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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

A solar concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis discusses aspects of a novel solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal (PV/T) collector that has been designed to produce both electricity and hot water. (more)

Coventry, Joseph S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submittedConcentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey Lee Hardin

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermal regeneration of an electrochemical concentration cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are described for thermally regenerating an electrochemical concentration cell having first and second aluminum electrodes respectively positioned in contact with first and second electrolytes separated by an ion exchange member, the first and second electrolytes being composed of different concentrations of an ionic solvent and a salt, preferably an aluminum halide. The ionic solvent may be either organic or inorganic with a relatively low melting point, the ionic solvent and the salt form a complex wherein the free energy of formation of said complex is less than about -5 kcal/mole. A distillation column using solar heat or low grade industrial waste heat receives the first and second electrolytes and thermally decomposes the salt-solvent complex to provide feed material for the two half cells.

Krumpelt, M.; Bates, J.K.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Development of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Draft under Consideration by the World Bank) In May 2004, the World Bank submitted a status report on the GEF co-financed solar thermal portfolio to the GEF Council. In response to Council comments, the Bank subsequently commissioned an external assessment of the World Bank/GEFs strategy for the market development of concentrating solar thermal power. The consultant was selected through a competitive procurement process, following World Bank procedures. The selected consortium, the Global Research Alliance, is led by CSIR-South Africa, and includes the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research, Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, and CSIRO-Australia. The reports findings and recommendations are now under consideration by the World Bank. Council Members are invited to comment on the report, by July 15, 2005.

Gef Council; Concentrating Solar; Thermal Power; Copied To Mr. Rohit Khanna; Senior Operations Officer; Steve Szewczuk; Csir South Africa; Thomas Engelmann; Michael Geyer; Juan Granados; Andreas Haeberle; Haeussermann Tewfik Hasni; David Kearney; Ludger Lorych; Thomas Mancini; Abdellah Mdarhri; Paul Nava; Joachim Nick-leptin; Hani El Nokrashy; Robert Pitz; Klaus-peter Pischke; Hank Price; Jrgen Ratzinger; Thomas Rueckert; David Saul; Franz Trieb; Christine Woerlen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS, Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering Solar Thermal Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

11

Concentrating Solar Program; Session: Thermal Storage - Overview (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project overview of this presentation is: (1) description--(a) laboratory R and D in advanced heat transfer fluids (HTF) and thermal storage systems; (b) FOA activities in solar collector and component development for use of molten salt as a heat transfer and storage fluid; (c) applications for all activities include line focus and point focus solar concentrating technologies; (2) Major FY08 Activities--(a) advanced HTF development with novel molten salt compositions with low freezing temperatures, nanofluids molecular modeling and experimental studies, and use with molten salt HTF in solar collector field; (b) thermal storage systems--cost analysis and updates for 2-tank and thermocline storage and model development and analysis to support near-term trought deployment; (c) thermal storage components--facility upgrade to support molten salt component testing for freeze-thaw receiver testing, long-shafted molten salt pump for parabolic trough and power tower thermal storage systems; (d) CSP FOA support--testing and evaluation support for molten salt component and field testing work, advanced fluids and storage solicitation preparation, and proposal evaluation for new advanced HTF and thermal storage FOA.

Glatzmaier, G.; Mehos, M.; Mancini, T.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermally activated heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

This article describes research to develop efficient gas-fired heat pumps heat and cool buildings without CFCs. Space heating and cooling use 46% of all energy consumed in US buildings. Air-conditioning is the single leading cause of peak demand for electricity and is a major user of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Advanced energy conversion technology can save 50% of this energy and eliminate CFCs completely. Besides saving energy, advanced systems substantially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, which contribute to smog and acid rain. These emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels used to generate electricity. The Office of Building Technologies (OBT) of the US Department of Energy supports private industry`s efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in buildings. To help industry, OBT, through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is currently working on thermally activated heat pumps. OBT has selected the following absorption heat pump systems to develop: generator-absorber heat-exchange (GAX) cycle for heating-dominated applications in residential and light commercial buildings; double-condenser-coupled (DCC) cycle for commercial buildings. In addition, OBT is developing computer-aided design software for investigating the absorption cycle.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013...

15

SOLAR THERMAL CONCENTRATOR APPARATUS, SYSTEM, AND METHOD - Energy ...  

SOLAR THERMAL CONCENTRATOR APPARATUS ... The invention was made with the State of California's support under the California Energy Commission contract No. 5005 ...

16

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A solar tracker and concentrator was designed and assembled for the purpose of cogeneration of thermal power and electrical power using thermoelectric technology. A BiTe (more)

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to...

18

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

20

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL-TP-6A2-45833 February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage Ramteen Sioshansi The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Paul Denholm National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks Pascal Richter1 of solar power for energy supply is of in- creasing importance. While technical development mainly takes introduce our tool for the optimisation of parameterised solar thermal power plants, and report

Ábrahám, Erika

22

Secondary concentrators for parabolic dish solar thermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

One approach to production of electricity or high-temperature process heat from solar energy is to use point-focusing, two-axis pointing concentrators in a distributed-receiver solar thermal system. This paper discusses some of the possibilities and problems in using compound concentrators in parabolic dish systems. 18 refs.

Jaffe, L.D.; Poon, P.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Natural Radionuclide Activity Concentrations In Spas Of Argentina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal waters have been used on a large scale for bathing, drinking and medical purposes. These waters can contain natural radionuclides that may increase the exposure to people. In this work the most important natural radionuclide activity concentrations in different thermal spas of Argentina were measured to characterize waters and to evaluate the exposure of workers and members of the public.

Gnoni, G.; Czerniczyniec, M.; Canoba, A.; Palacios, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Bs. As. (1429) (Argentina)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermally-Activated Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Thermally-activated technologies include a diverse portfolio of equipment that transforms heat for useful purposes such as heating, cooling, humidity control, thermal storage, and shaft/electrical power. Thermally-activated technologies are essential for combined heat and power (CHP)-integrated systems that maximize energy savings and economic return. Thermally-activated technologies systems also enable customers to reduce seasonal peak electric demand and future electric and gas grids to operate with more level loads. Absorption Chillers Absorption cycles have been used for more than 150 years. Early equipment used a mixture of ammonia and water as an absorption working pair, with

27

Thermal test procedure for a paraboloid concentrator solar cooker  

SciTech Connect

Suitable thermal tests have been identified for performance evaluation of a concentrating solar cooker. These tests provide parameters that characterize the performance of the solar cooker, and are more or less independent of the climatic variables. The overall heat loss factor is obtained from the cooling curve and the optical efficiency factor is determined from the heating curve - both under full load conditions. The performance characteristic curve for the solar cooker is obtained and discussed. The study indicates that the no load test, which is useful in the case of a box type solar cooker, is not appropriate in the case of concentrator type cookers.

Mullick, S.C.; Kandpal, T.C.; Kumar, S. (Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nonimaging concentrators for solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small experimental solar collector test facility has been established on the campus of the University of Chicago. This capability has been used to explore applications of nonimaging optics for solar thermal concentration in three substantially different configurations: (1) a single stage system with moderate concentration on an evacuated absorber (a 5.25X evacuated tube Compound Parabolic Concentrator or CPC), (2) a two stage system with high concentration and a non-evacuated absorber (a 16X Fresnel lens/CPC type mirror) and (3) moderate concentration single stage systems with non-evacuated absorbers for lower temperature (a 3X and a 6.5X CPC). Prototypes of each of these systems have been designed, built and tested. The performance characteristics are presented. In addition a 73 m/sup 2/ experimental array of 3X non-evacuated CPC's has been installed in a school heating system on the Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico. The full array has a peak noon time efficiency of approx. 50% at ..delta..T = 50/sup 0/C above ambient and has supplied about half the school's heat load for the past two heating seasons. Several theoretical features of nonimaging concentration have been investigated including their long term energy collecting behavior. The measured performance of the different systems shows clearly that non-tracking concentrators can provide solar thermal energy from moderately high low temperature regimes (> 50/sup 0/C above ambient) up into the mid-temperature region (well above 200/sup 0/C above ambient). The measured efficiency at 220/sup 0/C for the 5.25X CPC was as high or higher than that for any of the commercial tracking systems tested.

Winston, R.

1980-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An experimental and computational study of a rooftop-mounted linear fresnel solar thermal concentrator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study describes the thermal performance of a new low-cost rooftop concentrating solar thermal collector (MCT), developed by Chromasun, which uses linear Fresnel reflectors, (more)

Sultana, Tanzeen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Active solar thermal design manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is aimed at systems design engineers, architects, system supplier/installers, and contractor/builders. Practical information for both skilled and inexperienced designers. Solar thermal applications focuses on residential and commercial space heating, potable hot water heating, process water heating, and space cooling.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electrical Cogeneration . 16 2.4.OptimalELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A thesis submitted inFOR ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL COGENERATION A solar tracker and

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

Hebert, Peter H. (Glendale, CA); Brandt, Randolph J. (Palmdale, CA)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage to concentrating solar thermal power plants expands both the amount of power and the timing of production. With thermal energy storage, plant power output can be firmed and shaped to better match consumer demand for electricity. Thermal storage associated with these plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity productio...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables...

37

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

38

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a heat engine, such as a steam turbine or sterling enginethese concentrations, a steam turbine achieves roughly 25%ratio can run a steam turbine at 35-50% efficiency, with

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Concentrating Solar Power One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds....

40

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the replacement of non-renewable energy production. Unlikereplacement of non-renewable energy sources. The thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceedings of the solar thermal concentrating collector technology symposium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the symposium was to review the current status of the concentrating collector technology, to disseminate the information gained from experience in operating solar systems, and to highlight the significant areas of technology development that must be vigorously pursued to foster early commercialization of concentrating solar collectors. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirteen invited papers and working group summaries. Two papers were previously abstracted for EDB.

Gupta, B.P.; Kreith, F. (eds.) [eds.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal power (CSP) systems. Background and motivation2 Figure 2: Schematic of Sensible Heat Based CSP Plant[3 Figure 3: Schematic of PCM Based CSP Plant[

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Thermal stress analysis of eccentric tube receiver using concentrated solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

In the parabolic trough concentrator with tube receiver system, the heat transfer fluid flowing through the tube receiver can induce high thermal stress and deflection. In this study, the eccentric tube receiver is introduced with the aim to reduce the thermal stresses of tube receiver. The ray-thermal-structural sequential coupled numerical analyses are adopted to obtain the concentrated heat flux distributions, temperature distributions and thermal stress fields of both the eccentric and concentric tube receivers. During the sequential coupled numerical analyses, the concentrated heat flux distribution on the bottom half periphery of tube receiver is obtained by Monte-Carlo ray tracing method, and the fitting function method is introduced for the calculated heat flux distribution transformation from the Monte-Carlo ray tracing model to the CFD analysis model. The temperature distributions and thermal stress fields are obtained by the CFD and FEA analyses, respectively. The effects of eccentricity and oriented angle variation on the thermal stresses of eccentric tube receiver are also investigated. It is recommended to adopt the eccentric tube receiver with optimum eccentricity and 90 oriented angle as tube receiver for the parabolic trough concentrator system to reduce the thermal stresses. (author)

Wang, Fuqiang; Shuai, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guo; Tan, Heping [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal design of compound parabolic concentrating solar-energy collectors  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical analysis of the heat exchanges in a Compound Parabolic Concentrator solar energy collector is presented. The absorber configuration considered is that of a tube (with or without a spectrally-selective surface) either directly exposed or enclosed within one or two glass envelopes. The annular cavity formed between the tube and the surrounding envelope can be either air-filled or evacuated. The optimal annular gap, which leads to the best overall collector efficiency, has been predicted for the nonevacuated arrangement. It was found to be approximately 5 mm for the considered geometry. The evacuation of the annular cavity or the application of a selective surface, separately employed, are demonstrated to yield improvements of the same order.

Prapas, D.E.; Norton, B.; Probert, S.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

48

Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

Moran, Paul R. (Madison, WI)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

A 20-SUN HYBRID PV-THERMAL LINEAR MICRO-CONCENTRATOR SYSTEM FOR URBAN ROOFTOP APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor satisfies aesthetic demands for general rooftop solar technologies, and is a marked departure fromA 20-SUN HYBRID PV-THERMAL LINEAR MICRO-CONCENTRATOR SYSTEM FOR URBAN ROOFTOP APPLICATIONS D Walter has been developed specifically for urban rooftop environments. The light- weight, low-profile form

51

Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Concentrating Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-58186 March 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Prepared under Task No. CP08.8301

52

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Effect of bulk liquid BOD concentration on activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to assess the impact of bulk liquid biological oxygen demand (BOD) concentrations on the activity oxygen demand (BOD) for denitrification, are critical for improving current wastewater treatment and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA e

Nerenberg, Robert

53

Technical and economic analysis of the thermal performance of a solar boiling concentrator for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A system for power generation using solar energy collected by compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) incorporated into a Rankine cycle system is studied by developing a model to simulate the CPC performance. The power cycle is also modeled under quasi-steady and transient conditions. An economic analysis is performed through a model developed to study the economic viability of the power system. The CPC performance is sensitive to the ratio of diffuse to beam components of the solar incident irradiation. This ratio, along with the concentration ratio, govern the CPC optical efficiency which in turn determine the thermal efficiency. The performance of the CPC working under boiling and superheating conditions is governed by the axial fractional lengths of the non-boiling and the superheating regions. The overall thermal loss coefficient is formulated as a function of the local thermal loss coefficient in the different regions and the length of each region. The thermal efficiency of CPC's and flat plates, whether under non-boiling, boiling or superheating conditions, is evaluated. The CPC working under superheating conditions has a good potential for solar powered Rankine cycles. System efficiencies as high as 11.3% could be obtained at R-11 evaporation temperature of 120/sup 0/C and a condensation temperature of 20/sup 0/ C.

El-Assy, A.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation on the prediction of thermal performance of compound parabolic concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The present paper focuses attention on the prediction of thermal performance of a compound parabolic concentrator for different values of insolation and mass flow rate of collector medium (water), under steady-state conditions. The analysis involves an iterative scheme and a method is proposed by which the absorber temperature, outlet temperature and glazing temperature can be predicted for given insolation and mass flow rate. 4 refs.

Hariprasad, C.R.; Natarajan, R.; Gupta, M.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thermal and optical performance test results for compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs)  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics (thermal and optical) of a properly truncated CPC that could be used in two-stage solar thermal power generation systems. The CPCs selected for testing were the 5:1 cones with a 25{degree} acceptance angle and an untruncated concentration ratio of 5.6X. Experiments were carried out at the Advanced Components Test Facility of the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Several cones of the same dimensions but with different shell materials, reflector surfaces, and employing various heat removal methods were tested. It has been demonstrated experimentally for the first time that the CPCs with high reflectivity surfaces can have optical efficiencies in the range of 90% and above. In order to verify those results, a computer ray-trace analysis was also performed. These tests have shown that passive cooling alone is adequate for small-scale, low-power systems.

Suresh, D.; O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Coupled power and thermal simulation with active cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Power is rapidly becoming the primary design constraint for systems ranging from server computers to handhelds. In this paper we study microarchitecture-level coupled power and thermal simulation considering dynamic and leakage power models with temperature and voltage scaling. We develop an accurate temperature-dependent leakage power model and efficient temperature calculation, and show that leakage energy can be different by up to 10X for temperatures between 35 o C and 110 o C. Given the growing significance of leakage power and its sensitive dependence on temperature, no power simulation without considering dynamic temperature calculation is accurate. Furthermore, we discuss the thermal runaway induced by the interdependence between leakage power and temperature, and show that in the near future thermal runaway could be a severe problem. We also study the microarchitecture level coupled power and thermal management by novel active cooling techniques that reduce packaging thermal resistance. We show that the active cooling technique that reduces thermal resistance from 0.8 o C/W to 0.05 o C/W can increase system maximum clock by up to 2.44X under the same thermal constraints. 1

Weiping Liao; Lei He

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Indoor test for thermal performance evaluation of the Northrup Concentrating Solar Collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedure used and the results obtained from an evaluation test program conducted to obtain thermal performance data on a Northrup concentrating solar collector under simulated conditions are described. These tests were made using the Marshall Space Flight Center's solar simulator. A time constant test and incident angle modifier test were also conducted to determine the transient effect and the incident angle effect on the collector. The Northrup concentrating solar collector is a water/glycol/working fluid type, dipped galvanized steel housing, transparent acrylic Fresnel lens cover, copper absorber tube, fiber glass insulation and weighs approximately 98 pounds. The gross collector area is about 29.4 ft/sup 2/ per collector. A collector assembly includes four collector units within a tracking mount array.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Concentrated solar thermal (cst) system for fuelwood replacement and for household water sanitation in developing countries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrated Solar Thermal (CST) is a proven renewable energy technology that harnesses solar irradiation in its most primitive form. This technology with roots in ancient history is growing at a fast pace in recent times. Developing countries could use CST to solve fundamental human-needs challenges, such as for the substitution of fuelwood and the treatment of water for household use. This paper proposes a conceptual design for a standardized modular CST for these applications in developing countries. A modular-designed parabolic CST with an aperture area of 7.5 m2 is adequate to provide enough solar thermal energy to replace the fuelwood need (5 tons/yr) or to pasteurize the minimum daily water requirement (2500 liters) for a household. Critical parameters of the CST are discussed and an affordable solid thermal storage is recommended to be used as a backup when sunlight is unavailable. A funding program that includes in-country resources and external funding will be needed to sustain the development and wide spread adaptation of this technology.

