National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for active sensors parent

  1. Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Chapter 6 Microwave Sensors ­ Active and Passive David G. Long Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Brigham Young University Center for Remote Sensing 459 Clyde Building, Provo, UT 84602, long be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight

  2. Radiation interchange modeling for active infrared proximity sensor design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, James Clarice

    1999-01-01

    . This research focuses on information gathered using active optical proximity sensors in the reflectance sensing mode. The portion of energy reflected to a given sensor in combination with the known location of the source and sensor elements provide the basic...

  3. Management of Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks Utilizing Multi-Parent Recursive Area Hierarchies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Delgado-Frias, Jose

    2013-04-19

    Autonomously configuring and self-healing a largescale wireless sensor network requires a light-weight maintenance protocol that is scalable. Further, in a battery powered wireless sensor network duty-cycling a node’s radio can reduce the power consumption of a device and extend the lifetime of a network. With duty-cycled nodes the power consumption of a node’s radio depends on the amount of communication is must perform and by reducing the communication the power consumption can also be reduced. Multi-parent hierarchies can be used to reduce the communication cost when constructing a recursive area clustering hierarchy when compared to singleparent solutions that utilize inefficient communication methods such as flooding and information propagation via single-hop broadcasts. The multi-parent hierarchies remain scalable and provides a level of redundancy for the hierarchy.

  4. Rechargeable Sensor Activation under Temporally Correlated Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Koushik

    -surveilled regions. For long term monitoring of such environments, sensors can be deployed with rechargeable their occurrences. Typically, sensors are heavily constrained in terms of energy, and thus energy usage optimally only if events are uncorrelated. Index Terms Rechargeable Sensors, Temporal Correlations, Node

  5. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17

    balance between sensing costs and performance. Inspired from the history of active sensing, in this dissertation, we developed active sensing algorithms that address three different computational problems in chemical sensing. First, we consider...

  6. Creating 35 mm Camera Active Pixel Sensors by Glenn Chapman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    #12;Creating 35 mm Camera Active Pixel Sensors by Glenn Chapman* and Yves Audet** * Simon Fraser Pixel Sensor imaging area device is studied which would be ideal for use with standard 35 mm cameras.5 per sq. cm. By being a retrofit for current 35 mm cameras, and having larger photodiode pixels than

  7. Active pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Matthew (Matthew L.)

    2005-01-01

    An active pixel sensor array, APS-1, has been fabricated for the purpose of scientific x-ray detection. This thesis presents the results of testing the device. Alternate design architectures are explored. Recommendations ...

  8. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING: structural health monitoring (SHM), piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), nondestructive evaluation (NDE sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for structural health monitoring (SHM). After

  9. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  10. Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology in intact adult fruit flies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Gilles

    Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology. However, the interpretation of images of brain activity produced using such sensors is not straightforward. Several recent studies of sensory coding used G-CaMP 1.3--a calcium sensor--as an indicator of neural

  11. Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring** V class of structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper presents and discusses with conclusions and suggestions for further work. Key Words: structural health monitoring, piezoelectric, sensors

  12. Activity recognition with end-user sensor installation in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockinson, Randy Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a system for recognizing activities in the home setting that uses a set of small and simple state-change sensors, machine learning algorithms, and electronic experience sampling is introduced. The sensors are ...

  13. Clustering-based Active Learning on Sensor Type Classification in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weimer, Westley

    study on metadata collected from over 20 different sensor types and 2,500 sen- sor streams in threeClustering-based Active Learning on Sensor Type Classification in Buildings Dezhi Hong, Hongning- lenge. Based on the large deployment of sensors in modern commercial buildings, many organizations

  14. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  15. An Activity-Based Sensor Networks Course for Undergraduates with Sun SPOT Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Nirupama

    An Activity-Based Sensor Networks Course for Undergraduates with Sun SPOT Devices Damon Tyman that had previously been entirely lecture-based. For the laboratory exercises, we utilized Sun's Java-programmable Sun SPOT [7] sensor network technology. We found the Sun SPOT based laboratory activities to be quite

  16. Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors predictive modeling and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors ­ predictive modeling of the state of the art in structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and follows with conclusions and suggestions for further work Key Words: structural health monitoring, SHM, nondestructive

  17. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Terzo; A. Macchiolo; R. Nisius; B. Paschen

    2014-11-20

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of $1.4\\times10^{16}n_{eq}/cm^{2}$.

  18. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    -run perturbations are presented. Index Terms--Error suppression, microelectromechanical sys- tems (MEMS), rate integrating gyroscopes, smart MEMS. I. INTRODUCTION AS MICROELECTROMECHANICAL systems (MEMS) inertial sensorsIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

  19. Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring with Coupled-Filed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring) is emerging as an effective and powerful technique in structural health monitoring (SHM). Modeling to analytical calculation and experimental data. Key words: Structural Health Monitoring, PWAS, finite element

  20. Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications Adrian detection and structural health monitoring. Where appropriate, comparison between different methods-coupling coefficient I. Introduction STRUCTURAL health monitoring (SHM) is an emerging research area with multiple

  1. Characterization of Three-Dimensional-Integrated Active Pixel Sensor for X-Ray Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bautz, Marshall W.

    We have developed a back-illuminated active pixel sensor (APS) which includes an SOI readout circuit and a silicon diode detector array implemented in a separate high-resistivity wafer. Both are connected together using a ...

  2. Scheduling Sensor Activity for Point Information Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Vikram

    , to monitor some targets of interests at all times. Sensors are often equipped with non-rechargeable batteries such that all targets can be monitored all the time and the network can operate as long as possible. A solution network is the coverage problem [2], which addresses how well a target area is monitored. In some

  3. Rail Sensor Testbed Program: Active Agents in Containers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . Project Sponsor: Office of Naval Research Contract: N00014-07-1-1042 The University of Kansas Technical of the project, we have developed several data mining algorithms to enable intelligent agents to detect changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4. Data Mining Foundation of Anomaly Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks 10 4.1. Network

  4. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secrest, Laura A

    2001-01-01

    , activities and peer group, whereas the second (Supervision) represents parent behaviors/practices that interfere with parents' ability to obtain knowledge about where their child is and what he/she is doing. Results of this study were not consistent...

  5. An Experiment in Hierarchical Recognition of Group Activities using Wearable Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    /office setting. One node was connected to a smart-phone using a USB adapter and acted as a bridge between the WSN equipped with 3D acceleration sensors were attached to coffee mugs (Smart Mugs) in a university and the smart-phone. The nodes sampled activity and context data at the mugs, processed this data to the d

  6. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  7. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b) the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance

  8. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR the onset and progress of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b

  9. Tuned Lamb Wave Excitation and Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    and detect tuned Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is explored. First, a brief review of Lamb waves mode Lamb waves is demonstrated as an effective structural health monitoring method. Key Words: structural health monitoring, Lamb waves, piezoelectric wafer active sensors, aging aircraft, cracks, damage

  10. Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    41 Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring ends with a conceptual design of a structural health monitoring system and suggestions for aging damage detection Á structural health monitoring Á failure prevention Á ultrasonics Á pulse-echo Á emitter

  11. SPATIO-TEMPORAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROSOLS THROUGH ACTIVE USE OF DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    climate change related studies. In recent years remote sensing instruments of various properties have been. Aerosol concentration and chemical properties are important parameters in climate change modelsSPATIO-TEMPORAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROSOLS THROUGH ACTIVE USE OF DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS Z

  12. BodyScope: A Wearable Acoustic Sensor for Activity Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    , speaking, laughing, and coughing. The F-measure of the Support Vector Machine classification of 12 of activities (e.g., eating, drinking, speaking, laughing and coughing) with BodyScope reveals that the system

  13. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, T.V.

    1996-06-11

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate there through to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex. 23 figs.

  14. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Tuan V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

  15. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar BoundaryLayer Flow --Part II: Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary­Layer Flow -- Part II: Use of Sensors growth and stabilize the instabilities within the laminar boundary layer. This scenario is shown in Fig

  16. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hi Gyu

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor ...

  17. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  18. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Rymaszewski; Marlon Barbero; Patrick Breugnon; Stépahnie Godiot; Laura Gonella; Tomasz Hemperek; Toko Hirono; Fabian Hügging; Hans Krüger; Jian Liu; Patrick Pangaud; Ivan Peric; Alexandre Rozanov; Anqing Wang; Norbert Wermes

    2016-01-04

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  19. Parent Involvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    To be successful, a 4-H program must have parent involvement. Although 4-H leaders and Extension agents may interest young people in becoming members, they need the parents' goodwill and support to keep them interested, ...

  20. Application of piezoelectric active-sensors for SHM of wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-04

    The goal of this study is to characterize the dynamic response of a CX-100 wind blade and the design parameters of SHM techniques as they apply to wind turbine blades, and to investigate the performance of high-frequency active-sensing SHM techniques, including lamb wave and frequency response functions, as a way to monitor the health of a wind turbine blade. The results of the dynamic characterization will be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. The focus of SHM study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage, with a special consideration given to field deployability. For experiments, a 9-m CX-100 blade was used. Overall, the methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of 9-m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active-sensors.

  1. A Monolithic active pixel sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180nm HV-SOI process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Hemperek; Tetsuichi Kishishita; Hans Krüger; Norbert Wermes

    2015-02-23

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffer from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry witch mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples.

  2. iCalm: Wearable Sensor and Network Architecture for Wirelessly Communicating and Logging Autonomic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Kelly

    Widespread use of affective sensing in healthcare applications has been limited due to several practical factors, such as lack of comfortable wearable sensors, lack of wireless standards, and lack of low-power affordable ...

  3. Activity recognition in the home setting using simple and ubiquitous sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munguia Tapia, Emmanuel, 1978-

    2003-01-01

    During the past several years, researchers have demonstrated that when new wireless sensors are placed in the home environment, data collected from them can be used by software to automatically infer context, such as the ...

  4. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  5. Active time scheduling for rechargeable sensor networks Volodymyr Pryyma, Damla Turgut and Ladislau Boloni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    a significant performance advantage. Key words: rechargeable, energy harvesting, sensor network 1. Introduction that energy is acquired through a solar cell, thus it is dependent on the weather (more exactly, the available, FL 32816­2362 Email: vpryyma,turgut,lboloni@eecs.ucf.edu Abstract Recent progress in energy

  6. Making Sensor Networks Accessible to Undergraduates Through Activity-Based Laboratory Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Nirupama

    used the SunSPOT devices [1] which have been made publicly available by Sun Microsystems since April 2007. SunSPOTs are programmed in Java, relieving the necessity of students having to learn Tiny for a concentration on sensor network concepts such as localization, wireless communication, and power management

  7. Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    technique for structural health monitoring. The E/M impedance method utilizes as its main apparatus Fourier Transform, PWAS, impedance analyzer 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a method International Symposium on NDE for Health Monitoring and Diagnostics, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies

  8. Nanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    efficiently convert the vortex motion in the atmosphere into electricity. Based on the Karman vortex street in wireless environmental monitoring networks. 1. Introduction Self-powered nanosystem is a promising concept for the realization of environmental wireless sensor networks. Due to the enormous demands of distributed nodes

  9. Advanced Detector Research - Fabrication and Testing of 3D Active-Edge Silicon Sensors: High Speed, High Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Sherwood I

    2008-09-01

    Development of 3D silicon radiation sensors employing electrodes fabricated perpendicular to the sensor surfaces to improve fabrication yields and increasing pulse speeds.

