Sample records for active volcanic areas

  1. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  3. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  4. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    to produce a synthetic and objective map of recent mud flows covering a 640 · 700 km2 area, which representsORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western Mediterranean model for the origin for Mediterranean Ridge mud volcanism. Image analysis techniques are used

  5. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  6. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  7. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  8. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  9. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,...

  10. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

  11. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log...

  12. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:WindLaoLaredoLassen Volcanic

  13. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic Field

  14. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

  15. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  16. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  18. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  19. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson,...

  1. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  2. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982)...

  3. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

  4. active volcanic areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gases and solid aerosol particles that can affect the Earth's radiative balance and climate and the cold winter of 1783-1784 (see Franklin, Benjamin, Volume 1). If an...

  5. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-TaxShelf Lands ActWestern

  6. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  7. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumeric JumpTerrace,the Jemez Volcanic

  8. Quantitative analysis of the hydrothermal system in Lassen Volcanic National Park and Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lassen hydrothermal system is in the southern Cascade Range, approximately 70 kilometers east-southeast of Redding, California. The conceptual model of the Lassen system is termed a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system with a parasitic vapor-dominated zone. The essential feature of this model is that steam and steam-heated discharge at relatively high elevations in Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and liquid discharge with high chloride concentrations at relatively low elevations outside LVNP in the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) are both fed by an upflow of high-enthalpy, two-phase fluid within the Park. Liquid flows laterally away from the upflow area towards the areas of high-chloride discharge, and steam rises through a vapor-dominated zone to feed the steam and steam-heated features. The geometric model corresponds to an areally restricted flow regime that connects the Bumpass Hell area in LVNP with regions of chloride hot springs in the Mill Creek canyon in the KGRA south of LVNP. Simulations of thermal fluid withdrawal in the Mill Creek Canyon were carried out in order to determine the effects of such withdrawal on portions of the hydrothermal system within the Park. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  10. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  11. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-ą). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  12. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  13. THE TEPHRA STRATIGRAPHY OF TWO LAKES IN SOUTH-CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    FOR THE MID-LATE HOLOCENE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT GLACIER PEAK AND MOUNT ST. HELENS, WASHINGTON, USA Objective · New evidence of the ages and plume trajectories for four tephras. First evidence of Glacier Peak A, D, and Dusty Creek, and Mt. St. Helens P, as airfall tephra in south-central British Columbia. · The Glacier

  14. Volcanic activity can have a profound effect on the Earth's atmosphere and environment across many spatial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    . Fink (Eds.) 117 Earth's Deep Interior: Mineral Physics and Tomography From the Atomic to the Global and the atmosphere will find this work an important resource. Volcanism and the Earth's Atmosphere Alan Robock IUGG Volumes Maurice Ewing Volumes Mineral Physics Volumes #12;105 New Perspectives on the Earth

  15. Evolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Evolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans FINAL January 2008 Sharon B with a grant from the Arizona Water Institute and by the Arizona Department of Water Resources #12;Evolution 1 Methodology 2 Management Plan Purpose and Intent 4 Evolution and Evaluation of the Management Plan

  16. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search...

  17. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  18. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  19. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of...

  20. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  1. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  2. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  3. Title: Training Effects on Emergency Management Activation Response Subject Area: Social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Title: Training Effects on Emergency Management Activation Response Subject Area: Social Keyword considered whether local and long-term emergency management training could produce different behavioral training on emergency management behavioral response. Individuals with higher levels of training engaged

  4. Graphical Models for Wide-Area Activity Analysis in Continuous Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Nandita Miyar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Multi-person Activity Recognition in Wide-area Videos 2.1Context Modeling in Continuous Videos Using Graphical Modelsmethod. Given a continuous video with computed tracklets, a

  5. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  6. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  7. Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas on Large Wafer Xiaogan graphene islands from a graphite and then uses transfer printing to place the islands from the stamp from the printed graphene. The transistors show a hole and electron mobility of 3735 and 795 cm2/V

  8. Precursor Systems Analysis of Automated Highway Systems Activity Area J--Entry/Exit Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Precursor Systems Analysis of Automated Highway Systems Activity Area J--Entry/Exit Implementation This is the final report of a study of the following issues in the implementation of entry and exit in an Automated dedicated ramps; ffl Communication protocols for coordinating entry and exit maneuvers, and lateral

  9. A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcanism was modeled in experiments in which thermite melt fFe + AtOj explosively interacted with water

  11. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  12. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  13. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  14. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  15. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  16. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  17. Late Quaternary geology of small basaltic volcanic centers, SW USA: Disparity among dating methods and implications for volcanic and geomorphic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology; Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Byrd Polar Research Center; Crowe, B.; Pothis, J.; Olinger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of volcanic hazards near the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain provides the impetus for a series of detailed field and geochronologic studies of selected small late Quaternary basaltic scoria cones and lava flows in Nevada and California. Two of the most significant results of these studies are: the presence of chronostratigraphic units which indicate multiple eruptions with significant intervals of no activity between events (polycyclic volcanism); and a marked difference between conventional, numerical ages derived from K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 methods and numerical, calibrated, and relative ages derived from thermoluminescence, cosmogenic He-3, the degree of soil development, and geomorphology of these volcanic landforms. Soil-bounded unconformities and buried stone pavements define the boundaries of chronostratigraphic units within these small volume basaltic centers. Volcanic centers displaying this type of stratigraphy may appear morphological simple but cannot be considered mongenetic. Recent studies by Perry and Crowe demonstrate that geochemical variations within a single basaltic volcanic center in NV are consistent with several magma batches forming a complex polycyclic volcano. The K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are 1--2 orders of magnitude older than either TL or cosmogenic He-3 and appear to have insufficient precision to constrain the ages of chronostratigraphic units within polycyclic volcanoes. In contrast, preliminary data indicate the TL and cosmogenic He-3 dating methods have the ability to resolve the late Quaternary volcanic stratigraphy, and results from these dating methods are consistent with the degree of soil development and geomorphic modification of the volcanic units. K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates from these small basaltic volcanic centers have been used to calibrate new Quaternary dating methods, e.g. rock varnish, which in turn have been used to interpret landscape evolution in the SW US.

  18. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, Crustal...

  19. Research and Creative Activity Resources Administrative units (area code 517, unless noted otherwise)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /commercialization (area code 517, unless noted otherwise) MSU Bioeconomy Institute (Holland, Mich.) 616395 8918 http

  20. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  1. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  2. Opiate activity in the rat prefrontal cortex: modulation of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic influence on cortical efferent neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Mary, John Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPIATE ACTIVITY IN THE RAT PREFRONTAL CORTEX: MODULATION OF VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA DOPAMINERGIC INFLUENCE ON CORTICAL EFFERENT NEURONS A Thesis by JOHN STEVEN ST. MARY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... Thesis by JOHN STEVEN ST. MARY Approved as to style and content by: Steven Peterson (Chairman of Committee) Robert Matthews (- '" j'pj") Ger a ((~Fe g (Mem er) George Chion (Member) December 1986 ABSTRACT Opiate Activity in the Rat...

  3. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    geothermal heat associated with their em- placement and cooling could play a crucial role in basal melt water [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help production. For instance, the geothermal flux estimate in the vicinity of a (potential) recently active

  4. The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    -purity depleted uranium produced as a by-product of nuclear isotope enrichment programmes. The early actinideThe non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1 for uranium will be created in part by the quest of researchers to understand the properties and potential

  5. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, H.H. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  6. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    temperatures of 223 degrees C (Muffler et al., 1982) and 229 degrees C (Thompson, 1985) reported for Growler Hot Spring water, but are within the 220-240 degrees C...

