National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for active sensors aerial

  1. Reducing Information Gathering Latency through Mobile Aerial Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Francis C.M.

    for information gathering through a Mobile Aerial Sensor Network (MASN). We adopt the Hive-Drone model [5] where (Drones) is strategically placed in the sensing field. We then face the challenges of how to control a Mobile Aerial Sensor Network (MASN) based on the Hive- Drone model [5]. MASN comprises a swarm of Micro

  2. Reliable Communications in Aerial Sensor Networks by Using A Hybrid Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    -sized Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with sensors and wireless radio, enables low cost high granularity- able mobile sensors to explore the aerial dimension, i.e., engineering Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVsReliable Communications in Aerial Sensor Networks by Using A Hybrid Antenna Kai Li Nadeem Ahmed

  3. Reliable Positioning with Hybrid Antenna Model for Aerial Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles. An actor node in the network has the capabilities of both acting accordingly. The recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) made it possible to deploy Aerial WirelessReliable Positioning with Hybrid Antenna Model for Aerial Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks Kai Li

  4. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  5. Autonomous Deployment and Repair of a Sensor Network Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Corke; S. Hrabar; R. Peterson; D. Rus; S. Saripalli; G. Sukhatme

    2004-01-01

    landing of an unmanned aerial vehicle,” IEEE Transactions onNetwork using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle P. Corke ? , S.provide the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with information

  6. Technical Report: Activity Recognition in Wide Aerial Video Surveillance Using Entity Relationship Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    recognition system for wide area aerial video surveillance using Entity Relationship Models (ERM and efficiently defined and inferred using the ERM framework. We also show how vi- sual tracks can be better). activities with the Entity Relationship Model (ERM) frame- work [7]. The ERM is an appropriate framework

  7. Link Characterization for Aerial Wireless Sensor Networks Nadeem Ahmed Salil S. Kanhere Sanjay Jha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    station by equipping the UAVs with a 802.11 or ZigBee transmitter. Given that the typical range of wireless technologies such as 802.11 and ZigBee is only a few meters, UAVs create a multi-hop aerial

  8. Autonomous Deployment and Repair of a Sensor Network using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    sensor nodes are "Motes" and the mobile nodes are autonomous helicopters. Integrating static nodes, for example a star, grid, or random. The helicopter deploys the sensors one at a time at designated locations in a localized and distributed way. The helicopter is equipped with a sensor node so that it is a mobile

  9. Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Chapter 6 Microwave Sensors ­ Active and Passive David G. Long Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Brigham Young University Center for Remote Sensing 459 Clyde Building, Provo, UT 84602, long be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight

  10. Digital autoland system for unmanned aerial vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Thomas William, Jr.

    2007-09-17

    Autoland controllers are prevalent for both large and small/micro unmanned aerial vehicles, but very few are available for medium sized unmanned aerial vehicles. These vehicles tend to have limited sensors and instrumentation, ...

  11. Radiation interchange modeling for active infrared proximity sensor design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, James Clarice

    1999-01-01

    . This research focuses on information gathered using active optical proximity sensors in the reflectance sensing mode. The portion of energy reflected to a given sensor in combination with the known location of the source and sensor elements provide the basic...

  12. Application of active flow control technology in an unmanned aerial vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaurav,

    2009-05-15

    A low speed wind tunnel experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the leading edge pulsed blowing and the trailing edge jet blowing/ Gurney flap on the improvement of aerodynamic performance of an unmanned aerial...

  13. Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Selcuk Bayraktar, Georgios in the development of networks of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (U.A.V.s), as aerial sensor networks size) aerial and space vehicles, which are frequently networked. This modern view of future aerospace

  14. Aerial robotic data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Pendergast, M.M.; Corban, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    A small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre-programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology.

  15. Energy efficient strategies for wireless sensor networks with varying connectivity properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam, Clement

    2010-01-01

    of sensor-equipped unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have beena small number of unmanned aerial vehicles (?10 UAVs) are

  16. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  17. Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  18. Rechargeable Sensor Activation under Temporally Correlated Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kar, Koushik

    -surveilled regions. For long term monitoring of such environments, sensors can be deployed with rechargeable their occurrences. Typically, sensors are heavily constrained in terms of energy, and thus energy usage optimally only if events are uncorrelated. Index Terms Rechargeable Sensors, Temporal Correlations, Node

  19. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17

    balance between sensing costs and performance. Inspired from the history of active sensing, in this dissertation, we developed active sensing algorithms that address three different computational problems in chemical sensing. First, we consider...

  20. Creating 35 mm Camera Active Pixel Sensors by Glenn Chapman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    #12;Creating 35 mm Camera Active Pixel Sensors by Glenn Chapman* and Yves Audet** * Simon Fraser Pixel Sensor imaging area device is studied which would be ideal for use with standard 35 mm cameras.5 per sq. cm. By being a retrofit for current 35 mm cameras, and having larger photodiode pixels than

  1. Active pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Matthew (Matthew L.)

    2005-01-01

    An active pixel sensor array, APS-1, has been fabricated for the purpose of scientific x-ray detection. This thesis presents the results of testing the device. Alternate design architectures are explored. Recommendations ...

  2. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING: structural health monitoring (SHM), piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), nondestructive evaluation (NDE sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for structural health monitoring (SHM). After

  3. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  4. Activity Recognition in Wide Aerial Video Surveillance Using Entity Relationship Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    video surveillance us- ing Entity Relationship Models (ERM). In this approach, finding an activity using the ERM framework. We also show how visual tracks can be better interpreted as activities by using Relationship Model (ERM) [3] frame- work (Fig. 1). The ERM is an appropriate framework to capture multiple

  5. Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology in intact adult fruit flies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Gilles

    Evaluating a genetically encoded optical sensor of neural activity using electrophysiology. However, the interpretation of images of brain activity produced using such sensors is not straightforward. Several recent studies of sensory coding used G-CaMP 1.3--a calcium sensor--as an indicator of neural

  6. Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Space Application of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring** V class of structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper presents and discusses with conclusions and suggestions for further work. Key Words: structural health monitoring, piezoelectric, sensors

  7. Activity recognition with end-user sensor installation in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockinson, Randy Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a system for recognizing activities in the home setting that uses a set of small and simple state-change sensors, machine learning algorithms, and electronic experience sampling is introduced. The sensors are ...

  8. Clustering-based Active Learning on Sensor Type Classification in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weimer, Westley

    study on metadata collected from over 20 different sensor types and 2,500 sen- sor streams in threeClustering-based Active Learning on Sensor Type Classification in Buildings Dezhi Hong, Hongning- lenge. Based on the large deployment of sensors in modern commercial buildings, many organizations

  9. Parameterized Trajectories for Target Localization Using Small and Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langelaan, Jack W.

    Parameterized Trajectories for Target Localization Using Small and Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles uninhabited aerial vehi- cles using a family of pre-computed parameterized trajectories. These trajectories with respect to relative vehicle speed, sensor range, and sensor update rate allows the same table to be used

  10. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  11. An Activity-Based Sensor Networks Course for Undergraduates with Sun SPOT Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Nirupama

    An Activity-Based Sensor Networks Course for Undergraduates with Sun SPOT Devices Damon Tyman that had previously been entirely lecture-based. For the laboratory exercises, we utilized Sun's Java-programmable Sun SPOT [7] sensor network technology. We found the Sun SPOT based laboratory activities to be quite

  12. Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors predictive modeling and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors ­ predictive modeling of the state of the art in structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and follows with conclusions and suggestions for further work Key Words: structural health monitoring, SHM, nondestructive

  13. Aerial Measuring System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20

    To establish policy for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Program. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  14. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Terzo; A. Macchiolo; R. Nisius; B. Paschen

    2014-11-20

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of $1.4\\times10^{16}n_{eq}/cm^{2}$.

  15. 722 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 11, NO. 3, MARCH 2011 A Fluid Dynamic Based Coordination of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    of a Wireless Sensor Network of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: 3-D Simulation and Wireless Communication on smoothed par- ticle hydrodynamics (SPH) is proposed for coordination of a team of unmanned aerial vehicles hydrody- namics, unmanned aerial vehicles, wireless sensor network. I. INTRODUCTION UNMANNED aerial

  16. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    -run perturbations are presented. Index Terms--Error suppression, microelectromechanical sys- tems (MEMS), rate integrating gyroscopes, smart MEMS. I. INTRODUCTION AS MICROELECTROMECHANICAL systems (MEMS) inertial sensorsIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

  17. Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring with Coupled-Filed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Finite Element Simulation of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring) is emerging as an effective and powerful technique in structural health monitoring (SHM). Modeling to analytical calculation and experimental data. Key words: Structural Health Monitoring, PWAS, finite element

  18. Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural Health Monitoring with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Space Applications Adrian detection and structural health monitoring. Where appropriate, comparison between different methods-coupling coefficient I. Introduction STRUCTURAL health monitoring (SHM) is an emerging research area with multiple

  19. Characterization of Three-Dimensional-Integrated Active Pixel Sensor for X-Ray Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bautz, Marshall W.

    We have developed a back-illuminated active pixel sensor (APS) which includes an SOI readout circuit and a silicon diode detector array implemented in a separate high-resistivity wafer. Both are connected together using a ...

  20. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Instrumentation for Rapid Aerial Photo System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01

    This research will proposed a new kind of relatively low cost autonomous UAV that will enable farmers to make just in time mosaics of aerial photo of their crop. These mosaics of aerial photo should be able to be produced with relatively low cost and within the 24 hours of acquisition constraint. The autonomous UAV will be equipped with payload management system specifically developed for rapid aerial mapping. As mentioned before turn around time is the key factor, so accuracy is not the main focus (not orthorectified aerial mapping). This system will also be equipped with special software to post process the aerial photos to produce the mosaic aerial photo map

  1. Scheduling Sensor Activity for Point Information Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Vikram

    , to monitor some targets of interests at all times. Sensors are often equipped with non-rechargeable batteries such that all targets can be monitored all the time and the network can operate as long as possible. A solution network is the coverage problem [2], which addresses how well a target area is monitored. In some

  2. Rail Sensor Testbed Program: Active Agents in Containers for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . Project Sponsor: Office of Naval Research Contract: N00014-07-1-1042 The University of Kansas Technical of the project, we have developed several data mining algorithms to enable intelligent agents to detect changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4. Data Mining Foundation of Anomaly Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks 10 4.1. Network

  3. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC, ARCHITECTURAL, ENGINEERING, AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC,...

