s our job to make sure that air, land and water are looked after by everyone in today’s society, so that tomorrow’s generations inherit a cleaner, healthier world. Our work includes tackling flooding and pollution incidents, reducing industry’s impacts on the environment, cleaning up rivers, coastal waters and contaminated land, and improving wildlife habitats.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 5, 2013 ... CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment with safe threads. Nicholas Gould(nick.gould ***at*** stfc.ac.uk) Dominique ...

394

A fluctuation theorem in a random environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple class of chaotic systems in a random environment is considered and the fluctuation theorem is extended under the assumption of reversibility.

F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; G. Gentile

2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nanomaterials and the Environment & Instrumentation, Metrology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials October 6-7, 2009: Nanomaterials and the Environment & Instrumentation, Metrology, and Analytical Methods November 17-18, 2009:...

396

Discrete Frontal Propagation in a Nonconvective Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface discrete frontal propagation in a wintertime, nonconvective environment is documented using conventional surface and upper-air data and simulated using the PSU–NCAR mesoscale model.

Joseph J. Charney; J. Michael Fritsch

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah River Operations Office and Savannah River Site, January 2010 Independent Oversight...

398

The hardware/software environment - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 30, 1998 ... The hardware/software environment. As the school was relatively poorly equipped to begin with, it purchased and installed an entirely new ...

399

CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained Testing Environment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 5, 2013 ... CUTEst: a Constrained and Unconstrained. Testing Environment with safe threads. Nicholas I. M. Gould,1,2 Dominique Orban3,4 and Philippe ...

400

Communicating Sustainability through Design within Retail Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis uses a systematic understanding of sustainability informed by human needs, learning and design theory to explore ways in which small retail environments can… (more)

Hendry, Daniel; Silcox, Lawrence

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PNNL: Procurement: Contractor Environment, Safety & Health: Manuals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search PNNL Home About Research Publications Jobs News Contacts Business Contractor Environment, Safety & Health PNNL Visitor Orientation PNNL Visitors Guide Manuals PNNL...

402

Developer United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Developer United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Jump to: navigation, search A list of all pages that have property...

403

Panasonic Home & Environment Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Create one now Panasonic Home & Environment Company is a company located in Washington, DC. References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePanasonicHome%26E...

404

Computational Systems & Software Environment | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > ASC Program Elements > Computational Systems & Software Environment...

405

Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) is a local NGO responsible for developing and promoting Renewable Energy Technologies in Tanzania. TaTEDO is a coalition...

406

Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA)  

TESSA is a parallelized discrete event simulation for large-scale modeling and simulation of space events in a high performance computing environment.

407

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Guesstimating the Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video (The Origin of the Elements) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (The Higgs Boson and Our Life) The Higgs Boson and Our Life Guesstimating the Environment Dr....

408

Energy and environment. Annual report, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following programs: geothermal and geosciences; controlled thermonuclear research; chemical processing; instrument development; environment; energy use and conservation; energy analysis; and engineering sciences.

Barton, R.G.; Lizama, L.R. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental Protection Division R. Lee, Manager ENVIRONMENT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division R. Lee, Manager ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH DIRECTORATE Assistant Laboratory Director George A. Goode EMSOHSAS Rep - K. Schwager ES&H Coordinator - K. Conkling...

410

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISIONJ. CAIRNS Chairperson ENERGY POLICY IV. SIRI, CriBlrparsanW. BLANCH, Deputy SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM M. A. WAHLIG, Leader

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Designing and Modeling Smart Environments (Invited Paper)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes our experience in designing and modeling single habitant and multiple inhabitant smart environments based on learning and prediction based paradigm.

Sajal K. Das; Diane J. Cook

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

AGREEMENT BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU AND WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT PERMITTEES REGARDING A TIME EXTENSION FOR DISPUTE RESOLUTION RELATED TO FINAL AUDIT...