  7. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy Development JumpLars Enviro

  8. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) GeothermalFernando,San

  9. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,EnergySan Juan

  10. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSan JoseSan

  11. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co2010) | Open Energy

  12. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson, 1985) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co2010) | Open EnergyOpen

  13. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data andDarnestown, Maryland:(Blackwell, Et

  14. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open(Thompson, 1985) | Open Energy

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)Energy Information )Et Al.,Energy

  17. Morphine effects on unit activity in dopaminergic and noradrenergic brain areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Ellen

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the coeruleus acts as a relay station for all information passing from higher brain centers to areas controlling vegetative functions. Catalepsy and hyperactivity are indicative of some action of morphine upon motor areas of the brain. Morphine does influence...). Nakamura et al. (1973) bilaterally lesioned the caudate-putamen of rats with 6-OHDA and found a decrease in brain DA and a dose-dependent increase in morphine-induced catatonia. Administration of morphine into the caudate suppressed evoked potentials...

  18. Summary of geothermal exploration activity in the State of Washington from 1978 to 1983. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project activity is summarized with references to the publications produced. Project findings are reported as they relate to specific geothermal resource target areas. Some major projects of the goethermal exploration program are: thermal and mineral spring chemistry, heat flow drilling, temperature gradient measurements, Cascade Range regional gravity, geohydrology study of the Yakima area, low temperature geothermal resources, geology, geochemistry of Cascade Mountains volcanic rocks, and soil mercury studies. (MHR)

  19. Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, Thomas J. (Star City, WV); Meacham, G. B. Kirby (Shaker Heights, OH)

    2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

  20. Active Moss Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Trace Element Deposition in Belgrade Urban Area using ENAA and AAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anicic, M.; Tasic, M.; Tomasevic, M.; Rajsic, S. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Frontasyeva, M. V.; Strelkova, L. P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot Curie 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Steinnes, E. [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Active biomonitoring of air quality in Belgrade, Serbia, was performed using the moss Sphagnum girgensohnii. Moss bags were exposed in parallel with and without irrigation respectively for four consecutive 3-month periods at three urban sites. Twenty-nine elements were determined in the exposed moss samples by ENAA and three (Cu, Cd, and Pb) by AAS. The relative accumulation factor (RAF) was greater than 1 for the majority of elements. Elements such as Cl, K, Rb and Cs, however, leached from the moss tissue during the exposure time. For all exposure periods, higher uptake in the irrigated moss bags was evident for Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Pb, and Cd.

  1. The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.E. Lederle

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

  2. Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

  3. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  4. Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM 2:30 p.m. Crystal Ballroom B Chairs: J. E. Bleacher M. H to the northeast. 2:45 p.m. Baloga S. M. * Glaze L. S. Time-Dependent Levee Growth for Mars Lava Flows [#1276, for very cold climate, sulfur dioxide glaciers and liquid sulfur dioxide runoff. 4:00 p.m. Johnson S. S

  5. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  6. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the vents, being flanked or covered with volcaniclastic flow deposits. Each volcanic pile is several kilometers wide and several hundred meters thick, and overlaps one after...

  7. archean volcanic hosted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greenstone pile Sandiford, Mike 23 Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and...

  8. anatolian volcanic province: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volcanic Province Geosciences Websites Summary: the Lonar crater. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns in the target basalts and brecciaTrace element and...

  9. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  10. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,...

  11. Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archipelago, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension To The...

  12. Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  13. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of a 3334 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA. 2 Department and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201­203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated

  15. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK. 2 Present address: NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

  16. The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C. Varekamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C (northern Patagonia, Argentina) is a large glacial lake acidified by volcanic fluids from Copahue volcano

  17. Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mege, Daniel

    Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

  18. Abstract--Recent brain imaging studies on primates revealed that a network of brain areas is activated both during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahanias, Panos

    9 Abstract-- Recent brain imaging studies on primates revealed that a network of brain areas and constitutes an efficient behavior of mammals. Recent brain imaging studies investigate where and how observed to this direction [23]. Additional studies [10],[16] indicate the existence of a much wider network of brain areas

  19. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon...

  20. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lack of surface thermal manifestation * Assessing unconventional targets requires re-tooling the standard geothermal exploration kit and adding in new tools Gravity Aeromagnetics...

  1. active andean volcanism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change is forcing dramatic glacier mass loss in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, resulting recession is proceeding very rapidly and that climate change-related...

  2. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which is most sensitive to change in temperature and, therefore, can best map heat budget and hydrological character to aid in prediction of eruptions. Author Catherine K....

  3. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10| Departmentin theIssues

  4. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the|And

  5. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |Bleckley County, Georgia: EnergyMulti-phase

  6. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the youngest pulses of volcanism. > Oxygen-isotope data from illitesmectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from -2.15 to +7.97...

  7. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  8. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  9. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  10. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  11. Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western United States, II. Long...

  12. Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  13. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  14. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  15. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Halogen emissions from a small volcanic eruption: Modeling the peak concentrations, dispersion, and volcanically induced ozone loss in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , with lesser quantities of H2S, H2 and CO. Volcanic emissions also often include halogen-bearing species, and the greater water vapor content in the lower troposphere at tropical latitudes, which enhance removal

  17. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity area J, AHS entry/exit implementation. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, S.; Schulze, R.; Lima, P.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity focuses on the traffic operational impacts of Automated Highway Systems (AHS) entry/exit facilities at the points where they interface with the local street network. Information and results from several of the other Precursor Systems Analyses (PSA) activity areas are utilized in the conduct of the entry/exit research. Various strategies for AHS entry and exit are considered and their attributes identified. Analyses determined the operating conditions based on AHS volumes and ramp volumes from other PSA studies. Measures of effectiveness were established to allow comparison of different entry and exit strategies.

  18. Characterization Activities to Evaluate Chlorinated Solvent Discharges to Tims Branch from the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation was to identify those regions of plume outcrop along Tims Branch southeast of A/M Area and to establish fixed monitoring points along the seepline to evaluate proposed remediation needs and to support long-term monitoring activities in the vicinity of the seepline. The characterization approach employed in completing these tasks was dynamic and graded. Three stages of characterization were used to evaluate the outcrop region, with the results from each of the previous activities used to direct subsequent characterization.

  19. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Perry; R. Youngs

    2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is threefold: (1) Present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996 [DIRS 100116]). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and applied in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed, as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) Present revised probability calculations based on PVHA outputs for a repository footprint proposed in 2003 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 162289]), rather than the footprint used at the time of the PVHA. This analysis report also calculates the probability of an eruptive center(s) forming within the repository footprint using information developed in the PVHA. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes located within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers (conditional on a dike intersecting the repository) located within the repository footprint. (3) Document sensitivity studies that analyze how the presence of potentially buried basaltic volcanoes may affect the computed frequency of intersection of the repository footprint by a basaltic dike. These sensitivity studies are prompted by aeromagnetic data collected in 1999, indicating the possible presence of previously unrecognized buried volcanoes in the YMR (Blakely et al. 2000 [DIRS 151881]; O'Leary et al. 2002 [DIRS 158468]). The results of the sensitivity studies are for informational purposes only and are not to be used for purposes of assessing repository performance.

  20. Activities of livestock and deer on experimental pastures of the Kerr Wildlife Management Area near Hunt, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grelen, Harold Eugene

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 42 Qso swk fs?a ?atoriag ofter ~ctfsll. Pho4o- graph takes ?ith eamaa tssy sag flash. Srigh4 eyoi ia piet?re is ?atoh cgcioh refieoM light fr?a the flMh s ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Q ACZPITXNS lF LSSSSCK LND QUINN CN NZyRRDWLL RLNSSNS O' TNR KNNN... oattle twreDed tve an4 a half to three adios a day~ motored tm or throe times a day and took salt ono to three times during tho day. Time spent im tho various daily activities by these cattle ~ as fcllovsa 10 hours, 25 minutes 2 hours' 28 minutes 3...

  1. Evaluation of retrieval activities and equipment for removal of containers from the transuranic storage area retrieval enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, R.; Rhoden, G.; Davies, G.B. [BNFL, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1970, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has accepted over 55,000 cubic meters of Transuranic contaminated hazardous waste for interim storage. The waste has been neatly stored in ``cell`` configurations on adjoining, above ground asphalt pads at the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA). A number of reports have been supplied for review and comment describing the methodology and equipment proposed for retrieval of drums and boxes from a storage facility at the INEL site. The contract for this review requires two main issues to be addressed. First, the adequacy of equipment and methodology for the retrieval of containers which have been breached, lost structural integrity, or are otherwise damaged, Second, to review the strategies and equipment for retrieval of intact waste containers. These issues are presented in the following report along with additional detail in the methodology to complete the description of the operations required for retrieval under most operational scenarios. The documentation reviewed is considered to be at an interim stage and is therefore expected to be subject to the development of the methodology from the existing level of detail with input from the facility operators. This review aims to anticipate some of this development by providing suggested detailed methods of retrieval and equipment for both normal and abnormal operations.