  4. The DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbe, John M.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Chand, Duli; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Biraud, S.; McFarquhar, Greg

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties, mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months), and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF). The airborne observations acquired by the AAF enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in-situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval-algorithm development, and model evaluation that are not possible using ground- or satellite-based techniques. Several ARM aerial efforts were consolidated into the AAF in 2006. With the exception of a small aircraft used for routine measurements of aerosols and carbon cycle gases, AAF at the time had no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments at its disposal. In this "virtual hangar" mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, AAF started managing operations of the Battelle-owned Gulfstream I (G-1) large twin-turboprop research aircraft. Furthermore, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of over twenty new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments.

  5. Demo Abstract: BlimpProbe: An Aerial Surveillance Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    of wind turbines which maximize the amount of renewable energy generation. Since wind and weather patterns Unmanned aerial vehicles, mobile sensors, environmental monitoring 1. INTRODUCTION Recently, we have seen) Blimps can hover above a target area for an extensive time with little or no energy expenditure, enabling

  6. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahawi, RA; Dandois, JP; Holl, KD; Nadwodny, D; Reid, JL; Ellis, EC

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles will revolutionizelightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropicalfrom lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-

  7. An Experiment in Hierarchical Recognition of Group Activities using Wearable Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    /office setting. One node was connected to a smart-phone using a USB adapter and acted as a bridge between the WSN equipped with 3D acceleration sensors were attached to coffee mugs (Smart Mugs) in a university and the smart-phone. The nodes sampled activity and context data at the mugs, processed this data to the d

  8. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  9. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b) the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance

  10. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR the onset and progress of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b

  11. Tuned Lamb Wave Excitation and Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    and detect tuned Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is explored. First, a brief review of Lamb waves mode Lamb waves is demonstrated as an effective structural health monitoring method. Key Words: structural health monitoring, Lamb waves, piezoelectric wafer active sensors, aging aircraft, cracks, damage

  12. Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    41 Piezoelectric Wafer Embedded Active Sensors for Aging Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring ends with a conceptual design of a structural health monitoring system and suggestions for aging damage detection Á structural health monitoring Á failure prevention Á ultrasonics Á pulse-echo Á emitter

  13. SPATIO-TEMPORAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROSOLS THROUGH ACTIVE USE OF DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    climate change related studies. In recent years remote sensing instruments of various properties have been. Aerosol concentration and chemical properties are important parameters in climate change modelsSPATIO-TEMPORAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROSOLS THROUGH ACTIVE USE OF DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS Z

  14. BodyScope: A Wearable Acoustic Sensor for Activity Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    , speaking, laughing, and coughing. The F-measure of the Support Vector Machine classification of 12 of activities (e.g., eating, drinking, speaking, laughing and coughing) with BodyScope reveals that the system

  15. ARM Aerial Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act LogogovDataValue-AddedgovSitesAerial

  16. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, T.V.

    1996-06-11

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate there through to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex. 23 figs.

  17. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Tuan V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

  18. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar BoundaryLayer Flow --Part II: Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary­Layer Flow -- Part II: Use of Sensors growth and stabilize the instabilities within the laminar boundary layer. This scenario is shown in Fig

  19. Aerial Measuring System in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, C., Colton, D. P.

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency’s Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring System’s mission beyond the borders of the US.

  20. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hi Gyu

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor ...

  1. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  2. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Rymaszewski; Marlon Barbero; Patrick Breugnon; Stépahnie Godiot; Laura Gonella; Tomasz Hemperek; Toko Hirono; Fabian Hügging; Hans Krüger; Jian Liu; Patrick Pangaud; Ivan Peric; Alexandre Rozanov; Anqing Wang; Norbert Wermes

    2016-01-04

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  3. Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, P. P.

    2012-07-16

    This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

  4. Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

  5. International-Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) Training Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotre T.; Malchor, Russell L.; Maurer, Richard J.; Adams, Henry L.

    2015-10-01

    Since the Fukushima reactor accident in 2011, there has been an increased interest worldwide in developing national capabilities to rapidly map and assess ground contamination resulting from nuclear reactor accidents. The capability to rapidly measure the size of the contaminated area, determine the activity level, and identify the radionuclides can aid emergency managers and decision makers in providing timely protective action recommendations to the public and first responders. The development of an aerial detection capability requires interagency coordination to assemble the radiation experts, detection system operators, and aviation aircrews to conduct the aerial measurements, analyze and interpret the data, and provide technical assessments. The Office of International Emergency Management and Cooperation (IEMC) at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsors an International - Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) training program for partner nations to develop and enhance their response to radiological emergencies. An initial series of courses can be conducted in the host country to assist in developing an aerial detection capability. As the capability develops and expands, additional experience can be gained through advanced courses with the opportunity to conduct aerial missions over a broad range of radiation environments.

  6. AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANUAL FOR AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES IN SWEDEN NILS YEAR for aerial photo interpretation 1 www-nils.slu.se SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics. 901 83 Umeå, Sweden #12;NILS ­ manual for aerial photo interpretation 2 Table of contents 1 About NILS

  7. Wireless Relay Communications with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    1 Wireless Relay Communications with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Performance and Optimization in which Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are used as relays between ground-based terminals and a network node and relay assignments as the topology of the network evolves. Index Terms: unmanned aerial

  8. Acquisition and registration of aerial video imagery of urban traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, Rohan C

    2008-01-01

    The amount of information available about urban traffic from aerial video imagery is extremely high. Here we discuss the collection of such video imagery from a helicopter platform with a low-cost sensor, and the post-processing used to correct radial distortion in the data and register it. The radial distortion correction is accomplished using a Harris model. The registration is implemented in a two-step process, using a globally applied polyprojective correction model followed by a fine scale local displacement field adjustment. The resulting cleaned-up data is sufficiently well-registered to allow subsequent straight-forward vehicle tracking.

  9. Application of piezoelectric active-sensors for SHM of wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-04

    The goal of this study is to characterize the dynamic response of a CX-100 wind blade and the design parameters of SHM techniques as they apply to wind turbine blades, and to investigate the performance of high-frequency active-sensing SHM techniques, including lamb wave and frequency response functions, as a way to monitor the health of a wind turbine blade. The results of the dynamic characterization will be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. The focus of SHM study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage, with a special consideration given to field deployability. For experiments, a 9-m CX-100 blade was used. Overall, the methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of 9-m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active-sensors.

  10. A Monolithic active pixel sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180nm HV-SOI process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Hemperek; Tetsuichi Kishishita; Hans Krüger; Norbert Wermes

    2015-02-23

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffer from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry witch mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples.

  11. Robustness Analysis of Genetic Programming Controllers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Robustness Analysis of Genetic Programming Controllers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Gregory J to operate the vehicle safely. We have evolved navigation controllers for unmanned aerial vehicles programming, robustness, trans- ference, unmanned aerial vehicles Gregory J. Barlow is also affiliated

  12. Trajectory Optimization for Target Localization Using Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajectory Optimization for Target Localization Using Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Sameera S. Ponda , Richard M. Kolacinski and Emilio Frazzoli Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped in technology are encouraging the use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for intelli- gence

  13. Aerial Photography | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan UKRenewable2004) | OpenAerial

  14. iCalm: Wearable Sensor and Network Architecture for Wirelessly Communicating and Logging Autonomic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Kelly

    Widespread use of affective sensing in healthcare applications has been limited due to several practical factors, such as lack of comfortable wearable sensors, lack of wireless standards, and lack of low-power affordable ...

  15. Activity recognition in the home setting using simple and ubiquitous sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munguia Tapia, Emmanuel, 1978-

    2003-01-01

    During the past several years, researchers have demonstrated that when new wireless sensors are placed in the home environment, data collected from them can be used by software to automatically infer context, such as the ...

  16. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  17. myCopter Enabling Technologies for Personal Aerial Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fua, Pascal

    Transport System PAV Personal Aerial Vehicle PPL Private pilot license UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle 1 towards a Personal Aerial Transportation System, in which vehicles would also have vertical spaceCopter project aims to provide a basis for a transportation system based on Per- sonal Aerial Vehicles

  18. Active time scheduling for rechargeable sensor networks Volodymyr Pryyma, Damla Turgut and Ladislau Boloni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    a significant performance advantage. Key words: rechargeable, energy harvesting, sensor network 1. Introduction that energy is acquired through a solar cell, thus it is dependent on the weather (more exactly, the available, FL 32816­2362 Email: vpryyma,turgut,lboloni@eecs.ucf.edu Abstract Recent progress in energy

  19. Making Sensor Networks Accessible to Undergraduates Through Activity-Based Laboratory Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulusu, Nirupama

    used the SunSPOT devices [1] which have been made publicly available by Sun Microsystems since April 2007. SunSPOTs are programmed in Java, relieving the necessity of students having to learn Tiny for a concentration on sensor network concepts such as localization, wireless communication, and power management

  20. Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    technique for structural health monitoring. The E/M impedance method utilizes as its main apparatus Fourier Transform, PWAS, impedance analyzer 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a method International Symposium on NDE for Health Monitoring and Diagnostics, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies

  1. Nanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    efficiently convert the vortex motion in the atmosphere into electricity. Based on the Karman vortex street in wireless environmental monitoring networks. 1. Introduction Self-powered nanosystem is a promising concept for the realization of environmental wireless sensor networks. Due to the enormous demands of distributed nodes

  2. Advanced Detector Research - Fabrication and Testing of 3D Active-Edge Silicon Sensors: High Speed, High Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Sherwood I

    2008-09-01

    Development of 3D silicon radiation sensors employing electrodes fabricated perpendicular to the sensor surfaces to improve fabrication yields and increasing pulse speeds.