Akinjiola, O. P.; Balachandran, U. (Energy Systems); (Rsage Research, LLC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Effect of Power-Law Body Forces on a Thermally Driven Flow between Concentric Rotating Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, ...

Michele G. Macaraeg

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid, or paraffin wax) are typically used for TES. This limits the operating temperature of CSP units to below 400 degrees C. Increasing the operating temperature to 560 degrees C (i.e., the creeping temperature of stainless steel), can enhance the theoretical thermal efficiency from 54 percent to 63 percent. However, very few thermal storage materials are compatible for these high temperatures. Molten salts are thermally stable up to 600 degrees C and beyond. Using the molten salts as the TES materials confers several benefits, which include: (1) Higher operating temperature can significantly increase the overall cycle efficiency and resulting costs of power production. (2) Low cost of the molten salt materials can drastically reduce the cost. (3) The molten salts, which are environmentally safe, can also reduce the potential environmental impact. However, these materials suffer from poor thermo-physical properties. Impregnating these materials with nanoparticles can enhance these properties. Solvents doped with nanoparticles are termed as nanofluids. Nanofluids have been reported in the literature for the anomalous enhancement of their thermo-physical properties. In this study, the poor thermal properties of the molten salts were enhanced dramatically on mixing with nanoparticles. For example the specific heat capacity of these molten salt eutectics was found to be enhanced by as much as ~ 26 percent on mixing with nanoparticles at a mass fraction of ~ 1 percent. The resultant properties of these nanomaterials were found to be highly sensitive to small variations in the synthesis protocols. Computational models were also developed in this study to explore the fundamental transport mechanisms on the molecular scale for elucidating the anomalous enhancements in the thermo-physical properties that were measured in these experiments. This study is applicable for thermal energy storage systems utilized for other energy conversion technologies such as geothermal energy, nuclear energy and a combination of energy generation technologies.

Shin, Donghyun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Silica and boron-containing ultraphosphate laser glass with low concentration quenching and improved thermal shock resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Neodymium-doped phosphate glasses having a refractive index, nd>1.520; an Abbe number, Vd, <60; a density <3.0 g/cm.sup.3, a thermal expansion coefficient, .alpha., .ltoreq.110.times.10.sup.-7 .degree.C..sup.-1 ; a Young's Modulus, E, <70.times.10.sup.3 N/mm.sup.2 ; a Poisson's Ratio, .nu., <0.28; a thermal conductivity, K, >0.5 W/m.multidot.K, a thermal FOM=(1-.nu.).multidot.K/.alpha.E>0.7, consisting essentially of, in mol. %: P.sub.2 O.sub.5 : 40-70% SiO.sub.2 : 0-20% B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-20% Sum SiO.sub.2 +B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-35% Sum Li.sub.2 O+Na.sub.2 O+K.sub.2 O: 5-20% Sum La.sub.2 O.sub.3 +Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 3-10% Sum MgO+CaO+SrO+BaO+ZnO: 0-10% and preferably containing an amount of Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 effective for laser activity having an emission cross-section, .sigma., >3.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2 ; a fluorescence linewidth (.DELTA..lambda..sub.f1)<23.5 nm; a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 0.5 wt. % Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 >375 .mu.sec, and a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 10 wt. % >175 .mu.sec at 10 wt. %, have very low self-concentration quenching rates.

Cook, Lee M. (Duryea, PA); Stokowski, Stanley E. (Danville, CA)

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

Fiskum, R.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thermal performance evaluation of the Northrup Model NSC-01-0732 concentrating solar collector array at outdoor conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance tests conducted on the Northrup Model NSC-01-0732 concentrating, tracking solar collector for approximately two months (from the end of August to the first part of October 1979) are described. These tests were made using the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar House Test Facility.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermally Activated Stripe Reconstruction Induced by O on Nb (011)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) observations for thin films of Nb (011) of stripe-phase behavior by two variants of an O-induced reconstruction. Stripes occur for thin films but not bulk crystals. At low temperatures the less-favored variant is thermally activated as single stripes on surface heterogeneities. Near T{sub 0}=1505 K , where the reconstruction is lifted, the stripes crowd to form a periodic array with a temperature dependent spacing. LEEM permits quantitative insight into stripe behavior and reveals novel details of stripes interacting with topographic features such as steps, facets, and dislocations.

Ondrejcek, M.; Appleton, R. S.; Swiech, W.; Petrova, V. L.; Flynn, C. P.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microfluidic concentration-enhanced single cell enzyme activity assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells sense stimuli, process information and respond using signaling networks regulated by enzymatic activity of various proteins. Aberrations in signaling are associated with diseases such as cancer. Most current methods ...

Sarkar, Aniruddh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimization of central receiver concentrated solar thermal : site selection, heliostat layout & canting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, two new models are introduced for the purposes of (i) locating sites in hillside terrain suitable for central receiver solar thermal plants and (ii) optimization of heliostat field layouts for any terrain. ...

Noone, Corey J. (Corey James)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

Edenburn, M.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Performance and cost benefits associated with nonimaging secondary concentrators used in point-focus dish solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using nonimaging secondary concentrators in point-focus applications may permit the development of more cost-effective concentrator systems by either improving performance or reducing costs. Secondaries may also increase design flexibility. The major objective of this study was to develop as complete an understanding as possible of the quantitative performance and cost effects associated with deploying nonimaging secondary concentrators at the focal zone of point-focus solar thermal concentrators. A performance model was developed that uses a Monte Carlo ray-trace procedure to determine the focal plane distribution of a paraboloidal primary as a function of optical parameters. It then calculates the corresponding optimized concentration and thermal efficiency as a function of temperature with and without the secondary. To examine the potential cost benefits associated with secondaries, a preliminary model for the rational optimization of performance versus cost trade-offs was developed. This model suggests a possible 10% to 20% reduction in the cost of delivered energy when secondaries are used. This is a lower limit, and the benefits may even be greater if using a secondary permits the development of inexpensive primary technologies for which the performance would not otherwise be viable. 20 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermal shock modeling of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under active cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal shock resistance is one of the most important parameters in Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) since it determines their performance in various applications. In this paper, due to the fact that the material parameters of UHTCs are very sensitive ... Keywords: Active cooling, Target temperature, Thermal protection system, Thermal shock resistance, Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

Weiguo Li; Fan Yang; Daining Fang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

Hall, M.M. Jr.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotnica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Fsica, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Secondary and compound concentrators for parabolic-dish solar-thermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

A secondary optical element may be added to a parabolic dish solar concentrator to increase the geometric concentration ratio attainable at a given intercept factor. This secondary may be a Fresnel lens or a mirror, such as a compound elliptic concentrator or a hyperbolic trumpet. At a fixed intercept factor, higher overall geometric concentration may be obtainable with a long focal length primary and a suitable secondary matched to it. Use of a secondary to increase the geometric concentration ratio is more likely to be worthwhile if the receiver temperature is high and if errors in the primary are large. Folding the optical path with a secondary may reduce cost by locating the receiver and power conversion equipment closer to the ground and by eliminating the heavy structure needed to support this equipment at the primary focus. Promising folded-path configurations include the Ritchey-Chretien and perhaps some three-element geometries. Folding the optical path may be most useful in systems that provide process heat.

Jaffe, L.D.; Poon, P.T.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

PWR Activity Transport and Source Term Assessment: Surface Activity Concentrations by Gamma Scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of surface isotopic concentrations, known as gamma scanning in the United States, is an invaluable tool in assessing variations in shutdown dose rates and the impacts of chemistry and operational changes.

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to synthesize nanomaterials by mixing molten salt (alkali nitrate salt eutectics) with inorganic nanoparticles. The thermo-physical properties of the synthesized nanomaterials were characterized experimentally. Experimental results allude to the existence of a distinct compressed phase even for the solid phase (i.e., in the nanocomposite samples). For example, the specific heat capacity of the nanocomposites was observed to be enhanced after melting and re-solidification - immediately after their synthesis; than those of the nanocomposites that were not subjected to melting and re-solidification. This shows that melting and re-solidification induced molecular reordering (i.e., formation of a compressed phase on the nanoparticle surface) even in the solid phase - leading to enhancement in the specific heat capacity. Numerical models (using analytical and computational approaches) were developed to simulate the fundamental transport mechanisms and the energy storage mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancements in the thermo-physical properties. In this study, a simple analytical model was proposed for predicting the specific heat capacity of nanoparticle suspensions in a solvent. The model explores the effect of the compressed phase that is induced from the solvent molecules - at the interface with individual nanoparticles in the mixture. The results from the numerical simulations indicate that depending on the properties and morphology of the compressed phase it can cause significant enhancement in the specific heat capacity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. The interfacial thermal resistance (also known as Kapitza resistance, or Rk) between a nanoparticle and the surrounding solvent molecules (for these molten salt based nanomaterials) is estimated using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. This exercise is relevant for the design optimization of nanomaterials (nanoparticle size, shape, material, concentration, etc.). The design trade-off is between maximizing the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterial (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size varying between ~ 20-30nm) and maximizing the specific heat capacity (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size less than 5nm), while simultaneously minimizing the viscosity of the nanofluid. The specific heat capacity of nitrate salt-based nanomaterials was measured both for the nanocomposites (solid phase) and nanofluids (liquid phase). The neat salt sample was composed of a mixture of KNO3: NaNO3 (60:40 molar ratio). The enhancement of specific heat capacity of the nanomaterials obtained from the salt samples was found to be very sensitive to minor variations in the synthesis protocol. The measurements for the variation of the specific heat capacity with the mass concentration of nanoparticles were compared to the predictions from the analytical model. Materials characterization was performed using electron microscopy techniques (SEM and TEM). The rheological behavior of nanofluids can be non-Newtonian (e.g., shear thinning) even at very low mass concentrations of nanoparticles, while (in contrast) the pure undoped (neat) molten salt may be a Newtonian fluid. Such viscosity enhancements and change in rheological properties of nanofluids can be detrimental to the operational efficiencies for thermal management as well as energy storage applications (which can effectively lead to higher costs for energy conversion). Hence, the rheological behavior of the nanofluid samples was measured experimentally and compared to that of the neat solvent (pure molten salt eutectic). The viscosity measurements were performed for the nitrate based molten salt samples as a function of temperature, shear rate and the mass concentration of the nanoparticles. The experimental measurements for the rheological behavior were compared with analytical models proposed in the literature. The results from the analytical and computational investigations as well as the experimental measurements performed in this proposed study were used to formul

Jung, Seunghwan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Radiostrontium activity concentrations in milk in the Republic of Croatia for 1961 - 2001 and dose assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of systematic measurements of Sr-90 activity concentrations in milk for the period 1961 - 2001 are summarized. An exponential decline of radioactivity followed the moratorium on atmospheric nuclear testing. The highest activity of Sr-90 deposited by fallout, being 1060 Bq/m2, was recorded in 1963, while the peak Sr-90 activity concentration in milk, 1.42 +/-0.17 Bq/L, was recorded in 1964. The values in year 2001 for fallout deposition and milk were 7.7 Bq/m2 and 0.07 +/- 0.03 Bq/L, respectively. The reactor accident at Chernobyl caused higher Sr-90 levels only in 1986. Sr-90 fallout activity affects milk activity, the coefficient of correlation between Sr-90 fallout activity and Sr-90 activity concentrations in milk being 0.80. The transfer coefficient from fallout deposition to milk was estimated to be 2.5 mBqy/L per Bq/m2. The dose incurred by milk consumption was estimated for the Croatian population, the annual collective effective dose in 2001 being approximately 2.0 man-Sv.

Franic, Z; Marovic, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers  

SciTech Connect

Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiocaesium Activity Concentrations in Potatoes in Croatia after the Chernobyl Accident and Dose Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic investigations of 137Cs and 134Cs activity concentrations in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) for the post-Chernobyl period (1986-2005) in the Republic of Croatia are summarized. The correlation between 137Cs activity concentrations in fallout and potatoes, has been found to be very good, the correlation coefficient being r2=0.88 with P(t) < 0.001 for 18 degrees of freedom. As the radiocaesium levels in potatoes decreased exponentially, the mean residence time of 137Cs in potatoes was estimated by fitting the measured activity concentrations to the exponential curve. The mean residence time was found to be 6.8 +/- 1.1 years, the standard deviation being estimated by the Monte Carlo simulations. The initial observed 134Cs:137Cs activity ratio in potatoes has been found to be quite variable, but slightly lesser than theoretically predicted value of 0.5, calculated by applying the known inventory of these radionuclides in the Chernobyl reactor to the equation for the differential radioactive decay. Thi...

Franic, Z; Marovic, G; Petrinec, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, Mark Mehos March 2013 NREL/PR-6A20-58470 2 Motivation * Implement concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in a commercial production cost model o Develop approaches that can be used by utilities and system planners to incorporate CSP in standard planning tools * Evaluate the optimal dispatch of CSP with TES o How would a plant actually be used to minimize system production cost? * Quantify the value of adding storage to CSP in a high renewable energy (RE) scenario in California

93

Effect of aspect ratio on convection in a porous enclosure with partially active thermal walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the present numerical investigation is to understand the effect of aspect ratio and partially thermally active zones on convective flow and heat transfer in a rectangular porous enclosure. Five different heating and cooling zones are considered ... Keywords: Aspect ratio, Finite volume method, Natural convection, Partial heating, Porous medium

M. Bhuvaneswari; S. Sivasankaran; Y. J. Kim

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling Simulation Of Pyrolysis Of Biomass: Effect Of Thermal Conductivity, Reactor Temperature And Particle Size On Product Concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simultaneous chemical kinetics and heat transfer model is used to predict the effects of the most important physical and thermal properties (thermal conductivity, reactor temperature and particle size) of the feedstock on the convective-radiant pyrolysis of biomass fuels. The effects of these parameters have been analyzed for different geometries such as slab, cylinder and sphere. Finite difference method is employed for solving heat transfer model equation while Runge-Kutta 4 th order method is used for solving chemical kinetics model equations. Simulations are carried out for equivalent radius ranging from 0.0000125 m to 0.02 m, and temperature ranging from 303 K to 2100 K.

Chaurasia And Babu; A. S. Chaurasia; B. V. Babu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development and demonstration of compound parabolic concentrators for solar thermal power generation and heating and cooling applications. Progress report, July--December 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the development of Compound Parabolic Concentrators (CPC) is described. A tenfold concentrator with a cavity receiver was constructed and tested. The optical efficiency was very good (65 percent), but the thermal performance was degraded by heat losses of the cavity receiver. A 20 ft/sup 2/ (1.86 m/sup 2/) concentrating collector (5.3x) has been tested for thermal and optical performance, and the optical efficiency was excellent (68 percent). In this collector, aluminum extrusions were used to define the CPC shape and provide the fluid-flow path. A 30 ft (9.14 m) long collector (10x) has been designed and is being built for daily-cycle testing. The expected performance of this collector has been evaluated. The conceptual design of a lightweight collector using evacuated glass tubes around the absorber is presented. Various construction techniques for use with low-cost materials, such as plastics, are being evaluated for this collector. Optical design studies of Compound Parabolic Concentrators for tubular absorbers and for use as secondary concentrators are discussed. Comparison of the CPC with tube and the CPC with one-sided flat absorber shows that the tubular configuration is preferable not only because of lower heat losses but also because of lower collector cost. For tracking concentrators with line focus, the use of second-stage concentrators is found to be cost effective; the CPC is found to be significantly better for this application than a V-trough. A summary of the results of subcontracts described in the previous progress report are presented, and the influence of these results on ANL programs is noted.