  2. SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

  3. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  4. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongsik [Hanwha Chemical Research and Development Center, 6, Shinseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-804 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Ok, E-mail: gmjong37@gmail.com [Hanwha Chemical Research and Development Center, 6, Shinseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-804 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil [Hanwha Chemical Research and Development Center, 6, Shinseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-804 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO{sub 2} supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H{sub 2} adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area while the suitability of this activation process was proved via SEM, TGA, EA, XRF, and PSD. Being compared with the crystal structures of IRMOF-16 and HCC-1 via XRD and FT-IR analysis, the crystal structure of HCC-2 having an identical chemical structure except the introduction of four hydroxyl functional side groups on the backbone of its organic ligand showed no noticeable change. Specifically, HCC-2 was established as a cubic structure with each axis of about 21.5 A. Moreover, H{sub 2} adsorption isotherms for these HCCs were attained to ultimately examine that hydroxyl functionalities inside their pores have any influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCC-2 having higher number of hydroxyl groups than that of HCC-1 was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of HCC-2 was a cubic-shaped structure with each axis of 21.5 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -OH functionalities on HCCs had negative influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This might be due to impurities rigidly attached to their functional side groups.

  5. Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Htun, K.M.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

  6. Vertical motions in the Aegean volcanic arc: evidence for rapid subsidence preceding volcanic activity on Milos and Aegina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    School of Geodynamics (VMSG), Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands b Faculty of Earth Sciences, Institute for Paleoenvironments and Paleoclimate Utrecht (IPPU), Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands c Geological Institute of Romania, Str

  7. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to the TSPA, which uses the ASHPLUME software described and used in this model report. Thus, ASHPLUME software inputs are inputs to this model report for ASHPLUME runs in this model report. However, ASHPLUME software inputs are outputs of this model report for ASHPLUME runs by TSPA.

  8. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  9. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BVEnergy Information Shevenell,Information2004)

  10. Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc IosilEnergyEnergy Information

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGroton

  12. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGrotonOpenGround|2004) | Open

  13. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIremNot Available)Information

  14. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | OpenSuperiorEnergy Information GolesOpen

  15. Late Cenozoic Ring Faulting and Volcanism in the Coso Range Area of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow Tank Jump to:WindLaoLaredoLassen

  16. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbinsDensityOpenEnergy

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel, Et Al., 2011)Reiter,

  18. Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore JumpSolarezoSolicorePatras, GreeceSolvis GmbHSome

  19. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt. Francis(RedirectedStarr| OpenOpen Energy2005) |

  20. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co Ltd Place:Mclaren, 2010) | Open Energy

  1. Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin:InformationKawaihae1983) | Open

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechint Spa JumpTVCEt Al., 2013) | Open| Open

  3. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County, Michigan:Applewood, Colorado:Of Travale,|Mt Etna

  4. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab| Open

  5. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  6. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ValleyMono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotelluric and Magnetic Variation Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  7. DETERMINATION OF THE POINT-SPREAD FUNCTION FOR THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE FROM ON-ORBIT DATA AND LIMITS ON PAIR HALOS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: mdwood@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: mar0@uw.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); and others

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to detect photons with energies from Almost-Equal-To 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The pre-launch response functions of the LAT were determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizing the angular distribution of reconstructed photons as a function of energy and geometry in the detector is determined here from two years of on-orbit data by examining the distributions of {gamma} rays from pulsars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Above 3 GeV, the PSF is found to be broader than the pre-launch PSF. We checked for dependence of the PSF on the class of {gamma}-ray source and observation epoch and found none. We also investigated several possible spatial models for pair-halo emission around BL Lac AGNs. We found no evidence for a component with spatial extension larger than the PSF and set upper limits on the amplitude of halo emission in stacked images of low- and high-redshift BL Lac AGNs and the TeV blazars 1ES0229+200 and 1ES0347-121.

  8. Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

  9. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  10. area spoil area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  11. Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump

  12. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  13. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  14. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation,BarriersIzu-Oshima Volcano, Central

  15. Temporal and petrogenetic constraints on volcanic accretionary processes at 9-10 degrees North East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Christopher L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic accretion at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) occurs over a ~2-4 km wide neo-volcanic zone on either side of the axial summit trough (AST). Eruption ages are critical for understanding the distribution ...

  16. Spatio-temporal variability in volcanic sulphate deposition over the past 2 kyr in snow pits and firn cores from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    environmental effects. Apart from volcanic ashes, CO2 and water vapour, the reactive gaseous compounds SO2, H2S Running median RRMi Reduced running mean (after removal of all volcanic peaks) xi Ion concentration

  17. Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

  18. OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPEN-FILE REPORT 2005-1164 An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities Reawakens Volcanic Threat Assessment: Analysis of Hazard and Risk Factors......................... 14 · Table 2. List of hazard and exposure factors used in the NVEWS threat assessment · Figure 3

  19. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

  20. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden

  1. Arctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols and ozone depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    of perturbation experiments, the full radiative effects of the observed Pinatubo aerosol cloud were included eruption, which produced the largest global volcanic aerosol cloud in the twentieth century. A seriesArctic Oscillation response to the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption: Effects of volcanic aerosols

  2. Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area by passing the exhaust air through a filter and/or adsorbent, such as an activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    I. Policy Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories); 5154.1 (Ventilation Requirements for Laboratory-Type Hood Operations require use of fume hoods to control exposure to hazardous or odorous chemicals. IV. Definitions Activated

  3. NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities represent areas, which are international in scope; US TAG = US Technical Advisory Group)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities-Use Applications and Loads D. Su 772 #12;NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations

  4. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  5. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

  7. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date...

  8. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  9. Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date...

  11. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

  12. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity...

  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  14. Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Nash & D., 1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date...

  15. Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

  16. Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

  17. Characterization Activities to Determine the Extent of DNAPL in the Vadose Zone at the A-014 Outfall of A/M Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to perform characterization activities necessary to confirm the presence and extent of DNAPL in the shallow vadose zone near the headwaters of the A-014 Outfall. Following the characterization, additional soil vapor extraction wells and vadose monitoring probes were installed to promote and monitor remediation activities in regions of identified DNAPL.

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  1. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  2. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr & Percival, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  4. Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity...

  5. Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  6. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  7. Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W. (David William)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

  8. Ice core evidence for a second volcanic eruption around 1809 in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    is reported in the historical volcanism record between 1801 and 1812 [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. [3] Analysis and a March 1809 eruption date for Cosiguina [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. However, recent work on Cosiguina has

  9. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  10. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  11. Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

  12. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  13. Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

  14. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike [Cabrera Services (United States); Matthews, Brian [Nuclear Safety Associates (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

  15. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  16. Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

  17. area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  18. areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  20. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  1. Petrography Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Quane...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Petrography Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Quane, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  2. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

  3. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  4. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  5. Isotopic Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  6. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration...

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  8. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  9. Search for possible relationship between volcanic ash particles and thunderstorm lightning activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jánosi, Imre M.

    , with up to three separate layers of enhanced ozone and low humidity. Strong evidence for mixing cyclone, the warm conveyor belt [Browning, 1990], has recently been argued to be one of the main

  10. activity beneath non-volcanic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    showers are traced by muon (as well electromagnetic) bundles that would give evidence of rare Earth-Skimming neutrinos, tau and anti-tau neutrinos, at PeVs-EeVs energies. Their...

  11. CV-2a: Plutonic - Recent or Active Volcanism | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to:ROWCV-2a: Plutonic -

  12. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the lake water, and finally a Strombolian-type eruption. Recent observations...

  13. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (contrast values > 1.5) occur within Novarupta Basin. High-magnitude, active Hg2 enrichment was found on the Turtle, a dome-like feature northeast of the Novarupta extrusive...