  3. Vision-Based Following of Structures Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Sivakumar; Kim, ZuWhan; Sengupta, Raja

    2006-01-01

    landing of an unmanned aerial vehicle,” in Proceedings offor Landing an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle,” in Proceedings ofStructures Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Sivakumar

  4. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  5. Measurements on HV-CMOS Active Sensors After Irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ristic; for the ATLAS CMOS pixel collaboration

    2015-01-13

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to $2\\cdot10^{16}\\,\\text{n}_\\text{eq}\\text{cm}^{-2}$ are presented.

  6. MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL VEHICLE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OPPORTUNITIES WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFER ACTIVE and the research needs are also discussed. INTRODUCTION Structural Health Monitoring is a major component of the remaining structural life. For the health monitoring of an actual structure, networks of embedded active

  7. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.B. Thien

    2006-03-01

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage to the actual pipeline itself, the proposed methods were used to demonstrate the capability of detecting deposits inside of pipelines. Monitoring these deposits can prevent clogging and other hazardous situations. Finally, suggestions are made regarding future research issues which are needed to advance this research. Because the research of this thesis has only demonstrated the feasibility of the techniques for such a SHM system, these issues require attention before any commercial applications can be realized.

  8. Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    1 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination F.B. da Silva S.D. Scott-mail: halab@mit.edu #12;2 Design Methodology for Unmannded Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Team Coordination by F.B. da Silva, S.D. Scott, and M.L. Cummings Executive Summary Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems, despite

  9. Visibility Maximization with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Complex Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visibility Maximization with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Complex Environments by Kenneth Lee #12;2 #12;Visibility Maximization with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Complex Environments by Kenneth Lee of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract Unmanned aerial

  10. Linkping University Post Print Vision-Based Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Linköping University Post Print Vision-Based Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Navigation Using Geo. Original Publication: Gianpaolo Conte and Patrick Doherty, Vision-Based Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Navigation.1155/2009/387308 Research Article Vision-Based Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Navigation Using Geo-Referenced Information Gianpaolo

  11. A Distributed Architecture for Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    A Distributed Architecture for Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experimentation P. Doherty, P unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) research has shown rapid development in recent years and offers a great of distributed AI technologies. #12;The WITAS1 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Project2 [4] is a basic research project

  12. Advanced Research with Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Patrick Doherty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Advanced Research with Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Patrick Doherty Department of Computer Abstract The emerging area of intelligent unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) research has shown rapid for the development and integration of distributed AI technologies. The WITAS1 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Project

  13. Autonomous Controller Design for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Autonomous Controller Design for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Multi-objective Genetic Programming controllers were developed for fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications using multi well to real UAVs. 2 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Simulation The focus of this research was the development

  14. OBJECT TRACKING IN AERIAL VIDEO OF SMOKY ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    objects in video of smoky regions provided by unmanned aerial vehicles. Such moving objects may include Detection, Neural Networks, Support Vec- tor Machines. 1 Introduction Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV be raised automatically when an individual is presumed to be in harm's way. Keywords: Unmanned Aerial

  15. TOWARDS MULTIMODAL OMNIDIRECTIONAL OBSTACLE DETECTION FOR AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    TOWARDS MULTIMODAL OMNIDIRECTIONAL OBSTACLE DETECTION FOR AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES Dirk of concept. 1 INTRODUCTION AND RELATED WORK Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are particularly useful in ap mapping of inaccessible areas and objects, we aim at de- veloping an unmanned aerial vehicle that is able

  16. Aerospace Industry Opportunities in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, K. C.

    Aerospace Industry Opportunities in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs) - Are They Ready Technology Forum Report titled "Study of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Market in Australia", by Dr KC in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs) - Are They Ready This Time? Are We? Dr K.C. Wong1 Department

  17. Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini B;Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini Submitted for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract The operation of unmanned aerial

  18. Robust Trajectory Planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Uncertain Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robust Trajectory Planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Uncertain Environments by Brandon Luders;Robust Trajectory Planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Uncertain Environments by Brandon Luders of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract As unmanned aerial

  19. BScope: A Scalable, Run-Time Architecture for Activity Recognition Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teixeira, Thiago

    be con- nected together into hierarchies to provide even more com- plex interpretations. The power are used to generate summaries of daily activities and to trigger various levels of alarms as well as cell-phone

  20. Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, Adam Ian

    2005-01-01

    The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

  1. CMOS Photodiodes with Substrate Openings for Higher Conversion Gain in Active Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    . Lee, R. I. Hornsey Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario by a source-follower; the capacitance of the device determines the conversion gain. In the case of CMOS active

  2. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    interrogation with unmanned aerial vehicles. In Proceedings05] and a UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) in structural health

  3. A Reconfigurable Active Retrodirective/Direct Conversion Receiver Array for Wireless Sensor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    of California, Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 Abstract -- A reconfigurable active time. In a retrodirective system, the communication link between the transponder and base station can (a), the array system works as a direct conversion receiver and stores data received from remote

  4. Revealing Protocol Information and Activity from Energy Instrumentation in Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnawali, Omprakash

    of features based on various aspects of energy data and use those features to classify and reveal network based on energy data by doing extensive experiments on three WSN testbeds. Our results from analyzing four-million energy data and ra- dio activity points, indicate that energy instrumentation

  5. Are Wireless Sensors and Controls Ready for the Building Automation Industry? Selected Case Studies and Technology Development Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Brambley, Michael R.

    2006-09-13

    This paper discusses whether or not today’s wireless sensors are ready for building controls and energy efficiency monitoring applications.

  6. Ultralight photovoltaic modules for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowlan, M.J.; Maglitta, J.C.; Darkazalli, G.; Lamp, T.

    1997-12-31

    New lightweight photovoltaic modules are being developed for powering high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Modified low-cost terrestrial solar cell and module technologies are being applied to minimize vehicle cost. New processes were developed for assembling thin solar cells, encapsulant films, and cover films. An innovative by-pass diode mounting approach that uses a solar cell as a heat spreader was devised and tested. Materials and processes will be evaluated through accelerated environmental testing.

  7. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2013-01-01

    classification of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery forSpecifications of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for EarlyBased Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images José

  8. Low Frequency Radio Polarization Sensor with Applications in Attitude Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire, Sean; Robertson, Paul

    2015-08-19

    -based systems in high-acceleration, cost-constrained environments such as small fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In order to validate this method, a sensor system is presented which is capable of determining the H-field polarization of LF radio signals from...

  9. Fault Tolerant SAMI for Vision-Based Probe and Drogue Autonomous Aerial Refueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    to the future deployment of unmanned aerial vehicles is reliable autonomous in-flight aerial refueling.1,2 Two for practical autonomous aerial refuel- ing. The refueling scenario of an unmanned tanker aircraft refueling. 2 provides an overview of the various challenges involved in aerial refueling for unmanned aerial

  10. Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal, node energy, etc), the collected data are transmitted to their final destination, usually a fusion

  11. NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Boston...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cover approximately 25 square miles. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be...

  12. NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over Washington,...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    occurring background radiation. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be...

  13. Energy-Efficient Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardei, Mihaela

    successively. Only the sensors from the current active set are responsible for monitoring all targets

  14. Decision Support Visualizations for Schedule Management of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    Decision Support Visualizations for Schedule Management of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Amy S, 02139 Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are quickly becoming indispensable in military operations aerial vehicles (UAVs) for reconnaissance, surveillance, and attack missions, and there is also

  15. Advanced sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-08-01

    This article examines how advances in sensor technology are beginning to close the gap with advances in other parts of the control and sensing loops; these advances are needed to more easily meet new EPA regulations and demand for more efficient power plant operation. Topics of the article include fiberoptic sensors, sensors for the air side of the plant, and water side sensors.

  16. Current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-01-16

    A current sensor is described that uses a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The sensor can be hinged to allow clamping to a conductor. The current sensor provides high measurement accuracy for both DC and AC currents, and is substantially immune to the effects of temperature, conductor position, nearby current carrying conductors and aging.

  17. Category:Aerial Photography | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°, -86.3376761°AnadromousASHRAE ClimateAerial

  18. Aerial Measuring System | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O09OurManagementAerial Measuring

  19. Development of a Carbon Dioxide Monitoring Rotorcraft Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Uwe

    Development of a Carbon Dioxide Monitoring Rotorcraft Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Florian Poppa and Uwe the development of a carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing rotorcraft unmanned aerial vehicle (RUAV) and the experiences stage to prevent potential danger to workforce and material, and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS

  20. Autonomous Orbit Coordination for Two Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonomous Orbit Coordination for Two Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Rolf Rysdyk, Christopher Lum This work considers autonomous coordination between two Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in orbit about a target the vehicles. Guid- ance algorithms are investigated to maintain an approxi- mately constant phase angle

  1. Environmental Factors Affecting Situation Awareness in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scerri, Paul

    Environmental Factors Affecting Situation Awareness in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Prasanna Velagapudi in the application of unmanned aerial systems to a wide variety of problems. One particular class of vehicle that has of unmanned vehicles. One such factor is the physical proximity of operators to the vehicle during deployment

  2. Fusion of Electromyographic Signals with Proprioceptive Sensor Data in Myoelectric Pattern Recognition for Control of Active Transfemoral Leg Prostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    Fusion of Electromyographic Signals with Proprioceptive Sensor Data in Myoelectric Pattern on electromyographic data. The use of surface electromyographic signals and additional information related Nknj ekX N nc (1) Assuming that electromyographic signals can be approximated by a normal distribution

  3. Use of Aerial Photography to Monitor Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Richard H.; Dauble, Dennis D.); Geist, David R.)

    2002-11-01

    This paper compares two methods for enumerating salmon redds and their application to monitoring spawning activity. Aerial photographs of fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River were digitized and mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques in 1994 and 1995 as part of an annual assessment of the population. The number of visible redds from these photographs were compared to counts obtained from visual surveys with fixed wing aircraft. The proportion of the total redds within each of five general survey areas was similar for the two monitoring techniques. However, the total number of redds based on aerial photographs was 2.2 and 3.0 times higher than those observed during visual surveys for 1994 and 1995, respectively. The divergence in redd counts was most evident near peak spawning activity when the number of redds within individual spawning clusters exceeded 500. Aerial photography improved our ability to monitor numbers of visible salmon redds and to quantify habitat use.