  10. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  11. Measurements on HV-CMOS Active Sensors After Irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ristic; for the ATLAS CMOS pixel collaboration

    2015-01-13

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to $2\\cdot10^{16}\\,\\text{n}_\\text{eq}\\text{cm}^{-2}$ are presented.

  12. MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE and the research needs are also discussed. INTRODUCTION Structural Health Monitoring is a major component of the remaining structural life. For the health monitoring of an actual structure, networks of embedded active

  13. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.B. Thien

    2006-03-01

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage to the actual pipeline itself, the proposed methods were used to demonstrate the capability of detecting deposits inside of pipelines. Monitoring these deposits can prevent clogging and other hazardous situations. Finally, suggestions are made regarding future research issues which are needed to advance this research. Because the research of this thesis has only demonstrated the feasibility of the techniques for such a SHM system, these issues require attention before any commercial applications can be realized.

  14. BScope: A Scalable, Run-Time Architecture for Activity Recognition Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teixeira, Thiago

    be con- nected together into hierarchies to provide even more com- plex interpretations. The power are used to generate summaries of daily activities and to trigger various levels of alarms as well as cell-phone

  15. Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, Adam Ian

    2005-01-01

    The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

  16. CMOS Photodiodes with Substrate Openings for Higher Conversion Gain in Active Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    . Lee, R. I. Hornsey Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario by a source-follower; the capacitance of the device determines the conversion gain. In the case of CMOS active

  17. A Reconfigurable Active Retrodirective/Direct Conversion Receiver Array for Wireless Sensor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    of California, Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract -- A reconfigurable active time. In a retrodirective system, the communication link between the transponder and base station can (a), the array system works as a direct conversion receiver and stores data received from remote

  18. Revealing Protocol Information and Activity from Energy Instrumentation in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnawali, Omprakash

    of features based on various aspects of energy data and use those features to classify and reveal network based on energy data by doing extensive experiments on three WSN testbeds. Our results from analyzing four-million energy data and ra- dio activity points, indicate that energy instrumentation

  19. Are Wireless Sensors and Controls Ready for the Building Automation Industry? Selected Case Studies and Technology Development Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Brambley, Michael R.

    2006-09-13

    This paper discusses whether or not today’s wireless sensors are ready for building controls and energy efficiency monitoring applications.

  20. Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal, node energy, etc), the collected data are transmitted to their final destination, usually a fusion

  1. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Parents Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    2014 SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Parents Handbook #12;Featuring the sounds of rock, country, electronic or daughter encounters at college. The Parents Handbook is designed to address your questions about a broad

  2. Energy-Efficient Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardei, Mihaela

    successively. Only the sensors from the current active set are responsible for monitoring all targets

  3. Advanced sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-08-01

    This article examines how advances in sensor technology are beginning to close the gap with advances in other parts of the control and sensing loops; these advances are needed to more easily meet new EPA regulations and demand for more efficient power plant operation. Topics of the article include fiberoptic sensors, sensors for the air side of the plant, and water side sensors.

  4. Current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-01-16

    A current sensor is described that uses a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The sensor can be hinged to allow clamping to a conductor. The current sensor provides high measurement accuracy for both DC and AC currents, and is substantially immune to the effects of temperature, conductor position, nearby current carrying conductors and aging.

  5. Fusion of Electromyographic Signals with Proprioceptive Sensor Data in Myoelectric Pattern Recognition for Control of Active Transfemoral Leg Prostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    Fusion of Electromyographic Signals with Proprioceptive Sensor Data in Myoelectric Pattern on electromyographic data. The use of surface electromyographic signals and additional information related Nknj ekX N nc (1) Assuming that electromyographic signals can be approximated by a normal distribution

  6. Vibration detection in turbomachinery using non-contacting sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Eric D., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments have seen the introduction of multiple Eddy Current Sensors (ECS) into turbomachinery. These sensors employ an active magnetic field to monitor each blade as it passes the sensor. They generate an ...

  7. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  8. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  9. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  10. Effect of parental health beliefs and related dietary factors on adolescent health beliefs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhavan, Meera

    1998-01-01

    Adolescent health beliefs of 54 adolescents residing phics. in Texas were compared with their parental health beliefs, parenting style, maternal diet related activities and eating habits, to determine their influence on ...

  11. With the development of the MEMS technology and of wireless networking, the sensor network area has been an active field of research in the last five years. Sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the sensor networks is energy as the nodes are powered with non renewable batteries, and numerous techniques, Anna, Anja og Troels who have given me the motivation to complete the project. I also thank my friends.4 Motivation for Sensor N

  12. Child Development Center Parent Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Child Development Center Parent Handbook 2013-2014 #12;Parent Handbook September 2013 2 Table and SAFETY Emergency Treatment #12;Parent Handbook September 2013 3 Health Information Minor Injuries Dress the Program Confidentiality Child Abuse and Neglect SIGNATURE PAGE #12;Parent Handbook September 2013 4

  13. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  14. Annotating Smart Environment Sensor Data for Activity Learning S. Szewcyzk, K. Dwan, B. Minor, B.Swedlove, and D. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative

  15. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation

  16. Growth & Development / Parental Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg independently #12;Skeletal muscle (primarily leg and pectoral muscles) is mean source of heat #12;Energy largest mouth & loudest cries gets the most food Food delivery rates range from food every other day (or

  17. Brothers, Sisters and Aging Parents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isbell, Lou

    1999-09-02

    Adult children play a crucial role in helping aging parents. When relationships with siblings are poor, everyone suffers. Brothers and sisters can build strong relationships and unite in caring for elderly parents when they learn to relate to each...

  18. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    analysis activities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis activities. No abstract prepared. Authors:...

  19. Energize Our Families Parent Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Energize Our Families Parent Program A Leader's Guide #12;The National Heart, Lung, and Blood in compliance with these laws and Executive Orders. #12;Energize Our Families Parent Program A Leader's Guide #12;Table of Contents We Can! Energize Our Families: Parent Program INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

  20. Predictable and Controllable Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    .roedig|c.sreenan}@cs.ucc.ie Abstract: Research activity in the area of wireless sensor networks has grown dramatically in the past few and reliability, raising concerns over their use in scenarios like mission critical production environments on Wireless Sensor Networks [1]. The volume of activity is further illustrated by recent IEEE magazines

  1. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Jarman, Kristin K. (Richland, WA); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  2. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Jarman, Kristin K. (Richland, WA); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  3. Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems with regard to successfully implementing Structural Health Monitoring technologies in Air Force systems sensor system design and packaging. Keywords: Structural Health Monitoring, Piezo Wafer Active Sensors

  4. A Multi-site Evaluation of Parent to Parent Programs for Parents of Children with Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, George H. S.; Marquis, Janet; Powers, Laurie K.; Blanchard, Lynn; DiVenere, Nancy; Santelli, Betsy; Ainbinder, Judith G.; Sharp, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .7% $35,000-$50,000 13.0% 17.1% $50,000-$75,000 9.3% 11.4% >$75,000 7.4% 5.7% Note. Age is reported in years. All parent participants were mothers except for one father in the intervention group. Design Quantitative study. The quantitative portion... with this specific population of parents who seek Parent to Parent help. Empowerment. The Family Empowerment Scale (Koren, DeChillo, & Friesen, 1992) was used to assess perceived changes in parent's sense of being empowered. It consists of three subscales...

  5. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  6. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  7. Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    of heterogeneous physical sensors. For example, on an intelligent construction site, users may desire the cranesVirtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2006-001 Sanem Kabadayi Adam Pridgen Christine Julien © Copyright 2006 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Virtual Sensors

  8. Building Adaptable Sensor Networks with Sensor Cubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, George

    (battery voltage, charge/discharge current, input power, ...) Wireless link: · To nearby sensor modules of autonomous wireless sensor module Alternative hardware implementation using solder ball interconnect technology Wireless sensor module on 2 EUR coin Sensor module hardware Wide application range requires

  9. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  10. Dear Parent or Guardian,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design of anFletcherParent or

  11. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  12. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  13. Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group This is an eight-week parent group series starting Monday, January 12, 2015 Future parent group sessions to be held: January 26 (no group 19th ) February 2, 9 and 23 (no group 16th ) and March 2, 9 and 16 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Room 145 of the Clinical Services

  14. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  15. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  16. Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful SmartAcomita Lake,

  17. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5?lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5?lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52?mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V?s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup ?13} A) and OPD (<10{sup ?8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75??m pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ?10?lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50??m. Moreover, the detector entrance exposure per projection can be reduced from 1 to 0.3 mR without a significant reduction of DQE. The signal-to-noise ratio of the a-IGZO APS imager under 0.3 mR x-ray exposure is comparable to that of a-Si:H passive pixel sensor imager under 1 mR, indicating good image quality under low dose. A threefold reduction of current tomosynthesis dose is expected if proposed technology is combined with an advanced DBT image reconstruction method. Conclusions: The proposed a-IGZO APS x-ray imager with a pixel pitch <75??m is capable to achieve a high spatial frequency (>6.67 lp/mm) and a low dose (<0.4 mGy) in next generation DBT systems.

  18. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer to monitor the consump- tion of energy in wireless sensor networks based on video streams com- posed from energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-03-28

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  1. Influenza sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-30

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  2. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-05-17

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  3. Dynamic sensor tasking in heterogeneous, mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter B. (Peter B.), S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Modern sensor environments often attempt to combine several sensors into a single sensor network. The nodes of this network are generally heterogeneous and may vary with respect to sensor complexity, sensor operational ...

  4. Duty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    active and dormant states, so as to conserve energy and extend the network lifetime. Unfortunately fails to capture the uniqueness of energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. The sensor nodesDuty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks Feng Wang Jiangchuan Liu School of Computing

  5. Microcantilever sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  6. Nanostructures and Porous Silicon: Activity at Interfaces in Sensors & Photocatalytic Reactors Chui-Lai Cheung, New York University, 2010 SURF Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    was the anode. The current density was kept constant anywhere between 3 mA/cm2 and 50 mA/cm2 for each individual be formed by etching silicon wafers under a constant current density in HF solutions. These silicon­ as efficient gas sensors, for example. Metal particles can be deposited on the increased surface area

  7. Sensors and Actuators B 120 (2006) 2534 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    2006-01-01

    Sensors and Actuators B 120 (2006) 25­34 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors via novel of solid-state ceramic-based chemical sensors. High selectivity, enhanced sensitivity and short response activity of ceramics are largely microstructure-dominated, benign surface features such as small grain size

  8. Configurable dynamic privacy for pervasive sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Nan-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing sensor networks have greatly augmented the functionality of interactive media systems by adding the ability to capture and store activity-related information. Analyzing the information recorded from ...

  9. Three-Dimensional Routing in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    -ASN can perform pollu- tion monitoring (chemical, biological, and nuclear). ¢ Disaster Prevention. Sensor networks that measure seismic activity from remote locations can provide tsunami warnings to coastal areas

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Mian; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-11-01

    This review article provides a comprehensive review on sensors and biosensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  11. Caring for an Elderly Parent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    or contact LifeMatters directly to screen: - Adult day care - Assisted living and nursing homes - Alternatives to nursing home care - Communicating with aging parents - Caring for caregivers - Senior health

  12. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  13. NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook Jolene Wayne Director NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook #12;NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook 2 August 2012 This page left intentionally blank. #12;NIST Child Care Center Parent Handbook 3 August 2012 Contents WELCOME TO THE NIST CHILD CARE CENTER

  14. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01

    Gale et al. (2006) and evaluation of sensor performance byConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systemsConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systems

  15. Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    sensing, composed of 3 MEMS sensors. Angular yaw rate wasIn particular, as the MEMS sensor suppliers release everwhich utilizes miniature MEMS sensor technology. It combines

  16. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  17. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  18. New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

  19. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the last decade there has been significant interest in research to deploy sensor networks. This research is driven by the fact that the costs associated with installing sensor...