  14. GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES) Richard Rijkers 1 & Robert Hack 2 ABSTRACT A geomechanical analysis of a shallow small scale landslide, (NITG-TNO), Geomechanical Research, PO box 97, 2600 JA Delft, The Netherlands, tel.: +31 15 2697222, r

  15. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  16. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  17. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  18. Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater or even significant species extinctions. The K/T mass extinction may have been caused by the coincidenceImpacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect? G. KELLER

  19. Did the Toba volcanic eruption of $74 ka B.P. produce widespread glaciation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    climate models, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model 3.0 (CCSM3 that the Toba volcanic eruption, approximately 74 ka B.P., was responsible for the extended cooling period a maximum global cooling of 10 K and ModelE runs produced 8­17 K of cooling within the first years

  20. Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

  1. American Journal of Science UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Matthew

    American Journal of Science JUNE 2008 UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO MID. Uturuncu volcano, SW Bolivia, is a dormant stratovolcano ( 85 km3 ) dominated by dacitic lava domes §§§ Empresa Minera Unificada S.A., La Paz, Bolivia; Mayelsuco@hotmail.com Institute of Geophysics, University

  2. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  3. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  4. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

  5. Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Density Log Activity Date 1984 - 1984 Usefulness not...

  6. Self Potential At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date 1984 - 1984 Usefulness not indicated...

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  9. Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

  11. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  14. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

  15. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  17. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colorado School of Mines and Imperial College London, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Neal...

  18. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

  19. Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity...

  20. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  1. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not...

  2. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  3. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

  4. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells...

  7. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1991 - 1991 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  9. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  10. Ground Magnetics At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity...

  11. Core Analysis At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date...

  12. Recommended Underground Test Area Activity Reference Documents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Site, Nevada, DOENV--478-Rev. 1, July 1999. (15033) o Addendum, CAIP for CAU98, June, 2001, DOENV-478, Rev.1-ADD (789217) o Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective...

  13. Recommended Underground Test Area Activity Reference Documents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i-C C1

  14. Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration...

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  17. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2007)...

  18. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  19. A WEB-BASED ATLAS INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR VOLCANIC MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    @erdw.ethz.ch) ABSTRACT Quiescent but active volcanoes represent a severe hazard and risk potential. Early warning systems and to develop a prototype of an early warning system. The system is an entirely web-based Atlas Information councils and civil protection agencies will use it as an early warning system. It includes the necessary

  20. Monitoring Volcanic Eruptions with a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption of these systems is very high, requiring large batteries and solar panels for long deployments, and differ- entiate true eruptions from noise or other signals (e.g., mining activity) not of volcanological interest. A typical campaign-type study will involve placement of one or more stations on various sites

  1. Influence of early Miocene tectonism on Miocene deposystems, Tejon area, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, B.M.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tejor area, located in the southeastern end of the San Joaquin Valley of California, provides an excellent opportunity to study earliest Miocene tectonics and their subsequent control on Miocene deposystems in the east slope setting. Abundant outcrop and subsurface control, correlative time markers (including volcanic units and micropaleontologic reports), and a relatively mild overprinting by recent structuring facilitated this 3-year study. Late Zemorrian through early Saucesian (22 Ma) volcanic flows and eruptives covered the area while coincident tensional faulting caused the Zemorrian-age Vedder shelf-slope system to collapse. A horst-and-graben basin system resulted, with a narrow serrated shelf along the eastern margin. Onset of Saucesian deposition was dominated by conglomeratic turbidites spilling into silled basin depocenters. The clastic load included typical Sierran-derived material and volcanic detritus from the prior flows. Rugged sea floor relief controlled channel courses and sediment thickness. Turbidite deposition continued through the earliest Mohnian. The early Saucesian sea flow topography exerted progressively less effect on channel courses, while influence from previous channel buildups increased. Clastic sorting improved with time as the shelf matured and the slope gradient decreased, and clean reservoir channel sands were deposited in meanderlike patterns. This sequence of events is critical to working the structural and stratigraphic hydrocarbon potential of the Tejon area. Zemorrian Vedder and Eocene-age production is associated with paleohorst blocks (e.g., Tejon North oil field and Tunis Creek pool of the Tejon Hills oil field).

  2. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  3. An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmiteIn The Artesian-City Area, Idaho |Rocks |

  4. Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    combination of chemical, thermal, and electrical properties. The utility of activated carbon suggests is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The activated BN microstructure is similar

  5. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  6. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line:1 Volcanic history, petrological Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline40 sodic series. Petrological

  7. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  8. Volcanic gas emissions and their effect on ambient air character

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, A.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Elias, T. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography was assembled to service an agreement between Department of Energy and the USGS to provide a body of references and useful annotations for understanding background gas emissions from Kilauea volcano. The current East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption of Kilauea releases as much as 500,000 metric tonnes of SO{sub 2} annually, along with lesser amounts of other chemically and radiatively active species including H{sub 2}S, HCl, and HF. Primary degassing locations on Kilauea are located in the summit caldera and along the middle ERZ. The effects of these emissions on ambient air character are a complex function of chemical reactivity, source geometry and effusivity, and local meteorology. Because of this complexity, we organized the bibliography into three main sections: (1) characterizing gases as they leave the edifice; (2) characterizing gases and chemical reaction products away from degassing sources; and (3) Hawaii Island meteorology.

  9. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  10. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  11. Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

  12. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  13. Aspects of igneous activity significant to a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krier, D. J. (Donathan J.); Perry, F. V. (Frank V.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location, timing, volume, and eruptive style of post-Miocene volcanoes have defined the volcanic hazard significant to a proposed high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a low-probability, high-consequence event. Examination of eruptive centers in the region that may be analogueues to possible future volcanic activity at Yucca Mountain have aided in defining and evaluating the consequence scenarios for intrusion into and eruption above a repository. The probability of a future event intersecting a repository at Yucca Mountain has a mean value of 1.7 x 10{sup -8} per year. This probability comes from the Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) completed in 1996 and updated to reflect change in repository layout. Since that time, magnetic anomalies representing potential buried volcanic centers have been identified fiom magnetic surveys; however these potential buried centers only slightly increase the probability of an event intersecting the repository. The proposed repository will be located in its central portion of Yucca Mountain at approximately 300m depth. The process for assessing performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain has identified two scenarios for igneous activity that, although having a very low probability of occurrence, could have a significant consequence should an igneous event occur. Either a dike swarm intersecting repository drifts containing waste packages, or a volcanic eruption through the repository could result in release of radioactive material to the accessible environment. Ongoing investigations are assessing the mechanisms and significance of the consequence scenarios. Lathrop Wells Cone ({approx}80,000 yrs), a key analogue for estimating potential future volcanic activity, is the youngest surface expression of apparent waning basaltic volcanism in the region. Cone internal structure, lavas, and ash-fall tephra have been examined to estimate eruptive volume, eruption type, and subsurface disturbance accompanying conduit growth and eruption. The Lathrop Wells volcanic complex has a total volume estimate of approximately 0.1 km{sup 3}. The eruptive products indicate a sequence of initial magmatic fissure fountaining, early Strombolian activity, and a brief hydrovolcanic phase, and violent Strombolian phase(s). Lava flows adjacent to the Lathrop Wells Cone probably were emplaced during the mid-eruptive sequence. Ongoing investigations continue to address the potential hazards of a volcanic event at Yucca Mountain.

  14. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

  15. Ion Uptake Determination of Dendrochronologically-Dated Trees Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenan Unlu; P.I. Kuniholm; D.K.H. Schwarz; N.O. Cetiner; J.J. Chiment

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Uptake of metal ions by plan roots is a function of the type and concentration of metal in the soil, the nutrient biochemistry of the plant, and the immediate environment of the root. Uptake of gold (Au) is known to be sensitive to soil pH for many species. Soil acidification due to acid precipitation following volcanic eruptions can dramatically increase Au uptake by trees. Identification of high Au content in tree rings in dendrochronologically-dated, overlapping sequences of trees allows the identification of temporally-conscribed, volcanically-influenced periods of environmental change. Ion uptake, specifically determination of trace amounts of gold, was performed for dendrochronologically-dated tree samples utilizing Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The concentration of gold was correlated with known enviironmental changes, e.g. volcanic activities, during historic periods.