  4. Vibration detection in turbomachinery using non-contacting sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Eric D., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments have seen the introduction of multiple Eddy Current Sensors (ECS) into turbomachinery. These sensors employ an active magnetic field to monitor each blade as it passes the sensor. They generate an ...

  5. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  6. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  7. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  8. Monitoring of bolted joints using piezoelectric active-sensing for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R; Park, Chan - Yik; Jun, Seung - Moon

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a report of an initial investigation into tracking and monitoring the integrity of bolted joints using piezoelectric active-sensors. The target application of this study is a fitting lug assembly of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), where a composite wing is mounted to a UAV fuselage. The SHM methods deployed in this study are impedance-based SHM techniques, time-series analysis, and high-frequency response functions measured by piezoelectric active-sensors. Different types of simulated damage are introduced into the structure, and the capability of each technique is examined and compared. Additional considerations encountered in this initial investigation are made to guide further thorough research required for the successful field deployment of this technology.

  9. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

  10. Dynamic Model and Control of a New Quadrotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with Tilt-Wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Dynamic Model and Control of a New Quadrotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with Tilt-Wing Mechanism Kaan, LQR, Quadrotor, Tilt-wing, VTOL. I. INTRODUCTION Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) designed for various of a new tilt-wing aerial vehicle (SUAVi: Sabanci University Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) that is capable

  11. Hybrid Modeling and Experimental Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    Hybrid Modeling and Experimental Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Selcuk growing interest in the development of networks of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (U.A.V.s), as aerial focused on single aerial vehicles. In particular, we have witnessed autonomous or aggressive control

  12. Aerial Righting, Directed Aerial Descent, and Maneuvering in the Evolution of Flight in Birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangelista, Dennis Jose

    2013-01-01

    use of a force sensor and 3D printer. Chapter 4 Disturbancewere then output to a 3D printer (ProJet HD 3000; 3D Systems

  13. An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phoenix, K.A.

    1997-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

  14. Aerial Photography At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 1975 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Petersen, C.A. Masters Thesis at the University of Utah Notes USGS aerial photography (scale 1:40,000) interpreted...

  15. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahawi, RA; Dandois, JP; Holl, KD; Nadwodny, D; Reid, JL; Ellis, EC

    2015-01-01

    multirotor hexacopter’ UAV using R.A. Zahawi et al. /and Ellis, 2013). The UAV was equipped with a lithium-unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-effective

  16. Georectification of Historic Aerial Photographs for Douglas County, Kansas (PRESENTATION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2004-12-22

    This presentation describes a project to georeference and georectify historic aerial photographs for Douglas County in northeastern Kansas. The University of Kansas Libraries wanted to enhance an air photo archive and allow integration with other...

  17. Visibility maximization with unmanned aerial vehicles in complex environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kenneth (Kenneth King Ho)

    2010-01-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles are used extensively in persistent surveillance, search and track, border patrol, and environment monitoring applications. Each of these applications requires the obtainment of information using a ...

  18. Motion Planning for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with Resource Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundar, Kaarthik

    2012-10-19

    Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are currently used in several surveillance applications to monitor a set of targets and collect relevant data. One of the main constraints that characterize a small UAV is the maximum amount of fuel the vehicle...

  19. Natural language processing for unmanned aerial vehicle guidance interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craparo, Emily M. (Emily Marie), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the opportunities and challenges involved in applying natural language processing techniques to the control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are addressed. The problem of controlling an unmanned aircraft ...

  20. A distributed embedded software architecture for multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matczynski, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    In order to deploy intelligent, next-generation applications on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), we must first develop a software architecture that supports onboard computation and flexible communication. This thesis ...

  1. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis.more »The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).« less

  2. Design of a GaAs/Ge solar array for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheiman, D.A.; Colozza, A.J.; Brinker, D.J.; Bents, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being proposed for many applications including surveillance, mapping and atmospheric studies. These applications require a lightweight, low speed, medium to long duration airplane. Due to the weight, speed, and altitude constraints imposed on such aircraft, solar array generated electric power is a viable alternative to air-breathing engines. Development of such aircraft is currently being funded under the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is currently building a Solar Electric Airplane to demonstrate UAV technology. This aircraft utilizes high efficiency Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) GaAs/Ge space solar cells. The cells have been provided by the Air Force through the ManTech Office. Expected completion of the plane is early 1995, with the airplane currently undergoing flight testing using battery power.

  3. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).

  4. Design of a GaAs/Ge solar array for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheiman, D.A.; Brinker, D.J.; Bents, D.J.; Colozza, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being proposed for many applications including surveillance, mapping and atmospheric studies. These applications require a lightweight, low speed, medium to long duration airplane. Due to the weight, speed, and altitude constraints imposed on such aircraft, solar array generated electric power is a viable alternative to air-breathing engines. Development of such aircraft is currently being funded under the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is currently building a Solar Electric Airplane to demonstrate UAV technology. This aircraft utilizes high efficiency Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) GaAs/Ge space solar cells. The cells have been provided by the Air Force through the ManTech Office. Expected completion of the plane is early 1995, with the airplane currently undergoing flight testing using battery power.

  5. Solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhardt, K.C.; Lamp, T.R.; Geis, J.W.; Colozza, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis was performed to determine the impact of various power system components and mission requirements on the size of solar-powered high altitude long endurance (HALE)-type aircraft. The HALE unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has good potential for use in many military and civil applications. The primary power system components considered in this study were photovoltaic (PV) modules for power generation and regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. The impact of relevant component performance on UAV size and capability were considered; including PV module efficiency and mass, power electronics efficiency, and fuel cell specific energy. Mission parameters such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power were also varied to determine impact on UAV size. The aircraft analysis method used determines the required aircraft wing aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass based on maximum endurance or minimum required power calculations. The results indicate that the capacity of the energy storage system employed, fuel cells in this analysis, greatly impacts aircraft size, whereas the impact of PV module efficiency and mass is much less important. It was concluded that an energy storage specific energy (total system) of 250--500 Whr/kg is required to enable most useful missions, and that PV cells with efficiencies greater than {approximately} 12% are suitable for use.

  6. With the development of the MEMS technology and of wireless networking, the sensor network area has been an active field of research in the last five years. Sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the sensor networks is energy as the nodes are powered with non renewable batteries, and numerous techniques, Anna, Anja og Troels who have given me the motivation to complete the project. I also thank my friends.4 Motivation for Sensor N

  7. Self-Organizing Relay Network Supporting Remotely Deployed Sensor Nodes in Military Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliassen, Frank

    Self-Organizing Relay Network Supporting Remotely Deployed Sensor Nodes in Military Operations Dalimir Orfanus, Frank Eliassen Department of Informatics University of Oslo Oslo, Norway dalimir.orfanus@no.abb. Thus, alternative communications approaches have to be used, such as relay links via unmanned aerial

  8. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  9. Photovoltaic electric power applied to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geis, J.; Arnold, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Photovoltaic electric-powered flight is receiving a great deal of attention in the context of the United States` Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) program. This paper addresses some of the enabling technical areas and their potential solutions. Of particular interest are the long-duration, high-altitude class of UAV`s whose mission it is to achieve altitudes between 60,000 and 100,000 feet, and to remain at those altitudes for prolonged periods performing various mapping and surveillance activities. Addressed herein are studies which reveal the need for extremely light-weight and efficient solar cells, high-efficiency electric motor-driven propeller modules, and power management and distribution control elements. Since the potential payloads vary dramatically in their power consumption and duty cycles, a typical load profile has been selected to provide commonality for the propulsion power comparisons. Since missions vary widely with respect to ground coverage requirements, from repeated orbiting over a localized target to long-distance routes over irregular terrain, the authors have also averaged the power requirements for on-board guidance and control power, as well as ground control and communication link utilization. In the context of the national technology reinvestment program, wherever possible they modeled components and materials which have been qualified for space and defense applications, yet are compatible with civilian UAV activities. These include, but are not limited to, solar cell developments, electric storage technology for diurnal operation, local and ground communications, power management and distribution, and control servo design. And finally, the results of tests conducted by Wright Laboratory on ultralight, highly efficient MOCVD GaAs solar cells purchased from EPI Materials Ltd. (EML) of the UK are presented. These cells were also used for modeling the flight characteristics of UAV aircraft.

  10. Coresident sensor fusion and compression using the wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yocky, D.A.

    1996-03-11

    Imagery from coresident sensor platforms, such as unmanned aerial vehicles, can be combined using, multiresolution decomposition of the sensor images by means of the two-dimensional wavelet transform. The wavelet approach uses the combination of spatial/spectral information at multiple scales to create a fused image. This can be done in both an ad hoc or model-based approach. We compare results from commercial ``fusion`` software and the ad hoc, wavelet approach. Results show the wavelet approach outperforms the commercial algorithms and also supports efficient compression of the fused image.

  11. Operational Capability to be Provided: aerial robots that fly slowly, autonomously avoiding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Paul

    obstacles to visually monitor closed quarters Concept: CQAR (Closed-Quarters Aerial Robotics) Scenario floors - Populated - Congested Examples Technical Approach: Airfoil Data and Design: Low Reynolds number Markets: DARPA (Organic Aerial Vehicle Program), ONR and ARL (Future Capabilities), SEPTA (maintenance

  12. Avionics and control system development for mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sanghyuk, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    A flight control system was developed to achieve mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a part of the Parent Child Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (PCUAV) project at MIT and the Draper Laboratory. A lateral ...