Allen, J.W.; Levitz, N.M.; Rabl, A.; Reed, K.A.; Schertz, W.W.; Thodos, G.; Winston, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2009. It addresses relevant policies in the United States and internationally, technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2008. It addresses technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by EPRI and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic, commercially called Hitec Solar Salt. Two nanoparticle types were chosen, alumina and silica. The nanoparticle composite materials were fabricated by mixing the components in an aqueous solution, mixing that solution for a set amount of time using a sonic mixer, then removing the water from the aqueous solution, leaving the composite molten salt behind as a fine white powder. The thermal properties of the composite and plain material were measured using two techniques: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 1269E and Modulating Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC). These two techniques measured the specific heat and the heat of fusion of the plain and composite materials. The results of all the ASTM and MDSC measurements suggest that the addition of the nanoparticles using the given manufacturing technique increased the specific heat of the molten salt by approximately 20 percent, with both measurement techniques showing approximately the same level of increase. The silica and the alumina improved the specific heat by nearly the same amount over the base material. The heat of fusion did not seem to be significantly altered compared to the observed heat of fusion value of the unmodified material. It was also observed that the nitrate and silica composite material's specific heat decreased if the material was raised to a temperature above 400C. The specific heat was observed to decrease over time, even when the temperature was well below 400C. It is unknown why this occurred. The nitrate plus alumina composite and the plain nitrate were stable to a temperature of 450C for the test duration.

Betts, Matthew

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, t

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the {sup 238}U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased.A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning.

Villa, M.; Hurtado, S. [Centro de Investigation, Tecnologia e Innovation. CUIUS. Universidad de Sevilla. Av. Reina Mercedes 4B. 41012-Sevilla (Spain); Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R. [E. T. S. Arquitectura. Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada II. Universidad de Sevilla. Av. Reina Mercedes, 2. 41012-Sevilla (Spain); Mosqueda, F.; Vaca, F. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada. Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales. Universidad de Huelva. Campus de El Carmen. 21007-Huelva (Spain)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

A. Bershadskii

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of thermal treatments on the properties of nickel and cobalt activated-charcoal-supported catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The effect of thermal pretreatment in N[sub 2] up to 723 K and the activation treatments in H[sub 2] and an inert atmosphere on the properties of Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts were studied. Catalysts were characterized by means of N[sub 2] adsorption at 77 K, H[sub 2] chemisorption at room temperature, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalysts' activity and selectivity for acetone hydrogenation to 2-propanol under unusual and severe conditions (473 K and high overall acetone conversion) were also measured. TGA and XRD evidence was found for the charcoal-support-promoted NiO and CoO reduction to the metallic states when the catalysts were subjected to an inert atmosphere above 723 K caused a loss of acetone hydrogenation activity (calculated on a metal load basis) for both the Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts, with respect to that of the low-temperature (573 K) activation treatments. In a series of activated-charcoal-supported Ni catalysts, a large decrease in the H[sub 2] chemisorption uptake was also found for a sample pretreated in N[sub 2] at 723 K prior to H[sub 2] reduction. These results were not due to nickel or cobalt sintering, as shown by XRD line broadening measurements. The catalytic activity loss was accompanied by a decrease (in the case of Ni) and an increase (in the case of Co) in the 2-propanol selectivity. 44 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Gandia, L.M.; Montes, M. (Universidad del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Application of Ion Concentration Polarization to Water Desalination and Active Control of Analytes in Paper.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on the development of two new applications using ion concentration polarization (ICP): an out-of-plane microfluidic approach for water desalination and a method (more)

Pei, Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High active carrier concentration in n-type, thin film Ge using delta-doping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate CVD in situ doping of Ge by utilizing phosphorus delta-doping for the creation of a high dopant diffusion source. Multiple monolayer delta doping creates source phosphorous concentrations above 1 10[superscript ...

Cai, Yan

109

Options for thermal energy storage in solar-cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current effort concentrates on design requirements of thermal storage subsystems for active solar cooling systems. The use of thermal storage with respect to absorption, Rankine, and desiccant cooling technologies is examined.

Curran, H.M.; DeVries, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

A study of the stack relaxation in thermal batteries on activation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stack-relaxation processes occurring in a thermal-battery upon activation and discharge were studied dynamically with a special test fixture that incorporated an internal load cell. The factors which were screened initially included stack diameter and height (number of cells), thickness and binder content of the separator, temperature, and closing pressure. A second series of more-detailed experiments included only those factors that were identified by the screening study as being important (as closing force, number of cells, and separator thickness). The resulting experimental data from this second series of experiments were used to generate a surface-response model based on these three factors. This model accounted for 94% of the variation in the response (final stack-relaxation pressure) over the range of conditions studied.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; THOMAS,EDWARD V.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Temporal variability of uranium concentrations and 234 activity ratios in the Mississippi river and its tributaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, United States c-basins exert the greatest control on Lower Mississippi River uranium concentration and isotope signatures; Uranium isotope ratios; Temporal variability; Tributary sources; Global riverine uranium flux 1

113

Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carps in north Croatia after the Chernobyl accident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carps in the Republic of Croatia are presented. The radiocaesium levels in carps decreased exponentially and the effective ecological half-life of 137Cs in carps was estimated to be about 1 year for 1987-2002 period and 5 years for 1993-2005 period. The observed 134Cs:137Cs activity ratio in carps has been found to be similar to the ratio that has been observed in other environmental samples. Concentration factor for carps (wet weight) was roughly estimated to be 128 +/- 74 Lkg-1, which is in reasonable agreement with model prediction based on K+ concentrations in water. Estimated annual effective doses received by 134Cs and 137Cs intake due to consumption of carps for an adult member of Croatian population are small, per caput dose for the 1987 - 2005 estimated to be 0.5 +/- 0.2 microSv. Due to minor freshwater fish consumption in Croatia and low radiocaesium activity concentrations in carps, it can be concluded that carps consumption was no...

Franic, Z

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Innovative Evaporative and Thermally Activated Technologies Improve Air Conditioning, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Evaporative and Innovative Evaporative and Thermally Activated Technologies Improve Air Conditioning Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) invented a breakthrough technology that improves air conditioning in a novel way-with heat. NREL combined desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90% less electricity and up to 80% less total energy than traditional air conditioning (AC). This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVap), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. Desiccants are an example of a thermally activated technology (TAT) that relies on heat instead

115

Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to...

116

Effects of HCl and SO{sub 2} concentration on mercury removal by activated carbon sorbents in coal-derived flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of the presence of HCl and SO{sub 2} in the simulated coal combustion flue gas on the Hg{sup 0} removal by a commercial activated carbon (coconut shell AC) was investigated in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor in a temperature range of 80-200{sup o}C. The characteristics (thermal stability) of the mercury species formed on the sorbents under various adsorption conditions were investigated by the temperature-programmed decomposition desorption (TPDD) technique. It was found that the presence of HCl and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas affected the mercury removal efficiency of the sorbents as well as the characteristics of the mercury adsorption species. The mercury removal rate of AC increased with the HCl concentration in the flue gas. In the presence of HCl and the absence of SO{sub 2} during Hg{sup 0} adsorption by AC, a single Hg{sup 0} desorption peak at around 300{sup o}C was observed in the TPDD spectra and intensity of this peak increased with the HCl concentration during mercury adsorption. The peak at around 300{sup o}C may be derived from the decomposition and desorption of mercury chloride species. The presence of SO{sub 2} during mercury adsorption had an adverse effect on the mercury removal by AC in the presence of HCl. In the presence of both HCl and SO{sub 2} during Hg{sup 0} adsorption by AC, the major TPDD peak temperatures changed drastically depending upon the concentration of HCl and SO{sub 2} in flue gas during Hg{sup 0} adsorption. 16 refs., 7 figs.

Ryota Ochiai; M. Azhar Uddin; Eiji Sasaoka; Shengji Wu [Okayama University, Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To characterize the relationship between lesion detection sensitivity and injected activity as a function of lesion size and contrast on the PEM (positron emission mammography) Flex Solo II scanner using phantom experiments. Methods: Phantom lesions (spheres 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mm diameter) were randomly located in uniform background. Sphere activity concentrations were 3 to 21 times the background activity concentration (BGc). BGc was a surrogate for injected activity; BGc ranged from 0.44-4.1 kBq/mL, corresponding to 46-400 MBq injections. Seven radiologists read 108 images containing zero, one, or two spheres. Readers used a 5-point confidence scale to score the presence of spheres. Results: Sensitivity was 100% for lesions {>=}12 mm under all conditions except for one 12 mm sphere with the lowest contrast and lowest BGc (60% sensitivity). Sensitivity was 100% for 8 mm spheres when either contrast or BGc was high, and 100% for 4 mm spheres only when both contrast and BGc were highest. Sphere contrast recovery coefficients (CRC) were 49%, 34%, 26%, 14%, and 2.8% for the largest to smallest spheres. Cumulative specificity was 98%. Conclusions: Phantom lesion detection sensitivity depends more on sphere size and contrast than on BGc. Detection sensitivity remained {>=}90% for injected activities as low as 100 MBq, for lesions {>=}8 mm. Low CRC in 4 mm objects results in moderate detection sensitivity even for 400 MBq injected activity, making it impractical to optimize injected activity for such lesions. Low CRC indicates that when lesions <8 mm are observed on PEM images they are highly tracer avid with greater potential of clinical significance. High specificity (98%) suggests that image statistical noise does not lead to false positive findings. These results apply to the 85 mm thick object used to obtain them; lesion detectability should be better (worse) for thinner (thicker) objects based on the reduced (increased) influence of photon attenuation.

MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Wang, Carolyn L.; Eissa, Marna; Haseley, David; Kelly, Mary M.; Liu, Franklin; Parikh, Jay R.; Beatty, J. David; Rogers, James V. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States); Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermal biology, torpor use and activity patterns of a small diurnal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

all climate zones with varying thermal conditions. Gener- ally, however, the lack of vegetation, moisture and cloud cover in desert regions result in extreme daily...

119

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermal removal of mercury in spent powdered activated carbon from TOXECON process  

SciTech Connect

This research developed and demonstrated a technology to liberate Hg adsorbed onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) by the TOXECON process using pilot-scale high temperature air slide (HTAS) and bench-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The HTAS removed 65, 83, and 92% of Hg captured with PAC when ran at 900{sup o}F, 1,000{sup o}F, and 1,200 {sup o}F, respectively, while the TGA removed 46 and 100% of Hg at 800 {sup o}F and 900{sup o}F, respectively. However, addition of CuO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture and CuCl catalysts enhanced Hg removal and PAC regeneration at lower temperatures. CuO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture performed better than CuCl in PAC regeneration. Scanning electron microscopy images and energy dispersive X-ray analysis show no change in PAC particle aggregation or chemical composition. Thermally treated sorbents had higher surface area and pore volume than the untreated samples indicating regeneration. The optimum temperature for PAC regeneration in the HTAS was 1,000{sup o}F. At this temperature, the regenerated sorbent had sufficient adsorption capacity similar to its virgin counterpart at 33.9% loss on ignition. Consequently, the regenerated PAC may be recycled back into the system by blending it with virgin PAC.

Okwadha, G.D.O.; Li, J.; Ramme, B.; Kollakowsky, D.; Michaud, D. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system  

SciTech Connect

The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

Veilleux, J. M. (John M.)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A thermal active restrained shrinkage ring test to study the early age concrete behaviour of massive structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In massive concrete structures, cracking may occur during hardening, especially if autogenous and thermal strains are restrained. The concrete permeability due to this cracking may rise significantly and thus increase leakage (in tank, nuclear containment...) and reduce the durability. The restrained shrinkage ring test is used to study the early age concrete behaviour (delayed strains evolution and cracking). This test shows, at 20 {sup o}C and without drying, for a concrete mix which is representative of a French nuclear power plant containment vessel (w/c ratio equal to 0.57), that the amplitude of autogenous shrinkage (about 40 {mu}m/m for the studied concrete mix) is not high enough to cause cracking. Indeed, in this configuration, thermal shrinkage is not significant, whereas this is a major concern for massive structures. Therefore, an active test has been developed to study cracking due to restrained thermal shrinkage. This test is an evolution of the classical restrained shrinkage ring test. It allows to take into account both autogenous and thermal shrinkages. Its principle is to create the thermal strain effects by increasing the temperature of the brass ring (by a fluid circulation) in order to expand it. With this test, the early age cracking due to restrained shrinkage, the influence of reinforcement and construction joints have been experimentally studied. It shows that, as expected, reinforcement leads to an increase of the number of cracks but a decrease of crack widths. Moreover, cracking occurs preferentially at the construction joint.

Briffaut, M. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Benboudjema, F. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Torrenti, J.M., E-mail: jean-michel.torrenti@lcpc.f [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire central des ponts et chaussees, Paris (France); Nahas, G. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL develops publications, including technical reports and papers, about its R&D activities in concentrating solar power, as well as related information. Below you'll find a list of selected NREL publications concerning these activities. Also see TroughNet's publications on parabolic trough technology, and market and economic assessment. For other NREL concentrating solar power publications, you can search NREL's Publications Database. Selected Publications These publications are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines NREL Subcontract Report Author: David Kearney - Kearney & Associates Publication Date: March 2013 Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy

124

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Linking high and low temperature plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: thermal activation, extreme value statistics and kinetic freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At temperatures well below their glass transition, the deformation properties of bulk metallic glasses are characterised by a sharp transition from elasticity to plasticity, a reproducible yield stress, and an approximately linear decrease of this stress with increasing temperature. In the present work it shown that when the well known properties of the under-cooled liquid regime, in terms of the underlying potential energy landscape, are assumed to be also valid at low temperature, a simple thermal activation model is able to reproduce the observed onset of macro-scopic yield. At these temperatures, the thermal accessibility of the complex potential energy landscape is drastically reduced, and the statistics of extreme value and the phenomenon of kinetic freezing become important, affecting the spatial heterogeneity of the irreversible structural transitions mediating the elastic-to-plastic transition. As the temperature increases and approaches the glass transition temperature, the theory is able to smoothly transit to the high temperature deformation regime where plasticity is known to be well described by thermally activated viscoplastic models.

P. M. Derlet; R. Maa

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Concentrating Solar Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity...

128

U.S. Department of Energy thermal energy storage research activities review: 1989 Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers the opportunity for the recovery and re-use of heat currently rejected to the ambient environment. Further, through the ability of TES to match an energy supply with a thermal energy demand, TES increases efficiencies of energy systems and improves capacity factors of power plants. The US Department of Energy has been the leader in TES research, development, and demonstration since recognition in 1976 of the need for fostering energy conservation as a component of the national energy budget. The federal program on TES R and D is the responsibility of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution within the US Department of Energy (DOE). The overall program is organized into three program areas: diurnal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat for use in residential and commercial buildings on a daily cycle; industrial--relating primarily to higher temperature heat for use in industrial and utility processes on an hourly to daily cycle; seasonal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat or chill for use in residential complexes (central supply as for apartments or housing developments), commercial (light manufacturing, processing, or retail), and industrial (space conditioning) on a seasonal to annual cycle. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hoffman, H.W. [ed.] [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomlinson, J.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Combustion characteristics and influential factors of isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental study on the isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion (ATAC) which is assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane. The active-thermal atmosphere is created by low- and high-temperature reactions of n-heptane which is injected at intake port, and isooctane is directly injected into combustion chamber near the top dead center. The effects of isooctane injection timing, active-thermal atmosphere intensity, overall equivalence ratio, and premixed ratio on combustion characteristics and emissions are investigated. The experimental results reveal that, the isooctane ignition and combustion can be classified to thermal atmosphere combustion, active atmosphere combustion, and active-thermal atmosphere combustion respectively according to the extent of n-heptane oxidation as well as effects of isooctane quenching and charge cooling. n-Heptane equivalence ratio, isooctane equivalence ratio and isooctane delivery advance angle are major control parameters. In one combustion cycle, the isooctane ignited and burned after those of n-heptane, and then this combustion phenomenon can also be named as dual-fuel sequential combustion (DFSC). The ignition timing of the overall combustion event is mainly determined by n-heptane equivalence ratio and can be controlled in flexibility by simultaneously adjusting isooctane equivalence ratio. The isooctane ignition regime, overall thermal efficiency, and NO{sub x} emissions show strong sensitivity to the fuel delivery advance angle between 20 CA BTDC and 25 CA BTDC. (author)

Lu, Xingcai; Ji, Libin; Ma, Junjun; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Zhen [Key Lab. for Power Machinery and Engineering of MOE, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Phase 0: goal study for the technical and economic evaluation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) concept applied to solar thermal and photovoltaic collectors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a quick, six-week technical and economic evaluation of the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) solar collector. The purpose of this effort was to provide an initial phase of a goals study that is directed toward recommending relative priorities for development of the compound parabolic concentrator concept. The findings of this study are of a very preliminary nature. Conclusions based on study findings at this depth should be considered preliminary and subject to revision and review in later phases.