  20. Parenting style and older children's and young adolescents' dietary intake and nutritional status 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Mi Jeong

    2007-09-17

    neglected. The present study examined whether perceived parenting style and its dimensions are associated with older children�s/young adolescents� health outcomes, including self-concept, eating behaviors, physical activity behaviors, energy...

  1. ISDSN Sensor System Phase One Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gail Heath

    2011-09-01

    This Phase 1 Test Report documents the test activities and results completed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sensor systems that will be deployed in the meso-scale test bed (MSTB) at Florida International University (FIU), as outlined in the ISDSN-MSTB Test Plan. This report captures the sensor system configuration tested; test parameters, testing procedure, any noted changes from the implementation plan, acquired test data sets, and processed results.

  2. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  4. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  5. OVERVIEW ______ Sensors for Intelligent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    OVERVIEW ______ Sensors for Intelligent Processing of Materials Haydn N.G. Wadley INTRODUCTION A sensor is a device that detects and measures some physical/chemical quantity and outputs and outputs an electrical signal which can be used to characterize the vibration. Numer- ous types of sensors

  6. Image Sensor Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ; #12; #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2

  7. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  8. Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Building BoundariesTM Information for Parents Even very young children can learn some skills of 2 #12;Building BoundariesTM: Information for Parents How to Recognize Warning Signs in Your Child

  9. Clip-on wireless wearable microwave sensor for ambulatory cardiac monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Richard Ribon

    We present a new type of non-contact sensor for use in ambulatory cardiac monitoring. The sensor operation is based on a microwave Doppler technique; however, instead of detecting the heart activity from a distance, the ...

  10. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  11. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  12. Changing dynamics of spontaneous waves during retinal development: a novel panretinal perspective achieved with the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) 4,096 electrodes array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Matthias; Sernagor, Evelyne; Maccione, Alessandro; Gandolfo, Mauro; Eglen, Stephen; Berdondini, Luca

    2010-07-02

    The developing retina exhibits spontaneous waves of activity spreading across the ganglion cell layer. These waves are present only during a limited perinatal period, and they are known to play important roles during the ...

  13. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    of wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Trans- portationof wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Transportationmagnetic sensors for different Intelligent Transportation

  14. INTELLIGENT SENSOR VALIDATION AND SENSOR FUSION FOR RELIABILITY AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 INTELLIGENT SENSOR VALIDATION AND SENSOR FUSION FOR RELIABILITY AND SAFETY ENHANCEMENT IN VEHICLE #12;2 Intelligent Sensor Validation and Sensor Fusion for Reliability and Safety Enhancement acknowledge the help of PATH engineers Pete Devlin, Seibum Choi, and Leon Chen. II. Keywords Sensor Validation

  15. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  16. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  17. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  18. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  19. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA)

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  20. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  1. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  2. Intake Air Oxygen Sensor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ignition can occur at elevated gas temperatures and with aged sensor Next Steps FMEA Study to understand ignition risk for failure modes identified by FMEA Identify...

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  4. SDRT: A Reliable Data Transport Protocol for Underwater Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jun-Hong

    activities such as scientific exploration and commercial exploitation, underwater sensor networks empower us networks, for mission critical applications, reliable data transport is demanded in under- water sensor channels is limited and depends on both transmission range and frequency [8], [24], [5], [6]. According

  5. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01

    Weimar, and H. Ulmer, MEMS Gas-Sensor Array for Monitoringreveal that a MEMS-based infrared sensor is on the horizon (4P Photacoustic Sensor Platform A4.36-37 A4.38 MEMS; 0-100%,

  6. MEMS Resonant Strain Sensor Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    down microelectromechanical MEMS sensors for high-g munitionof making harsh environment MEMS sensors is the ability toG load forces. SiC MEMS sensors and actuators have potential

  7. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  8. Future Flight Hawaii Family Exploration Program "Delightful for elementary students and wonderful for parents of any age." Parent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a variety of training modules with a mission context. Since 1991, over 9000 student and parent participants instructional modules; 3:45-4:00: afternoon mission SUNDAY ­8:30 ­ 9:00 am: crew briefing -9:00 a.m. ­ 12:00 pm: 3 modules ; -12:00-1:15 pm special anniversary lunch and activities; -1:30 ­ 4:00 pm: concluding

  9. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  10. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  11. Hardware Components: Sensors, Actuators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    in an electric field light-electric effects; magnetic effects; ... #12;3 5 Example: Acceleration Sensor MEMS connected to mass change Detect change in resistance and model acceleration iPhones have MEMS accelerometers Microelectromechanical systems (~ 1 to 100 µm) 6 Example: Acceleration Sensor Alternative

  12. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  13. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris B. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  14. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim on implementation and evaluation due to the difficulty of building mobile sensors. In the litera- ture, some--Mobile sensors are useful in many environments because they can move to increase the sensing coverage

  15. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    With the convergence of technologies such as MEMS sensor devices, wireless networking, and low-power em- beddedSensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged

  16. Intelligent Sensor Validation And Sensor Fusion For Reliability And Safety Enhancement In Vehicle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice; Goebel, Kai; Alag, Sanam

    1995-01-01

    A Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Validation, Fusion andA Framework for Intelligent Sensor Validation, SensorA Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion

  17. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  18. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  19. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  20. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  2. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  3. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  4. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  5. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  6. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information.

  7. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  8. Deployment and organization strategies for sampling- interpolation sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaskovitis, Periklis G.

    2009-01-01

    Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks andConference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks andprice: sensor placements ought to be done in an intelligent

  9. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

  10. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  11. Sandia Energy - Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blade Sensors and Instrumentation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Rotor Innovation Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation Rotor Blade Sensors and...

  12. MEMS Aluminum Nitride Technology for Inertial Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigevani, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    1, the growth of angular rate MEMS sensor is a growingdominant market in MEMS inertial sensors - with millions ofsector of the MEMS inertial sensor market. Being able to

  13. Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°, -86.3376761°AnadromousASHRAE Climate

  14. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  15. Energy-Quality Tradeoffs for Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Energy-Quality Tradeoffs for Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks Sundeep Pattem1 , Sameera-of-magnitude energy savings with negligible difference in tracking quality. We then consider duty-cycled activation. In these sensor activation strategies, energy savings come at the expense of a reduction in the quality

  16. Parental Time, Behaviors and Childhood Obesity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuteesa, Annette

    2012-02-14

    The rates of childhood obesity remain high in spite of the enormous efforts dedicated to tackling the disease. This dissertation investigates the effect of two of its causes, including parental time and children's obesity ...

  17. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  18. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  19. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  20. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  1. Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic University of California, Berkeley Sing Yiu Cheung, Sinem Coleri, and Pravin Varaiya 2 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle wireless sensor networks compete? 7 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle

  2. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  3. Piezo-sensor self-diagnostics using electrical impedance measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G. H. (Gyu Hae); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Rutherford, A. C. (Amanda C.); Robertson, A. N. (Amy N.)

    2004-01-01

    This paper present the piezoelectric sensor self-diagnostic procedure that performs in-situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric materials (PZT) used for sensors and actuators in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The use of active-sensing piezoelectric materials has received considerable attention in the SHM community. A critical aspect of the piezoelectric active-sensing technologies is that usually large numbers of distributed sensors and actuators are needed to perform the required monitoring process. The sensor/actuator self-diagnostic procedure, where the sensors/actuators are confirmed to be functioning properly during operation, is therefore a critical component to successfully complete the SHM process and to minimize the false indication regarding the structural health. The basis of this procedure is to track the changes in the capacitive value of piezoelectric materials resulting from the sensor failure, which is manifested in the imaginary part of the measured electrical admittances. Furthermore, through the analytical and experimental investigation, it is confirmed that the bonding layer between the PZT and a host structure significantly contributes to the measured capacitive values. Therefore, by monitoring the imaginary part of the admittances, one can quantitatively assess the degradation of the mechanical/electrical properties of the PZT and its attachment to a host structure. This paper concludes with an experimental example to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sensor-diagnostic procedure.

  4. A Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedo, Kavi K; Mungur, Avinash; Mauritius, University of; Mauritius,; 10.5121/ijwmn.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Sensor networks are currently an active research area mainly due to the potential of their applications. In this paper we investigate the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for air pollution monitoring in Mauritius. With the fast growing industrial activities on the island, the problem of air pollution is becoming a major concern for the health of the population. We proposed an innovative system named Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System (WAPMS) to monitor air pollution in Mauritius through the use of wireless sensors deployed in huge numbers around the island. The proposed system makes use of an Air Quality Index (AQI) which is presently not available in Mauritius. In order to improve the efficiency of WAPMS, we have designed and implemented a new data aggregation algorithm named Recursive Converging Quartiles (RCQ). The algorithm is used to merge data to eliminate duplicates, filter out invalid readings and summarise them into a simpler form which significantly reduce the amount of dat...

  5. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  6. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  7. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of thePrograms:ModeRobotics:Robotics:Sensors Sensors

  10. Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

    2012-01-01

    GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

  11. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  12. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  13. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01

    because the film takes on SddFticardL water arrd swells beyond its nannal mmp. 'Ihen, the dawn me has gmater -is than mnnal, altlwkqh the sensor recwers its initial values after a short tine at 1- hrnaidity levels. The mqcmse me is eharn in Fig. 5...

  14. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  15. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  16. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  17. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  18. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  19. Composite sensor membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  20. Miniaturized wireless sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecointre, Aubin; Dubuc, David; Katia, Grenier; Patrick, Pons; Aubert, Hervé; Muller, A; Berthou, Pascal; Gayraud, Thierry; Plana, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an overview of the wireless sensor networks. It is shown that MEMS/NEMS technologies and SIP concept are well suited for advanced architectures. It is also shown analog architectures have to be compatible with digital signal techniques to develop smart network of microsystem.

  1. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: ? Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, ? Selects the right sensors for process conditions ? Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and ? Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

  2. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  3. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  4. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A. [Grupo MEMS, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S. [Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Buffa, F. A. [INTEMA Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  5. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  6. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  7. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  8. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  9. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  10. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Wave and Tide Sensor 5218 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ISDBSensorsWave and Tide Sensor 5218 < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company...

  11. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timo Peltola

    2015-03-12

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented.

  12. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  13. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  14. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  15. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  16. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  17. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  18. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  19. A wireless sensor tag platform for container security and integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaya, Ivan A.; Cree, Johnathan V.; Mauss, Fredrick J.

    2011-05-06

    Cargo containers onboard ships are widely used in the global supply chain. The need for container security is evidenced by the Container Security Initiative launched by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). One method of monitoring cargo containers is using low power wireless sensor tags. The wireless sensor tags are used to set up a network that is comprised of tags internal to the container and a central device. The sensor network reports alarms and other anomalies to a central device, which then relays the message to an outside network upon arrival at the destination port. This allows the port authorities to have knowledge of potential security or integrity issues before physically examining the container. Challenges of using wireless sensor tag networks for container security include battery life, size, environmental conditions, information security, and cost among others. PNNL developed an active wireless sensor tag platform capable of reporting data wirelessly to a central node as well as logging data to nonvolatile memory. The tags, operate at 2.4 GHz over an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, and were designed to be distributed throughout the inside of a shipping container in the upper support frame. The tags are mounted in a housing that allows for simple and efficient installation or removal prior to, during, or after shipment. The distributed tags monitor the entire container volume. The sensor tag platform utilizes low power electronics and provides an extensible sensor interface for incorporating a wide range of sensors including chemical, biological, and environmental sensors.