413

Test concept for waste package environment tests at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is characterizing a tuffaceous rock unit at Yucca Mountain, Nevada to evaluate its suitability for a repository for high level radioactive waste. The candidate repository horizon is a welded, devitrified tuff bed located at a depth of about 300 m in the unsaturated zone, over 100 m above the water table. As part of the project, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for designing the waste packages and for assessing their expected performance in the repository environment. The primary region of interest to package design and performance assessment is the portion of the rock mass within a few meters of waste emplacement holes. Hydrologic mechanisms active in this unsaturated near-field environment, along with thermal and mechanical phenomena that influence the hydrology, need to be understood well enough to confirm the basis of the waste package designs and performance assessment. Large scale in situ tests (called waste package environment tests) are being planned in order to develop this understanding and to provide data sets for performance assessment model validation (Yow, 1985). Exploratory shafts and limited underground facilities for in-situ testing will be constructed at Yucca Mountain during site characterization. Multiple waste package environment tests are being planned for these facilities to represent horizontal and vertical waste emplacement configurations in the repository target horizon. These approximately half-scale tests are being designed to investigate rock mass hydrologic conditions during a cycle of thermal loading.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008.

416

DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities The original release of DOE-STD-1120-98 provided integrated safety management guidance for enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during all facility disposition activities. Volume One of this Standard has been revised to provide a Department of Energy (DOE) approved methodology for preparing a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for decommissioning of nuclear facilities, as well as environmental restoration activities that involve work not done within a permanent structure. Methodologies provided in this Standard are intended to be compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part

417

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008.

418

DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities DOE Standard Integration Of Environment,Safety, and Health Into Facility Disposition Activities The original release of DOE-STD-1120-98 provided integrated safety management guidance for enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during all facility disposition activities. Volume One of this Standard has been revised to provide a Department of Energy (DOE) approved methodology for preparing a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for decommissioning of nuclear facilities, as well as environmental restoration activities that involve work not done within a permanent structure. Methodologies provided in this Standard are intended to be compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part

419

Balance Calibration and Use in an Analytical Environment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the sources of weighing errors in analytical environments, methodologies for ... to use of balances in an analytical environment where compliance ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

New Report on NIST Tests of Wireless Environment in Auto ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... key parameters that describe the wireless propagation environment, which will be ... of wireless equipment used in highly reflective environments. ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activities for DOE Solar Heating and Cooling Research andconditions for active solar heating systems," Second AnnualACTIVITIES FOR DOE SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING RESEARCH AND

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Integrating Pedagogical Agents into Virtual Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for a virtual environment to be effective as a training tool, it is not enough to concentrate on the fidelity of the renderings and the accuracy of the simulated behaviors. The environment should help trainees develop an understanding of the ...

W. Lewis Johnson; Jeff Rickel; Randy Stiles; Allen Munro

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Design considerations in course support environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Course-support environments are an important technical development relating to computer communications in education that involves the linking of a Web-compliant user interface and Web-compliant tools and applets with an underlying database. But we must ... Keywords: comparison, content, course support environment

Andreas Veglis

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Adding content in course support environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Course-support environments are an important technical development relating to computer communications in education that involves the linking of a Web-compliant user interface and Web-compliant tools and applets with an underlying database. But we must ... Keywords: comparison, content, course support environment

Andreas Veglis; Andreas Pomportsis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-17 June, University of Osnabruck, Germany. 9. Simonite, T., 2005, Anti-terror study tracks gas dispersalStudy of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments Razvan Corneliu Carbunescu Center head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can

Allen, Gabrielle

426

Design For Environment: Methodologies, Tools, And Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design for Environment (DfE) optimizes the relationship and interaction of the economic system and the environmental system, and strives to produce a sustainable development and enterprise integration. The driving force behind DfE includes customers, ... Keywords: Design for environment, DfE, implementation, tools

Junning Sun; Bin Han; Stephen Ekwaro-Osire; Hong-Chao Zhang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT I COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1- REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT I COURSE SYLLABUS GEOG 526, Fall 2012 T Th 9:30 ­ 10:45 228 relating to remote sensing of the earth's environment. We will begin by examining remote sensing as a field will shift to digital image processing and to areas in which remote sensing is applied as a tool for mapping

Peterson, Blake R.