  13. Annotating Smart Environment Sensor Data for Activity Learning S. Szewcyzk, K. Dwan, B. Minor, B.Swedlove, and D. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative

  14. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation

  15. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Six Years of Aerial and Ground Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium 323 Six Years of Aerial and Ground that causes sudden oak death (SOD). Each year the aerial and ground surveys monitored much of California of California forest and woodland were flown by helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft over six years of aerial

  16. An Optimization-based Approach to Time Critical Cooperative Surveillance and Coverage with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Aerial Vehicles Ali Ahmadzadeh, James Keller, George J. Pappas, Ali Jadbabaie and Vijay Kumar I, elec- trically powered fixed-wing aerial vehicle that feature body fixed cameras to provide a low OF SMALL, ELECTRICALLY POWERED FIXED-WING AERIAL VEHICLE THAT FEATURE BODY FIXED CAMERAS Speed (airspeed

  17. Effect of Auditory Peripheral Displays On Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Operator Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    Effect of Auditory Peripheral Displays On Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Operator Performance of Defense, or the U.S. Government. #12;Effect of Auditory Peripheral Displays On Unmanned Aerial Vehicle in Engineering Systems Abstract With advanced autonomy, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operations

  18. Real-time Trajectory Design for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Receding Horizon Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real-time Trajectory Design for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Receding Horizon Control by Yoshiaki Students #12;2 #12;Real-time Trajectory Design for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles using Receding Horizon Control This thesis investigates the coordination and control of fleets of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Future

  19. Words at the Right Time: Real-Time Dialogues with the WITAS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Words at the Right Time: Real-Time Dialogues with the WITAS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Extended UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), in our case a helicopter. Its dialogue-system subprojects address Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Project 14,15] is an ambitious, long- term basic research project whose main

  20. A PRECISE POSITION AND ATTITUDE DETERMINATION SYSTEM FOR LIGHTWEIGHT UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    A PRECISE POSITION AND ATTITUDE DETERMINATION SYSTEM FOR LIGHTWEIGHT UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES.wieland)@igg.uni-bonn.de, heiner.kuhlmann@uni-bonn.de KEY WORDS: Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, Direct Georeferencing, RTK-GPS, IMU, Extended Kalman Filtering, Real Time Operating System ABSTRACT: In many unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV

  1. The Georgia Tech Unmanned Aerial Research Vehicle: GTMax Eric N. Johnson* and Daniel P. Schrage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric N.

    The Georgia Tech Unmanned Aerial Research Vehicle: GTMax Eric N. Johnson* and Daniel P. Schrage This paper describes the design, development, and operation of a research Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV be utilized. INTRODUCTION This paper presents the development of an open system Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV

  2. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology Innovations in unmanned varieties of autonomous aerial vehicles, and new ways of utilizing them, offer the potential for making aerial vehicles autonomous and capable of penetrating tunnels, caves, and buildings, so that surveillance

  3. StarVis: A Configural Decision Support Tool for Schedule Management of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) become increasingly autonomousStarVis: A Configural Decision Support Tool for Schedule Management of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Aerial Vehicles by Amy S. Brzezinski Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics

  4. Experimental Dependability Evaluation of a Fail-Bounded Jet Engine Control System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Johan

    engine controller intended for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The controller is implemented. This is especially true for applications such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The market for military UAVs Aerial Vehicles Jonny Vinter1 , Olof Hannius2 , Torbjörn Norlander2 , Peter Folkesson1 , Johan Karlsson1

  5. Modeling and Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Current Status and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Modeling and Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ­ Current Status and Future Directions George have highlighted the potential utility for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Both fixed wing and rotary Reimann, Panos Antsaklis, Kimon Valavanis, "Modeling and Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles­ Current

  6. Situational Awareness of a Ground Robot from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochersberger, Kevin

    Situational Awareness of a Ground Robot from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Daniel Hager Thesis an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Daniel Hager ABSTRACT In the operation of unmanned vehicles, safety is a primary system that allows for safe deployment and operation of a ground robot from an unmanned aerial vehicle

  7. Collaborative Sensing by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles W. T. Luke Teacy, Jing Nie,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Collaborative Sensing by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles W. T. Luke Teacy, Jing Nie, Sally Mc.trigoni,stephen.cameron}@comlab.ox.ac.uk ABSTRACT In many military and civilian applications, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) provide, advances in airframe design and con- trol technology mean that using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs

  8. Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee, and Ioannis Rekleitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee an aerial vehicle. Ex- tensive experimental results in simulation validate the presented system, along. INTRODUCTION This paper presents a realization of an optimal terrain coverage algorithm for an Unmanned Aerial

  9. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest Rakan A. Zahawi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Erle C.

    Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery Rakan A. Zahawi a from lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-effective substitute for tradi- tional field Rica. Ecosynth methods combine aerial images from consumer-grade digital cameras with com- puter vision

  10. Hybrid formation control of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Ali Karimoddini a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Hybrid formation control of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Ali Karimoddini a,b , Hai Lin b, , Ben M December 2010 Keywords: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) Formation control Hybrid supervisory control Polar partitioning a b s t r a c t An essential issue in the formation control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs

  11. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    activities. Many of these records have continuing historical value after they are no longer of use to the Department. This records schedule covers only disposable records...

  12. Risk Management Guide Operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    01-05-15 Risk Management Guide Operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's) The use of drones, model aircraft, and other UAV's pose a risk of injury and property damage and therefore, any flight of a UAV Canada Requirements UAV operations for University purposes are deemed by Transport Canada to be "non

  13. U. S. Department of Energy Aerial Measuring Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. J. Lease

    1998-10-01

    The Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) is an aerial surveillance system. This system consists of remote sensing equipment to include radiation detectors; multispectral, thermal, radar, and laser scanners; precision cameras; and electronic imaging and still video systems. This equipment, in varying combinations, is mounted in an airplane or helicopter and flown at different heights in specific patterns to gather various types of data. This system is a key element in the US Department of Energy's (DOE) national emergency response assets. The mission of the AMS program is twofold--first, to respond to emergencies involving radioactive materials by conducting aerial surveys to rapidly track and map the contamination that may exist over a large ground area and second, to conduct routinely scheduled, aerial surveys for environmental monitoring and compliance purposes through the use of credible science and technology. The AMS program evolved from an early program, begun by a predecessor to the DOE--the Atomic Energy Commission--to map the radiation that may have existed within and around the terrestrial environments of DOE facilities, which produced, used, or stored radioactive materials.

  14. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    analysis activities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 failure analysis activities. No abstract prepared. Authors:...

  15. Predictable and Controllable Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    .roedig|c.sreenan}@cs.ucc.ie Abstract: Research activity in the area of wireless sensor networks has grown dramatically in the past few and reliability, raising concerns over their use in scenarios like mission critical production environments on Wireless Sensor Networks [1]. The volume of activity is further illustrated by recent IEEE magazines

  16. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Jarman, Kristin K. (Richland, WA); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  17. Ultrasensitive surveillance of sensors and processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Jarman, Kristin K. (Richland, WA); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a source of data for determining an operating state of a working system. The method includes determining a sensor (or source of data) arrangement associated with monitoring the source of data for a system, activating a method for performing a sequential probability ratio test if the data source includes a single data (sensor) source, activating a second method for performing a regression sequential possibility ratio testing procedure if the arrangement includes a pair of sensors (data sources) with signals which are linearly or non-linearly related; activating a third method for performing a bounded angle ratio test procedure if the sensor arrangement includes multiple sensors and utilizing at least one of the first, second and third methods to accumulate sensor signals and determining the operating state of the system.

  18. Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Characterization of Sensor Performance and Durability for Structural Health Monitoring Systems with regard to successfully implementing Structural Health Monitoring technologies in Air Force systems sensor system design and packaging. Keywords: Structural Health Monitoring, Piezo Wafer Active Sensors

  19. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  20. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  1. Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    of heterogeneous physical sensors. For example, on an intelligent construction site, users may desire the cranesVirtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2006-001 Sanem Kabadayi Adam Pridgen Christine Julien © Copyright 2006 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Virtual Sensors

  2. Building Adaptable Sensor Networks with Sensor Cubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, George

    (battery voltage, charge/discharge current, input power, ...) Wireless link: · To nearby sensor modules of autonomous wireless sensor module Alternative hardware implementation using solder ball interconnect technology Wireless sensor module on 2 EUR coin Sensor module hardware Wide application range requires

  3. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  4. Aerial Surveillance and the Fourth Amendment – California v. Ciraolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corse, John

    1987-01-01

    policeman perched on a double decker bus might have been able to see into the defendant's backyard, is troubling. Such logic suggests an unusually high burden for satisfying the first prong of the Katz test. An individual should not be required to protect... of a double decker bus represents only an unfortunate overstatement by the Court. Perhaps the Court intended to suggest that an individual's sub-jective expectation of privacy from aerial surveillance should be evaluated by his conduct vis a vis...

  5. An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

  6. Synthesis of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote control augmentation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczyk, Andrzej

    2014-12-10

    Medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) usually flies as an autonomous aircraft including automatic take-off and landing phases. However in the case of the on-board control system failure, the remote steering is using as an emergency procedure. In this reason, remote manual control of unmanned aerial vehicle is used more often during take-of and landing phases. Depends on UAV take-off mass and speed (total energy) the potential crash can be very danger for airplane and environment. So, handling qualities of UAV is important from pilot-operator point of view. In many cases the dynamic properties of remote controlling UAV are not suitable for obtaining the desired properties of the handling qualities. In this case the control augmentation system (CAS) should be applied. Because the potential failure of the on-board control system, the better solution is that the CAS algorithms are placed on the ground station computers. The method of UAV handling qualities shaping in the case of basic control system failure is presented in this paper. The main idea of this method is that UAV reaction on the operator steering signals should be similar - almost the same - as reaction of the 'ideal' remote control aircraft. The model following method was used for controller parameters calculations. The numerical example concerns the medium size MP-02A UAV applied as an aerial observer system.

  7. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  8. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  9. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  10. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  11. Vision-based estimation and control of airdrop vehicles for aerial deployment of sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hyungil, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiences indicate there are limitations to the surveillance capability of high-value long-distance standoff ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance) platforms such as the latest observation satellites and ...

  12. Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful SmartAcomita Lake,

  13. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5?lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5?lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52?mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V?s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup ?13} A) and OPD (<10{sup ?8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75??m pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ?10?lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50??m. Moreover, the detector entrance exposure per projection can be reduced from 1 to 0.3 mR without a significant reduction of DQE. The signal-to-noise ratio of the a-IGZO APS imager under 0.3 mR x-ray exposure is comparable to that of a-Si:H passive pixel sensor imager under 1 mR, indicating good image quality under low dose. A threefold reduction of current tomosynthesis dose is expected if proposed technology is combined with an advanced DBT image reconstruction method. Conclusions: The proposed a-IGZO APS x-ray imager with a pixel pitch <75??m is capable to achieve a high spatial frequency (>6.67 lp/mm) and a low dose (<0.4 mGy) in next generation DBT systems.