None

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M., E-mail: schryver@lmsal.co [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

Calculation of Potential Broadband Biologically Active and Thermal Solar Radiation above Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral model was assembled and used to compute the potential solar irradiance in five broad bands, that is, ultraviolet-B (280?320 nm in wavelength), ultraviolet-A (320?400 nm), photosynthetically active (400?700 nm), near infrared (700?1500 ...

Xiusheng Yang; David R. Miller

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cytokine-capture nanoparticles to quantify IL-2 concentrations within the immunological synapse during T cell activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of bringing a nascent technology for detection and quantification of local cytokine concentrations on cell surfaces to market is presented in this paper. Quantum dots or fluorochrome-loaded nanoparticles ...

Hong, Julee Y. (Julee Yang-A.), 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Electrochemical activation and inhibition of neuromuscular systems through modulation of ion concentrations with ion-selective membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional functional electrical stimulation aims to restore functional motor activity of patients with disabilities resulting from spinal cord injury or neurological disorders. However, intervention with functional ...

Song, Yong-Ak

139

PVT -- A photovoltaic/thermal concentrator total energy system: Final phase 1 project report. Building opportunities in the U.S. for photovoltaics (PV:BONUS) Two  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United Solar completed its Phase 1 report and its proposal for Phase 2 of the PVBONUS Two program at the end of March 1998. At the same time, it also completed and submitted a proposal to the California Energy Commission PIER program for additional funding to cost-share development and testing of a pre-production model of the PVT-14. It was unsuccessful in both of these proposed efforts. While waiting for the proposal decisions, work continued in April and May to analyze the system design and component decisions described below. This document is a final summation report on the Phase 1 effort of the PVBONUS Two program that describes the key technical issues that United Solar and its subcontractor, Industrial Solar Technology Corporation, worked on in preparation of a Phase 2 award. The decisions described were ones that will guide the design and fabrication of a pre-production prototype of a 1500:1 mirrored concentrator with gallium arsenide cells when United solar resumes its development work. The material below is organized by citing the key components that underwent a design review, what the company considered, what was decided, the name of the expected supplier, if not to be produced in-house, and some information about expected costs. The cost figures given are usually budgetary estimates, not the result of firm quotations or extensive analysis.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

Manrique, J.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermal Treatment of PtNiCo Electrocatalysts: Effects of Nanoscale Strain and Structure on the Activity and Stability for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction  

SciTech Connect

The ability to control the nanoscale size, composition, phase, and facet of multimetallic catalysts is important for advancing the design and preparation of advanced catalysts. This report describes the results of an investigation of the thermal treatment temperature on nanoengineered platinum-nickel-cobalt catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction, focusing on understanding the effects of lattice strain and surface properties on activity and stability. The thermal treatment temperatures ranged from 400 to 926 C. The catalysts were characterized by microscopic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical techniques for establishing the correlation between the electrocatalytic properties and the catalyst structures. The composition, size, and phase properties of the trimetallic nanoparticles were controllable by our synthesis and processing approach. The increase in the thermal treatment temperature of the carbon-supported catalysts was shown to lead to a gradual shrinkage of the lattice constants of the alloys and an enhanced population of facets on the nanoparticle catalysts. A combination of the lattice shrinkage and the surface enrichment of nanocrystal facets on the nanoparticle catalysts as a result of the increased temperature was shown to play a major role in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity for catalysts. Detailed analyses of the oxidation states, atomic distributions, and interatomic distances revealed a certain degree of changes in Co enrichment and surface Co oxides as a function of the thermal treatment temperature. These findings provided important insights into the correlation between the electrocatalytic activity/stability and the nanostructural parameters (lattice strain, surface oxidation state, and distribution) of the nanoengineered trimetallic catalysts.

B Wanjala; R Loukrakpam; J Luo; P Njoki; D Mott; C Zhong; M Shao; L Protsailo; T Kawamura

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Activities and Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 11   Heats of formation of solid and liquid copper-tin alloys at 723 K...? 0.255 (b) ε -1920 ? ? ? ? ? ? (±100) (a) C p = heat capacity. (b) Phase

144

Concentrated solar power on demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

Codd, Daniel Shawn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Solar collector with improved thermal concentration  

SciTech Connect

Reduced heat loss from the absorbing surface of the energy receiver of a cylindrical radiant energy collector is achieved by providing individual, insulated, cooling tubes for adjacent parallel longitudinal segments of the receiver. Control means allow fluid for removing heat absorbed by the tubes to flow only in those tubes upon which energy is then being directed by the reflective wall of the collector.

Barak, Amitzur Z. (Chicago, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pennsylvania State University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardee for their advanced collectors. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling Thermal Fatigue in CPV Cell Assemblies (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation outlines the modeling of thermal fatigue in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) assemblies.

Bosco, N.; Panchagade, D.; Kurtz, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

3D modeling of effects of increased oxygenation and activity concentration in tumors treated with radionuclides and antiangiogenic drugs  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in response to hypoxia is a fundamental event in the process of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. However, abnormalities in tumor neovasculature often induce increased interstitial pressure (IP) and further reduce oxygenation (pO{sub 2}) of tumor cells. In radiotherapy, well-oxygenated tumors favor treatment. Antiangiogenic drugs may lower IP in the tumor, improving perfusion, pO{sub 2} and drug uptake, by reducing the number of malfunctioning vessels in the tissue. This study aims to create a model for quantifying the effects of altered pO{sub 2}-distribution due to antiangiogenic treatment in combination with radionuclide therapy. Methods: Based on experimental data, describing the effects of antiangiogenic agents on oxygenation of GlioblastomaMultiforme (GBM), a single cell based 3D model, including 10{sup 10} tumor cells, was developed, showing how radionuclide therapy response improves as tumor oxygenation approaches normal tissue levels. The nuclides studied were {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 211}At. The absorbed dose levels required for a tumor control probability (TCP) of 0.990 are compared for three different log-normal pO{sub 2}-distributions: {mu}{sub 1} = 2.483, {sigma}{sub 1} = 0.711; {mu}{sub 2} = 2.946, {sigma}{sub 2} = 0.689; {mu}{sub 3} = 3.689, and {sigma}{sub 3} = 0.330. The normal tissue absorbed doses will, in turn, depend on this. These distributions were chosen to represent the expected oxygen levels in an untreated hypoxic tumor, a hypoxic tumor treated with an anti-VEGF agent, and in normal, fully-oxygenated tissue, respectively. The former two are fitted to experimental data. The geometric oxygen distributions are simulated using two different patterns: one Monte Carlo based and one radially increasing, while keeping the log-normal volumetric distributions intact. Oxygen and activity are distributed, according to the same pattern. Results: As tumor pO{sub 2} approaches normal tissue levels, the therapeutic effect is improved so that the normal tissue absorbed doses can be decreased by more than 95%, while retaining TCP, in the most favorable scenario and by up to about 80% with oxygen levels previously achieved in vivo, when the least favourable oxygenation case is used as starting point. The major difference occurs in poorly oxygenated cells. This is also where the pO{sub 2}-dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio is maximal. Conclusions: Improved tumor oxygenation together with increased radionuclide uptake show great potential for optimising treatment strategies, leaving room for successive treatments, or lowering absorbed dose to normal tissues, due to increased tumor response. Further studies of the concomitant use of antiangiogenic drugs and radionuclide therapy therefore appear merited.

Lagerloef, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg, Sweden and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg 41345 (Sweden)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

151

Aging study of Li(Si)/FeS/sub 2/ thermally activated batteries. [Results of accelerated aging at 130/sup 0/C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique for accelerating the aging process of thermally activated batteries that use iron disulfide was developed. In this approach, storage at 130/sup 0/C for one week was assumed equivalent to a shelf life of five years. Some of the batteries stored at 130/sup 0/C were discharged to test for functionality changes, and others were disassembled and carefully analyzed for evidence of deleterious reactions. Some functionality anomalies were observed. The only deleterious reaction observed was that of Li(Si) reacting with water vapor. 3 figures, 6 tables.

Searcy, J. Q.; Neiswander, P. A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Concentrating Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) are a promising alternative to flat-plate photovoltaics in high direct normal irradiance (DNI) environments. The technologys basic operating characteristics offer significant upside compared with other solar technologies: higher system efficiencies of upwards of 30%+; higher capacity factors, generated through two-axis tracking, exceeding 30% in ideal locations; lower cellular degradation from heat compared to flat-plate PV; lower water requirements; and reduced footpri...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970's and 1980's in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat's fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ([approximately]525--600[degrees]C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970`s and 1980`s in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat`s fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ({approximately}525--600{degrees}C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

2 Technology Description: Solar Thermal Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic troughs track sun, concentrate incident light onto a centralized, tubular receiver that runs length of each trough Thermal fluid circulates through all receivers in solar field Thermal fluid brought to one or more centralized power production facilities Heat transferred to a steam cycle, drives a steam turbine to generate power Cooled thermal fluid is then recirculated th through h solar fi field ld Wet cooling is common, dry cooling possible

Timothy J. Skone; Risks Of Implementation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a source of photovoltaic energy is rapidly increasingphotovoltaic cells under concentrated illumination: a critical review," Solar Energyphotovoltaic/thermal collector, PV/T, and it utilizes both electrical and heat energies

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy ...  

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research institutions have concentrating solar power ...

160

Solar Thermal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries of concentrating solar power and solar heating technologies available for licensing ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Breaking the Thermal Conductivity Glass Limit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Thermal Energy Storage Density LiNO3-KNO3-NaNO2-KNO2 Quaternary Molten Salt System for Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Generation.

162

A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage  

SciTech Connect

Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal energy at the Coso Geothermal Area, California, include fumarolic activity, active hot springs, and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic ridge near the center of an oval-shaped zone of late Cenozoic ring faulting. In an investigation of the thermal regime of the geothermal

164

Thermal dissolution of brown and hard coals with the addition of natural and organosilicon compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of activators (natural compounds and their mixtures with organo-silicates) was found to double the yield of liquid products from the thermal solvent extraction of Kansk-Achinsk brown coal, and increase by 20% the yield from Kuzbass bituminous coal. High concentrations of sulphur in the natural additives reduced the extractability of the coal.

Vol-Ehpshtein, A.B.; Gorlov, E.G.; Shataeva, T.A.; Shpil'berg, M.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Concentrating Photovoltaics: Collaborative Opportunities within DOEs CSP and PV Programs; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: DOEs Concentrating Solar Power program is investigating the viability of concentrating PV converters as an alternative to thermal conversion devices.

Mehos, M.; Lewandowski, A.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kurtz, S.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vehicle Technologies Office: Thermal Control and System Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Control and System Integration The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the...

167

Solar Thermal Group Australian National University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Concentrated Solar Power Parabolic Troughs (Concentration Ratio ~ 80) #12;Solar Thermal Group AustralianC 500o C Solar Concentrator (Dish or Trough) Rebecca Dunn & Dr Keith Lovegrove rebecca Concentrating Solar Power ­ The Basics 1. Parabolic mirror. 2. Receiver at focus. 3. Solar Radiation heats fluid

168

Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

Balakirev, Fedor F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaroszynski, J [NHMFL, FSU; Hunte, F [NHMFL, FSU; Balicas, L [NHMFL, FSU; Jo, Youn - Jung [NHMFL, FSU; Raicevic, I [NHMFL, FSU; Gurevich, A [NHMFL, FSU; Larbalestier, D C [NHMFL, FSU; Fang, L [CHINA; Cheng, P [CHINA; Jia, Y [CHINA; Wen, H H [CHINA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: neutron activation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, where the energy generated is determined from measurements of heat balance. The lat- ter includes by standard methods of radiation transport, in particular with Monte Carlo methods. The fluid dynamic part are equivalent regarding their ability to account for the ef- fect of fluid dynamics on the detector time

Pázsit, Imre

171

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced solar thermal technology  

SciTech Connect

The application of dish solar collectors to industrial process heat (IPH) has been reviewed. IPH represents a market for displacement of fossil fuels (10 quads/y). A 10% market penetration would indicate a substantial market for solar thermal systems. Apparently, parabolic dish systems can produce IPH at a lower cost than that of troughs or compound parabolic concentrators, even though dish fabrication costs per unit area are more expensive. Successful tests of point-focusing collectors indicate that these systems can meet the energy requirements for process heat applications. Continued efforts in concentrator and transport technology development are needed. 7 figures.

Leibowitz, L.P.; Hanseth, E.; Liu, T.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Proceedings: fourth parabolic-dish solar-thermal power program review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the review was to present the results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Applications Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. The Review consisted of 6 technical sessions, covering Stirling, Organic Rankine and Brayton module technologies, associated hardware and test results to date; concentrator development and progress; economic analyses; and current international dish development activities. Two panel discussions, concerning industry issues affecting solar thermal dish development and dish technology from a utility/user perspective, were also held. These Proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the review, which are abstracted separately for EDB.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Segregation of Aerosols by Cloud-Nucleating Activity. Part I: Design, Construction, and Testing of A High-Flux Thermal Diffusion Cloud Chamber for Mass Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a thermal diffusion cloud chamber operated in series with an aerodynamic dichotomous separator that can segregate aerosol particles by their abilities to nucleate cloud droplets. The apparatus takes advantage of compensating gradients ...

Lee Harrison; Halstead Harrison

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Definition: Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Concentrating solar power Technologies that use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a steam turbine or heat engine that drives a generator.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition . ]] File:El-v-01 ubt. jpeg Sustainable energy Renewable energy Anaerobic digestion Hydroelectricity · Geothermal Microgeneration · Solar Tidal · Wave · Wind Energy conservation Cogeneration · Energy efficiency Geothermal heat pump Green building · Passive Solar Sustainable transport Plug-in hybrids · Electric vehicles File:Terra- edge blur. png Environment Portal v · d · e Concentrated solar power (also called concentrating solar power, concentrated solar thermal, and CSP) systems use

176

Energy Basics: Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

177

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Concentrating National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage

179

Dual curvature acoustically damped concentrating collector. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A development program was conducted to investigate the design and performance parameters of a novel, dual curvature, concentrating solar collector. The reflector of the solar collector is achieved with a stretched-film reflective surface that approximates a hyperbolic paraboloid and is capable of line-focusing at concentration ratios ranging from 10 to 20X. A prototype collector was designed based on analytical and experimental component trade-off activities as well as economic analyses of solar thermal heating and cooling systems incorporating this type of collector. A prototype collector incorporating six 0.66 x 1.22 m (2 x 4 ft) was fabricated and subjected to a limited thermal efficiency test program. A peak efficiency of 36% at 121/sup 0/C (250/sup 0/F) was achieved based upon the gross aperture area. Commercialization activities were conducted, including estimated production costs of $134.44/m/sup 2/ ($12.49/ft/sup 2/) for the collector assembly (including a local suntracker and controls) and $24.33/m/sup 2/ ($2.26/ft/sup 2/) for the reflector subassembly.

Smith, G.A.; Rausch, R.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Solar Thermal Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Success Stories These success stories highlight some of the effective licensing and partnership activity between laboratories and industry in the area ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

182

Mixing in Thermals with and without Buoyancy Reversal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing characteristics of turbulent thermals were investigated in a water tank via laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The concentration of mixed fluid in the far field of a classical thermal is approximately uniform, whereas the near ...