428

SWIDE: semantic web integrated development environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology is a specification of conceptualization. This paper introduces an environment to develop semantic web applications. This environment integrates a lot of tools such as an editing capability, logic reasoner and semantic search engine. Design and ... Keywords: Jena, OWL, RDF, SPARQL, XML, ontology editor, semantic web

Islam Hany Harb; Abdurrahman A. Nasr; Salah Abdel-Magid; Hany Harb

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Client side personalization of smart environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we will describe our approach for supporting users by personalizing the multiple environments they visit in their daily lives. In our approach, user preferences are stored on a handheld device which can assist the user in selecting, installing ... Keywords: jxta, mobility, osgi, personalization, smart environments

Ibrahim Armac; Daniel Evers

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Stochastic binary sensor networks for noisy environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a stochastic framework for detecting anomalies or gathering events of interest in a noisy environment using a network consisting of binary sensors. A binary sensor is an extremely coarse sensor, capable of measuring data to only 1-bit ... Keywords: energy consumption, energy efficiency, noisy environments, sensor networks, simulation, stochastic binary sensors, wireless networks

T. Nguyen; Dong Nguyen; Huaping Liu; Duc A. Tran

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sample Environment Equipment Categories - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Sample Environment: Categories of Equipment All Ancillary Equipment Auto Changer Closed Cycle Refrigerators Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Bottom Loading Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Top Loading Furnaces Gas Handling Gas Panel High Pressure Systems Liquid Helium Cryostats Magnet Systems Other Special Environments Sample Cell Sample Stick Ultra Low Temperature Devices Sample Environment: by Beam Line All BL-11A-POWGEN BL-11B-MANDI BL-12-TOPAZ BL-13-Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line BL-14A-BL-14A BL-14B-HYSPEC BL-15-Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) BL-16B-VISION BL-17-SEQUOIA BL-18-ARCS BL-1A-TOF-USANS BL-1B-NOMAD BL-2-BASIS BL-3-SNAP BL-4A-Magnetism Reflectometer BL-4B-Liquids Reflectometer BL-5-Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) BL-6-EQ-SANS

432

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Environment < Geothermal(Redirected from Environment) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

433

Tunable electromagnetic environment for superconducting quantum bits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a setup which realises a tunable engineered environment for experiments in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We illustrate this concept with the specific example of a quantum bit, qubit, in a high-quality-factor cavity which is capacitively coupled to another cavity including a resistor. The temperature of the resistor, which acts as the dissipative environment, can be controlled in a well defined manner in order to provide a hot or cold environment for the qubit, as desired. Furthermore, introducing superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) into the cavity containing the resistor, provides control of the coupling strength between this artificial environment and the qubit. We demonstrate that our scheme allows us to couple strongly to the environment enabling rapid initialization of the system, and by subsequent tuning of the magnetic flux of the SQUIDs we may greatly reduce the resistor-qubit coupling, allowing the qubit to evolve unhindered.

P. J. Jones; J. A. M. Huhtamäki; J. Salmilehto; K. Y. Tan; M. Möttönen

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Integrating High Performance Computing and Virtual Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High performance computing has become accepted as a tool that can be used to solve many large scale computational problems. Because of the complexity of the problems associated with high performance computing, visualization of the output of high performance computing applications has always been an important factor in providing a complete problem solving environment for the high performance computing user. As visualization technology advances, it is important to consider what impacts those advances will have on the integration of high performance computing and visualization. Virtual environments are the most recent, and arguably the most powerful, visualization environments in use today. In this paper we analyze the current state of the research of integrating visualization, and in particular virtual environments, with high performance computing. We also present a framework for implementing such an environment and report on the status of its implementation at the Australian National Un...

Brian Corrie; David Sitsky; Paul Mackerras

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill deb.gill@wipp.ws 575-234-7270 Carlsbad, NM - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a grant for an estimated $1.6 million to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The five-year grant funds an agreement for NMED to conduct non-regulatory environmental oversight and monitoring to evaluate activities conducted at DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. NMED evaluates DOE activities related to WIPP's environmental monitoring and cleanup. This award is made in accordance with the Department of Energy

436

Fusion power and the environment  

SciTech Connect

Environmental characteristics of conceptual fusion-reactor systems based on magnetic confinement are examined quantitatively, and some comparisons with fission systems are made. Fusion, like all other energy sources, will not be completely free of environmental liabilities, but the most obvious of these-- tritium leakage and activation of structural materials by neutron bombardment-- are susceptible to significant reduction by ingenuity in choice of materials and design. Large fusion reactors can probably be designed so that worst-case releases of radioactivity owing to accident or sabotage would produce no prompt fatalities in the public. A world energy economy relying heavily on fusion could make heavy demands on scarce nonfuel materials, a topic deserving further attention. Fusion's potential environmental advantages are not entirely ''automatic'', converting them into practical reality will require emphasis on environmental characteristics throughout the process of reactor design and engineering. The central role of environmental impact in the long-term energy dilemma of civilization justifies the highest priority on this aspect of fusion. (auth)