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer to monitor the consump- tion of energy in wireless sensor networks based on video streams com- posed from energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  16. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  17. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-03-28

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  18. Influenza sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-30

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  19. Influenza Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Song, Xuedong (Los Alamos, NM); Unkefer, Clifford (Los Alamos, NM); Silks, III, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-05-17

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  20. Dynamic sensor tasking in heterogeneous, mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter B. (Peter B.), S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Modern sensor environments often attempt to combine several sensors into a single sensor network. The nodes of this network are generally heterogeneous and may vary with respect to sensor complexity, sensor operational ...

  1. Duty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    active and dormant states, so as to conserve energy and extend the network lifetime. Unfortunately fails to capture the uniqueness of energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. The sensor nodesDuty-Cycle-Aware Broadcast in Wireless Sensor Networks Feng Wang Jiangchuan Liu School of Computing

  2. Microcantilever sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, T.G.; Wachter, E.A.

    1998-02-17

    An improved microcantilever sensor is fabricated with at least one microcantilever attached to a piezoelectric transducer. The microcantilever is partially surface treated with a compound selective substance having substantially exclusive affinity for a targeted compound in a monitored atmosphere. The microcantilever sensor is also provided with a frequency detection means and a bending detection means. The frequency detection means is capable of detecting changes in the resonance frequency of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere. The bending detection means is capable of detecting changes in the bending of the vibrated microcantilever in the monitored atmosphere coactively with the frequency detection means. The piezoelectric transducer is excited by an oscillator means which provides a signal driving the transducer at a resonance frequency inducing a predetermined order of resonance on the partially treated microcantilever. Upon insertion into a monitored atmosphere, molecules of the targeted chemical attach to the treated regions of the microcantilever resulting in a change in oscillating mass as well as a change in microcantilever spring constant thereby influencing the resonant frequency of the microcantilever oscillation. Furthermore, the molecular attachment of the target chemical to the treated regions induce areas of mechanical strain in the microcantilever consistent with the treated regions thereby influencing microcantilever bending. The rate at which the treated microcantilever accumulates the target chemical is a function of the target chemical concentration. Consequently, the extent of microcantilever oscillation frequency change and bending is related to the concentration of target chemical within the monitored atmosphere. 16 figs.

  3. Nanostructures and Porous Silicon: Activity at Interfaces in Sensors & Photocatalytic Reactors Chui-Lai Cheung, New York University, 2010 SURF Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    was the anode. The current density was kept constant anywhere between 3 mA/cm2 and 50 mA/cm2 for each individual be formed by etching silicon wafers under a constant current density in HF solutions. These silicon­ as efficient gas sensors, for example. Metal particles can be deposited on the increased surface area

  4. Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Baseline Surveys for Emergency Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, C

    2012-06-04

    Originally established in the 1960s to support the Nuclear Test Program, the AMS mission is to provide a rapid and comprehensive worldwide aerial measurement, analysis, and interpretation capability in response to a nuclear/radiological emergency. AMS provides a responsive team of individuals whose processes allow for a mission to be conducted and completed with results available within hours. This presentation slide-show reviews some of the history of the AMS, summarizes present capabilities and methods, and addresses the value of the surveys.

  5. Sensors and Actuators B 120 (2006) 2534 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    2006-01-01

    Sensors and Actuators B 120 (2006) 25­34 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors via novel of solid-state ceramic-based chemical sensors. High selectivity, enhanced sensitivity and short response activity of ceramics are largely microstructure-dominated, benign surface features such as small grain size

  6. Configurable dynamic privacy for pervasive sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Nan-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing sensor networks have greatly augmented the functionality of interactive media systems by adding the ability to capture and store activity-related information. Analyzing the information recorded from ...

  7. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2013-01-01

    10 | e77151 Weed Maps with UAV Images References 1. ECPA (of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery for rangelandUnmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for Early Site Specific Weed

  8. Three-Dimensional Routing in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    -ASN can perform pollu- tion monitoring (chemical, biological, and nuclear). ¢ Disaster Prevention. Sensor networks that measure seismic activity from remote locations can provide tsunami warnings to coastal areas

  9. Techniques and Technology Article Aerial Surveys for Estimating Wild Turkey Abundance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Techniques and Technology Article Aerial Surveys for Estimating Wild Turkey Abundance in the Texas Aerial surveys have been used to estimate abundance of several wild bird species including wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). We used inflatable turkey decoys at 3 study sites in the Texas Rolling Plains

  10. Paper AAS 02-141 Navigation of Aerial Platforms on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    -shrouded moon Titan may involve aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. A significant challenge Cassini-Huygens mission may involve mobile aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. Such vehicles (these may not be the same thing ­ sample acquisition systems may be deployable from an airship

  11. Geotagged Photo Recognition using Corresponding Aerial Photos with Multiple Kernel Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Geotagged Photo Recognition using Corresponding Aerial Photos with Multiple Kernel Learning Keita for geotagged photos, we have already proposed ex- ploiting aerial photos around geotag places as addi- tional image features for visual recognition of geo- tagged photos. In the previous work, to fuse two kinds

  12. HAWK: An Unmanned Mini Helicopter-based Aerial Wireless Kit for Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Benyuan

    HAWK: An Unmanned Mini Helicopter-based Aerial Wireless Kit for Localization Zhongli Liu, Yinjie, for conducting aerial localization. HAWK is a programmable mini helicopter - Draganflyer X6 - armed for the mini helicopter to fly a planned route. A Moore space filling curve is designed as a flight route

  13. Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes Wesam H. Al-Sabban, Luis F. Gonzalez and Ryan N. Smith Abstract-- Exploiting wind-energy is one possible way to extend the flight duration of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Wind-energy can also be used

  14. DOE/NNSA Aerial Measuring System (AMS): Flying the 'Real' Thing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig Lyons

    2011-06-24

    This slide show documents aerial radiation surveys over Japan. Map product is a compilation of daily aerial measuring system missions from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant to 80 km radius. In addition, other flights were conducted over US military bases and the US embassy.

  15. AUTOMATIC EXTERIOR ORIENTATION OF AERIAL IMAGES IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS C. Drewniok, K. Rohr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    AUTOMATIC EXTERIOR ORIENTATION OF AERIAL IMAGES IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS C. Drewniok, K. Rohr-Based Detection, Invariants ABSTRACT We present an approach for automatic exterior orientation of aerial images: First, a landmark extraction scheme which enables us to automatically detect and precisely localize many

  16. Encoding and analyzing aerial imagery using geospatial semantic graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Jean-Paul; Strip, David R.; McLendon, William C.; Parekh, Ojas D.; Diegert, Carl F.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Rintoul, Mark Daniel

    2014-02-01

    While collection capabilities have yielded an ever-increasing volume of aerial imagery, analytic techniques for identifying patterns in and extracting relevant information from this data have seriously lagged. The vast majority of imagery is never examined, due to a combination of the limited bandwidth of human analysts and limitations of existing analysis tools. In this report, we describe an alternative, novel approach to both encoding and analyzing aerial imagery, using the concept of a geospatial semantic graph. The advantages of our approach are twofold. First, intuitive templates can be easily specified in terms of the domain language in which an analyst converses. These templates can be used to automatically and efficiently search large graph databases, for specific patterns of interest. Second, unsupervised machine learning techniques can be applied to automatically identify patterns in the graph databases, exposing recurring motifs in imagery. We illustrate our approach using real-world data for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and compare the performance of our approach to that of an expert human analyst.

  17. A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

    2007-01-05

    Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

  18. A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, A; Bolonkin, Alexander; Cathcart, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for che...

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Mian; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-11-01

    This review article provides a comprehensive review on sensors and biosensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  20. Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    Directed aerial robot explorers for planetary exploration A.A. Pankine a,*, K.M. Aaron a , M architecture relies upon the use of Directed Aerial Robot Explorers (DAREs), which essentially are long. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Scientific ballooning; Direct Aerial Robot

  1. Teleoperated Visual Inspection and Surveillance with Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles REV2008 -www.rev-conference.org 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    Teleoperated Visual Inspection and Surveillance with Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles REV2008) and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The paper focuses on three topics of the inspection with the combined UGV and Aerial Vehicles Sebastian Blumenthal1 , Dirk Holz1 , Thorsten Linder1 , Peter Molitor2 , Hartmut Surmann2

  2. VERIFICATION OF A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WING TORQUE BOX VIA EXPERIMENTAL MODAL TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    VERIFICATION OF A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WING TORQUE BOX VIA Aeronautical Association, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, TURKEY KEYWORDS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Wing (FEM) of an unmanned aerial vehicle wing torque box was verified by the experimental modal testing

  3. A*-Based Path Planning for an Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicle Team in a Radio Repeating Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochersberger, Kevin

    A*-Based Path Planning for an Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicle Team in a Radio Repeating Krawiec #12;A*-Based Path Planning for an Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicle Team in a Radio Repeating. Therefore, this thesis incorporates an unmanned aerial vehicle as a radio repeating node and presents a path

  4. GSM Technology as a Communication Media for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle GSM Technology as a Communication Media for an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    GSM Technology as a Communication Media for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle GSM Technology as a Communication Media for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Mariusz Wzorek, David Land´en, Patrick Doherty,davla,patdo}@ida.liu.se ABSTRACT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming more reliable, autonomous and easier to use

  5. Preprint version 2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Shanghai, CN Haptic Teleoperation of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teleoperation of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles over the Internet Dongjun Lee, Antonio Franchi, Paolo Robuffo control framework for multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) over the Internet, consisting of the three Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are well-recognized for their promises to achieve many powerful

  6. On the Effect of Winglets on the Performance of Micro-Aerial-Vehicles Dr. Helen L. Reed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vehicles. The smallest airplanes in use at that time were the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) that had#12;On the Effect of Winglets on the Performance of Micro-Aerial-Vehicles Dr. Helen L. Reed in developing Micro-Aerial-Vehicles (MAVs) has been expressed by various military and civilian entities

  7. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  8. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01

    Gale et al. (2006) and evaluation of sensor performance byConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systemsConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systems

  9. Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    sensing, composed of 3 MEMS sensors. Angular yaw rate wasIn particular, as the MEMS sensor suppliers release everwhich utilizes miniature MEMS sensor technology. It combines

  10. Thermal soaring flight of birds and unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ákos, Zsuzsa; Leven, Severin; Vicsek, Tamás; 10.1088/1748-3182/5/4/045003

    2010-01-01

    Thermal soaring saves much energy, but flying large distances in this form represents a great challenge for birds, people and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The solution is to make use of so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upwards with a speed exceeding the descent rate of birds and planes. Saving energy by exploiting the environment more efficiently is an important possibility for autonomous UAVs as well. Successful control strategies have been developed recently for UAVs in simulations and in real applications. This paper first presents an overview of our knowledge of the soaring flight and strategy of birds, followed by a discussion of control strategies that have been developed for soaring UAVs both in simulations and applications on real platforms. To improve the accuracy of simulation of thermal exploitation strategies we propose a method to take into account the effect of turbulence. Finally we propose a new GPS independent control strategy for exploiting...