Hamid Johari

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Concentrating Solar Power (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Projects Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of concentrating solar power plants. Activities include testing large-scale systems and developing advanced technologies, components, instrumentation, and analysis techniques....

185

Concentrating Solar Power Program overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the US solar thermal industry has established a track record in the power industry by building and operating utility-scale power plants with a combined rated capacity of 354 megawatts (MW). The technology used in these power plants is based on years of research and development (R and D), much of it sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). DOE`s Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program is collaborating with its partners in the private sector to develop two new solar technologies -- power towers and dish/engines -- to meet the huge commercial potential for solar power.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

Kurtz, S.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Solar is growing rapidly, and the concentrating photovoltaics industry-both high- and low-concentration cell approaches-may be ready to ramp production in 2009.

Kurtz, S.

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration...

189

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage Capacity for Concentrated Solar Power. Author(s), Dileep Singh, Sreeram...

195

Concentrating Solar Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Concentrating Solar Power Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis Text Version This solar concentrator has a fixed-focus faceted dish with a concentration of about 250 suns. This system can be used for large fields connected to the utility grid, hydrogen generation, or water pumping. Credit: Science Applications International Corporation / PIX 13464 Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a steam turbine or heat engine that drives a generator. Concentrating solar power offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for

196

Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Solar Thermal Electric Technology Update: 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After more than a dozen years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is seeing pronounced activity and investment. This product is intended to update the reader on these recent world-wide activities.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear receiver tube. The receiver contains a fluid that is...

199

Thermal Gradient Holes At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

200

Thermal Gradient Holes At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity...

202

Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al....  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

203

Thermal Gradient Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

204

Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

205

Thermal Gradient Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

206

Thermal Gradient Holes At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

207

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is pumped by a Zalman cooling tower, which is designed forZalman water pump and cooling tower. A closed loop coolingthe heat sink and the cooling tower. This water pump is very

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

limited energy available for either generation or storage. The modelled dispatch of CSP energy in PLEXOS is based on the hydro generation module, modified to incorporate the...

210

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ THERMOELECTRICS COMBINEDsystem in Burbank, California. Figure 2.6: Front panel andthermal system in Burbank, California. previously discussed.

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil-fuel based thermal power plants. Chapter 3 exploresthermal energy to be dissipated in concentrating solar power plants.thermal energy to electricity in a natural gas, coal or nuclear power plant

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (US)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other PV systems. PV cells are the most expensive components of a PV system, on a per-area basis. A concentrator makes use...

214

Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion: Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

215

Advance plant severe accident/thermal hydraulic issues for ACRS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACRS has been reviewing various advance plant designs for certification. The most active reviews have been for the ABWR, AP600, and System 80+. We have completed the reviews for ABWR and System 80+ and are presently concentrating on AP600. The ACRS gave essentially unqualified certification approval for the two completed reviews, yet,,during the process of review a number of issues arose and the plant designs changed somewhat to accommodate some of the ACRS concerns. In this talk, I will describe some of the severe accident and thermal hydraulic related issues we discussed in our reviews.

Kress, T.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced high efficiency concentrator cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research to develop the technology needed to demonstrate a monolithic, multijunction, two-terminal, concentrator solar cell with a terrestrial power conversion efficiency greater than 35%. Under three previous subcontracts, Varian developed many of the aspects of a technology needed to fabricate very high efficiency concentrator cells. The current project was aimed at exploiting the new understanding of high efficiency solar cells. Key results covered in this report are as follows. (1) A 1.93-eV AlGaAs/1.42-eV GaAs metal-interconnected cascade cell was manufactured with a one-sun efficiency at 27.6% at air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) global. (2) A 1.0eV InGaAs cell was fabricated on the reverse'' side of a low-doped GaAs substrate with a one-sun efficiency of 2.5% AM1.5 diffuse and a short-circuit current of 14.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Small-scale manufacturing of GaAs p/n concentrator cells was attempted and obtained an excellent yield of high-efficiency cells. (4) Grown-in tunnel junction cell interconnects that are transparent and thermally stable using C and Si dopants were developed. 10 refs.

Gale, R. (Varian Associates, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Varian Research Center)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a nanocomposite material consisting of a eutectic of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate and 1% by mass alumina nanoparticles. The material was subjected to thermal cycling in a stainless steel tube using a temperature controlled furnace. After thermal cycling, the stainless steel tube was sectioned into three equal parts top, middle and bottom. Composite material samples were taken from the central region and near the wall region of each section. The specific heat of this material in the temperature range of 290C-397C was measured using the Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC) method. The concentration of alumina nanoparticles in this material was measured using neutron activation analysis. The average specific heat of the uncycled material was found to be 1.37 J/gC.The average specific heat of the thermally cycled material was between 1.7-2.1 J/gC. It was found that the concentration of the nanoparticle varied along the height of the sample tube. The nanoparticles tended to settle towards the bottom of the tube with thermal cycling. There was also migration of nanoparticles towards the wall of the sample tube with thermal cycling. Despite these gross movements of nanoparticles, there was no significant change in the specific heat of the nanocomposite due to thermal cycling.

Shankar, Sandhya

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

220

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power SunShot CSP Team Learn more about the SunShot concentrating solar power program staff by visiting the team's profile pages. Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP University of California Los Angeles University of California Los Angeles High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Jet Propulsion Laborator Jet Propulsion Laboratory Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Abengoa Solar Abengoa Solar Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant HiTek Services HiTek Services Low-Cost Heliostat Development The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies as a unique path to achieve SunShot Initiative cost targets with systems that can supply solar power on demand through the use of thermal storage. CSP technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. Thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a turbine or heat engine driving a generator.

222

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. NREL collaborates with industry to further the research and development (R&D) of concentrating solar power (CSP) plant and solar thermal technologies. NREL's projects in concentrating solar power focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. In addition, NREL has received funding through the following competitively awarded projects: 10-megawatt supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) turbine test Near-blackbody, enclosed-particle receiver integrated with a

223

Concentrating Solar Power: Technology Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified, along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives, CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas-fired systems during peak-demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50%, and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

Mehos, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Parabolic concentrating collector: a tutorial  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tutorial overview of point-focusing parabolic collectors is presented. Optical and thermal characteristics of such collectors are discussed. Data representing typical achievable collector efficiencies are presented and the importance of balancing collector cost with concentrator quality is argued through the development of a figure of merit for the collector. The impact of receiver temperature on performance is assessed and the general observation made that temperatures much in excess of 1500 to 2000/sup 0/F can actually result in decreased performance. Various types of two-axis tracking collectors are described, including the standard parabolic deep dish, Cassegrainian and Fresnel, as well as two forms of fixed mirrors with articulating receivers. The present DOE program to develop these devices is briefly discussed, as are present and projected costs for these collectors. Pricing information is presented for the only known commercial design available on the open market.

Truscello, V.C.

1979-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes using the Landsat-1 Data Collection System. Part III. Heat discharge from Mount St. Helens, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two thermal anomalies, A at 2740 m altitude on the north slope, and B between 2650 and 2750 m altitude on the southwest slope at the contact of the dacite summit dome of Mount St. Helens, Washington, were confirmed by aerial infrared-scanner surveys between 1971 and 1973. Landsat-1 Data Collection Platform 6166, emplaced at site B anomaly, transmitted 482 sets of temperature values in 1973 and 1974, suitable for estimating the differential radiant exitance as 84 W m/sup -2/, approximately equivalent to the Fourier conductive flux of 89 W m/sup -2/ in the upper 15 cm below the surface. The differential geothermal flux, including heat loss via evaporation and convection, was estimated at 376 W m/sup -2/. Total energy yield of Mount St. Helens probably ranges between 0.1 and 0.4 x 10/sup 6/ W.

Friedman, J.D.; Frank, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Heat Pipe Performance Enhancement with Binary Mixture Fluids that Exhibit Strong Concentration Marangoni Effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the impact of Marangoni phenomena, with low mixture concentrations of alcohol and water, to enhance thermal transport capability of gravity-assisted heat pipes. (more)

Armijo, Kenneth Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advanced evacuated tubular concentrator research  

SciTech Connect

Previous research projects led to the conceptual development and proof-of-concept of an advanced evacuated concentrating solar collector tube. The basic idea involves the integration of a nonimaging Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) inside an evacuated tube and coupled to a spectrally selective absorber. An experimental panel of these tubes achieved the highest operating efficiency at high temperatures ever measured with a non-tracking stationary solar collector. Subsequent studies have indicated that a mass-producible collector, incorporating the same concepts, can be developed which will deliver excellent performance across a broad range of temperatures, extending from about 50{degrees}C (suitable for domestic hot water and space heating) to well above 200{degrees}C (suitable for space cooling, process steam and many other end uses). Some form of advanced Integrated CPC (ICPC) remains the only simple and effective method for delivering solar thermal energy efficiently throughout the temperature range from 50{degrees}C to about 300{degrees}C without tracking. It has the potential to make practical and economical several cooling technologies which are otherwise not viable. In addition to its potential for driving cooling systems, this technology also provides a highly versatile solar source for virtually all thermal end uses including general purpose space and domestic hot water heating as well as industrial process heat. Research efforts have been directed towards designing and prototyping a manufacturable version of such a collector tube. We have been pursuing several paths. These include: (1) a small tube version, 52mm in diameter, based on the use of the T-17 commercially produced fluorescent glass tubing, which is the largest size lamp tubing produced in high volume in the United States, and (2) a large tube version, 125mm in diameter, compatible with the commercial design manufactured until recently by Corning France (the CORTEC collector).

Winston, R.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Concentrating Photovoltaic Module Testing at NREL's Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much recent interest in photovoltaic modules designed to operate with concentrated sunlight (>100 suns). Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology offers an exciting new opportunity as a viable alternative to dish Stirling engines. Advantages of CPV include potential for>40% cell efficiency in the long term (25% now), no moving parts, no intervening heat transfer surface, near-ambient temperature operation, no thermal mass, fast response, concentration reduces cost of cells relative to optics, and scalable to a range of sizes. Over the last few years, we have conducted testing of several CPV modules for DOEs Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) program. The testing facilities are located at the Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility (CRULF) and consist the 10 kW High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) and a 14m2 Concentrating Technologies, LLC (CTEK) dish. This paper will primarily describe the test capabilities; module test results will be detailed in the presentation.

Bingham, C.; Lewandowski, A.; Stone, K.; Sherif, R.; Ortabasi, U.; Kusek, S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fifth parabolic dish solar thermal power program annual review: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Review was to present the results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Module/Systems Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. The Review consisted of nine technical sessions covering overall Project and Program aspects, Stirling and Brayton module development, concentrator and engine/receiver development, and associated hardware and test results to date; distributed systems operating experience; international dish development activities; and non-DOE-sponsored domestic dish activities. A panel discussion concerning business views of solar electric generation was held. These Proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the Review, as submitted by their authors at the beginning of the Review; therefore, they may vary slightly from the actual presentations in the technical sessions.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Thermal processes for heavy oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This status report summarizes the project BE11B (Thermal Processes for Heavy Oil Recovery) research activities conducted in FY93 and completes milestone 7 of this project. A major portion of project research during FY93 was concentrated on modeling and reservoir studies to determine the applicability of steam injection oil recovery techniques in Texas Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoirs. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of a steamflood predictive model developed by Mobil Exploration and Production Co. (Mobil E&P) was performed. Details of these two studies are presented. A topical report (NIPER-675) assessing the NIPER Thermal EOR Research Program over the past 10 years was also written during this fiscal year and delivered to DOE. Results of the Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoir simulation studies indicated that though these reservoirs can be successfully steamflooded and could recover more than 50% of oil-in-place, steamflooding may not be economical at current heavy oil prices. Assessment of Mobil E&P`s steamflood predictive model capabilities indicate that the model in its present form gives reasonably good predictions of California steam projects, but fails to predict adequately the performance of non-California steam projects.

Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

State of Solar Thermal Energy Storage Development 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage (TES) to concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants expands both the amount and timing of power delivered to the grid. Thermal storage associated with CSP plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity production cost and increase the solar plant capacity factor, enabling the availability of solar electricity during p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's concentrating solar power (CSP) projects focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies. We support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its CSP deployment efforts in the following areas: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. NREL received funding from DOE for concentrating solar power research projects. Through a competitive process, NREL was selected to lead the following projects: Novel Components to Overcome Existing Barriers-Particle Receiver Integrated with a Fluidized Bed Thermodynamic Cycle to Revolutionize CSP Systems-10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (s-CO2) Turbine Test Nanomaterials for thermal energy storage in CSP plants In addition to these efforts, NREL is also a key partner on two other

235

Concentrating Solar Power: Energy from Mirrors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mirror mirror on the wall, what's the Mirror mirror on the wall, what's the greatest energy source of all? The sun. Enough energy from the sun falls on the Earth everyday to power our homes and businesses for almost 30 years. Yet we've only just begun to tap its potential. You may have heard about solar electric power to light homes or solar thermal power used to heat water, but did you know there is such a thing as solar thermal-electric power? Electric utility companies are using mirrors to concentrate heat from the sun to produce environmentally friendly electricity for cities, especially in the southwestern United States. The southwestern United States is focus- ing on concentrating solar energy because it's one of the world's best areas for sun- light. The Southwest receives up to twice the sunlight as other regions in the coun-

236

Concentrating solar power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derived from NREL's concentrating solar power information page.)[1] Concentrating solar power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for electricity. CSP plants produce power by first using mirrors to focus sunlight to heat a working fluid. Ultimately, this high-temperature fluid is used to spin a turbine or power an engine that drives a generator. And the final product is electricity. Smaller CSP systems can be located directly where the power is needed. Larger, utility-scale CSP applications provide hundreds of megawatts of electricity for the power grid. Both linear concentrator and power tower systems can be easily integrated with thermal storage, helping to generate

237

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Concentrating Collectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflector; c) Plane receiver with plane reflector; d) parabolic concentrator; e) Fresnel reflector f) Array that are faced at different angles so that light falling on any ring is focused to the same point. Parabolic trough collector: A high-temperature (above 360K) solar thermal concentrator with the capacity

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

239

What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

240

Test results of early photovoltaic concentrating collectors  

SciTech Connect

Several passively and actively cooled photovoltaic concentrating collectors built during the period 1976 to 1979 have been tested. The tests provide information on the performance characteristics of these collectors. The results of the tests are summarized.

Gerwin, H.J.; Pritchard, D.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Collector R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage R&D Thermal Energy Storage R&D Featured Resource Learn more about NREL's capabilities in thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids. Thermal energy storage (TES) research at NREL focuses on reducing the costs of thermal storage and electricity from concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. NREL's TES effort contributes to these goals through materials and systems development, analysis, and modeling. CSP systems may include TES-a means of storing thermal energy for later use-to generate electricity any time when it is most needed and valuable, whether during the day, night, or cloudy intervals. Opportunities and Potential Impact TES usually reduces the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) compared to a system without storage because of better utilization of the power block.

242

SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment National Laboratory Research & Development

243

EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

ANDREWS,J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Concentrating Solar Power Generation to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

245

SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Competitive Awards on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

246

SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

247

Upgrades in thermal protection for downhole instruments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement of geophysical parameters in progressively deeper and hotter wells has prompted design changes that improve the performance of downhole instruments and their associated thermal protection systems. This report provides a brief description of the mechanical and thermal loads to which these instruments and systems are subjected. Each design change made to the passive thermal protection system is described along with its resulting improvement. An outline of work being done to scope an active thermal protection system and the preliminary qualitative results are also described. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Bennett, G.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Concentrator silicon cell research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Concentrator-quality evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a reflecting solar concentrator depends, of course, on its surface reflectance, but there are other important factors. Among these are sun-tracking errors, surface-slope errors, and surface irregularities. It is appropriate to use statistics to describe and analyze these non-deterministic factors. A scheme for specifying the quality of a solar concentrator that includes all these effects is described and illustrated. It is believed that this procedure is optimum in the sense that it requires a minimum of measurements to obtain a complete enough description of a concentrator to determine its optical performance under any operating geometry. The specification scheme is, therefore, suitable for use in general systems analysis studies involving solar concentrators.

Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Joined concentric tubes  

SciTech Connect

Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Case Study on Thermal Energy Storage: Gemasolar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19.9-MW Gemasolar plant is the first commercial concentrating-solar thermal power plant to use a central receiver tower and a two-tank molten-salt thermal energy storage system. The initial plant operation has demonstrated the feasibility of the technology to operate under commercial conditions at utility scale and verified continuous 24-hour operation. The storage capacity makes the plant output dispatchable and improves the plants capacity factor and profitability. This white paper ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during Solidification on Heat Exchanger Tube .. 14 FigureGPM flow rate through the heat exchanger. For the Therminol15 Heat Exchanger

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the system. A pair of RTDs was utilized at each inletA total of 19 thermocouples, 8 RTDs, and 2 flow meters were

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive {sup 36}Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the recognized need to validate the neutron component of the dose in Hiroshima. Although this was suggested at the time of the DS86 Final Report, where it was stated that the calculated neutron doses for survivors could possibly be wrong, the paucity of neutron validation measurements available at that time prevented adequate resolution of this matter. It was not until additional measurements and data evaluations were made that it became clear that more work was required to better understand the discrepancies observed for thermal neutrons in Hiroshima. This resulted in a large number of additional neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by scientists in the US, Japan, and Germany. The results presented here for {sup 36}Cl, together with measurements made by other scientists and for other isotopes, now provide a much improved measurement basis for the validation of neutrons in Hiroshima.

Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Concentrating PhotovoltaicsConcentrating Photovoltaics Andrew BlakersAndrew Blakers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULATION REPEAL: UCF-8.003 Solar Thermal Collector and PV Module Certification. (1) The Center shall) As a condition of displaying a Label of Certification on a solar thermal collector or PV module, the Seller mustNOTICE OF REGULATION REPEAL Date: July 1, 2010 REGULATION TITLE: REGULATION NO.: Solar Thermal

257

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were dispersed in a eutectic of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate (60:40 for mole fraction) to create nanofluids using a hot plate evaporation method and an air dryer method. The nominal Al2O3 (alumina) mass fraction was between 0 and 2%, and was determined as the ratio of the mass of Al2O3 nanoparticles to the total mass of the nanofluid. After the preparation of the nanofluids, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the actual Al2O3 mass fraction in the nanofluids. The specific heat, heat of fusion, and melting point were measured with a Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured with Laser Flash Analysis (LFA). The MDSC results showed that the addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles enhanced the specific heat of the nanofluids synthesize from both methods. There was a parabolic relation between the specific heat and the Al2O3 mass fraction for the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method, with a maximum 31% enhancement at 0.78% Al2O3 mass fraction. The nanofluids synthesized from the air dryer method also resulted in enhanced specific heats which were higher at the same Al2O3 mass fraction than those of the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method. It was not determined why this enhancement occurred. The results also showed that the introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles had no significant effect on the heat of fusion and melting point of the nanofluids synthesized from either method. The LFA results showed that adding Al2O3 nanoparticles decreased the thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity of the nitrate eutectic.

Shao, Qian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with frustrated total internal reflection absorber  

SciTech Connect

Since its introduction, the concept of nonimaging solar concentrators, as exemplified by the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) design, has greatly enhanced the ability to collect solar energy efficiently in thermal and photovoltaic devices. When used as a primary concentrator, a CPC can provide significant concentration without the complication of a tracking mechanism and its associated maintenance problems. When used as a secondary, a CPC provides higher total concentration, or for a fixed concentration, tolerates greater tracking error in the primary.

Hull, J.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Photovoltaic solar concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

262

Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1993)...

263

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Exploration...

264

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

265

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

266

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

267

Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

268

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

269

Second thermal storage applications workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modelling the vertical heat exchanger in thermal basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In geographical area characterize by specific geological conformations such as the Viterbo area which comprehend active volcanic basins, it is difficult to use conventional geothermal plants. In fact the area presents at shallow depths thermal falde ... Keywords: heat, thermal aquifer, thermal energy

Maurizio Carlini; Sonia Castellucci

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Concentrating Solar Power strategic plan summary  

SciTech Connect

A strategic plan for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) -- A Bright Path to the Future -- was completed and released by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Solar Thermal, Biomass Power, and Hydrogen Technologies in December 1996. This strategic plan document will help bring CSP (formerly solar thermal electric) technologies to the marketplace over the course of the next 20 years (1996--2015) -- taking us from the current pre-competitive status closer to full commercialization. The plan, developed in concert with stakeholders, is a living document and will undergo periodic reevaluation as well as revision to reflect changes in the market environment, the progress of the technologies, and the development of new concepts and ideas.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

278

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

279

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings...

280

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INLs Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

283

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Solar Thermal Generation Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is experiencing renewed activity and investment. The shift is partly due to new interest in large-scale centralized electricity generation, for which STE is well suited and offers the lowest cost for solar-specific renewable portfolio standards. With policymaking and public interest driven by concerns such as global climate change, atmospheric emissions, and traditional fossil fuel price and supply volatility, STE is increasing...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Photovoltaic concentrator technology development project. Sixth project integration meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-three abstracts and short papers are presented which describe the current status of research, development, and demonstration of concentrator solar cell technology. Solar concentrators discussed include the parabolic trough, linear focus Fresnel lens, point focus Fresnel lens, and the parabolic dish. Solar cells studied include silicon, GaAs, and AlGaAs. Research on multiple junction cells, combined photovoltaic/thermal collectors, back contact solar cells, and beam splitter modules is described. Concentrator solar cell demonstration programs are reported. Contractor status summaries are given for 33 US DOE concentrator solar cell contracts; a description of the project, project status, and key results to date is included. (WHK)

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) Place Cologne, Germany Zip D-51143 Sector Solar Product A spin-out of the DLR Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, providing consulting, due diligence and component testing for Solar Thermal Electricity Generation (STEG). References Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) is a company located in Cologne, Germany . References ↑ "Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Concentrating_Solar_Power_Services_CSP_Services&oldid=343830

288

Solar-thermal power technical and management support. Program summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Support activities described are: preparation of the significant development weekly reports; preparation of briefings for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program; preparation of the Annual Thermal Power Systems Technical Progress Report; Integrated Solar Thermal/Industrial Process Heat Program Plan; review of the Storage Technology Development Program for Thermal Power Systems; and review of the Thermal Power Systems Multiyear Plan. A draft of the Goals and Requirements Section of the Integrated Solar Thermal/Industrial Process Heat Program Plan is included. (LEW)

Not Available

1979-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Status of Solar-Thermal Electric Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the performance of three leading solar-thermal power plant concepts to assess their future use as sources of power for U.S. utilities. The trough system is commercially available now as a marginally competitive fossil hybrid. The central receiver and dish concentrator systems show more attractive potential but require additional component and system development.

1989-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Commercial Application of a Photovoltaic Concentrator system. Phase I. Final report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the design and analysis of the BDM CAPVC (Commercial Application of a Photovoltaic Concentrator) system. The preliminary design, prototype test and evaluation, system analysis, and final design of a large-scale concentrating photovoltaic system are described. The application is on an attractive new office building which represents a large potential market. The photovoltaic concentrating array is a roof-mounted, single-axis linear parabolic trough, using single crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells. A total of 6720 square feet of aperture is focussed on 13,944 PV cells. The photovoltaic system operates in parallel with the local utility in an augmentary loadsharing operating mode. The array is actively cooled and the thermal energy utilized for building heat during winter months. (WHK)

Anderson, D.J.; Anderson, E.R.; Bardwell, K.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft  

SciTech Connect

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Concentrating Solar Power: Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet summarizing the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

Not Available

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Profiles The SunShot Initiative concentrating solar power (CSP) program competitively funds and actively manages the efforts of industry, national laboratories, and...

295

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Updated Solar Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

international activities and work with federal agencies. Printable Version Concentrating Solar Power Research Home Projects Research Staff Working with Us Data & Resources...

296

Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes Thermal Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Gradient Holes Details Activities (50) Areas (39) Regions (4) NEPA(29) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Field wide fluid flow characteristics if an array of wells are drilled Thermal: Mapping and projecting thermal anomalies Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 5.00500 centUSD 0.005 kUSD 5.0e-6 MUSD 5.0e-9 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 16.501,650 centUSD 0.0165 kUSD 1.65e-5 MUSD 1.65e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 50.005,000 centUSD

297

Encapsulation of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermal energy storage is a major contributor to bridge the gap between energy demand (consumption) and energy production (supply) by concentrating solar power. The utilization (more)

Nath, Rupa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Development of a PMV-based thermal comfort modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concentrates on the modelling development for a PMV-based thermal comfort system. Operators can define their own expression towards the surroundings by inserting the respective value of PMV and the system will generate the compressor and fan ... Keywords: climatic modelling, predicted mean vote (PMV), thermal comfort

Shazmin Aniza Abdul Shukor; Karl Kohlhof; Zul Azhar Zahid Jamal

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators JPL logo Graphic of two dishes, mounted to the ground, that are side-by-side. This graphic shows the JPL/L'Garde lightweight concentrator facets, which are deployed for different configurations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with funding from the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D FOA, is designing an optimized solar thermal collector structure using a lightweight collector structure capable of lowering structural costs, simplifying installation, and leading to mass-manufacturability. Approach The JPL project seeks to achieve the SunShot Initiative installed cost target of $75/m2 for a solar thermal collector system, as well as SunShot performance targets for optical errors, operations during windy conditions, and lifetime.

300

Use of compound parabolic concentrator for solar energy collection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The joint team of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Chicago is reporting their midyear results of a proof-of-concept investigation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) for solar-energy collection. The CPC is a non-imaging, optical-design concept for maximally concentrating radiant energy onto a receiver. This maximum concentration corresponds to a relative aperture (f/number) of 0.5, which is well beyond the limit for imaging collectors. We have constructed an X3 concentrating flat-plate collector 16 ft/sup 2/ in area. This collector has been tested in a trailer laboratory facility built at ANL. The optical and thermal performance of this collector was in good agreement with theory. We have constructed an X10 collector (8 ft/sup 2/) and started testing. A detailed theoretical study of the optical and thermal characteristics of the CPC design has been performed.

Rabi, A.; Sevcik, V.J.; Giugler, R.M.; Winston, R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Characterization of Photovoltaic Concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper will describe the resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for performing characterization of photovoltaic (PV) materials designed for operation under concentrated light. NREL has the capability to measure devices ranging from very small, unencapsulated research cells to reasonably sized, environmentally protected modules. Data gathering and interpretation are also ongoing areas of revision and improvement. The main goal of the current research is to reduce the measurement uncertainty to the lowest practical value. At present, the state of the art is limited at a ?5% level in measuring efficiency accurately.

Kiehl, J.; Emery, E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of concentrating N/sup 15/ in a liquid is described. Gaseous nitric oxide and at least one liquid selected from the group consisting of the aqueous oxyacids and oxides of nitrogen, wherein the atomic ratio of oxygen to nitrogen is greater than unity, are brought into intimate contact to cause an enrichment of the liquid and a depletion of the gas in N/sup 15/. The liquid is, thereafter, reacted with sulfur dioxide to produce a gas contuining nitric oxide. The gas contuining nitric oxide is then continuously passed in countercurrent contact with the liquid to cause further enrichment of the liquid.

Taylor, T.I.; Spindel, W.

1960-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Concentric Black Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new supersymmetric solutions of five-dimensional minimal supergravity that describe concentric black rings with an optional black hole at the common centre. Configurations of two black rings are found which have the same conserved charges as a single rotating black hole; these black rings can have a total horizon area less than, equal to, or greater than the black hole with the same charges. A numerical investigation of these particular black ring solutions suggests that they do not have closed timelike curves.

Jerome P. Gauntlett; Jan B. Gutowski

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

306

Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Universal solar concentrator panel  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a solar concentrator device. It comprises: a solar energy receiver; and a flat solar energy reflector arranged to reflect solar energy to the receiver, the reflector including a substantially square-shaped frame limiting an inner space, individual flat reflective panels arranged in the space in a first group or rows extending in a first direction and a second group of rows extending in a second direction substantially transverse to the first direction and so that each of the panels is turnable about three mutually perpendicular axes, and means for mounting the panels so that they are turnable about the axes. The mounting means including first means which connect the panels in the rows extending in one of the directions so that the panels in each of the rows extending in the one direction are jointly turnable about a first one of the axes, second means for mounting each of the panels so that in each of the rows extending in the one direction each of the panels is turnable about a second one of the axes, and third means for mounting each panel in each of the rows extending in the one direction so that each of the panels is turnable about a third one of the axes. This patent also describes a solar concentrator device, wherein the receiver includes a box forming an inner chamber, a plurality of photovoltaic cells sealed with a clear plastic and accommodated in the chamber, and water filling the chamber and surrounding the photovoltaic cells.

Bagno, R.G.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrators Concentrators California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | January 15, 2013 | Ganapathi Thin Film mirror is ~40-50% cheaper and 60% lighter than SOA * Project leverages extensive space experience by JPL and L'Garde to develop a low-cost parabolic dish capable of providing 4 kW thermal. Key features: * Metallized reflective thin film material with high reflectivity (>93%) with polyurethane foam backing * Single mold polyurethane backing fabrication enables low cost high production manufacturing * Ease of panel installation and removal enables repairs and results in a low total life cycle cost * Deployment of multiple dishes enhances system level optimizations by simulating larger fields which addresses issues like shared resources

311

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

312

Thermal activation of superconducting Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting quantum circuits (SQCs) are being explored as model systems for scalable quantum computing architectures. Josephson junctions are extensively used in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) ...

Devalapalli, Aditya P. (Aditya Prakash)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Thermally Activated Dislocation Processes in FCC Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Simulation of the Erosion in the Hearth of COREX Melter Gasifier under the Condition of Different Drainage Type Numerical Study on Behavior of

314

Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

315

Thermal Gradient Holes At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

316

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

317

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

318

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

319

Non-tracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nontracking solar concentrator with a high concentration ratio is provided. The concentrator includes a plurality of energy absorbers which communicate with a main header by which absorbed heat is removed. Undesired heat flow of those absorbers not being heated by radiant energy at a particular instant is impeded, improving the efficiency of the concentrator.

Hinterberger, Henry (Batavia, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The DOE Solar Thermal Electric Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Electric Program is managed by the Solar thermal and biomass Power division which is part of the Office of utility Technologies. The focus of the Program is to commercialize solar electric technologies. In this regard, three major projects are currently being pursued in trough, central receiver, and dish/Stirling electric power generation. This paper describes these three projects and the activities at the National laboratories that support them.

Mancini, T.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Concentrating Collectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Parabolic trough collector: A high-temperature (above 360K) solar thermal concentrator with the capacity) Tubular absorbers with specular cusp reflector; c) Plane receiver with plane reflector; d) parabolic for tracking the sun using one axis of rotation. It uses a trough covered with a highly reflective surface

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

324

Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures have been obtained to depths up to 133 m in 22 boreholes with measurements being made at least four times in each borehole. Geothermal gradients ranged from 240C/km to 450 0C/km. References Combs, J. (1 December 1976) Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=511217"

326

SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Staff Concentrating Solar Power Staff to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Concentrating Solar Power Staff on AddThis.com... Accomplishments Visiting the SunShot Office Fellowships Postdoctoral Research Contacts Staff Concentrating Solar Power Staff The SunShot Initiative concentrating solar power (CSP) program competitively funds and actively manages the efforts of industry, national laboratories, and universities working to make large-scale dispatchable

327

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

328

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

329

Equilibrium Conformations of Concentric-tube Continuum Robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robots consisting of several concentric, preshaped, elastic tubes can work dexterously in narrow, constrained, and/or winding spaces, as are commonly found in minimally invasive surgery. Previous models of these ??active cannulas? assume ... Keywords: active cannula, concentric tube robot, continuum robot, elastica, flexible arms, kinematics, mechanics, medical robots, snake-like robot, variational calculus

D. Caleb Rucker; Robert J. Webster, III; Gregory S. Chirikjian; Noah J. Cowan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Photovoltaic solar concentrator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation which includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

Chiang, C.J.