Holdren, J.P.; Fowler, T.K.; Post, R.F.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Communities Against a Radioactive Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tri-Valley CAREs has been actively monitoring the Livermore and Sandia labs for nearly twenty-five years. During this time, Tri-Valley CAREs has been very careful to document the accidents and releases that have come to light and has worked closely with workers in those endeavors. We now hold support group meetings for sick workers, many of whom have or will apply for compensation under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness and Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). The number of workers from Sandia / Livermore who have received compensation through the EEOICPA program is dismal. Out of 221 cases filed as of October 14, 2007, only 12 cases have been paid. That is approximately 5 % of all of the claimants. While we witness the sickness and death that these workers suffer that is clearly due to their exposures, we are horrified as we see the former workers and their families suffer through this complicated and frustrating compensation process. In light of this, we are especially disappointed by the quality of this Site Profile summary document. In our review of the Sandia Site Profile, we have found numerous inaccuracies and shortfalls that significantly disadvantage the worker in the dose reconstruction process. Our evaluation of the Site Profile revealed major oversights and inconsistencies in the document that conflict with the documentation that we have gathered. Defective procedures, missing documents, absent references, and omitted incidents are its most significant flaws.

Robert A. Taft; Laboratories Ms-c; Peace Justice Environment

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Los Alamos hybrid environment: an integrated development/configuration management system  

SciTech Connect

I present the details of a hybrid configuration management system that utilizes a commercial configuration management tool (Softool's Change and Configuration Control environment) to monitor and control the development of mission-critical software systems at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The hybrid system combines features of the VMS host operating system and elements of the tool environment to integrate a flexible development environment with a very powerful automated configuration management system. The features of this system are presented with particular emphasis on the benefits of the hybrid approach. The complementary nature of the constituent environments is described. Special attention is given the issues of operational tradeoffs, personnel interaction and utilization, management visibility and overall system performance. It is shown that by employing a special interface data structure, the hybrid environment supports a much higher level of automation (of both development and configuration management activities) than is realizable in either environment individually. Examples are provided to illustrate the extent to which development activities and all phases of configuration management can be automated under this system. It is shown that in the process of providing a rigorous configuration management environment, the system remains virtually transparent to software development personnel and actually enhances the programmer's capabilities.

Cort, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin, Australia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monsoon Environment (Darwin, Australia) PETER T. MAY Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions

Protat, Alain

440

Decoherence alias Loschmidt echo of the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entanglement between a quantum system and its environment leads to loss of coherence in the former. In general, the temporal fate of coherences is complicated. Here, we establish the connection between decoherence of a central system and fidelity decay in the environment for a variety of situations, including both, energy conserving and dissipative couplings. We show how properties of unitary time evolution of the environment can be inferred from the non-unitary evolution of coherences in the central system. This opens up promising ways for measuring Loschmidt echoes in a variety of situations.

T. Gorin; T. Prosen; T. H. Seligman; W. T. Strunz

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

443

Adaptive file transfers for diverse environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dsync, a file transfer system that can dynamically adapt to a wide variety of environments. While many transfer systems work well in their specialized ontext, their performance comes at the cost of generality, and they perform poorly ...

Himabindu Pucha; Michael Kaminsky; David G. Andersen; Michael A. Kozuch

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

An environment-mediated quantum deleter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment-induced decoherence presents a great challenge to realizing a quantum computer. We point out the somewhat surprising fact that decoherence can be useful, indeed necessary, for practical quantum computation, in particular, for the effective erasure of quantum memory in order to initialize the state of the quantum computer. The essential point behind the deleter is that the environment, by means of a dissipative interaction, furnishes a contractive map towards a pure state. We present a specific example of an amplitude damping channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment in the weak Born-Markov approximation. This is contrasted with a purely dephasing, non-dissipative channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment by means of a quantum nondemolition interaction. We point out that currently used state preparation techniques, for example using optical pumping, essentially perform as quantum deleters.

R. Srikanth; Subhashish Banerjee

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Environment/Health/Safety Division: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How EHS Helped Build A First-Of-Its-Kind Accelerator A two-part series follows the EnvironmentHealthSafety (EHS) Division as a partner on the BELLA project from before its...