  11. LQR and SMC Stabilization of a New Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Kaan T. Oner, Ertugrul Cetinsoy, Efe Sirimoglu, Cevdet Hancer, Taylan Ayken, and Mustafa Unel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    LQR and SMC Stabilization of a New Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Kaan T. Oner, Ertugrul Cetinsoy, Efe, SMC I. INTRODUCTION Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) designed for various missions such as surveillance and control of a new tilt-wing aerial vehicle (SUAVI: Sabanci University Unmanned Aerial VehIcle

  12. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  13. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  14. New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

  15. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the last decade there has been significant interest in research to deploy sensor networks. This research is driven by the fact that the costs associated with installing sensor...

  16. ISDSN Sensor System Phase One Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gail Heath

    2011-09-01

    This Phase 1 Test Report documents the test activities and results completed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sensor systems that will be deployed in the meso-scale test bed (MSTB) at Florida International University (FIU), as outlined in the ISDSN-MSTB Test Plan. This report captures the sensor system configuration tested; test parameters, testing procedure, any noted changes from the implementation plan, acquired test data sets, and processed results.

  17. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  18. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  19. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  20. Human-RRT collaboration in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle mission path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griner, Alina

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are used for a variety of military and commercial purposes, including surveillance, combat, and search and rescue. Current research is looking into combining automation with human supervision ...

  1. Vision-Based Following of Structures Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Sivakumar; Kim, ZuWhan; Sengupta, Raja

    2006-01-01

    is shown in ?gures 16. The UAV was able to track a curvedan Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Sivakumar Rathinam, ZuWhanof Structures using an UAV Sivakumar Rathinam*, ZuWhan Kim

  2. Auditory Decision Aiding in Supervisory Control of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donmez, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of sonification, continuous auditory alert mapped to the state of a monitored task, in supporting unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) supervisory control. Background: UAV supervisory ...

  3. Real-Time Obstacle and Collision Avoidance System for Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esposito, Julien Florian

    2013-08-31

    The motivation for the research presented in this dissertation is to provide a two-fold solution to the problem of non-cooperative reactive mid-air threat avoidance for fixed-wing unmanned aerial systems. The first phase ...

  4. Mission Specialist Human-Robot Interaction in Micro Unmanned Aerial Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peschel, Joshua Michael

    2012-10-19

    This research investigated the Mission Specialist role in micro unmanned aerial systems (mUAS) and was informed by human-robot interaction (HRI) and technology findings, resulting in the design of an interface that increased the individual...

  5. Autonomous navigation and tracking of dynamic surface targets on-board a computationally impoverished aerial vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selby, William Clayton

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of an independent, on-board visual servoing system which allows a computationally impoverished aerial vehicle to autonomously identify and track a dynamic surface target. Image ...

  6. Embedded avionics with Kalman state estimation for a novel micro-scale unmanned aerial vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetos, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    An inertial navigation system leveraging Kalman estimation techniques and quaternion dynamics is developed for deployment to a micro-scale unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The capabilities, limitations, and requirements of ...

  7. BASIC CONTROL FOR FOUR ROTOR AUTONOMOUS AERIAL AGENT JONATHAN MCLEAN, CONNECTICUT COLLEGE, USA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    BASIC CONTROL FOR FOUR ROTOR AUTONOMOUS AERIAL AGENT JONATHAN MCLEAN, CONNECTICUT COLLEGE, USA, JMMCL2@CONNCOLL.EDU GARY PARKER, CONNECTICUT COLLEGE, USA, PARKER@CONNCOLL.EDU NEWELL SEAL, CONNECTICUT

  8. Use of Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Transportation Infrastructure Condition Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, William Scott

    2011-02-22

    This thesis provides an assessment of the effectiveness of micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAVs) as a tool for collecting condition data for transportation infrastructure based on multiple field experiments. The primary experiment entails...

  9. Effect of auditory peripheral displays on unmanned aerial vehicle operator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Hudson D

    2008-01-01

    With advanced autonomy, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operations will likely be conducted by single operators controlling multiple UAVs. As operator attention is divided across multiple supervisory tasks, there is a need ...

  10. Modelling Lost Person Behaviour and Intelligent Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in a Wilderness Search and Rescue Scenario 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRiggi, John

    2013-01-11

    ’re lost should be reasonable input variables into a model attempting to predict the lost person’s most likely path. Taken a significant step further, if unmanned aerial vehicles enabled with terrain recognition and navigation capabilities derived from...

  11. A Feasibility Study on the Use of Manual Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Topographical Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avery, Alexander

    2014-11-27

    Motion and Multi-View Stereoscopy software small organisations and individuals now have the ability to make and generate their own surveys. This study looks at the feasibility of using an inexpensive Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for photogrammetric...

  12. StarVis : a configural decision support tool for schedule management of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brzezinski, Amy S

    2008-01-01

    As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) become increasingly autonomous, current single-UAV operations involving multiple personnel could transition to a single operator simultaneously supervising multiple UAVs in high-level ...

  13. Implementation of mechanical, electrical, and feedback control systems in unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Derrick (Derrick Chi-Ho)

    2006-01-01

    The thesis objective was to design an unmanned aerial vehicle that was capable of stable, autonomous flight. A fixed wing aircraft was chosen to simplify some of the flight characteristics and avoid some of the challenges ...

  14. Automating Oceanography: A Robotic Surface Sensor Platform Combining Flexibility and Low-cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mairs, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    adapted from unmanned aerial vehicles, the SeaSlug isautopilot controlling unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). It is

  15. OVERVIEW ______ Sensors for Intelligent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    OVERVIEW ______ Sensors for Intelligent Processing of Materials Haydn N.G. Wadley INTRODUCTION A sensor is a device that detects and measures some physical/chemical quantity and outputs and outputs an electrical signal which can be used to characterize the vibration. Numer- ous types of sensors

  16. Image Sensor Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ; #12; #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2

  17. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  18. SUAAVE: Combining Aerial Robots and Wireless Networking Stephen Camerono

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    failures; and to report their findings to a base station on the ground. The novelty of these mobile sensor, and the Uni- versity of Oxford. The focus of SUAAVE lies in the creation and control of swarms of UAVs that are individually autonomous (i.e not under the direct realtime control of a human) but that collaboratively self

  19. Clip-on wireless wearable microwave sensor for ambulatory cardiac monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Richard Ribon

    We present a new type of non-contact sensor for use in ambulatory cardiac monitoring. The sensor operation is based on a microwave Doppler technique; however, instead of detecting the heart activity from a distance, the ...

  20. DOCUMENTATION, DEPLOYMENT AND EXTENSION OF A VERSATILE AND RAPIDLY RECONFIGURABLE UAV GNC RESEARCH PLATFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toepke, Samuel Lee

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . . . . .Sensor design for unmanned aerial vehicles. In Aerospacefor au- tonomous unmanned aerial vehicles in an air defence

  1. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  2. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  3. The Java-Sumatra Aerial Mega-Tramway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

    2007-01-09

    A mega-tramway based on the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Java is proposed to span Sunda Strait. The Java-Sumatra Aerial Mega-Tramway (JSAMT) will be self-elevating and will regularly and cheaply launch passengers and cargoes via two conveyor belt-like facilities using standard winged shipping containers like those currently used by international trucking and ocean shipping industries that are volplaned across the Sunda Strait. The JSAMT will be a self-sustaining toll facility free of any requirement for international loans or funding guarantees for its construction. Its existence will remove any immediate need for an expensive to dig/maintain Nusantara Tunnel. We offer the formative basic technical specifications for the JSAMT and indicate some of the physical and cultural geographical facts underpinning our macro-engineering proposal; offshoots of a perfected and tested JSAMT may be installed at Palk Strait between India and Sri Lanka, the Gibraltar Strait and the Bering Strait by mid-21st Century.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Aerial Measuring System Technical Integration Annual Report 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory

    2003-06-01

    Fiscal Year 2002 is the second year of a five-year commitment by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to invest in development of new and state-of-the-art technologies for the Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) project. In 2000, NNSA committed to two million dollars for AMS Technical Integration (TI) for each of five years. The tragedy of September 11, 2001, profoundly influenced the program. NNSA redirected people and funding resources at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to more immediate needs. Funds intended for AMS TI were redirected to NNSA's new posture of leaning further forward throughout. AMS TI was brought to a complete halt on December 10, 2001. Then on April 30, 2002, NNSA Headquarters allowed the restart of AMS TI at the reduced level of $840,000. The year's events resulted in a slow beginning of several projects, some of which were resumed only a few weeks before the AMS TI Symposium held at RSL on July 30.