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

332

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Property:ThermalInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:ThermalInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ThermalInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: A Acoustic Logs Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Density Log Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Drilling Methods E Earth Tidal Analysis Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion

335

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Generation Concentrating Solar Power Generation In 2010, DOE issued the Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Generation funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The following projects were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant eSolar: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility General Atomics: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage HiTek: Low-Cost Heliostat Development Infinia: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power PPG: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector Rocketdyne: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs SENER: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants

339

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Concentrating Solar Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Public Affairs LEARN MORE Visit energy.govsolar. Listen to a SunShot podcast on CSP and thermal energy storage. Watch our Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power video for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing the overall capabilities of the NREL CSP Program: collector/receiver characterization, advanced reflector and absorber materials, thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids, and CSP modeling and analysis.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sintering Process of Chromite Concentrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

343

Markets for concentrating solar power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the markets for concentrating solar power. As concentrating solar power technologies advance into the early stages of commercialization, their economic potential becomes more sharply defined and increasingly tangible.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This “power tower” is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories This "power tower" is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories is unique - and in demand. The Facility has been instrumental in NASA tests, national defense programs and concentrated solar technology development.

345

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Photo of numerous parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors tracking the sun. Cooling towers and other generator equipment are in the midst of the troughs, and two water tanks are in the background. The Solar Electric Generating Station IV power plant in California consists of many parallel rows of parabolic trough collectors that track the sun. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air, and white water tanks are in the background. Credit: Sandia National Laboratory / PIX 14955 Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear

346

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Southwest Concentrating Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Southwest Concentrating Solar Power 1000-MW Initiative Photos of various concentrating solar power systems. NREL, working through SunLab, supports the U.S. Department of Energy's goal to install 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new concentrating solar power systems in the southwestern United States by 2010. This level of deployment, combined with research and development to reduce technology component costs, could help reduce concentrating solar power electricity costs to $0.07/kilowatt-hour. At this cost, concentrating solar power can compete effectively in the Southwest's energy markets. To achieve the Initiative's goal, the U.S. Department of Energy is partnering with the Western Governors' Association to encourage concentrating solar power installations in Arizona, California, Colorado,

347

Energy Basics: Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

348

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

349

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thermal and Structural Constraints on the Tectonic Evolution of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah Thrust Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing of motion on thrust faults in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah (IWU) thrust belt comes from synorogenic sediments, apatite thermochronology and direct dating of fault rocks coupled with good geometrical constraints of the subsurface structure. The thermal history comes from the analyses of apatite thermochronology, thermal maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks and isotope analysis of fluid inclusions from syntectonic veins. New information from zircon fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He analysis provide constraints on the thermal evolution of the IWU thrust belt over geological time. These analyses demonstrate that the time-temperature pathway of the rocks sampled never reached the required conditions to reset the thermochronometers necessary to provide new timing constraints. Previous thermal constraints for maximum temperatures of IWU thrust belt rocks, place the lower limit at ~110C and the upper limit at ~328C. New zircon fission track results suggest an upper limit at ~180C for million year time scales. ID-TIMS and LA-ICPMS of syntectonic calcite veins suggest that new techniques for dating times of active deformation are viable given that radiogenic isotope concentrations occur at sufficient levels within the vein material.

Chapman, Shay Michael

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Industrial solar breeder project using concentrator photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the use of a concentrating photovoltaic system to provide the energy for operating a silicon solar cell production facility, i.e., to demonstrate a solar breeder. Solarex has proposed to conduct the first real test of the solar breeder concept by building and operating a 200 kW(e) (peak) concentrating photovoltaic system based on the prototype and system design developed during Phase I. This system will provide all of the electrical and thermal energy required to operate a solar cell production line. This demonstration would be conducted at the Solarex Rockville facility, with the photovoltaic array located over the company parking lot and on an otherwise unusable flood plain. Phase I of this program included a comprehensive analysis of the application, prototype fabrication and evaluation, system design and specification, and a detailed plan for Phases II and III. A number of prototype tracking concentrator solar collectors were constructed and operated. Extensive system analysis was performed to design the Phase II system as a stand-alone power supply for a solar cell production line. Finally, a detailed system fabrication proposal for Phase II and an operation and evaluation plan for Phase III were completed. These proposals included technical, management, and cost plans for the fabrication and exercise of the proposed system.

Hamilton, R.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Burkholder, J.; Levine, A.; Storti, G.; Wrigley, C.; McKegg, A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Concentration-Temperature Superposition of Helix Folding Rates in Gelatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the kinetics of helix-coil transition in water solutions of gelatin (collagen protein) by optical rotation techniques combined with thermal characterization. By examining the rates of secondary helix folding, and covering a very wide range of solution concentrations, we are able to identify a universal exponential dependence of folding rate on concentration and quench temperature. We demonstrate a new concentration-temperature superposition of data at all temperatures and concentrations, and build the corresponding master curve. The results support the concept of a diffuse helix-coil transition. We find no concentration dependance of the normalized rate constant, suggesting first order (single) kinetics of secondary helix folding dominate in the early stages of renaturation.

J. L. Gornall; E. M. Terentjev

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

354

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations...

355

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate salts are concentrated by evaporation and thermally decomposed into ketones. The ketones can then be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The presence of excess lime in the thermal decomposition step reduced product yield. Mixtures of calcium carboxylate salts were thermally decomposed at 450 degrees C. Low lime-to-salt ratios (g Ca(OH)2/g salt) of 0.00134 and less had a negligible effect on ketone yield. In contrast, salts with higher lime-to-salt ratios of 0.00461, 0.0190, and 0.272 showed 3.5, 4.6, and 9.4% loss in ketone yield, respectively. These losses were caused primarily by increases in tars and heavy oils; however, a three-fold increase in hydrocarbon production occurred as well. To predict ketone product distribution, a random-pairing and a Gibbs free energy minimization model were applied to thermal decompositions of mixed calcium and sodium carboxylate salts. Random pairing appears to better predict ketone product composition. For sodium and calcium acetate, two types of mixed sodium carboxylate salts, and two types of mixed calcium carboxylate salts, activation energy (EA) was determined using three isoconversional methods. For each salt type, EA varied significantly with conversion. The average EA for sodium and calcium acetate was 226.65 and 556.75 kJ/mol, respectively. The average EA for the two mixed sodium carboxylate salts were 195.61, and 218.18 kJ/mol. The average EA for the two mixed calcium carboxylate salts were 232.78, and 176.55 kJ/mol. In addition, three functions of conversion were employed to see which one best modeled the experimental data. The Sestak-Berggren model was the best overall. Possible reactor designs and configurations that address the challenges associated with the continuous thermal decomposition of carboxylate salts are also presented and discussed. Methods of fermentation broth clarification were tested. Flocculation showed little improvement in broth purity. Coagulation yielded broth of 93.23% purity. Filtration using pore sizes from 1 micrometer to 240 Daltons increased broth purity (90.79 to 98.33%) with decreasing pore size.

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

Capossela, Harry J. (Schenectady, NY); Dwyer, Joseph R. (Albany, NY); Luce, Robert G. (Schenectady, NY); McCoy, Daniel F. (Latham, NY); Merriman, Floyd C. (Rotterdam, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

362

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Planar micro-optic solar concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as compound parabolic concentrators and nonimagingas kaleidoscopes or compound parabolic concentrators whicha variation of the compound parabolic concentrator, however,

Karp, Jason Harris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Biomass thermal conversion research at SERI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERI's involvement in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals is reviewed. The scope and activities of the Biomass Thermal Conversion and Exploratory Branch are reviewed. The current status and future plans for three tasks are presented: (1) Pyrolysis Mechanisms; (2) High Pressure O/sub 2/ Gasifier; and (3) Gasification Test Facility.

Milne, T. A.; Desrosiers, R. E.; Reed, T. B.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

373

Development of a commercial photovoltaic concentrator module  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ojective of this work was to develop the design and prototype of a commercial high-concentration photovoltaic (PV) module. The design is for a 282-sun point-focus concentrating module. Most of the components, subassemblies, and design features incorporate simplifications and ease of manufacturing. The Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) module is designed to incorporate high-efficiency, single-crystal silicon PV cells. The housing is made with aluminum laminated for voltage stand-off and simultaneously providing high thermal conductivity. The Fresnel lens injection molded by American Optical (AO) as singles. The cell assembly consists of a copper heat spreader, a photovoltaic cell soldered, a top and bottom contact, and a reflective secondary optical element (SOE). The cell assemblies passed all of the initial electrical characterization and high-potential tests. Under environmental cycling, the only bond that failed was the PV cell-to-heat spreader interface. The other components (top contact, bottom contact, SOE) passed all the environmental cycling tests. The cell assemblies were designed to be mounted onto the receiver section with a thermally conductive RTV. This geometry was subjected to environmental testing. There was no delamination of this bond nor was there electrical breakdown when the assemblies were subjected to the hi-pot test. A mock module was fabricated for environmental evaluation. This module was subjected to the humidity/freeze cycling to assess the performance of the lens mounting design. This module was also subjected to the rain test after the humidity/freeze cycling and checked for water leaks. The lens showed small displacement from its original position after the environmental cycling. One tablespoon of water did collect inside the module.

Saifee, S.T.; Hutchison, G. [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids and phase-change materials (PCM) to serve as thermal energy storage media in the temperature range of 300 C to 800 C. Knowledge of thermophysical properties such as melting point, heat of fusion, density, viscosity, thermal stability are essential for understanding how candidate materials could be deployed in CSP plants. The laboratory runs high-temperature instruments for the analysis of thermophysical properties. Small samples of candidate materials are prepared and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and other specialized analytical methods. Instrumentation capabilities are being expanded to allow for analysis of samples up to 1,200 C. Higher temperature operation is one method to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of CSP systems.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnerships Partnerships NREL maintains partnerships to advance concentrating solar power research, development, and deployment efforts. Currently, NREL works with Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through SunLab-a partnership developed by the U.S. Department of Energy to administer its concentrating solar power R&D and analysis activities. SolarPACES Solar Power and Chemical Energy Systems (SolarPACES), an international program of the International Energy Agency, furthers collaborative development, testing, and marketing of CSP plants. NREL represents the U.S. activities and serves on various committees in SolarPACES, which now has 13 members: Algeria, Australia, Egypt, the European Commission, France, Germany, Israel, Mexico, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, and

376

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that

377

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act

378

ARM - Measurement - CO2 concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 concentration The amount of carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas, per unit of volume. Categories Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is...

379

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation andor concentration of aerosols and small liquidsolid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in...

380

Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

383

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

384

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

NREL: News - NREL Quantifies Significant Value in Concentrating Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

413 413 NREL Quantifies Significant Value in Concentrating Solar Power CSP with thermal energy storage boosts California electric grid April 24, 2013 Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have quantified the significant value that concentrating solar power (CSP) plants can add to an electric grid. The NREL researchers evaluated the operational impacts of CSP systems with thermal energy storage within the California electric grid managed by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). NREL used a commercial production cost model called PLEXOS to help plan system expansion, to evaluate aspects of system reliability, and to estimate fuel cost, emissions, and other operational factors within the CAISO system. The

387

Development of Non?Tracking Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aims of this research is to develop high temperature solar thermal collectors that do not require complex solar tracking devices to maintain optimal performance. The collector technology developed through these efforts uses non?imaging optics and is referred to as an external compound parabolic concentrator. It is able to operate with a solar thermal efficiency of approximately 50% at a temperature of 200??C and can be readily manufactured at a cost between $15 and $18 per square foot.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

LiH thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process for concentrated biomass saccharification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mirror alignment and focus of point-focus solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Distributed point-focusing solar concentrators are being developed for dish-Stirling systems and other applications. Many of these concentrators make use of faceted mirrors that have to be accurately aligned. Some of the solar concentrator designs use stretched-membrane facets that also require focusing. Accurate mirror alignment and focus of faceted solar concentrators have two benefits. First, the concentration ratio of the concentrator/receiver (collector) system is improved with accurate alignment and focus. The receiver aperture diameter can therefore be smaller, thereby reducing thermal losses from the receiver and improving the overall efficiency of the collector. Second, and perhaps more importantly, flux intensities on the receiver can be sensitive to facet alignment and focus. In this paper, the theory and practical application of an alignment and focusing technique are presented. In the technique, light from an artificial source is reflected from the concentrator`s facets to a target. From basic geometric principles, the shape and location of the reflected light on the target can be predicted. Alignment is accomplished by adjusting the facets aim so that the reflected image falls on the predetermined location. To focus a stretched-membrane facet, the reflected image size is adjusted to match that of the target. The governing equations used to draw the alignment targets are developed and the practical application of the technique to the alignment and focus of the Cummins Power Generation, Inc. CPG-460 are presented. Alignment uncertainty associated with this technique on the CPG-460 is also discussed.

Diver, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development and testing of Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic Dish Concentrator No. 1 (PDC-1) is a 12-m-diameter prototype concentrator that evolved from a six-year effort to produce a unit with low life-cycle costs for use with thermal-to-electric energy conversion devices. The concentrator assembly features panels made of a resin transfer molded balsa core/fiberglass sandwich with plastic reflective film as the reflective surface and a ribbed framework to hold the panels in place. The concentrator assembly tracks in azimuth and elevation on a base frame riding on a circular track. In 1982, PDC-1 was installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Initial optical testing showed that the panels did not exhibit the proper parabolic contour. After reassembly to correct this problem, further optical testing discovered thermal gradients in the panels with daily temperature changes. In spite of this, PDC-1 has sufficient optical quality to operate satisfactorily in a dish-electric system. With suggested improvements, its performance could be increased. The PDC-1 development effort provided the impetus for creating innovative optical testing methods and also provided valuable information for use in designing and fabricating concentrators of future dish-electric systems.

Dennison, E.W.; Thostesen, T.O.

1984-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cements resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laser window with annular grooves for thermal isolation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser window or other optical element which is thermally loaded, heats up and causes optical distortions because of temperature gradients between the center and the edge. A number of annular grooves, one to three or more, are formed in the element between a central portion and edge portion, producing a web portion which concentrates the thermal gradient and thermally isolates the central portion from the edge portion, producing a uniform temperature profile across the central portion and therefore reduce the optical distortions. The grooves are narrow and closely spaced with respect to the thickness of the element, and successive grooves are formed from alternate sides of the element.

Warner, B.E.; Horton, J.A.; Alger, T.W.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pyrolysis of epoxies used for thermal-battery headers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermally activated batteries use an epoxy for encapsulation of the electrical feedthroughs in the header of the battery. When the thermal battery is thermally abused, the encapsulant can pyrolyze and generate large internal pressures. This causes the battery to vent in extreme cases. The nature of these gases has never been adequately documented. Therefore, a study was undertaken to address this deficiency. The pyrolysis of various encapsulants that have been used, or are being considered for use, in thermally activated batteries was studied over a temperature range of 155 to 455 C. The composition of the pyrolysis decomposition products was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GS/MS). This determination is helpful in assessing the potential environmental and health effect for personnel exposed to such gases. In addition, the thermal stability of the various epoxies was measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

Guidotti, R.A.; Thornberg, S.M.; Campbell-Domme, B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Upper bounds for the yearly energy delivery of stationary solar concentrators and the implications for concentrator optical design  

SciTech Connect

Compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) type collectors have been viewed as the optimal design for totally stationary concentrators. However the CPC is ideal only for uniform incident solar flux averaged over the energy collection period. The actual yearly-averaged incident flux map turns out to be highly non-uniform, as a function of projected incidence angle, which implies that concentration can be increased markedly if optical collection efficiency is compromised. The question then becomes: what concentrator angular acceptance function is best matched to nature`s radiation flux input, and how much energy can such a concentrator deliver? The recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach could be used to determine optimal reflector contours, given the optimal acceptance angle function. We demonstrate that totally stationary TERCs can have around three times the geometric concentration of corresponding optimized stationary CPCs, with greater energy delivery per absorber area, in particular for applications that are currently being considered for stationary evacuated concentrators with the latest low-emissivity selective coating, e.g., solar-driven double-stage absorption chillers (at around 170{degree}C) and solar thermal power generation (at around 250{degree}C). 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Gordon, J.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel)]|[Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Lasken, M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Definition: Multispectral Thermal Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multispectral Thermal Infrared This wavelength range senses heat energy from the Earth's surface. It can be used to sense surface temperature, including anomalies associated with active geothermal or volcanic systems. Both multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing observations are available. This range can also be used to map mineralogy associate with common rock-forming silicates.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_infrared_spectroscopy ↑ http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Multispectral_Thermal_Infrared&oldid=601561

408

Thermal Performance of Insulating Cryogenic Pin Spacers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the proposal to introduce an actively cooled radiation screen (5-10 K) for the LHC machine, the design of the LHC cryostat foresees the need for spacers between the cold mass and the radiati on screen. The thermal impedance of the chosen material should be very high and the shape selected to withstrand the contact stress due to the displacements induced by the coll-down and warm-up transi ent. A cryogenic experiment dedicated to studying the thermal behaviour of several proposed spacers was performed at the cryogenics laboratory of CERN before choosing the one to be used for further i nvestigation on the LHC full-scale Cryostat Thermal Model [1] [2]. This paper describes a quantitative analysis leading to the choice of the spacer.