446

Convectively Coupled Waves in a Sheared Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear stability analysis, about a radiative–convective equilibrium in a sheared environment, on an equatorial beta plane, for a simple multicloud model for organized tropical convection is presented here. Both vertical/baroclinic and ...

Ying Han; Boualem Khouider

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Environment of Precipitating Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative estimates of precipitation in a typical undisturbed trade wind region are derived from 2 months of radar reflectivity data and compared to the meteorological environment determined from soundings, surface flux, and airborne-lidar ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens; A. Pier Siebesma

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tropical Storm Formation in a Baroclinic Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of the large-scale conditions associated with the initial development of Tropical Storm Diana (September 1984) in a baroclinic environment. Ordinary extratropical wave cyclogenesis began along an old frontal boundary east ...

Lance F. Bosart; Joseph A. Bartlo

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Webinar: Tapping Into Wind in Urban Environments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This live webinar presented by DOE on "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Tapping into Wind in Urban Environments" will take place on Tuesday, September 18, 2012, from 3:00 – 4:15 p.m....

450

Environment/Health/Safety/Security Concerns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hardhat EnvironmentHealthSafetySecurity Concerns construction workers If you have a life-threatening emergency, please dial 7-911 or 911 from Lab phones and 911 from a cell...

451

Control of single spin in Markovian environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study the control of single spin in Markovian environment. Given an initial state, we compute all the possible states to which the spin can be driven at arbitrary time, under the assumption that fast ...

Yuan, Haidong

452

Probing the Environment with Galaxy Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present various projects to study the halo dynamics of elliptical galaxies. This allows one to study the outer mass and orbital distributions of ellipticals in different environments, and the inner distributions of groups and clusters themselves.

Aaron J. Romanowsky

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Environment Geothermal/Environment < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

454

Wireless Environment LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wireless Environment LLC Wireless Environment LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Wireless Environment LLC Place Elyria, Ohio Product Wireless Environment designs light-emitting diode lighting products that it sells through a vehicle called "Mr. Beams." Coordinates 41.36768°, -82.105839° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.36768,"lon":-82.105839,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

European Environment Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Agency Environment Agency Jump to: navigation, search Logo: European Environment Agency Name European Environment Agency Address Kongens Nytorv 6 1050 Place Copenhagen, Denmark Phone number (+45) 33 36 71 00 Website http://www.eea.europa.eu/ Coordinates 55.6811436°, 12.5866457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.6811436,"lon":12.5866457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Efficient Multiagent Coordination in Dynamic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent coordination is a fundamental task in designing and operating multiagent systems. However, in dynamically changing environments, coordination must balance proactive and reactive behaviors in order to enable efficient operations while retaining ... Keywords: multiagent coordination, dynamics, adaption, social order generation

Jan Ole Berndt; Otthein Herzog

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliances and cost of peak power; oil use (through use ofpeaks were detected. Arsenic compounds present in these oils,peak power requirements of the different appliances in different environments and locations; and the amount of oil

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Occlusion Culling in Large Virtual Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, occlusion testing in very large virtual environments is discussed from two perspectives: a theoretical one, discussing occlusion culling in relation to detail elision (level of detail), and a practical one, relating to an adaptive occlusion-culling ...

Karsten Bormann

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Environment-induced superselection in cosmology  

SciTech Connect

Interaction between a quantum system and its environment can be often regarded as a measurement, in the course of which one of the system observables influences the evolution of the external degrees of freedom and is thus monitored'' by the environment. This causes the system to decohere.'' Loss of quantum coherence erases part of the density matrix responsible for the correlations between the eigenstates of the monitored observables. This mechanism is very efficient even in the limit of weak coupling to the environment. The classical limit of quantum theory -- that is, both classical irreversible equations of motion and classical states (trajectories in phase space rather than their superpositions) obtains in the limit in which the coupling strength and the Planck constant simultaneously tend to zero. Transition from quantum to classical in the inflationary cosmological model can be justified in the framework of environment induced susperselection. 24 refs., 2 figs.

Zurek, W.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Environment Midwest, January 1977 through December 1977  

SciTech Connect

This document compiles the January 1977 through December 1977 issuances of ENVIRONMENT MIDWEST into a single volume. This periodical publication reports on environmental protection in the midwestern United States.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

An environment machine for the ??-calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a natural deduction-like formalisation of Parigot's ??-calculus. From this, we derive an environment machine that allows any well-typed ??-term to be reduced to its weak head normal form. The soundness and completeness ...