  20. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  1. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  2. U.S. IOOS Regional Association Ocean Acidificiation Monitoring Activities April 2013 update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Activity Funding Source ACT FY12 ­ pH sensor evaluation ACT Fy10 and FY11 ­ pCO2 sensor evaluation ACT and biogeochemical controls on OA. AOOS AOOS contributes funds to a consortium to support maintenance of OA sensors, AOOS funds were used to add OA sensors to an NSF-funded mooring in the Chukchi Sea, enabling

  3. Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    . Dif- ferent from image sensor and sound sensor, MEMS accelerometer sensor can measure some biomedical, Localization of footstep source, MEMS accelerometer, Personal health care, Sensor net- work, Smart home. 1Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured by MEMS

  4. Parenting styles, peer influences, and adolescent cardiovascular disease risk factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tramm, Amy Bishop

    2000-01-01

    Parenting and friendship styles were examined as indicators for obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease in 54 Texas adolescents. This study investigated the relationship between parental and peer influences on obesity ...

  5. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  6. Parenting techniques and parent characteristics associated with child externalizing behavior problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland, Beth Hackethorn

    2009-05-15

    or Mississippi. Results suggested that inconsistent discipline partially mediates the relation between maternal distress and parent reported child hyperactivity and aggression. Inconsistent discipline partially mediates the relation between maternal stress...

  7. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  8. MEMS Resonant Strain Sensor Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    Strap-down microelectromechanical MEMS sensors for high-gdate of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is a bitmicroelectromechanical resonant output gyroscope. MEMS 2002,

  9. SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1 and Rajkumar Buyya2 Keywords: Sensors, Sensor Networks, Grid computing, SensorML, SensorWeb. 1. Introduction Recent advances in electronic circuit miniaturization and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the creation

  10. Exploring LoadBalance to Dispatch Mobile Sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    ­sensing MEMS and wireless com­ munication technologies have promoted the development of wireless sensorExploring Load­Balance to Dispatch Mobile Sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks You­Chiun Wang, Wen, a hybrid sensor network consisting of static and mobile sensors is considered, where static sensors

  11. Sensors and Actuators A 137 (2007) 147156 A single inputsingle output mass sensor based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    reserved. Keywords: MEMS; Resonant sensor; Chemical and biological sensors; Mass sensor; Localization the inherent advantages MEMS-based sensor plat- forms have over their macroscale counterparts, namelySensors and Actuators A 137 (2007) 147­156 A single input­single output mass sensor based

  12. Trading Computation & Precision for Energy in Wireless Sensor Networks with Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    Trading Computation & Precision for Energy in Wireless Sensor Networks with Applications, and how we affect our environment. The limited energy of those sensors poses the challenge of using such systems in an energy efficient man- ner to perform various activities. In many of these activi- ties

  13. Joint Charging and Rate Allocation for Utility Maximization in Sustainable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Daji

    repository of a sensor node is co-affected by three factors: uncontrollable ambient energy harvesting, communication, and sensing activities while guaranteeing non-empty energy repositories at all sensor nodes. JCRA. Harvesting ambient energy such as solar [1], wind [2], and vibration [3] has been a cost- free

  14. Towards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor Alessio Benavoli and Luigi Chisci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisci, Luigi

    Towards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor networks Alessio Benavoli and Luigi and which nodes to activate around the target's location so as to attain an appropriate quality-energy about the current sensor energy status. This is certainly efficient in terms of tracking quality

  15. Z .Sensors and Actuators B 60 1999 228237 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersensorb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    variety of hydrogen gas sensors, most are based on electronic devices and use palladium as the active mem hydrogen sensor system based on photopyroelectric purely-thermal-wave interference Chinhua Wang, Andreas hydrogen gas detection has been developed as a next generation device to earlier Z .photopyroelectric PPE

  16. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  17. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  18. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  19. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  20. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  1. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  2. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  3. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1987-06-23

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

  4. Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded or Revolutions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded ­ or Revolutions? Roger Wattenhofer Computer. This paper wants to motivate the distributed algorithms community to study sensor networks. We discuss why community, a sensor network essentially is ­ a database. The distributed algorithms community should join

  5. Mutual information based tracking with mobile sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russ, John A., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    In order to utilize mobile sensor nodes in a sensing and estimation problem, one must carefully consider the optimal placement of those sensor nodes and simultaneously account for the cost incurred in moving the sensor ...

  6. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor ...

  7. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15

    or fault tolerance capability of a sensor system. The redundancy degree of sensors plays two important roles pertaining to the robustness of a sensor network. First, the redundancy degree provides proper parameter values for robust estimator; second, we can...

  8. High Accuracy Sensor Aided Inertial Navigation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanandan, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    initialization. 3. The advent of MEMS sensors in the 1990s.MEMS based sensors have several favor- able properties. TheSystems (MEMS) based inertial sensors in the 1990s has led

  9. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  10. Sensor systems for the Altair Lunar Lander:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariella, R

    2009-12-22

    The Altair Lunar Lander will enable astronauts to learn to live and work on the moon for extended periods of time, providing the experience needed to expand human exploration farther into the solar system. My overriding recommendation: Use independent and complementary [sometimes referred to as 'orthogonal'] techniques to disambiguate confounding/interfering signals. E.g.: a mass spectrometer ['MS'], which currently serves as a Majority Constituent Analyzer ['MCA'] can be very valuable in detecting the presence of a gaseous specie, so long as it falls on a mass-to-charge ratio ['m/z'] that is not already occupied by a majority constituent of cabin air. Consider the toxic gas, CO. Both N{sub 2} and CO have parent peaks of m/z = 28, and CO{sub 2} has a fragment peak at m/z = 28 [and at 16 and 12], so the N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} m/z=28 signals could mask low, but potentially-dangerous levels of CO. However there are numerous surface-sensitive CO detectors, as well as tunable-diode-laser-based CO sensors that could provide independent monitoring of CO. Also, by appending a gas chromatograph ['GC'] as the front-end sample processer, prior to the inlet of the MS, one can rely upon the GC to separate CO from N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, providing the crew with another CO monitor. If the Altair Lunar Lander is able to include a Raman-based MCA for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2}, then each type of MCA would have cross-references, providing more confidence in the ongoing performance of each technique, and decreasing the risk that one instrument might fail to perform properly, without being noticed. See, also Dr. Pete Snyder's work, which states 'An orthogonal technologies sensor system appears to be attractive for a high confidence detection of presence and temporal characterization of bioaerosols.' Another recommendation: Use data fusion for event detection to decrease uncertainty: tie together the outputs from multiple sensing modalities - eNose, solid-state sensors, GC-IMS, GC-MS - via nonlinear algorithms, such as an 'artificial neural net.' MA Ryan at the JPL and Henry Abarbanel at UCSD are possible candidates to implement such an approach.

  11. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1985-05-20

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulating means for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor means compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. 4 figs.

  12. Inter-sensor propagation delay estimation using sources of opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Rémy; Michel, Olivier; Lacoume, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Propagation delays are intensively used for Structural Health Monitoring or Sensor Network Localization. In this paper, we study the performances of acoustic propagation delay estimation between two sensors, using sources of opportunity only. Such sources are defined as being uncontrolled by the user (activation time, location, spectral content in time and space), thus preventing the direct estimation with classical active approaches, such as TDOA, RSSI and AOA. Observation models are extended from the literature to account for the spectral characteristics of the sources in this passive context and we show how time-filtered sources of opportunity impact the retrieval of the propagation delay between two sensors. A geometrical analogy is then proposed that leads to a lower bound on the variance of the propagation delay estimation that accounts for both the temporal and the spatial properties of the sources field.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SIGNAL PROCESSING TOOLS AND HARDWARE FOR PIEZOELECTRIC SENSOR DIAGNOSTIC PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OVERLY, TIMOTHY G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PARK, GYUHAE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FARRAR, CHARLES R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-09

    This paper presents a piezoelectric sensor diagnostic and validation procedure that performs in -situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric (PZT) sensor/actuator arrays used in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The validation of the proper function of a sensor/actuator array during operation, is a critical component to a complete and robust SHM system, especially with the large number of active sensors typically involved. The method of this technique used to obtain the health of the PZT transducers is to track their capacitive value, this value manifests in the imaginary part of measured electrical admittance. Degradation of the mechanical/electric properties of a PZT sensor/actuator as well as bonding defects between a PZT patch and a host structure can be identified with the proposed procedure. However, it was found that temperature variations and changes in sensor boundary conditions manifest themselves in similar ways in the measured electrical admittances. Therefore, they examined the effects of temperature variation and sensor boundary conditions on the sensor diagnostic process. The objective of this study is to quantify and classify several key characteristics of temperature change and to develop efficient signal processing techniques to account for those variations in the sensor diagnostis process. In addition, they developed hardware capable of making the necessary measurements to perform the sensor diagnostics and to make impedance-based SHM measurements. The paper concludes with experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  14. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  16. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  17. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  18. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  19. Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    INVITED P A P E R Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare In healthcare, there is a strong need, wireless sensor networks for healthcare have emerged in the recent years. In this review, we present some representative applications in the healthcare domain and describe the challenges they introduce to wireless

  20. The Tenet Architecture for Tiered Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    a sensor network architecture: Lowering the waistline. InJ. Hill et al. System architecture directions for networkThe Tenet Architecture for Tiered Sensor Networks Omprakash

  1. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  2. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  3. Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: University of...

  4. New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency April 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE supported Eaton...

  5. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    2.2 Wireless Magnetic Sensors Vehicle Detection2.3 Vehicle Re-Identification Using Wireless MagneticPerformance iv 6 Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications for

  6. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  7. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  8. Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor New flexible electronics can better chart the heart a more detailed picture of the electrical activity of a beating heart. This high-resolution electrical map could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of heart abnormalities by pinpointing areas

  9. Header for SPIE use Multi-sensor Robot Navigation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    in an environment. Active (sensor- emitter) tracking technologies require powered-device installation, limiting of position (trajectory), velocity and heading. In the present approach we have neglected earth rotation Assembly) and because of the relatively small area of the trajectory. The scope of this experiment

  10. Collaborative Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks using Measurement Co-Occurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    activity of many WSN applica- tions. We focus on applications in which each sensor con- tinuously monitors the targets of interests in a field, and the base station is interested in getting every (discrete enumer

  11. HandWave : design and manufacture of a wearable wireless skin conductance sensor and housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Marc D

    2005-01-01

    This thesis report details the design and manufacture of HandWave, a wearable wireless Bluetooth skin conductance sensor, and dedicated housing. The HandWave collects Electrodermal Activity (EDA) data by measuring skin ...