  16. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions – height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters – are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14–16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  17. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

  18. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B: Andesitic Volcanic

  19. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  20. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  1. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  2. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  3. Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, T.M. (Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volcanic gases collected during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption along the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have uniform C-O-H-S-Cl-F compositions that are sharply depleted in CO[sub 2]. The CO[sub 2]-poor gases are typical of Type II volcanic gases (GERLACH and GRAEBER, 1985) and were emitted from evolved magma stored for a prolonged period of time in the east rift zone after releasing CO[sub 2]-rich gases during an earlier period of temporary residence in the summit magma chamber. The samples are remarkably free of contamination by atmospheric gases and meteoric water. Thermodynamic evaluation of the analytical data shows that the episode 1 gases have equilibrium compositions appropriate for temperatures between 935 and 1032[degrees]C. Open- and closed-system equilibrium models of species distributions for the episode 1 gases show unequivocally that coexisting lavas buffered the gas oxygen fugacities during cooling. These models indicate that the F[sub o[sub 2

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zacharakis, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,...

  5. Multispectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pickles, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pickles, Et...

  6. Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stroujkova & Malin, 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova &...

  7. Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mallan, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan, Et Al.,...

  8. Resistivity Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Resistivity Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987)...

  9. Neutron Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Neutron Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Exploration...

  10. Caliper Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Caliper Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al.,...

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2006) Exploration...

  12. areas lixiviacion estatica: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  13. areas sob influencia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 45 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  14. area iberian pyrite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 105 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  15. area sila massif: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 92 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  16. alfarcito area cordillera: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 50 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  17. area iwate prefecture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 33 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  18. area karachi sindh: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 29 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  19. areas stei romania: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 67 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  20. areas protegidas caso: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 60 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  1. adultos mayores area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 68 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  2. area tamil nadu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 111 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  3. afar pastoral area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 75 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  4. area otsenka dinamiki: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  5. area roller embossing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 82 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  6. area fukui prefecture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 44 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  7. area diretamente afetada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  8. area chinetsu kaihatsu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  9. area induces hyperactivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 149 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  10. area valles caldera: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 148 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  11. area sob influencia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 45 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  12. area sebaran logam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  13. area karelian isthmus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 31 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  14. area gifu prefecture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 33 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  15. area degradada pela: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 38 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  16. area apatite emplacement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 75 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  17. area burkina faso: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 103 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  18. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, New...

  20. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna &...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002)...

  2. Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grigsby & Tester, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby & Tester,...

  3. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Okaya & Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson, 1985)...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  5. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  6. Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  7. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

  8. Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd,...

  9. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  10. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  11. Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Musgrave, Et Al., 1989)...

  12. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

  13. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Exploration...

  14. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose & Pearl, 1981) Exploration...

  15. Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sorey & Farrar, 1998) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey & Farrar, 1998)...

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles & Lambert, 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  18. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,...

  19. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gerlach, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Taylor & Gerlach,...

  20. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rafferty, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997)...

  1. Groundwater Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox & Thomas, 1979) Exploration...

  2. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date - 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Field,...

  3. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  4. Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

  5. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration...

  6. Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia,...

  7. Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    London, 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Paleomagnetic Measurements At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (London, 2011)...

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) Exploration...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  10. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area...

  12. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas...

  13. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  14. Magmatic activity and plate motion during the latent stage of Midcontinent Rift development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, N. L; Burgess, S. D; Maloof, A. C; Bowring, S. A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extrusive felsic unit Portage Lake Volcanics North ShoreDavis and Paces, 1990) Portage Lake Volcanics N Pb/ 206 Pb

  15. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  16. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  17. High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications for Volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    High CO2 Levels in Boreholes at El Teide Volcano Complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands): Implications emissions at numerous water prospection drillings in the volcanic island of Tenerife. Large concentrations region of the island (Las Can~ adas del Teide caldera). In this work we analysed CO2 concentrations

  18. Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands: the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) Joan Andújara,* , Fidel Costab , Bruno Scailleta a. Université1 Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands eruptions (ca. 1 km3 ) of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife Island). Combined with previous

  19. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  20. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  1. Age, geochemical and SrNdPb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Age, geochemical and Sr­Nd­Pb isotopic constraints for mantle source characteristics and petrogenesis of Teru Volcanics, Northern Kohistan Terrane, Pakistan S.D. Khana,*, R.J. Sternb , M.I. Mantonb, University of Peshawar, Pakistan Accepted 21 April 2004 Available online 23 September 2004 Abstract

  2. Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State...

  3. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  4. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  5. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  6. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  7. Monitoring Erebus volcano's active lava lake; tools, techniques and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Nial John

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    are those that persistently expose magma at the Earth’s surface. In this respect, they encompass many of the popular stereo- types of volcanic activity, exhibiting sustained passive degassing, which is often ac- companied sporadically by varying degrees... serves the crater rim was replaced. The old system was approaching ten years of service, and had become overly com- plex, and unreliable. A combination of extreme winds and corrosive gases makes the crater rim of Erebus an unsuitable site for solar panels...

  8. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kienholz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kienholz, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details...

  9. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  10. Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 1976 - 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

  12. Transboundary Protected Areas Cooperation in the East Carpathian and Carpathian Biosphere Reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    Transboundary Protected Areas Cooperation in the East Carpathian and Carpathian Biosphere Reserves;Transboundary Protected Areas Cooperation in the Carpathians _______________________________ ii Table............................................................................................... 25 · Appendix A - Evaluation of Transboundary Protected Areas Activities in the ECBR and CBR

  13. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  14. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  15. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas

  16. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  17. Chemical Logging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Los Alamos...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies about geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in the region. Notes Many different collaborations were involved with the...

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1972 - 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Frank W. Trainer (1974) Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico...

  19. Center for volcanic and tectonic studies, Department of Geoscience, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV. Annual report No. 69, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, maps, and reprints that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1991 and December 31, 1992. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that had direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics included: (1) The role of the mantle during regional extension. (2) The structural controls and emplacement mechanisms of Pliocene/Quaternary basaltic centers and dikes. (3) The detailed geochemistry of individual volcanic centers in Crater Flat, Nevada. (4) Estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruption (this topic is being studied by Dr. C-H. Ho at UNLV).

  20. Abstract The Holocene Parinacota Volcanic Debris Av-alanche (ca. 8,000 years B.P.) is located in the central An-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    that material that travelled further broke up and had an initial greater kinetic energy. Keywords Debris Andes Volcanic Zone of northern Chile (Figs. 1 and 2). Parinacota Volcano is located on the Chile­Bolivia

  1. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  2. Inner Area Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area Principles The Inner Area