Philippe De Groote

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Environments of SLACS Gravitational Lenses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an investigation of the environments of the SLACS sample of gravitational lenses. The local and global environments of the lenses are characterized using SDSS photometry and, when available, spectroscopy. We find that the lens systems that are best modelled with steeper than isothermal density profiles are more likely to have close companions than lenses with shallower than isothermal profiles. This suggests that the profile steepening may be caused by interactions with a companion galaxy as indicated by N-body simulations of group galaxies. The global environments of the SLACS lenses are typical of non-lensing SDSS galaxies with comparable properties to the lenses, and the richnesses of the lens groups are not as strongly correlated with the lens density profiles as the local environments. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of line-of-sight contamination affecting the lens models but do not find a significant over-density of sources compared to lines of sight without lenses.

M. W. Auger

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

464

Essays on trade, CO?, and the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first chapter of this thesis uses a general equilibrium model of trade and the environment to investigate two questions. First, how do the gains from trade compare against the environmental costs of trade? Trade can ...

Shapiro, Joseph S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Arena in the petrochemical operations environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of discrete event simulation within Sasol, an international petrochemical company, is fast becoming an important tool for supporting strategic decision-making in the continuous operations environment. Arena models are used specifically to investigate ...

Lorraine Malherbe

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Qualitatitive description : light in the urban environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quality of our built environment is difficult to describe and to regulate; using light as an example, this thesis develops a descriptive framework using elementary, dynamic and connective forms. The combination of these ...

Stuebing, Susan

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Pragmatic Lighting Transition Design for Virtual Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract describes and motivates Ideel, a tool to explore expression of high-level lighting design changes for interactive virtual environments. Ideel allows lighting designers to quickly describe lighting changes using a sketchbased interface.

Joshua B. Gross

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Elevated Temperature Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Promoting Renewable Energy in a Market Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Promoting Renewable Energy in a Market Environment: A Community-Based Approach for Aggregating Green Demand Rudd Mayer Eric Blank Randy Udall John Nielsen Land and Water Fund of...

470

Built Environment Analysis Tool: April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documentation describes the tool development. It was created to evaluate the effects of built environment scenarios on transportation energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This documentation also provides guidance on how to apply the tool.

Porter, C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Sustainable and equitable urban environments in Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study identifies some of the factors and conditions that can encourage the development of sustainable and equitable urban environments. It argues that cities will continue to grow and that it is not productive to view ...

Badshah, Akhtar

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Los Alamos Lab: Fossil Energy & Environment, Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jutta Kayser 505-663-5649 Program Manager Melissa Fox 505-663-5538 A New Era for Fossil Fuels The Office of Fossil Energy and Environment (FE) is the focal point for Los...

473

Incorporating LCA tools in integrated simulation environments  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we address the issue of building data schema evolution in integrated simulation environments, as seen from the perspective of incorporating LCA tools within these environments. First we describe the key features of an integrated simulation environment designed for expandability, focusing on (a) the mechanism for the expansion of the integrated environment, and (b) its overall system architecture that allows processes and data to be added to the system without modifications or restructuring of existing code. We then focus on how the data schema allows the inclusion and maintenance of specialized construction objects bearing LCA data. Finally, we discuss various integration issues that arise from modeling capabilities and idiosyncrasies of individual simulation and analysis tools.

Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Bourassa, Norman; Loffeld, John J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION OF METALS IN OIL SHALE ENVIRONMENTS A. Levy and R.of Metals in In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts," NACE Corrosion 80,Corrosion of Oil Shale Retort Component Materials," LBL-

Bellman Jr., R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A light emitting object and its environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object that is intentionally produced with the inherent spirit of "Fine Art," will always be placed with a reverence for its setting. "LIGHT GRID" is a light sculpture with flexibility to utilize the environment where ...