  12. Handling Failures of Static Sensor Nodes in Wireless Sensor Network by Use of Mobile Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Flávio Rech

    usage and applicability of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) [1] [2]. Nevertheless, sensor nodes can fail, and influence WSN dependability [3]. In order to face this problem, and exploring the fact that WSN use several of nodes that in general compose a WSN provides good results. Neighbor nodes can monitor each others

  13. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo­ tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  14. Ion mobility sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  15. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  16. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  17. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen Andreas (Rochester, NY); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Neutzler, Jay Kevin (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-12-14

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  18. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  19. Decentralized TDOA Sensor Pairing in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Wei; Lihua, Xie; Wendong, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    a wireless sensor network (WSN). Most of the existing worksWe consider a multihop WSN. Given a team of nodes per-us represent a multihop WSN as a graph defined by , where is

  20. UAV sensor and survivability issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

  1. Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  2. Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors Shijun Qiu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors (Abstract) Shijun Qiu;References 1. Alag, S, K. Goebel, and A.M. Agogino, "A Framework for Intelligent Sensor Validation, Sensor, 1020 2. Alag, S, A.M. Agogino, and M.. Morjaria, " A Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Measurement

  3. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  4. Particulate matter sensor with a heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

    2011-08-16

    An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

  5. Novel Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palitha Jayaweera; Francis Tanzella

    2005-03-01

    SRI International (SRI) is developing ceramic-based microsensors to detect exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems under this DOE NETL-sponsored research project. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes attached to a solid state electrolyte and are designed to operate at the high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. The sensors can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. The ultimate objective is to develop sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package, along with data acquisition and control software and hardware, so that the information can be used for closed-loop control in novel advanced power generation systems. This report details the Phase I Proof-of-Concept, research activities performed from October 2003 to March 2005. SRI's research work includes synthesis of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, software development, and demonstration of pulse voltammetric analysis of NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO gases on catalytic electrodes.

  6. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  7. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  8. Sensor networks for social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farry, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis outlines the development of software that makes use of Bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real-world phenomena using data obtained from sensor networks. ...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Yibo

    2010-01-01

    The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

  10. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  11. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30

    piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber...

  12. Application Independent Energy Efficient Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virmani, Deepali; Ghanshyam,; Ahlawat, Khyati; Noble,

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor networks are dense networks of small, low-cost sensors, which collect and disseminate environmental data and thus facilitate monitoring and controlling of physical environment from remote locations with better accuracy. The major challenge is to achieve energy efficiency during the communication among the nodes. This paper aims at proposing a solution to schedule the node's activities to reduce the energy consumption. We propose the construction of a decentralized lifetime maximizing tree within clusters. We aim at minimizing the distance of transmission with minimization of energy consumption. The sensor network is distributed into clusters based on the close proximity of the nodes. Data transfer among the nodes is done with a hybrid technique of both TDMA/ FDMA which leads to efficient utilization of bandwidth and maximizing throughput.

  13. Single particle electrochemical sensors and methods of utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schoeniger, Joseph (Oakland, CA); Flounders, Albert W. (Berkeley, CA); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Los Gatos, CA); Wally, Karl (Lafayette, CA); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Janek, Richard P. (Oakland, CA)

    2006-04-04

    The present invention discloses an electrochemical device for detecting single particles, and methods for using such a device to achieve high sensitivity for detecting particles such as bacteria, viruses, aggregates, immuno-complexes, molecules, or ionic species. The device provides for affinity-based electrochemical detection of particles with single-particle sensitivity. The disclosed device and methods are based on microelectrodes with surface-attached, affinity ligands (e.g., antibodies, combinatorial peptides, glycolipids) that bind selectively to some target particle species. The electrodes electrolyze chemical species present in the particle-containing solution, and particle interaction with a sensor element modulates its electrolytic activity. The devices may be used individually, employed as sensors, used in arrays for a single specific type of particle or for a range of particle types, or configured into arrays of sensors having both these attributes.

  14. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  15. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  16. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  17. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (17 Eric Alan Lane, Tijeras, NM 87059); Alford, W. J. (3455 Tahoe, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Gruetzner, James K. (9407 Shoehone, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  18. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  19. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  20. Sampling Report for Parent Drum S855793 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This document corresponds to: Appendix B: Sampling Integrated Summary Report of the Technical Assessment Team Report. Sampling Report for Parent Drum S855793 More Documents &...

  1. A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Articles A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring performance and health. KEYWORDS: wireless sensors, structural monitoring, dam- age detection, smartb). Called structural health monitoring (SHM), this new paradigm offers an auto- mated method

  2. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  3. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  4. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  5. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Senturia, Stephen D. (Brookline, MA); Huber, Robert J. (Bountiful, UT)

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  6. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  7. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  8. Fault Tolerant Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, Iosif; Han, Qi; Mehrotra, Sharad; Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Dataevaluation of continuous selection queries (CSQs) over sensor-sensor suffices and there is no Fault Tolerant Evaluation of

  9. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G; ATLAS SCT Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    bias resistors. 6. Sensor Evaluation and Quality AssuranceHowever, an extensive evaluation of sensor characteristics6.3. Evaluation and Quality Assurance of irradiated sensors

  10. Rethinking Data Fusion-Based Services in Tiered Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantu, Karthik; Sukhatme, Gaurav

    2006-01-01

    conference on Embedded networked sensor systems, New York,conference on Embedded networked sensor systems, New York,Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, 2003, pp.

  11. Magic of Numbers in Networks of Wireless Image Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Mohammed; Ahmadian, Shaun; Zats, David; Laufer, Rafael; Estrin, D

    2006-01-01

    are solved on the battery- operated image sensor nodes andwith wireless battery-operated image sensors, we havedepicts a network of battery- operated image sensors placed

  12. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  13. Efficient Radio Communication for Energy Constrained Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    metrics in energy constrained wireless sensor networks. ” InRouting in Energy-Constrained Wireless Sensor Net- works. ”adaptive energy-efficient MAC protocol for wireless sensor

  14. Secure routing in wireless sensor networks: attacks and countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan

    against sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks­­sinkholes two novel classes of previously undocumented attacks against sensor net- works 1 ­­sinkhole attacks

  15. Secure Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Attacks and Countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks --- sinkholes and HELLO two novel classes of previously undoc­ umented attacks against sensor networks 1 -- sinkhole attacks

  16. Secure Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Attacks and Countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks --- sinkholes and HELLO­ umented attacks against sensor networks 1 -- sinkhole attacks and HELLO floods. #15; We show

  17. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the fabrication of the MEMS sensors from the readout system,mechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramicmechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramic

  18. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H. (Castro Valley, CA); Berry, Nina M. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-09-20

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  19. An Architecture for Multi-Sensor Fusion in Mobile Environments Datong Chen, Albrecht Schmidt, Hans-Werner Gellersen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Datong

    for multi-sensor fusion, applied for environment awareness of personal mobile devices. The working environment of personal mobile devices changes dynamically depending on their user's activities. Equipped with sensors, mobile devices can obtain an awareness of their mobile working environment, to improve

  20. The role of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh vacuum study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    active transition metals such as platinum and palladium, show great promise as sen- sors for hydrogenThe role of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh vacuum study Yung

  1. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  2. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  3. Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanette, Liana

    Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size Liana Zanette1,*, Michael, Canada Food-supplemented parents typically produce more offspring, as numerous experiments on vertebrate, with implications concerning the adult quality of offspring, although few experiments have addressed whether food-supplementing

  4. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Solar Radiation Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart Barometric Pressure SensorMHK

  5. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Tide Sensor 5217 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart Barometric Pressure SensorMHKMHK

  6. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Pressure Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Pressure

  7. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Tide Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented

  8. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Vented Wave Sensor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/SmartMHK ISDB/Sensors/VentedMHK

  9. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Taek; Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  10. Pivotal Response Parent Training Program: Generalization Of Clear Language Opportunities To At-Risk Siblings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Sara Ann

    2010-12-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of training parents as primary interveners through an accelerated parent education program for Pivotal Response Treatments. Specifically this study examined if the parent's change in ...

  11. Neuromorphic Vision Chips: intelligent sensors for industrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuromorphic Vision Chips: intelligent sensors for industrial applications Giacomo Indiveri, J, Neuromorphic Systems, Intelligent Sensors, Vehicle Navigation I. Introduction THE term "neuromorphic systems them in hardware. The developed chips can thus be used as "intelligent sensors"; sensors that, from

  12. CarolinaTiesA newsletter for University of South Carolina parents www.sa.sc.edu/parents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CarolinaTiesA newsletter for University of South Carolina parents www.sa.sc.edu/parents In this ever-changing economy, more University of South Carolina students are searching for and accepting part House Information Center #12;Dear friends: In this issue of Carolina Ties, we're providing you

  13. CarolinaTiesA newsletter for University of South Carolina parents www.sa.sc.edu/parents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CarolinaTiesA newsletter for University of South Carolina parents www.sa.sc.edu/parents Nestled a few recommendations. "Students should visit the Columbia Visitor's Bureau (CVB) website, www up-to-date with the CVB's online calendar of events, as well as like "Experience Columbia, SC

  14. Sensors Synergistic With Nature For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2012-10-01

    To be able to evolve fuel and structural microstructure within a nuclear power reactor in an engineered manner, an effective extreme environment sensor must exist. The development of sensor technology for nondestructive and nonintrusive measurements in harsh environments is a very active field. However most of the effort has been in adapting existing sensing technology to meet the harsh environmental requirements. A different approach is being presented. The fundamental question that we are trying to answer is how do we take advantage of the harsh environment and maintain synergy between the sensor and the environment. This paper will discuss the synergistic senor being developed that takes advantage of the harsh environments.

  15. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  16. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schill, Jr., Robert A. (Henderson, NV); Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  17. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Franklin R. (Loudon, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  18. Acoustic vector-sensor array processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchens, Jonathan Paul

    2010-01-01

    Existing theory yields useful performance criteria and processing techniques for acoustic pressure-sensor arrays. Acoustic vector-sensor arrays, which measure particle velocity and pressure, offer significant potential but ...

  19. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    v List of Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature2.3 Third vehicle upstream and downstream signatures (five

  20. Nanocomposite Flexible Pressure Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fachin, F.

    A new approach for the fabrication of flexible pressure sensors based on aligned carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs) is described in this paper. The technology is suitable for blood pressure sensors that can be attached to a stent-graft ...

  1. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  2. Underwater Data Collection Using Robotic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinger, Geoffrey A.

    We examine the problem of utilizing an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to collect data from an underwater sensor network. The sensors in the network are equipped with acoustic modems that provide noisy, range-limited ...

  3. Design and testing of piezoelectric sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mika, Bartosz

    2009-05-15

    system to evaluate the performance of a sensor made from polyvinylidene fluoride and its uses for studying insect locomotion and behaviors. A linear stage laboratory setup was designed and built to study the piezoelectric properties of a sensor during...

  4. Cantilever Sensors: Nanomechanical Tools for Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datar, Ram

    Cantilever sensors have attracted considerable attention over the last decade because of their potential as a highly sensitive sensor platform for high throughput and multiplexed detection of proteins and nucleic acids. A ...

  5. Obtaining accurate measurement using redundant sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Michael Scott

    1996-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests to accomplish accurate measurement, the sensors used must have high precision and excellent dynamic range. This generally results in sensor systems that are complex, costly, and often sensitive to environmental factors...

  6. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. In addition to presenting the general results with respect to the maximum sustainable throughput of wireless

  7. Underwater Sensor Barriers with Auction Stanley Barr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    underwater pathways of them. This approach may require deploying large-scale underwater sensor networks network to detect moving objects. In 2-dimensional (2D) terrestrial strip sensor networks, a barrier

  8. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel sensor design based on acoustics. Determine in real-timeand in a single sensor packagemultiple parameters: temperature, pressure, fluid flow; and fluid properties, such as density, viscosity, fluid composition.

  9. Sensor-based organizational design and engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olguín Olguín, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We propose a sensor-based organizational design and engineering approach that combines behavioral sensor data with other sources of information such as e-mail, surveys, and performance data in order to design interventions ...