  3. External Peer Review Team Report Underground Testing Area Subproject for Frenchman Flat, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An external peer review was conducted to review the groundwater models used in the corrective action investigation stage of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject to forecast zones of potential contamination in 1,000 years for the Frenchman Flat area. The goal of the external peer review was to provide technical evaluation of the studies and to assist in assessing the readiness of the UGTA subproject to progress to monitoring activities for further model evaluation. The external peer review team consisted of six independent technical experts with expertise in geology, hydrogeology,'''groundwater modeling, and radiochemistry. The peer review team was tasked with addressing the following questions: 1. Are the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results for Frenchman Flat consistent with the use of modeling studies as a decision tool for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements? 2. Do the modeling results adequately account for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat hydrological setting? a. Are the models of sufficient scale/resolution to adequately predict contaminant transport in the Frenchman Flat setting? b. Have all key processes been included in the model? c. Are the methods used to forecast contaminant boundaries from the transport modeling studies reasonable and appropriate? d. Are the assessments of uncertainty technically sound and consistent with state-of-the-art approaches currently used in the hydrological sciences? 3. Are the datasets and modeling results adequate for a transition to Corrective Action Unit monitoring studies—the next stage in the UGTA strategy for Frenchman Flat? The peer review team is of the opinion that, with some limitations, the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results are consistent with the use of modeling studies for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements. The peer review team further finds that the modeling studies have accounted for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat except for a few deficiencies described in the report. Finally, the peer review team concludes that the UGTA subproject has explored a wide range of variations in assumptions, methods, and data, and should proceed to the next stage with an emphasis on monitoring studies. The corrective action strategy, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, states that the groundwater flow and transport models for each corrective action unit will consider, at a minimum, the following: • Alternative hydrostratigraphic framework models of the modeling domain. • Uncertainty in the radiological and hydrological source terms. • Alternative models of recharge. • Alternative boundary conditions and groundwater flows. • Multiple permissive sets of calibrated flow models. • Probabilistic simulations of transport using plausible sets of alternative framework and recharge models, and boundary and groundwater flows from calibrated flow models. • Ensembles of forecasts of contaminant boundaries. • Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of model outputs. The peer review team finds that these minimum requirements have been met. While the groundwater modeling and uncertainty analyses have been quite detailed, the peer review team has identified several modeling-related issues that should be addressed in the next phase of the corrective action activities: • Evaluating and using water-level gradients from the pilot wells at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site in model calibration. • Re-evaluating the use of geochemical age-dating data to constrain model calibrations. • Developing water budgets for the alluvial and upper volcanic aquifer systems in Frenchman Flat. • Considering modeling approaches in which calculated groundwater flow directions near the water table are not predetermined by model boundary conditions and areas of recharge, all of which are very uncertain. • Evaluating local-scale variations in hydraulic conductivity on the calculated contaminant boundaries. • Evaluat

  4. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  5. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  6. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  7. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  8. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  9. Analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow imbibition experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.

    1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-meter-scale imbibition experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially dry cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was saturated by contacting the ends with pressurized water. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport has a small (less than 5%) effect on the speed of the wetting front. By using experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement with measured, transient, saturation data was achieved. The sensitivity of predicted transient wetting fronts to permeability data indicates a need for more extensive measurements. We conclude that it will be difficult to characterize an entire repository - where inhomogeneities due to variations in matrix and fracture properties are not well known - solely from the results of sub-meter-scale laboratory testing and deterministic modeling. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Drying analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.; Russo, A.J.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A submeter-scale drying experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially wet cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was dried by blowing dry nitrogen over the ends. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport is unimportant in the interior of the core; the rate of drying is controlled by transport of liquid water to the ends of the core, where it can evaporate and escape into the dry environment outside. By using previous experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement between measured and calculated drying rates was achieved. However, predicted saturation profiles were much smoother that those measured experimentally, presumably because of centimeter-scale inhomogeneities in the core sample. Our results indicate that water is transported chiefly as liquid from the interior to the edges of the core, where it evaporates and escapes out the ends. Thus, liquid-phase transport controls the overall drying rate. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

  12. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Field activities and well summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four hydrofracture sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were used for development, demonstration, and disposal from 1959 to 1984. More than 10 million gal of waste grout mix was disposed of via hydrofracture. Various types of wells were installed to monitor the hydrofracture operations. The primary goal of this remedial investigation was to gather information about the wells in order to recommend the type and best method of final disposition for the wells. Evaluations were performed to determine the integrity of well castings, confirm construction details for each well, evaluate the extent of contamination, assist in planning for future activities, and determine the suitability of the wells for future temporary site monitoring.

  13. An evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano area of Guatemala

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Duffield, W. (eds.)

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiometric ages indicate that the Tecuamburro Volcano and three adjacent lava domes grew during the last 38,300 years, and that a 360-m-wide phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, was formed near the base of these domes about 2900 years ago. Laguna Ixpaco is located within the Chupadero crater, from which pyroxene pumice deposits were erupted 38,300 years ago. Thus, the likelihood is great for a partly molten or solid-but-still-hot near-surface intrusion beneath the area. Fumaroles and hot springs issue locally from the Tecuamburro volcanic complex and near Laguna Ixpaco. Analyses of gas and fluid samples from these and other nearby thermal manifestations yield chemical-geothermometer temperatures of about 150{degree} to 300{degree}C, with the highest temperatures at Ixpaco. The existence of a commercial-grade geothermal reservoir beneath the Ixpaco area seems likely. 84 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  15. 4/22/08 4:15 PMCientficos estudian origen de los volcanes costarricenses -ALDEA GLOBAL -nacion.com Page 1 of 2http://nacion.com/ln_ee/2008/abril/22/aldea1502437.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    volcanes y los sismos aquĂ­ PABLO FONSECA Q. | pfonseca@nacion.com Un grupo de cientĂ­ficos estadounidenses y

  16. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  17. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354Strategic Focus Areas Lockheed

  18. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the southern Andes M. E. Pritchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], with about 60 active in the Holocene [Simkin and Siebert, 1994]. The AVZ has seven recognized volcanoes

  19. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

  20. Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Shirley Dawn

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (Huaynaputina) within the CVZ (de Silva and Francis, 1991). This site map is modified from Leg 201 Initial Reports (D?Hondt, Jorgensen, Miller et al., 2003). 4 Leg Site APC depth (mbsf) Recovery below previous APC depth 112 684 70 Francis, 1979). Three linear zones of active...

  1. Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

  2. The QUEST Large Area CCD Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlie Baltay; David Rabinowitz; Peter Andrews; Anne Bauer; Nancy Ellman; William Emmet; Rebecca Hudson; Thomas Hurteau; Jonathan Jerke; Rochelle Lauer; Julia Silge; Andrew Szymkowiak; Brice Adams; Mark Gebhard; James Musser; Michael Doyle; Harold Petrie; Roger Smith; Robert Thicksten; John Geary

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed, constructed and put into operation a very large area CCD camera that covers the field of view of the 1.2 m Samuel Oschin Schmidt Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The camera consists of 112 CCDs arranged in a mosaic of four rows with 28 CCDs each. The CCDs are 600 x 2400 pixel Sarnoff thinned, back illuminated devices with 13 um x 13 um pixels. The camera covers an area of 4.6 deg x 3.6 deg on the sky with an active area of 9.6 square degrees. This camera has been installed at the prime focus of the telescope, commissioned, and scientific quality observations on the Palomar-QUEST Variability Sky Survey were started in September of 2003. The design considerations, construction features, and performance parameters of this camera are described in this paper.

  3. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  4. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  5. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  6. A synthesis and review of geomorphic surfaces of the boundary zone Mt. Taylor to Lucero uplift area, West-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G. [NEOTEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mt. Taylor volcanic field and Lucero uplift of west-central New Mexico occur in a transitional-boundary zone between the tectonically active Basin-and Range province (Rio Grande rift) and the less tectonically active Colorado plateau. The general geomorphology and Cenozoic erosional history has been discussed primarily in terms of a qualitative, descriptive context and without the knowledge of lithospheric processes. The first discussion of geomorphic surfaces suggested that the erosional surface underlying the Mt. Taylor volcanic rocks is correlative with the Ortiz surface of the Rio Grande rift. In 1978 a study supported this hypothesis with K-Ar dates on volcanic rocks within each physiographic province. The correlation of this surface was a first step In the regional analysis of the boundary zone; however, little work has been done to verify this correlation with numerical age dates and quantitatively reconstruct the surface for neotectonic purposes. Those geomorphic surfaces inset below and younger than the ``Ortiz`` surface have been studied. This report provides a summary of this data as well as unpublished data and a conceptual framework for future studies related to the LANL ISR project.

  7. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy`s proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CRUSTAL DENSITY AND VOLCANIC ROCKS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garinger, Linda Pickett

    2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in wavelength and will not greatly impact gravity modeling. A new idea for preparing an isostatic correction is introduced in preliminary form. Models of crustal density contrasts were prepared for three study areas in California and Nevada through the use...