Jeibmann, Jon Karl

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Economic Integration and the Environment in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trade and the Environment: Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond. PaloFree Trade Agreement. The Mexico-US Free Trade Agreement. P.Performance Review for Mexico. Paris, OECD. (OECD),

Gallagher, Kevin P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Honeybees and Power Line EMF Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Resource Paper reviews research relevant to potential interactions between electric and magnetic field environments in the vicinity of high voltage overhead transmission lines. The paper deals first, with a description of a series of electric field studies conducted in a power line environment followed by mechanism studies under controlled conditions; second, with studies of the ability of bees to discriminate static and alternating magnetic fields; and third, with a study of native bees in a power ...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

480

Physics Research Integrated Development Environment (PRIDE)  

SciTech Connect

Past efforts to implement a Software Engineering approach to High Energy Physics computing have been met with significant resistance and have been, in many cases, only marginally successful. At least a portion of the problem has been the Lick of an integrated development environment, tailored to High Energy Physics and incorporating a suite of Computer Aided Software Engineering tools. The Superconducting Super Collider Physics Research Division Computing Department is implementing pilot projects to develop just such an environment.

Burton, J.; Cormell, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active volcanic environments" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Blending a Substation into its Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information about public acceptance issues as well as technical approaches available to make substations acceptable within their environments. Case studies were used to examine substation acceptance experience from utilities in different countries and areas. This is the second report in a multi-year effort to build a multi-volume library on Blending a Substation into its Environment. Volume 1 examined available literature, standards, guides, and regulations that affect the blending o...

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy and the environment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Work on the `Energy and the Environment` project has been focused on completion of two interrelated efforts: (1) development, production, and installation of energy related exhibits in the Ecology and Environment gallery, and (2) creation and implementation of the `Energy Backpack` program. The Energy exhibits have been available to over 1.5 million visitors since the opening of the new St. Louis Science Center. The `Energy Backpack` program will be implemented with students, teachers, and family groups this fall.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

Daisey, J.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield  

SciTech Connect

The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

485

Environment and the global arena: Actors, values, policies, and futures  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on issues such as threats and limits to the global environment, the role of the U.N. Environment Program, peace and the environment, and global environmental forecasts.

Dahlberg, K.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Development and experimental validation of computational methods to simulate abnormal thermal and structural environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 40 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been actively engaged in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to abnormal thermal and structural environments. These engineered systems contain very hazardous materials. Assessing the degree of safety/risk afforded the public and environment by these engineered systems, therefore, is of upmost importance. The ability to accurately predict the response of these systems to accidents (to abnormal environments) is required to assess the degree of safety. Before the effect of the abnormal environment on these systems can be determined, it is necessary to ascertain the nature of the environment. Ascertaining the nature of the environment, in turn, requires the ability to physically characterize and numerically simulate the abnormal environment. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the level of safety provided by these engineered systems by either of two approaches: (1) a purely regulatory approach, or (2) by a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). This paper will address the latter of the two approaches.

Moya, J.L.; Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storm and double-pane windows, insulating shutters, caulking and weatherstripping, and active- and passive- solar

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH EVALUATIONS APPRAISAL PROCESS GUIDE July 2009 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide Preface July 2009 i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), published its Appraisal Process Protocols to describe the philosophy, scope, and general procedures applicable to all Independent Oversight appraisal activities. The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations (HS-64) initially prepared this companion guide as part of a continuing effort to enhance the quality and consistency of ES&H oversight appraisals. The

489

Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Place Tanzania Phone number 255.22. 27.00.438 Coordinates -6.369028°, 34.888822° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-6.369028,"lon":34.888822,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

490

How does clustering depend on environment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the current paradigm, galaxies form and reside in extended cold dark matter (CDM) halos and in turn are key tracers of cosmological structure. Understanding how different types of galaxies occupy halos of different masses is one of the major challenges facing extragalactic astrophysics. The observed galaxy properties depend on the environment surrounding the galaxy. Within the framework of most galaxy formation models the environmental dependence of the galaxy population is mainly due to the change of the halo mass function with large-scale environment. Such models make precise predictions for how galaxy clustering should depend on environment. We will illustrate this by presenting analytical models of dark matter and galaxy clustering along with results obtained from numerical simulations. With these results we can hope to obtain a better understanding of the link between galaxies and dark matter and thereby constrain galaxy formation models.

Ummi Abbas; Ravi K. Sheth

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

491

Protecting the environment into the future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protecting the Environment Into the Future Protecting the Environment Into the Future Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Protecting the environment into the future Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste by placing it in the recycling containers. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The Lab's recycle rate of 47 percent compares favorably with the current national rate of 34 percent. Lab Employees Don't Treat Their Trash Like Garbage Last year, the Lab recycled 47 percent of its solid, non-hazardous waste (which translates to about 1,275 metric tons of paper, cardboard, plastic bottles, and aluminum cans) by placing it in the recycling containers that