  10. CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    students. Prerequisites include an introductory course in physical or analytical chemistry, undergraduateCHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors is an interdisciplinary topic covering area of science and engineering that lies between chemistry, physics, materials

  11. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  12. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01

    Advanced pipeline monitoringDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor “SewerSnortIllustration of mobile pipeline floating sensor monitoring

  13. Algorithmic Models for Sensor Networks Stefan Schmid1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a microprocessor, a wireless interface, some mem- ory, and one or more sensors. The sensors are used for col

  14. Sensor Wars: Detecting and Defending Against Spam Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Albert

    network are discussed in [7]. Security, network bandwidth and power consumption in sensor networksSensor Wars: Detecting and Defending Against Spam Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks Serdar Sancak@sabanciuniv.edu Abstract--Anti-nodes deployed inside a wireless sensor network can frequently generate dummy data packets

  15. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  16. Parental Education and the Gender Gap in University Completion in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Parent, Sec. Ed. Constant N Switzerland Female Parent, Post-Slovenia, Spain, and Switzerland. http://www.demographic-Slovakia Slovenia Spain Switzerland 1965-1974 Cohort Belgium

  17. Presented by SensorNet: The New Science of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet Collection Processing DisseminationSecurity Knowledge requirements Regulations Technology Intelligent Real world #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet SensorNet is ORNL's research in sensor network interoperability

  18. Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of massive deployment of sensors in electric power systems. There are several areas where the addition of modern, economical sensor technology can improve the quality of a large electric power grid. This reportMassively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center

  19. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  20. 700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder is a world leader in space-based research including measurements of the Sun with respect to sun center. LASP has built sun position sensors for decades beginning with sensors for sub

  1. Ferry-Based Linear Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    Networks Existing wireless sensor network research Assumption that the network used for sensors does of oil, gas, and water pipeline infrastructure using wireless sensor networks. #12;IEEE Globecom 2013 UAE (2006): 2,580 Km of gas pipelines 2,950 Km of oil pipelines 156 Km of refined products

  2. Short communication Observations of eruptive activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Short communication Observations of eruptive activity at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala Gregg J volcano, Guatemala, from the vantage point of its parent, Santa Mari´a. We have taken 12 h of digital

  3. Feasibility study of long-life micro fuel cell power supply for sensor networks for space and terrestrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manyapu, Kavya Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Sensor networks used for activities like border security, search and rescue, planetary exploration, commonly operate in harsh environments for long durations, where human supervision is minimal. A major challenge confronting ...

  4. Safety and Thermal Comfort Concerns for Active Travel to School: As Mediators and Correlates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Jae

    2014-12-03

    Children’s active travel to school (ATS), considered a regular source of physical activity, is influenced heavily by their parents’ perceived barriers to ATS such as safety and thermal comfort concerns. This dissertation focuses on environmental...

  5. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under controlled field conditions. In the third and fourth year a suite of larger field studies were conducted. For these studies, the uranium flux sensor was used with uranium speciation measurements and molecular-biological tools to characterize microbial community and active biomass at synonymous wells distributed in a large grid. These field efforts quantified spatial changes in uranium flux and field-scale rates of uranium attenuation (ambient and stimulated), uranium stability, and quantitatively assessed how fluxes and effective reaction rates were coupled to spatial variations in microbial community and active biomass. Analyses of data from these field experiments were used to generate estimates of Monod kinetic parameters that are ‘effective’ in nature and optimal for modeling uranium fate and transport at the field-scale. This project provided the opportunity to develop the first sensor that provides direct measures of both uranium (VI) and groundwater flux. A multidisciplinary team was assembled to include two geochemists, a microbiologist, and two quantitative contaminant hydrologists. Now that the project is complete, the sensor can be deployed at DOE sites to evaluate field-scale uranium attenuation, source behavior, the efficacy of remediation, and off-site risk. Because the sensor requires no power, it can be deployed at remote sites for periods of days to months. The fundamental science derived from this project can be used to advance the development of predictive models for various transport and attenuation processes in aquifers. Proper development of these models is critical for long-term stewardship of contaminated sites in the context of predicting uranium source behavior, remediation performance, and off-site risk.

  6. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1991-09-10

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level. 5 figures.

  7. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Otagawa, Takaaki (Solon, OH)

    1991-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulator for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor which compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. In particular, the concentration of the component of interest is proportional to the amplitude of the modulated output signal, while the identifying activation output energy of the chemical interaction indicative of that component is proportional to a normalized parameter equal to the peak-to-peak amplitude divided by the height of the upper peaks above a base line signal level.

  8. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  9. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagdal, Karl T. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  10. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    in three areas Envelope Equipment System/building integration Develop component technologies that are more in real buildings #12;6 Envelope research lab facilities Heat Flow Through Roof/Attic Assemblies Heat FlowSensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies Charles

  11. SO.sub.2 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dalla Betta, Ralph A. (Mountain View, CA); Sheridan, David R. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a process for detecting low concentration levels of sulfur oxides (SO.sub.2) in a flowing gas stream (typically a combustion exhaust gas stream) and a catalytic SO.sub.2 sensor system which may be used in that process.

  12. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  13. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA)

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  14. Empirical Mode Decomposition for Intrinsic-Relationship Extraction in Large Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    correlation filters only 50% of the sensors as being correlated with the behavior of the pump. In contrast of buildings, we broadly define useful work as the energy used to support occupant activities. From, varying schedules affect occupancy, rooms have lectures, class, or other office activities. Simply put

  15. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  16. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  17. Chemical micro-sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2005-05-03

    An integrated optical capillary electrophoresis system for analyzing an analyte. A modulated optical pump beam impinges on an capillary containing the analyte/buffer solution which is separated by electrophoresis. The thermally-induced change in the index of refraction of light in said electrophoresis capillary is monitored using an integrated micro-interferometer. The interferometer includes a first interferometer arm intersecting the electrophoresis capillary proximate the excitation beam and a second, reference interferometer arm. Changes in index of refraction in the analyte measured by interrogating the interferometer state using white light interferometry and a phase-generated carrier demodulation technique. Background thermo-optical activity in the buffer solution is cancelled by splitting the pump beam and exciting pure buffer solution in a second section of capillary where it crosses the reference arm of the interferometer.

  18. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  19. Indirect Force measurement of Micromilling with an Active Magnetic Bearing spindle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Indirect Force measurement of Micromilling with an Active Magnetic Bearing spindle R.S. Blom1 indirect cutting force measurement is proposed that uses the active nature of an Active Magnetic Bear- ing the displacement sensors and coil current sensors in the magnetic bear- ing system. It is demonstrated

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4112 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart BarometricMHKMHKMHKMHK

  1. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Turbidity Sensor 4705 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK ISDB/Sensors/Smart BarometricMHKMHKMHKMHKMHK

  2. Phylogenetic constraint on male parental care in the dabbling ducks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kevin P.

    Phylogenetic constraint on male parental care in the dabbling ducks Kevin P. Johnson1 {, Frank Mc as being constrained (Gould & Lewontin 1979; Bell 1987; Wagner 1995; Podos 1997). Good empirical examples

  3. The Voices of Five African American Children of Incarcerated Parents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larke, Altricia

    2014-05-08

    On any given day, more than two million children are affected by the incarceration of their parents. A plethora of research has been gathered from the point of view of others involved in this American travesty, such as the ...

  4. Maximising children's interests after parental separation: the australian experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seddon, Beth

    This briefing gives an overview of policy developments in Australia aimed at maximising the interests of children when their parents separate. It touches on issues common to a number of countries, in particular attempts ...

  5. PARENTE SUITE USER'S GUIDE (c) 1994-97

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    are granted a limited license to use this working version of Parente Suite which includes PGraph, Ego2Cpl, Par, funding from the A. von Humboldt Foundation and Leibnitz Award to Thomas Schweizer

  6. Parents Raising Children with Disabilities: Predictors and Determinants of Wellbeing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resch, James A.

    2012-10-19

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to identify and evaluate possible determinants of wellbeing and psychological adjustment in parents raising children with disabilities. Two studies drawing from the same sample of participants were...

  7. Parents' Views on Child Welfare's Response to Addiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Rebecca A.; Gregoire, Thomas K.

    1997-01-01

    The helping system often responds to parents recovering from addiction in a way that reinforces their powerlessness and may perpetuate their addiction. This study identified worker and agency qualities that contribute to ...

  8. AALO: Activity recognition in smart homes using Active Learning in the presence of Overlapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weimer, Westley

    (HMM and HSMM). I. INTRODUCTION Due to increasing number of elderly people and single households living activities are instrumented with passive sensors. When a resident moves from one room to another or uses

  9. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  10. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  11. Electrochemical Synthesis of One-Dimensional Nanostructures for Sensor and Spintronic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hangarter, Carlos Maldonado

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructures for Sensor and Spintronic Applications ANanostructures for Sensor and Spintronic Applications byfor sensor and spintronic applications. Conducting polymers

  12. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  13. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  14. Image-based occupancy sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  15. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  16. U.S. citizen children, undocumented immigrant parents : how parental undocumented status affects citizen children's educational achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act of 2003. http://Number of Undocumented Aliens. ” Employment and Earnings.the court found that “an alien parent who has no legal

  17. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Letant, Sonia (Livermore, CA); Stadermann, Michael (Dublin, CA); Artyukhin, Alexander B. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  18. Intelligent Sensor Validation And Fusion For Vehicle Guidance Using Probabilistic And Fuzzy Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice; Goebel, Kai; Alag, Sanam

    1997-01-01

    1995. A Framework for Intelligent Sensor Validation, SensorAgogino, A. 1995. Intelligent Sensor Validation and FusionOF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Intelligent Sensor Validation and

  19. Chinese parenting and children's compliance to adults: a cross-cultural comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ching-Yu Soar

    2013-02-05

    ), and that the effects can last even into adolescence (Pardini, Fite, & Burke, 2008). Considerable research has been conducted to elucidate the parenting process and examine types of parenting. One of the most widely recognised parenting typology was provided... their parenting practices reflect cultural-specific parenting constructs (Buki, Ma, Strom, & Strom, 2003; Costigan & Su, 2008; Kelley & Tseng, 1992; Lui, 1990). Researchers have shown that immigrants do not always adopt the perspectives of receiving cultures...

  20. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  1. Ripeness sensor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 {times} 10{sup 12} BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on {sup 1}H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on {sup 1}H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  2. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

  3. The 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing (ISSNIP 2005) and IEEE International Conference on e-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    The 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing sessions focusing on both theory and applications of intelligent sensors and smart systems. In addition Conference Organiser: ARC Research Networks on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information

  4. 5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    5616 J. Phys. Chem. 1987, 91, 5616-5623 (parent methane), 105633-27-0;6,109745-47-3;6 (parent methane), 105633-31-6;7, 109745-48-4;8, 109745-49-5;8 (parent methane), 109745-52-0;9,109745-50-8;9 (parent methane), 105633-32-7;10, 109745-53-1;11, 109745-51-9;1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene,634

  5. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  6. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D

    2010-03-22

    This thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor continuously and accurately measures time-varying, solid interface loads in embedded systems over tens of thousands of load cycles. Unlike all other interface load sensors, the CS sensor is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m), provides accurate, high-speed measurements, and exhibits good stability over time with no loss of calibration with load cycling. The silicon CS sensor, 5 mm{sup 2} and 65 {micro}m thick, has piezoresistive traces doped within a load-sensitive diaphragm. The novel package utilizes several layers of flexible polyimide to mechanically and electrically isolate the sensor from the environment, transmit normal applied loads to the diaphragm, and maintain uniform thickness. The CS sensors have a highly linear output in the load range tested (0-2.4 MPa) with an average accuracy of {+-} 1.5%.