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of the Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vespucci, P.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Cenozoic rocks of Hispaniola are subdivided into two petrographically and geochemically contrasting series, a calc-alkaline series (CA-series), and a mafic alkaline series (MA-series). The CA-series are basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites occurring in several eruptive centers in the southern part of the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic. MA-series basalts are alkali-olivine basalts and limburgitic basalts occurring in the San Juan Valley of the Dominican republic and in the Cul de Sac of south central Haiti. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, mica, feldspar, and titanomagnetite were analyzed for major element chemical composition. MA-series basalts are slightly to moderately silica undersaturated, have high TiO2 (>1.5%) and MgO (>5.0%) and moderately high total alkalis (>2.0%). MA-series basalts are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, Ba, U, Th and LREEs with Ba/La ratios around 0.98. REE patterns are fractionated (chrondrite normalized La/Yb ratios around 62, and La/Sm ratios around 6). HFS elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are high resembling intraplate basalts. 86SR/87SR ratios are high (0.7060-0.7070) with low Rb/Sr ratios (0.03 to 0.15). Basalts, basaltic andesites, trachyandesites, and dacites of the CA-series show low MgO (<5.0%) and TiO2(<2.0%), and moderately high total alkali contents (2 to 7%). Enrichment is seen in K Rb, Sr, Ba, Th, U, and LREEs with Ba/La ratios as high as 5.6 REE patterns are fractionated to a lesser degree compared to the MA-series (chondrite normalized La/Yb around 23, and La/Sm ratios less than 5). HFS elements are lower resembling typical island arc volcanic rocks. CA-series have 87Sr/86Sr ratios (.7043-.7053), with low Rb/Sr ratios as in the MA-series.

  10. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  11. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  12. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  13. Boundary Waters Canoe Area (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area occupies a large section of northern Minnesota, and is preserved as a primitive wilderness area. Construction and new development is prohibited. A map of the...

  14. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  15. Addendum to the composite analysis for the E-Area Vaults and Saltstone Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the composite analysis performed on the two active SRS low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility.

  16. active erosion areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    landscape. Treatment of stream crossings involved excavating culverts and associated road fill and reshaping streambanks. A variety of techniques were applied to road benches,...

  17. activate frontoparietal areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches which how power-law distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for...

  18. Preliminary study on hydrogeology in tectonically active areas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Lappin, Allen R.; Gettemy, Glen L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Arnold, Bill Walter; James, Scott Carlton; Lee, Moo Yul; Meier, Diane A.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the final product of a background literature review conducted for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Internationally, research of hydrological and transport processes in the context of high level waste (HLW) repository performance, has been extensive. However, most of these studies have been conducted for sites that are within tectonically stable regions. Therefore, in support of NUMO's goal of selecting a site for a HLW repository, this literature review has been conducted to assess the applicability of the output from some of these studies to the geological environment in Japan. Specifically, this review consists of two main tasks. The first was to review the major documents of the main HLW repository programs around the world to identify the most important hydrologic and transport parameters and processes relevant in each of these programs. The review was to assess the relative importance of processes and measured parameters to site characterization by interpretation of existing sensitivity analyses and expert judgment in these documents. The second task was to convene a workshop to discuss the findings of Task 1 and to prioritize hydrologic and transport parameters in the context of the geology of Japan. This report details the results and conclusions of both of these Tasks.

  19. activated area presidential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING MENTORING Funding Opportunity Number: NSF 11-563. CFDA Number(s): 47.076. AgencyDepartment: National Science Farritor, Shane 83 Presidential...

  20. areas technical activities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the respondents, and has therefore placed demands on women who are both agricultural workers and caretakers. Oladele O. I 97 NOAA Technical Report NMFS 47 Reproduction,...

  1. Global estimation of burned area using MODIS active fire observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giglio, L.; van der Werf, G. R; Randerson, J. T; Collatz, G. J; Kasibhatla, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Justice, C. O. : The quantity of biomass burned in southernestimates of the quantity of biomass consumed through com-consume prodigious quantities of biomass yet leave a very

  2. An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton area,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo,TransmissionOperations at theChaffee

  3. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  4. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  5. area metal-oxide-semiconductor electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scale resolution. Parallel data capture can lead to real Marks, Laurence D. 122 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  6. area gjerstad aust-agder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 26 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  7. area barrasi-ye kanishenasi-ye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  8. area north-eastern estonia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 66 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  9. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  10. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  11. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  12. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Instructions for use An Integrated Geophysical Study of Vestbakken Volcanic Province,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunogai, Urumu

    of crustal intrusions is much lower in this area than farther west. East of the Knřlegga Fault crystalline basement velocities are brought close to the seabed. This fault marks the eastern limit of thick Cenozoic though most continental margins are rifted, several authors have discussed sheared (or transform

  14. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    twelve years. The Mid-Atlantic Area National Corridor includes certain counties in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Virginia, and all of New Jersey,...

  15. Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heintz, Mindi

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    using neutron activation analysis (NAA) of bulk ash and glass shards, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) of bulk ash, and electron microprobe analysis of both apatite phenocrysts and glass shards to characterize their geochemistry...

  16. An InSAR-based survey of volcanic deformation in the central Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    constrained [e.g., de Silva and Francis, 1991]. For example, Simkin and Siebert [1994] list 15 different be increased fumarolic activity [Simkin and Siebert, 1994; Smithsonian Institution, 1997b]. Furthermore, subtle

  17. Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a t approximately 0.4 Tg S y-l, emissions from biomass burning a t approximately 2 Tg S Y-' and volcanic emissions localized i n the highly populated and industrialized regions i n Eastern North America, and across Europe from the United Kingdom over Central Europe t o the Donbas region #12;in Russia (Benkovitz et a!., 1996

  18. Transportation activity analysis using smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yu

    Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

  19. High-potential geothermal energy resource areas of Nigeria and their geologic and geophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalola, O.O.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread occurrence of geothermal manifestations in Nigeria is significant because the wide applicability and relative ease of exploitation of geothermal energy is of vital importance to an industrializing nation like Nigeria. There are two known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in Nigeria: the Ikogosi Warm Springs of Ondo State and the Wikki Warm Springs of Bauchi State. These surficial effusions result from the circulation of water to great depths through faults in the basement complex rocks of the area. Within sedimentary areas, high geothermal gradient trends are identified in the Lagos subbasin, the Okitipupa ridge, the Auchi-Agbede are of the Benin flank/hinge line, and the Abakaliki anticlinorium. The deeper Cretaceous and Tertiary sequences of the Niger delta are geopressured geothermal horizons. In the Benue foldbelt, extending from the Abalaliki anticlinorium to the Keana anticline and the Zambuk ridge, several magmatic intrusions emplaced during the Late Cretaceous line the axis of the Benue trough. Positive Bouguer gravity anomalies also parallel this trough and are interpreted to indicate shallow mantle. Parts of this belt and the Ikom, the Jos plateau, Bauchi plateau, and the Adamawa areas, experienced Cenozoic volcanism and magmatism.

  20. Evaluation of the hot-dry-rock geothermal potential of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arney, B.H.; Goff, F.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho, was performed to assess the hot dry rock (HDR) potential of the prospect. The techniques reported include telluric and gravity profiling, passive seismic, hydrology and water chemistry surveys, and lineament analysis. Gravity and telluric surveys were unsuccessful in locating fractures buried beneath recent volcanics and sediments of the plain because density and conductivity contrasts were insufficient. Gravity modeling indicated areas where granite was not likely to be within drilling depth, and telluric profiling revealed an area in the northwest part of the prospect where higher conductivity suggested the presence of fractures or water or both, thereby making it unsuitable for HDR. Water geochemistry indicated that (hot water) reservoir temperatures do not exceed 100/sup 0/C. An area in the east central part of the prospect was delineated as most favorable for HDR development. Temperature is expected to be 200/sup 0/C at 3-km depth, and granitic rock of the Idaho Batholith should be intersected at 2- to 3-km depth.

  1. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  2. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  3. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  4. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOf TheLtd APWR JumpArea

  5. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

  6. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARA TrainingANDREW W.categoricalHSS/UNIONAREA

  7. The Program Area Committee Chairperson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

  8. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  9. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  10. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  11. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  12. Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es unaChelmsford,Volcanic National Park |Chena

  13. Cherry Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es unaChelmsford,Volcanic National

  14. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  15. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  16. Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the...