Darve, C

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Study of segmented absorbers of thermal solar compound parabolic collectors  

SciTech Connect

One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is by reducing the energy lost by the host absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is by recognizing that the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly. Therefore, it is possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem.

Keita, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of NREL's Thermal Stress and Reliability Project work from October 2007 to March 2009 with an emphasis on activity during 2008/2009.

O'Keefe, M. P.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

416

Carbothermic Reduction of Niobium Concentrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ferro Niobium is produced by aluminothermic reduction of the ... However, the niobium concentrate has impurities, such as phosphorus, lead and tin, ... Phase Transformation of Andalusite-Mullite and Its Fiber Reinforcement to...

417

Thermal manipulator of medical catheters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

Chastagner, P.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show vacancy activation energy. Thermal expansion coefficients as function of temperature are displayed in Fig

419

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

420

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Concentrating Solar Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Resource Maps Concentrating Solar Power Resource Maps These direct-normal solar radiation maps-filtered by solar resource and land availability-identify the most economically suitable lands available for deploying of large-scale concentrating solar power plants in the southwestern United States. Each of the following seven states, as well as the southwestern U.S. region, has two maps: the left and right maps represent analyses excluding land with slopes >1% and >3%, respectively. Lower-resolution jpg versions are available below; much higher-resolution pdf files, suitable for plotting large-scale posters, can be requested. You can also access an unfiltered direct-normal solar radiation map of the southwestern United States. Download Adobe Reader. Southwestern U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems August 20, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other...

423

Survey of solar thermal test facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

Masterson, K.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Dynamic Thermal Management for High-Performance Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal-aware design of disk drives is important because high temperatures can cause reliability problems. Dynamic Thermal Management (DTM) techniques have been proposed to operate the disk at the average case temperature, rather than at the worse case by modulating the activities to avoid thermal emergencies. The thermal emergencies can be caused by unexpected events, such as fan-breaks, increased inlet air temperature, etc. One of the DTM techniques is a delay-based approach that adjusts the disk seek activities, cooling down the disk drives. Even if such a DTM approach could overcome thermal emergencies without stopping disk activity, it suffers from long delays when servicing the requests. Thus, in this chapter, we investigate the possibility of using a multispeed disk-drive (called dynamic rotations per minute (DRPM)) that dynamically modulates the rotational speed of the platter for implementing the DTM technique. Using a detailed performance and thermal simulator of a storage system, we evaluate two possible DTM policies (- time-based and watermark-based) with a DRPM disk-drive and observe that dynamic RPM modulation is effective in avoiding thermal emergencies. However, we find that the time taken to transition between different rotational speeds of the disk is critical for the effectiveness of the DRPM based DTM techniques.

Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gurumurthi, Dr Sudhanva [University of Virginia; Sivasubramaniam, Anand [Pennsylvania State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

THERMAL INSULATION MATERIALS TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 01/W01 CAN/CGSB-51.2-M88 Thermal Insulation, Calcium Silicate, for Piping, Machinery and Boilers _____ ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NVLAP Thermal Insulation Materials LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for thermal insulation materials. The final report for Round 31 was released in February 2010. Proficiency testing is on hold ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

430

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating Solar Power Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating...

431

Holographic Thermal Helicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal helicity, defined in arXiv:1211.3850, of a conformal field theory with anomalies in the context of AdS$_{2n+1}$/CFT$_{2n}$. To do so, we consider large charged rotating AdS black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant using fluid/gravity expansion. We compute the anomaly-induced current and stress tensor of the dual CFT in leading order of the fluid/gravity derivative expansion and show their agreement with the field theoretical replacement rule for the thermal helicity. Such replacement rule is reflected in the bulk by new replacement rules obeyed by the Hall currents around the black hole.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; R. Loganayagam; Gim Seng Ng; Maria J. Rodriguez

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

436

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

437

Concentrating Solar Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating Solar Power Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis Text Version This solar concentrator has a fixed-focus faceted dish with a concentration of...

438

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphenes thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

Ghosh, Suchismita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

448

Solar Tracing Sensors for Maximum Solar Concentrator ...  

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) relies on thermodynamic processes to convert concentrated light into useful forms of energy. Accurate sun tracking ...

449

Maximally concentrating optics for photovoltaic solar energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of a two-stage concentrator with a fresnel lens primary and a nonimaging dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary, has unique advantages for photovoltaic concentration. Some preliminary ray trace studies have shown that with planar lenses, an increase in angular acceptance for a given geometric concentration to about 2/3 of the maximum theoretical limit can be achieved. To demonstrate this, two preprototype concentrators, each having a geometric concentration of 248:1 for a 0.635cm (0.25 inch) diameter cell, have been designed, built, and tested. Measurements of the angular response show an acceptance of 8[degrees] (full angle) which is drastically better than the 1[degrees]--2[degrees] achievable without a secondary, and is in excellent agreement with the ray trace predictions. For these preprototypes, passive cooling was sufficient to prevent any thermal problems for both the cell and secondary. No problems associated with nouuniform cell illumination were found, as evidenced by the fill factor of 71%--73% measured under concentration. Initial measurements of the system electrical efficiency lie in the range 7.5%--9.9% for a variety of individual cells.

O'Gallagher, J.J.

1985-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Effect of variation of angle of inclination on the performance of low-concentration-ratio compound parabolic concentrating solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

Thermal heat transfer in line-axis, symmetric, compound parabolic concentrating solar energy collectors (CPCs) has been investigated and a theoretical numerical model has been developed. The model allows the effect of the angle of axial inclination of an east-west aligned CPC and hence the effect of the latitudinal and tracking configuration of the CPC system on performance to be determined. The internal and external convective heat transfer correlations employed are angular dependent. The variation of convective, radiative, conductive and overall heat transfer coefficients and system efficiency for a range of angular inclinations, concentration ratios, total insolations and beam to diffuse insolation factors are presented graphically. The results demonstrate that there is a 10% variation in convective heat transfer with angle of inclination for low concentration CPCs (i.e. C=1.5). 13 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

A.F. Kothdiwala; Norton, B.; Eames, P.C. [Univ. of Ulster, Antrim (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Progress in solar thermal distributed receiver technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author reports the status of research on distributed receivers, which are solar thermal collectors which concentrate sunlight on an absorber and do not employ the central receiver concept. Point-focusing collectors such as the parabolic dish, line-focusing collectors such as the parabolic trough, and the fixed-mirror distributed-focus of hemispheric bowl collectors are the most common receivers. Following an overview of fundamental principals, there is a description of several installations and of the organic Rankine Cycle engine and the Solarized Automotive Gas Turbine projects. Future development will explore other types of power cycles, new materials, and other components and designs. 5 references, 6 figures.

Leonard, J.A.; Otts, J.V.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electronic, Thermal and Structural Properties of Graphene Oxide Frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a theoretical study of the electronic, thermal, and structural properties of a series of graphene oxide frameworks (GOFs) using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The molecular structure of GOFs is systematically studied by varying the nature and concentration of linear boronic acid pillars and the thermal stability is assessed using ab initio molecular dynamics. The results demonstrate that GOFs are thermally stable up to 550 K and that electronic properties, such as their band gap, can be modified controllably by an appropriate choice of pillaring unit and pillar concentration. The tunability of the electronic structure using non-chemical means, e.g., mechanical strain, is also quantified. Overall, this class of materials is predicted to offer highly tunable materials electronic properties ranging from metallic to semiconducting.

Zhu, Pan [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, V. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Concentrating solar collector: technical note  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acurex Model 3002 concentrator is a reflecting parabolic trough collector designed to heat liquids or gases to temperatures between 140/sup 0/F and 350/sup 0/F. The cost effectiveness, performance, reliability, and technical description of the collector are presented.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Modeling the solar thermal receiver for the CSPonD Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective was to create an accurate steady state thermal model of a molten salt receiver prototype with a horizontal divider plate in the molten salt for Concentrated Solar Power on Demand (CSPonD). The purpose of the ...

Rees, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Anne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Safety-Basis Thermal Analysis for KE Basin Sludge Transport and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of safety-basis thermal and gas generation analyses were completed and independently reviewed to assess the thermal performance of a large diameter container (LDC) containing KE Basin sludge. The results demonstrate: (1) the sludge transport system (STS) containing a LDC can safely transport a KE basin sludge payload up to 2.0 m{sup 3} and, (2) large diameter containers with sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3} can be safely stored in a process cell at T Plant. The transport and storage analyses are based on a conservative set of assumptions, including limiting environmental conditions. Conclusions drawn from the transport and storage results were not impacted by changes in the radial gap between the cask and LDC, purge gas (i.e., either helium or nitrogen), sludge porosity, or thermal conductivity. The design of the transport cask and large diameter container can accommodate reasonable changes in these values. Both transport from KE Basin and long-term storage at T Plant are addressed for sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3}. Additional analyses determined the expected range of T Plant environmental temperatures, the hydrogen and oxygen generation rate due to the radiolysis of water, and the maximum hydrogen concentration within a process cell due to chemical reactions and the radiolysis of water. All sludge temperature and hydrogen concentration criteria for transport and storage are met. The analyses assumed a safety-basis sludge mixture defined as 60% by volume floor and 40% by volume canister sludge with 35% retained gas, and a conservative segregated (axial) distribution of metallic uranium (resulting from particulate settling) with associated safety-basis properties. The analyses recognized that the retrieval process would produce non-uniform sludge distributions. Four batch process loadings of 0.5m{sup 3} each are assumed. Each process batch loading will settle and segregate (separate) into two layers: an active layer containing all the metallic uranium which is chemically active, and a non-active layer containing uranium oxide, non-uranium material, and no metallic uranium. This is a conservative representation of operational controls designed to limit the metallic uranium concentration. The sludge layers are assumed to remain intact during transport and storage.

HEARD, F.J.; SATHYANARAYANA, J.J.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And Thermal Erosion At Perseverance, Western Australia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We have applied a thermal-fluid dynamic-geochemical model to investigate the emplacement and erosional potential of Archean komatiite flows at Perseverance, Western Australia. Perseverance has been proposed as a site of large-scale thermal erosion by large-volume komatiite eruption(s), resulting in a 100-150-m-deep lava channel containing one of the world's largest komatiite-hosted Fe-Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide deposits. Using

459

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Watson Published: Proceedings of the ninth international symposium on remote sensing of environment, April 15-19, p. 1919-1932., 1974 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Reconnaissance_From_Quantitative_Analysis_Of_Thermal_Infrared_Imagery&oldid=387504" Category:

460

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either constructing thermal storage or using it on a day-by-day basis. This presentation will discuss three technologies for thermal storage systems noting the particular advantages of each. Thermal storage technologies are selected by the temperature range of the storage media. This is not a design-oriented presentation, but an overview of what one utility sees taking place in the commercial and industrial refrigeration market place.

Knipp, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active thermal concentrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geothermal Exploration In Akutan, Alaska, Using Multitemporal Thermal Infrared Images Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Akutan geothermal system, which is a part of Alaska's Aleutian volcanic arc, has several known thermal springs and a known fumarole field. It is reported to be one of the few high-grade geothermal resources in Alaska with a potential for further development as a geothermal energy resource. However, there is paucity of data and limited understanding and characterization of this system for optimal resource development. We used cloud-free summer-time thermal infrared (TIR) images

462

64 kW concentrator Photovoltaics Application Test Center. Volume. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kaman Sciences Corporation has designed a 64 kW Concentrating Photovoltaic Applications Test Center (APTEC). The APTEC employs a combined concentrating photovoltaic array in a total energy system application for load sharing the electric and thermal demands of a large computer center with the interfaced electric and natural gas utility. The photovoltaic array is composed of two-axis tracking heliostats of Fresnel lens concentrating, silicon solar cell modules. The modules are cooled with a fluid which transfers heat to a ground coupled heat sink/storage unit for subsequent use in meeting the computer center's thermal load demand. The combined photovoltaic power system shares basic components - a power conditioning unit, batteries and thermal conditioning equipment - with the electric and natural gas utility service, improving the computer center's operating availability time and displacing a portion of the fossil fuel required to power the computer center with solar energy. The detailed system design is reported.

Jardine, D.M.; Jones, D.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Technical Research of Thermal Adjusting in Pulverizing System Intermediate Storage Bunker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the temperature change effect of the primary air and powder mixture in storage-type milling system, it is difficult to obtain accurate results of the direct measurement of the primary wind speed, resulting in this type of boiler system, the thermal ... Keywords: pulverizing system intermediate storage bunker, thermal adjustment, coal concentration, heat balance

Zhenning Zhao; Yaqin Ge; Hongwei Chen; Ying Zhang; Tao Sun; Xiao Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove density differences produced using the varying salt concentrations in a water tank. The flow to visualise #12;Modelling the Convective Flow in Solar Thermal Receivers Yeh the flow outside the cavity mouth

465

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program...........................................................................................................................11 #12;Table of Contents California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook ii 2.5 Surface

468

Thermal vacancies in close-packing solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on Stillinger's version of cell cluster theory, we derive an expression for the equilibrium concentration of thermal monovacancies in solids which allows for a transparent interpretation of the vacancy volume and the energetic/entropic part in the corresponding Gibbs energy of vacancy formation $\\Delta G_{\\rm v}$. For the close--packing crystals of the hard sphere and Lennard--Jones model systems very good agreement with simulation data is found. Application to metals through the embedded--atom method (EAM) reveals a strong sensitivity of the variation of $\\Delta G_{\\rm v}$ with temperature to details of the EAM potential. Our truncation of the cell cluster series allows for an approximate, but direct measurement of crystal free energies and vacancy concentration in colloidal model systems using laser tweezers.

Mostafa Mortazavifar; Martin Oettel

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

MARUSICH, R.M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Application Of Airborne Thermal Infrared Imagery To Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Burlington Northern (BN) conducted TIR surveys using a fixed wing aircraft over 17 different geothermal prospects in Washington, Montana and Wyoming because of this remote sensing tool's ability to detect variations in the heat emitted from the earth's surface. The surveys were flown at an average elevation of 5000 ft. above the ground surface which gave a spatial resolution of approximately 7 feet diameter. BN found thermal activity which had not been recognized previously in some prospects (e.g., Lester,

471

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Assessment of methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess methods for hydrogen production using concentrated solar energy. The results of this work can be used to guide future work in the application of concentrated solar energy to hydrogen production. Specifically, the objectives were to: (1) determine the cost of hydrogen produced from methods that use concentrated solar thermal energy, (2) compare these costs to those of hydrogen produced by electrolysis using photovoltaics and wind energy as the electricity source. This project had the following scope of work: (1) perform cost analysis on ambient temperature electrolysis using the 10 MWe dish-Stirling and 200 MWe power tower technologies; for each technology, sue two cases for projected costs, years 2010 and 2020 the dish-Stirling system, years 2010 and 2020 for the power tower, (2) perform cost analysis on high temperature electrolysis using the 200 MWe power tower technology and projected costs for the year 2020, and (3) identify and describe the key technical issues for high temperature thermal dissociation and the thermochemical cycles.

Glatzmaier, G. [Peak Design, Evergreen, CO (United States); Blake, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Showalter, S. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Thermal transient anemometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Multispectral thermal imaging  

SciTech Connect

Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Corp., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Kay, R.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Monitoring Systems and Technology Center

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing materials that can conduct electricity easily, but block the motion of phonons is necessary in the applications of thermoelectric devices, which can generate electricity from temperature differences. In converse, a key requirement as chips get faster is to obtain better ways to dissipate heat. Controlling heat transfer in these crystalline materials devices such as silicon is important. The heat is actually the motion or vibrat