  7. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  8. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Shin (Danbury, CT) [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. (Bethel, CT) [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W. (Bethel, CT) [Bethel, CT; Welch, James (Fairfield, CT) [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan (Danbury, CT) [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  9. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  10. Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments ­Path to low cost (sensor) at 500k qty ­Develop test rig for sensor evaluation · Program Evaluation ­ UTRC Benchmark Sensor Test ­ IIT Sensor Test & Refinement ­ UTRC Program Lead And Evaluation UTCDevelopment of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells DOE Agreement DE-FC04-02AL67616 Brian

  11. Hallway Monitoring: Distributed Data Processing with Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgartner, Tobias

    infrared sensors (PIRs), con- nected to 30 wireless sensor nodes. There are also 29 LEDs and speakers, development, and evaluation of higher-level algorithms in real de- ployments in which sensor nodes can share, and 29 passive infrared sensors (PIRs) for motion detection. The construction of the load sensors has

  12. Multi-Level Alert Clustering for Intrusion Detection Sensor Data*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siraj, Ambareen

    multiple, diverse sensors. Intelligent sensor fusion of runtime behavior data is critical for such systemsMulti-Level Alert Clustering for Intrusion Detection Sensor Data* Ambareen Siraj Rayford B. Vaughn sensors that monitor security violations throughout the network. The outputs of the sensors must be fused

  13. Query Processing in Mobile Sensor Networks Wang-Chien Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wang-Chien

    , a sensor network for air pollution test, where all sensors are scattered in the air and transported to collect the data from the sensors about air pollution and traffic conditions. In comparison, vehicles, animals, air, and water). With self-propelling sensor nodes, a mobile sensor network is self

  14. Wireless sensor network survey Jennifer Yick, Biswanath Mukherjee, Dipak Ghosal *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Lakshmish

    -Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology which has facilitated the development of smart sensors. These sensors are smallWireless sensor network survey Jennifer Yick, Biswanath Mukherjee, Dipak Ghosal * Department online 14 April 2008 Responsible Editor: E. Ekici Keywords: Wireless sensor network Protocols Sensor

  15. Design and Fabrication of a MEMS Capacitive Chemical Sensor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    Design and Fabrication of a MEMS Capacitive Chemical Sensor System Vishal Saxena, Todd J. Plum-- This paper describes the development of a MEMS sensor system to detect volatile compounds. The sensor consists of a MEMS capacitive sensor element monolithically integrated with a sensing circuit. The sensor

  16. Notes on practical photometry for image sensor and vision sensor developers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delbruck, Tobi

    Notes on practical photometry for image sensor and vision sensor developers T. Delbruck, Inst you ask? Photometry units The basic photometric quantity is a lumen (lm), which is a certain quantity

  17. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  18. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-05-18

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  19. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2003-07-22

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  20. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  1. PROGRAMMING 2 Sensors and Servos: Building Blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7/16/13 1 ARDUINO PROGRAMMING 2 Sensors and Servos: Building Blocks Analog vs. Digital Digital Wire up a Potentiometer Analog Inputs and Arduino int sensorPin = A2; // Analog pin 2 int ledPin = 13 to the LED } #12;7/16/13 4 Analog Inputs and Arduino int sensorPin = A2; // Analog pin 2 int ledPin = 13; int

  2. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  3. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  4. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager Waveguide-based Ultrasonic and Far-field Electromagnetic Sensors for Downhole Reservoir Characterization High Temperature ESP Monitoring...

  5. Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technologies - Teaming with DOE to Develop, Transfer, and Deploy Technologies Ames Laboratory scientists are contributing their expertise...

  6. Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Newsletter | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Annual Project Review 2013 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by...

  7. Ivan Stojmenovic 1 Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Flood detection Ivan Stojmenovic 8 Forest Fires · Provide finer granularity weather data via sensor networks · Improved prediction and management of forest fires · Univ. Colorado at Boulders (Rick Han

  8. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of oxide electrodes * Decision point: Down select to metal or electronically- conducting oxide electrodes Electrochemical NO x Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions 17 Plans for...

  9. Cognitive Radio Networks as Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandari, Dorna; Yang, Seung R.; Zhao, Yue; Pottie, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    assuming the cognitive radios know their own coordinates.Networked Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks As SensorIntroduction: Cognitive Radio (CR) Networks The Need For

  10. Security for distributed wireless sensor nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verbauwhede, Ingrid

    for individual sensors: depends · tank passes in a battlefield: not really needed · individual hart beats computations & optimizations )min( SRC EEE ++ Example: Burmester-Desmedt conference key protocol

  11. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alamos National Laboratory High Temperature Tools and Sensors, Down-hole Pumps and Drilling May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  12. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  13. MB3a Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; McDowell, Kyle D.

    2014-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated a new infrasound sensor, the MB3a, manufactured by Seismo Wave. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by researchers at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the technology was recently licensed to Seismo Wave for production and sales. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, seismic sensitivity, and self- calibration ability. The MB3a infrasound sensors are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  14. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  15. Toward a sensor-actuation software platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Kaisen

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 3 Control Command Dissemination in WSN . . 3.1wireless sensor networks (WSN) and the Internet of Things [in- formation available. WSN applications have included

  16. Collecting and Disseminating Smart Home Sensor Data in the CASAS Project D.J. Cook, M. Schmitter-Edgecombe, Aaron Crandall, Chad Sanders, and Brian Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Collecting and Disseminating Smart Home Sensor Data in the CASAS Project D.J. Cook, M. Schmitter a physical smart home testbed. Expertise and resources are needed to design and install the sensors to test, compare, and enhance smart home and telemedicine technologies such as user modeling, activity

  17. International Conference on Materials for Advanced Technologies (ICMAT 2007), Singapore, July 1-6, 2007. A Novel Strategy of Surface Nanofication for Ceramic Gas Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    -6, 2007. A Novel Strategy of Surface Nanofication for Ceramic Gas Sensors (Invited) A.-M. Azad* and S in the solid-state ceramic-based chemical sensors. Since the sensing mechanism and catalytic activity of ceramics are predominantly surface- dominated, benign surface features in terms of small grain size, large

  18. Power Sources for Wireless Sensor Abstract. Wireless sensor networks are poised to become a very significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, Luc G.

    Power Sources for Wireless Sensor Networks Abstract. Wireless sensor networks are poised to become a very significant enabling technology in many sectors. Already a few very low power wireless sensor environment, alternative power sources must be employed. This paper reviews many potential power sources

  19. Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    807 Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Paper 22-2 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant for power plant applications. The sensor utilizes quenching of the bright red fluorescence from inorganic. Motivation Combustion processes in power plants require the correct mix of fuel and oxygen to maximize

  20. Mesh-based Sensor Relocation for Coverage Maintenance in Mobile Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoro, Nicola

    sophisticated protocols, mobile sensor networks are more flexible and adaptive to unknown or hazardous of reasons. All of them rely on global/cross-network message transmissions for discovering nearby replacementMesh-based Sensor Relocation for Coverage Maintenance in Mobile Sensor Networks Xu Li SCS, Carleton

  1. Estimation of Human Energy Expenditure Using Inertial Sensors and Heart Rate Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu?trek, Mitja

    Estimation of Human Energy Expenditure Using Inertial Sensors and Heart Rate Sensor Bozidara, we tested a combination of thigh inertial sensor with hart rate monitor, usually worn by athletes and availability and ease of development. Average smart phone has a rather powerful processing unit. It comes

  2. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  3. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  4. sensors | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named|Got Solitons?scriptEnv - loading modulesSensors

  5. Patent: Microelectromechanical inertial sensor | DOEpatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall Reactor for DeepK.alpha. X-rayinertial sensor

  6. WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK BASED CONTROL SYSTEM CONCIDERING COMMUNICATION COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK BASED CONTROL SYSTEM CONCIDERING COMMUNICATION COST Yutaka Iino* Takeshi for wireless sensor network based control system, minimizing communication energy consumption. Some control, wireless sensor network technology has been developed rapidly, and various applications to control system

  7. Real-Time Communication and Coordination in Embedded Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    sensors and actuators. Because of this interaction, we find that sensor networks are very data-centric. These networks are very data-centric, with data queries being issued from base stations and time-dependent sensor

  8. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01

    SewerSnort gas sensor board evaluation . . . . . . . . .8.1 SewerSnort gas sensor board evaluation In our previousFigure 8.6: Gas sensor board evaluation scenario and

  9. An Evaluation of Sensing Platforms Used for Sensor Network Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    An Evaluation of Sensing Platforms Used for Sensor Network Research Daniel T. Fokum, Dr. Victor S to complex sensor nodes; which include fully configured computers. Several of these platforms were evaluated ................................................................................................................. 2 3 Evaluation of Sensor Platforms

  10. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the testing and evaluation of sensors by both optical and4: Results and Evaluation The results of sensor fabrication,of testing and evaluation. A double beam sensor which

  11. Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    for Sensors for the Pulp And Paper Industry M. A. Green, P.FOR SENSORS FOR THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY M. A. Green, P.sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic

  12. Managing Sensor Data Uncertainty: a data quality approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servigne, Sylvie

    and users with data quality information. Keywords: Data Quality, Sensor Data, Metadata, EnvironmentalManaging Sensor Data Uncertainty: a data quality approach Claudia C. Gutiérrez Rodríguez (I3S improvement, sensors infrastructure actually supports many current and promising environmental applications

  13. Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Sensors for the Pulp And Paper Industry M. A. Green, P. J.SENSORS FOR THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY M. A. Green, P. J.sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic

  14. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image. Remondino, N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision ­ 1. Measurement in images (b) Camera calibration of Photogrammetry and Machine Vision Fully understand: 1. Image based 3D and 4D measurement 2. Image based 3D

  15. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation, texturing (b) Camera, noise) 2N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation

  16. a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gburzynski, Pawel

    technology: a truly self configurable, low-cost, maintenance-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on ZigBee-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on ZigBee TM ) Practically unbounded scalability, e.g., thousands

  17. Unifying sensor fault detection with energy conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Simon

    Unifying sensor fault detection with energy conservation Lei Fang and Simon Dobson School energy usage. Section 2 presents our framework, which is evaluated in section 3 by means of some reliability. Sensors are often energy-hungry and cannot operate over the long term, and the data they gather

  18. Applications of Industrial Wireless Sensor Milan Erdelj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    applications is vital for the production in all the branches of industry. 3. Process automation. The last group1 Applications of Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks Milan Erdelj FUN Research Group, INRIA Lille manuscript, published in "Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards CRC

  19. Pervasive UWB Sensor Networks for Oil exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    network applications. One of these applications is represented by land seismic exploration for oil and gas reservior. Seismic exploration requires a large number (2000 nodes/sqkm) of sensors to be deployed applications [1]. Land seismic exploration for oil reservoir requires a large number of sensors (geophones

  20. Sensor device and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothgeb, Timothy Michael; Gansle, Kristina Marie Rohal; Joyce, Jonathan Livingston; Jordan, James Madison; Rohwer, Tedd Addison; Lockhart, Randal Ray; Smith, Christopher Lawrence; Trinh, Toan; Cipollone, Mark Gary

    2005-10-25

    A sensor device and method of employment is provided. More specifically, a sensor device adapted to detect, identify and/or measure a chemical and/or physical characteristic upon placement of the device into an environment, especially a liquid medium for which monitoring is sought is provided.