  17. Midcontinent rift volcanism in the Lake Superior region: Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic evidence for a mantle plume origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, S.W. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA) Univ. of Minnesota, MN (USA)); Shirey, S.B. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1091 and 1098 Ma, most of a 15- to 20-km thickness of dominantly tholeiitic basalt erupted in the Midcontinent Rift System of the Lake Superior region, North American. The Portage Lake Volcanics in Michigan, which are the youngest MRS flood basalts, fall into distinctly high- and low-TiO{sub 2} types having different liquid lines of descent. Incompatible trace elements in both types of tholeiites are enriched compared to depleted or primitive mantle (La/Yb = 4.3-5.3; Th/Ta = 2.12-2.16; Zr/Y = 4.3-4.4), and both basalt types are isotopically indistinguishable. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of the Portage Lake tholeiites have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr{sub i} {approx}0.7038, {epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 {plus minus} 2, and {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2. Model ages with respect to a depleted mantle source (T{sub DM}) average about 1950-2100 Ma. Portage Lake rhyolits fall into two groups. Type I rhyolites have Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 to {minus}4.7; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2-7.8) consistent with contamination of tholeiitic rocks by 5-10% Archean crust. The one type II rhyolite analyzed has Nd and Pb isotopic compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}{minus}13 to {minus}16; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}7.6-7.7) which are consistent with partial melting of Archean crust. Early Proterozoic crust was not a major contaminant of MRS rocks in the Lake Superior region. Most reported Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of MRS tholeiites from the main stage of volcanism in the Lake Superior region and of the Duluth Complex are comparable to the Nd and Pb isotopic data for Portage lake tholeiites. The isotopic enrichment of the MRS source compared to depleted mantle is striking and must have occurred at least 700 m.y. before 1100 Ma.

  18. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  19. The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decline. On 20 August 2007, a barge loaded with $10,000 L of diesel sank in the area, exposing 25, protected areas have been used to mitigate effects of human activities on mammals such as grizzly bears

  20. Exploring for hydrocarbons in geothermally and hydrothermally complex areas -- a southern Nevada example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, A.G.; Repetski, J.E. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Grow, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-based isograd maps using conodont color alteration indices (CAI) have been compiled and interpreted for a large area in southern Nevada that includes Yucca Mountain, the Nevada Test Site, and the Nellis Air Force Bombing and Gunnery Range. These maps were produced to evaluate the controversy about possible important mineral and (or) energy resources near Yucca Mountain, the potential burial site for high-level nuclear waste. The hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain area has been likened to that of the Railroad and Pine Valley areas, 200 km to the northeast where 35 million barrels of oil have been produced from Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata. In 1991, two companies with no previous drilling experience in Nevada drilled three oil exploration wells within 20 km of Yucca Mountain and within or close to the Timber Mountain caldera system. No shows of oil or gas were found in these wells. The deepest well was drilled to 5,000 feet and penetrated 2,200 feet of upper Tertiary valley-fill deposits and volcanic rocks overlying an overturned sequence of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician rocks having conodonts with CAI values of 5. Our new conodont sampling, however, has targeted some thermally favorable areas for hydrocarbons east of Yucca mountain, but their maturation history suggests that the potential for oil is substantially lower than in the Railroad and Pine Valley areas. Cambrian through Triassic rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain have experienced temperatures too high for oil to be preserved, except for a narrow zone (20 x 100 km) northeast of Yucca Mountain, where Mississippian through Triassic rocks are just within the upper limit of the oil generating window. Most of this zone, however, lies on Federal lands that are, for now, inaccessible for a variety of security and environmental reasons.

  1. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  2. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  3. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  4. Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

  5. Influence of deterministic geologic trends on spatial variability of hydrologic properties in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States); Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Istok, J.D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Fling, L.E. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic properties have been measured on outcrop samples taken from a detailed, two-dimension grid covering a 1.4 km outcrop exposure of the 10-m thick non-welded-to-welded, shardy base microstratigraphic unit of the Tiva Canyon Member of the Miocene Paintbrush Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These data allow quantification of spatial trends in rock matrix properties that exist in this important hydrologic unit. Geologic investigation, combined with statistical and geostatistical analyses of the numerical data, indicates that spatial variability of matrix properties is related to deterministic geologic processes that operated throughout the region. Linear vertical trends in hydrologic properties are strongly developed in the shardy base microstratigraphic unit, and they are more accurately modeled using the concept of a thickness-normalized stratigraphic elevation within the unit, rather than absolute elevation. Hydrologic properties appear to be correlated over distances of 0.25 to 0.3 of the unit thickness after removing the deterministic vertical trend. The use of stratigraphic elevation allows scaling of identified trends by unit thickness which may be of particular importance in a basal, topography-blanketing unit such as this one. Horizontal changes in hydrologic properties do not appear to form obvious trends within the limited lateral geographic extent of the ash-flow environment that was examined. Matrix properties appear to be correlated horizontally over distances between 100 and 400 m. The existence and quantitative description of these trends and patterns of vertical spatial continuity should increase confidence in models of hydrologic properties and groundwater flow in this area that may be constructed to support the design of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  6. Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; and Keith J. Halford

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types—volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

  7. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milnes, J. S., E-mail: james.milnes@photek.co.uk; Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J. [Photek Ltd, 26 Castleham Road, St Leonards on Sea, East Sussex, TN38 9NS (United Kingdom); Horsfield, C. J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  8. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  9. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  10. Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

  11. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  12. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  13. Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Photo of Comfort Station at the Chickasaw National Recreation...

  14. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Administrator The Quality Assurance (QA) Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) establishes common...

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  17. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  18. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  19. Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

  20. Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions This document was...

  1. R-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the following locations in R Area: Well cluster P20 east of R Area (one well each in the water table and the McBean formation), the R-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (the four water-table wells of the RAC series), the R-Area Ash Basin/Coal Pile (one well of the RCP series in the Congaree formation and one in the water table), the R-Area Disassembly Basin (the three water-table wells of the RDB series), the R-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (the four water-table wells of the RRP series), and the R-Area Seepage Basins (numerous water-table wells in the RSA, RSB, RSC, RSD, RSE, and RSF series). Lead was the only constituent detected above its 50{mu}g/L standard in any but the seepage basin wells; it exceeded that level in one B well and in 23 of the seepage basin wells. Cadmium exceeded its drinking water standard (DWS) in 30 of the seepage basin wells, as did mercury in 10. Nitrate-nitrite was above DWS once each in two seepage basin wells. Tritium was above DWS in six seepage basin wells, as was gross alpha activity in 22. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its screening standard in 29 wells. Extensive radionuclide analyses were requested during 1993 for the RCP series and most of the seepage basin wells. Strontium-90 in eight wells was the only specific radionuclide other than tritium detected above DWS; it appeared about one-half of the nonvolatile beta activity in those wells.

  2. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

  3. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

  4. Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  5. activity recorded simultaneously: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  6. activity modulates codon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  7. activation modulates radioresistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  8. activity modulates recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  9. activity modulates myeloid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  10. activation requires modulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  11. akt activation modulates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for photovoltaic module efficiency of 33.9% (active area). The latest prototype module Photovoltaic Systems (ISFOC) in Puertollano, Spain, the efficiency significantly exceeds...

  12. A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the upper southern flank of the volcano, a particularly active area during the last 30 years, damaging several tourist facilities and threatening some villages. The composite...

  13. Personal Background andPersonal Background and AreasAreas ofof InterestInterest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehning, Dankmar

    General Topics CurrentCurrent AreasAreas ofof InterestInterest ResearchResearch AreasAreas inin Preperation InterestInterest ResearchResearch AreasAreas inin PreperationPreperation #12;Personal BackgroundHistory BesidesBesides cooperatingcooperating inin severalseveral projectsprojects in SEin SE AsiaAsia oneone

  14. Tanks focus area. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

  15. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  16. Resource Areas of Texas: Land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

  17. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesStateTagsTexas Area Jump to:

  18. Focus Areas | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAM DOE O 413.2B Admin ChgFocus Areas Focus

  19. Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - January 16, 2015 Summary ofAboutDepartmentControlSurrounding Area

  20. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)