  1. Multiresolution Storage and Search in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    battery-operated nodes. Constructing a storage and search system that satisfies the requirements of dataMultiresolution Storage and Search in Sensor Networks DEEPAK GANESAN University of Massachusetts in wireless sensor networks: in-network storage and distributed search. The need for these techniques arises

  2. Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qun

    of limited storage, communication capacity, and battery power is ameliorated. Placing storage nodesOptimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE, and Weizhen Mao Abstract--Data storage has become an important issue in sensor networks as a large amount

  3. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  4. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leach, Jr., Richard R; Nekoogar, Faranak; Haugen, Peter C

    2013-08-06

    Ultra wideband radar motion sensors strategically placed in an area of interest communicate with a wireless ad hoc network to provide remote area surveillance. Swept range impulse radar and a heart and respiration monitor combined with the motion sensor further improves discrimination.

  5. MAXIMUM ENTROPY APPROACH TO OPTIMAL SENSOR PLACEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    MAXIMUM ENTROPY APPROACH TO OPTIMAL SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR AEROSPACE NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING R discussed for space struc- tures. Key words: Non-destructive testing, maximum entropy, aerospace structures not have a sufficient number of them, so additional sensors must be placed to test the structural integrity

  6. Maximizing Charging Throughput in Rechargeable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    mobile chargers (mobile vehicles) to replenish sensors' energy has attracted much attention recently Email: richard.rxj@anu.edu.au, wliang@cs.anu.edu.au, wenzheng.xu3@gmail.com Abstract--Energy is one of the most critical optimization objectives in wireless sensor networks. Compared with renewable energy

  7. Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    components, enhanced the ideas of wireless sensor networks (WSN). The goal of any WSN is to provide measures for a WSN is how to efficiently integrate the available information from individual sensors to reach with WSN can be categorized into two groups of methods: decision fusion and value fusion methods

  8. The RTMS (Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor) unit is a traffic sensor which uses microwave signals to detect vehicles. Unlike sensors which use the Doppler effect, this sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    1 RTMS The RTMS (Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor) unit is a traffic sensor which uses microwave counter unit. Additional items for deployment include solar panel, batteries and modem with cellular dimly. The LED is bright only when data is being downloaded from it. Solar Panel The solar panel

  9. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  10. Wireless Sensor Networks Dr. Faruk Bagci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerer, Theo

    of Augsburg, Germany Wireless Sensor Network Applications Early disaster detection Habitat observation Intelligent buildings Research Topics Energy efficient communication ESTR-Protocol ESTR ­ Energy Saving Token and can receive data · Most sensors in ring sleep and save energy Energy efficiency Simulation of a WSN

  11. Wireless Sensor Networks: Scheduling for Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertazzi, Thomas G.

    Wireless Sensor Networks: Scheduling for Measurement and Data Reporting MEQUANINT MOGES, Member allocation approach is presented for measurement and data reporting in wireless sensor networks with a single involve each antenna scanning a different frequency and directional range. We emphasize here wireless

  12. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Industrial Process Measurement and Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiber-Optic Sensor for Industrial Process Measurement and Control Reliable Advanced Laser Sensor Helps Control High Temperature Gas Combustion Through a marketing agreement...

  13. Sensor Network for Motor Energy Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor Network for Motor Energy Management Sensor Network for Motor Energy Management Remote Sensing Electric Motor Operation Optimizes Maintenance and Energy Efficiency Electric...

  14. Attack-Resistant Location Estimation in Sensor (Revised August 2005)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning, Peng

    role in many sensor network applications. Not only do applications such as environment monitoring and target tracking require sensors' location information to fulfill their tasks, but several fundamental

  15. Energy Efficient Distributed Data Fusion In Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    estimation in energy-constrained wireless sensor networks,”J. Wu, “Energy-e?cient coverage problems in wireless ad hoca transmission energy problem for wireless sensor networks.

  16. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor A...

  17. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  18. Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D 100 Award Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D...

  19. Active Query Forwarding in Sensor Networks Narayanan Sadagopan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    , response latency and storage requirements. We show that with optimal parameter settings, depending on the update frequency, ACQUIRE obtains order of magnitude reduction over FBQ and potentially 60 to 85% energy days with a frequency of 1 measurement per hour") versus One-shot queries, which have a simple response

  20. TECHNOLOGY GUIDE: DETECTOR HANDBOOK ' Active-pixel sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossum, Eric R.

    on the shifting of charge to read out the image. In contrast, an APS acts similarly to a random access memory (RAM, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109. - - _ . _ - ._·Y~- 1OO

  1. Nanotube sensors Probing Macrophage Activity with Carbon-Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    available for single-cell studies with a versatile high-sensitivity probe of nanometer dimension. SWNTs have,[5] SWNT probes can have a higher spatial resolution and impose a largely reduced physical perturbation when in contact with or punctur- ing through the membrane of a single cell. Here we present our

  2. A Frequency-Shift based CMOS Magnetic Biosensor with Spatially Uniform Sensor Transducer Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    the spatially uniform gain. II. SENSOR MECHANIMS AND SENSOR TRANSDUCER GAIN MODELING Magnetic biosensors

  3. Energy-Conservation Clustering Protocol based on Heat Conductivity for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landfeldt, Bjorn

    -sensors based on MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology. A wireless sensor network is composed

  4. MEMS Materials and Temperature Sensors for Down Hole Geothermal System Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wodin-Schwartz, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    MEMS for Geothermal Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . .Existing MEMS Capacitive Temperature Sensors . . . . .In-Plane MEMS Temperature Sensor

  5. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J. [DuPont Electronics, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  6. MEMS inertial sensors with integral rotation means.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Stewart M.

    2003-09-01

    The state-of-the-art of inertial micro-sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) has advanced to the point where they are displacing the more traditional sensors in many size, power, and/or cost-sensitive applications. A factor limiting the range of application of inertial micro-sensors has been their relatively poor bias stability. The incorporation of an integral sensitive axis rotation capability would enable bias mitigation through proven techniques such as indexing, and foster the use of inertial micro-sensors in more accuracy-sensitive applications. Fabricating the integral rotation mechanism in MEMS technology would minimize the penalties associated with incorporation of this capability, and preserve the inherent advantages of inertial micro-sensors.

  7. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  8. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-01

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  9. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2006-06-27

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator for drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows, for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  10. On computer vision in wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-09-01

    Wireless sensor networks allow detailed sensing of otherwise unknown and inaccessible environments. While it would be beneficial to include cameras in a wireless sensor network because images are so rich in information, the power cost of transmitting an image across the wireless network can dramatically shorten the lifespan of the sensor nodes. This paper describe a new paradigm for the incorporation of imaging into wireless networks. Rather than focusing on transmitting images across the network, we show how an image can be processed locally for key features using simple detectors. Contrasted with traditional event detection systems that trigger an image capture, this enables a new class of sensors which uses a low power imaging sensor to detect a variety of visual cues. Sharing these features among relevant nodes cues specific actions to better provide information about the environment. We report on various existing techniques developed for traditional computer vision research which can aid in this work.

  11. Graphene Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-01

    Graphene, emerging as a true 2-dimensional material, has received increasing attention due to its unique physicochemical properties (high surface area, excellent conductivity, high mechanical strength, and ease of functionalization and mass production). This article selectively reviews recent advances in graphene-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. In particular, graphene for direct electrochemistry of enzyme, its electrocatalytic activity toward small biomolecules (hydrogen peroxide, NADH, dopamine, etc.), and graphene-based enzyme biosensors have been summarized in more detail; Graphene-based DNA sensing and environmental analysis have been discussed. Future perspectives in this rapidly developing field are also discussed.

  12. Characteristic study of silicon sensor for ILD ECAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shusuke Takada; Hiroto Hirai; Kiyotomo Kawagoe; Yohei Miyazaki; Yuji Sudo; Taikan Suehara; Hiroki Sumida; Tatsuhiko Tomita; Hiraku Ueno; Tamaki Yoshioka

    2015-03-31

    Excellent jet energy measurement is important at the International Linear Collider (ILC) because most of interesting physics processes decay into multi-jet final states. We employ a particle flow method to reconstruct particles, hence International Large Detector (ILD) needs high spatial resolution which can separate each particle in jets. We study pixelized silicon sensors as active material of ILD Silicon electro- magnetic calorimeter (SiECAL). This paper reports studies of temperature and humidity dependence on dark current and response of laser injection.

  13. Characteristic study of silicon sensor for ILD ECAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shusuke; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Miyazaki, Yohei; Sudo, Yuji; Suehara, Taikan; Sumida, Hiroki; Tomita, Tatsuhiko; Ueno, Hiraku; Yoshioka, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Excellent jet energy measurement is important at the International Linear Collider (ILC) because most of interesting physics processes decay into multi-jet final states. We employ a particle flow method to reconstruct particles, hence International Large Detector (ILD) needs high spatial resolution which can separate each particle in jets. We study pixelized silicon sensors as active material of ILD Silicon electro- magnetic calorimeter (SiECAL). This paper reports studies of temperature and humidity dependence on dark current and response of laser injection.

  14. Electro-chemical sensors, sensor arrays and circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Howard E.; Kong, Hoyoul

    2014-07-08

    An electro-chemical sensor includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and a semiconductor channel in electrical contact with the first and second electrodes. The semiconductor channel includes a trapping material. The trapping material reduces an ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct a current of charge carriers by trapping at least some of the charge carriers to localized regions within the semiconductor channel. The semiconductor channel includes at least a portion configured to be exposed to an analyte to be detected, and the trapping material, when exposed to the analyte, interacts with the analyte so as to at least partially restore the ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct the current of charge carriers.

  15. Optimal Movement of Mobile Sensors for Barrier Coverage of a Planar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    or for reporting various types of activities and events. Another impor- tant application concerns critical security critical infrastructure facilities and ge- ographic delimiters (chemical plants, forests, etc). As a matter that a point is covered by a sensor if it is within its range. In this paper we will use the concept of barrier

  16. Analysis of Energy Conservation in Sensor Networks , K.J.Blow1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    profile for various levels of sensor network activity and derive an optimum energy saving curve the information to the user or, in general, a data sink. Due to the node's limited transmission range, this forwarding mostly involves using multi-hop paths through other nodes [3]. A node in the network has

  17. Optimal Movement of Mobile Sensors for Barrier Coverage of a Planar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    or for reporting various types of activities and events. Another impor- tant application concerns critical security critical infrastructure facilities and ge- ographic delimiters (chemical plants, forests, etc). Since, we say that a point is covered by a sensor if it is within its range. In this paper we will use

  18. Backcasting: Adaptive Sampling for Sensor Networks Rebecca Willett, Aline Martin, and Robert Nowak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert

    sensors may not need to be activated by the fusion center. Thus, adaptive sampling can save energy- less technology makes these systems relatively flexible, but also places heavy demands on energy con communications and energy consumption while maintaining high accuracy. Backcasting operates by first having

  19. 26th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES SECURITY OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK ENABLED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    the condition of aircraft engines, structures, gear boxes, and so on [8]. Wireless sensor network (WSN), i the grow- ing prospects of a onboard WSN. As noted in [10], the RFID system can be considered to be a WSN must be addressed. WSN and active RFID system have vulnera- bilities that can be exploited

  20. Molecular Design of Intercalation-Based Sensors. 2. Sensing of Carbon Dioxide in Functionalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Design of Intercalation-Based Sensors. 2. Sensing of Carbon Dioxide in Functionalized-9) × 10-9 cm2/s. Carbon dioxide, as both a reactant in and a product of large- scale reactions, is the focus of much current research activity. Millions of tons of carbon dioxide are used every year