  6. Lightweight photovoltaic module development for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowlan, M.J.; Maglitta, J.C.; Lamp, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    Lightweight photovoltaic modules are being developed for powering high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Terrestrial crystalline silicon solar cell and module technologies are being applied to minimize module cost, with modifications to improve module specific power (W/kg) and power density (W/m{sup 2}). New module processes are being developed for assembling standard thickness (320 mm) and thin (125 mm) solar cells, thin (50 to 100 mm) encapsulant films, and thin (25 mm) cover films. In comparison, typical terrestrial modules use 300 to 400 mm thick solar cells, 460 mm thick encapsulants, and 3.2 mm thick glass covers. The use of thin, lightweight materials allows the fabrication of modules with specific powers ranging from 120 to 200 W/kg, depending on cell thickness and efficiency, compared to 15 W/kg or less for conventional terrestrial modules. High efficiency designs based on ultra-thin (5 mm) GaAs cells have also been developed, with the potential for achieving substantially higher specific powers. Initial design, development, and module assembly work is completed. Prototype modules were fabricated in sizes up to 45 cm x 99 cm. Module materials and processes are being evaluated through accelerated environmental testing, including thermal cycling, humidity-freeze cycling, mechanical cycling, and exposure to UV and visible light.

  7. Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

    2013-03-12

    During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence, specific capabilities, and use of local aerial radiation detection systems would be critical in planning the response, even before federal assets arrive on the scene. The relationship between local and federal aerial assets and the potential role for the further use of the MARS training and expanded AMS Reachback capabilities in facilitating such interactions will be discussed.

  8. Changing dynamics of spontaneous waves during retinal development: a novel panretinal perspective achieved with the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) 4,096 electrodes array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Matthias; Sernagor, Evelyne; Maccione, Alessandro; Gandolfo, Mauro; Eglen, Stephen; Berdondini, Luca

    2010-07-02

    The developing retina exhibits spontaneous waves of activity spreading across the ganglion cell layer. These waves are present only during a limited perinatal period, and they are known to play important roles during the ...

  9. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    of wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Trans- portationof wireless magnetic sensors in Intelligent Transportationmagnetic sensors for different Intelligent Transportation

  10. INTELLIGENT SENSOR VALIDATION AND SENSOR FUSION FOR RELIABILITY AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 INTELLIGENT SENSOR VALIDATION AND SENSOR FUSION FOR RELIABILITY AND SAFETY ENHANCEMENT IN VEHICLE #12;2 Intelligent Sensor Validation and Sensor Fusion for Reliability and Safety Enhancement acknowledge the help of PATH engineers Pete Devlin, Seibum Choi, and Leon Chen. II. Keywords Sensor Validation

  11. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  12. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  13. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  14. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  15. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  16. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA)

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  17. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  18. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  19. Intake Air Oxygen Sensor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ignition can occur at elevated gas temperatures and with aged sensor Next Steps FMEA Study to understand ignition risk for failure modes identified by FMEA Identify...

  20. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  1. SDRT: A Reliable Data Transport Protocol for Underwater Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Jun-Hong

    activities such as scientific exploration and commercial exploitation, underwater sensor networks empower us networks, for mission critical applications, reliable data transport is demanded in under- water sensor channels is limited and depends on both transmission range and frequency [8], [24], [5], [6]. According

  2. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01

    Weimar, and H. Ulmer, MEMS Gas-Sensor Array for Monitoringreveal that a MEMS-based infrared sensor is on the horizon (4P Photacoustic Sensor Platform A4.36-37 A4.38 MEMS; 0-100%,

  3. MEMS Resonant Strain Sensor Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    down microelectromechanical MEMS sensors for high-g munitionof making harsh environment MEMS sensors is the ability toG load forces. SiC MEMS sensors and actuators have potential

  4. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  5. Collaborative Exploration with a Micro Aerial Vehicle: A Novel Interaction Method for Controlling a MAV with a Hand-Held Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, D.

    2012-01-01

    In order to collaboratively explore an environment with a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV), an operator needs a mobile interface, which can support the operator’s divided attention. To this end, we developed the Micro Aerial ...

  6. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  7. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  8. Hardware Components: Sensors, Actuators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    in an electric field light-electric effects; magnetic effects; ... #12;3 5 Example: Acceleration Sensor MEMS connected to mass change Detect change in resistance and model acceleration iPhones have MEMS accelerometers Microelectromechanical systems (~ 1 to 100 µm) 6 Example: Acceleration Sensor Alternative

  9. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of fungi in the genus Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices Binbin Lin a , Shane D. Ross b , Aaron J air pollution and disease spread. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 6 February 2014 Pathogen Aerobiology Aerobiological sampling Burkard volumetric sampler Unmanned aerial vehicle UAV Long

  10. Improving in-water estimates of marine turtle abundance by adjusting aerial survey counts for perception and availability biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for perception and availability biases M.M.P.B. Fuentes a,b,1 , I. Bell c , R. Hagihara a , M. Hamann a,d , J form 3 May 2015 Accepted 4 May 2015 Available online xxxx Keywords: Abundance estimation Aerial surveys Availability bias Detection bias Detection probability Marine turtles Perception bias Aerial surveys are often

  11. Getting Ready for the Challenges for the Air Traffic Management for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) C.W. Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    as EUROCONTROL's Spec-0102 on the Use of Military Unmanned Aerial Vehicles as Operational Air Traffic Outside-1- Getting Ready for the Challenges for the Air Traffic Management for Unmanned Aerial Systems's 08-01: Unmanned Aircraft Systems Operations in the U. S. National Airspace System, as well

  12. Special Issue on Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles In support of military operations and civil applications, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Editorial Special Issue on Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles In support of military operations and civil applications, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have quickly emerged and practitioners in the fields of unmanned systems, with a common interest in the new challenges in platform design

  13. Abstract--In this paper, we present an collision avoidance algorithm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) based on model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Abstract-- In this paper, we present an collision avoidance algorithm for unmanned aerial vehicles in a head-on collision scenario using unmanned aerial vehicles. I. INTRODUCTION HE concept of a highly to avoid the impending collision at all cost. During this procedure, the unmanned vehicle must compute

  14. Using historical aerial photography and softcopy photogrammetry for waste unit mapping in L Lake.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christel, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    L Lake was developed as a cooling water reservoir for the L Reactor at the Savannah River Site. The construction of the lake, which began in the fall of 1984, altered the structure and function of Steel Creek. Completed in the fall of 1985, L Lake has a capacity of 31 million cubic meters and a normal pool of 58 meters. When L Reactor operations ceased in 1988, the water level in the lake still had to be maintained. Site managers are currently trying to determine the feasibility of draining or drawing down the lake in order to save tax dollars. In order to understand the full repercussions of such an undertaking, it was necessary to compile a comprehensive inventory of what the lake bottom looked like prior to filling. Aerial photographs, acquired nine days before the filling of the lake began, were scanned and used for softcopy photogrammetry processing. A one-meter digital elevation model was generated and a digital orthophoto mosaic was created as the base map for the project. Seven categories of features, including the large waste units used to contain the contaminated soil removed from the dam site, were screen digitized and used to generate accurate maps. Other map features include vegetation waste piles, where contaminated vegetation from the flood plain was contained, and ash piles, which are sites where vegetation debris was burned and then covered with clean soil. For all seven categories, the area of disturbance totaled just over 63 hectares. When the screen digitizing was completed, the elevation at the centroid of each disturbance was determined. When the information is used in the Savannah River Site Geographical Information System, it can be used to visualize the various L Lake draw-down scenarios suggested by site managers and hopefully, to support evaluations of the cost effectiveness for each proposed activity.

  15. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  16. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris B. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  17. Aerial Photo: P. velutina cover derived from June 1996 color-infrared digital ortho-photographs and classified with Maximum Likelihood supervised classification algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    ·· Aerial Photo: P. velutina cover derived from June 1996 color-infrared digital ortho- photographs relationships were then used in conjunction with field surveys and aerial photos to ascertain the extent these to the stand-level using standard vegetation sampling protocols was problematic. · The GIS / aerial photo

  18. George Vachtsevanos, Panos Antsaklis, Kimon Valavanis, "Modeling and Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Current Status and Future Directions," Chapter 9, Modeling and Control of Complex Systems, CRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles­ Current Status and Future Directions," Chapter 9, Modeling and Control of Complex of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles­ Current Status and Future Directions," Chapter 9, Modeling and Control of Complex of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles­ Current Status and Future Directions," Chapter 9, Modeling and Control of Complex

  19. Barlow, Gregory John. Design of Autonomous Navigation Controllers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Multi-objective Genetic Programming. (under the direction of Edward Grant.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Vehicles Using Multi-objective Genetic Programming. (under the direction of Edward Grant.) Unmanned aerial them to fly real UAVs. #12;DESIGN OF AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION CONTROLLERS FOR UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLESAbstract Barlow, Gregory John. Design of Autonomous Navigation Controllers for Unmanned Aerial

  20. From Motion Planning to Control -A Navigation Framework for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle From Motion Planning to Control -A Navigation Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    From Motion Planning to Control - A Navigation Framework for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle From Motion Planning to Control - A Navigation Framework for an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle,giaco,pioru,g-torme,simdu,patdo}@ida.liu.se ABSTRACT The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) which can operate autonomously in dynamic and complex

  1. The Hidden Human Factors in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Chris. W. Johnson, DPhil; Department of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    The Hidden Human Factors in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Chris. W. Johnson, DPhil; Department In April 2006, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle crashed near Nogales, Arizona. This incident is of interest Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) refers to the airborne component of the wider Unmanned Aircraft Systems

  2. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim on implementation and evaluation due to the difficulty of building mobile sensors. In the litera- ture, some--Mobile sensors are useful in many environments because they can move to increase the sensing coverage

  3. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    With the convergence of technologies such as MEMS sensor devices, wireless networking, and low-power em- beddedSensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged

  4. Intelligent Sensor Validation And Sensor Fusion For Reliability And Safety Enhancement In Vehicle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice; Goebel, Kai; Alag, Sanam

    1995-01-01

    A Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Validation, Fusion andA Framework for Intelligent Sensor Validation, SensorA Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion

  5. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dynamic-Tracking Directional Wireless Antennas for Low Powered Applications that Require Reliable Extended Range Operations in Time Critical Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott G. Bauer; Matthew O. Anderson; James R. Hanneman

    2005-10-01

    The proven value of DOD Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will ultimately transition to National and Homeland Security missions that require real-time aerial surveillance, situation awareness, force protection, and sensor placement. Public services first responders who routinely risk personal safety to assess and report a situation for emergency actions will likely be the first to benefit from these new unmanned technologies. ‘Packable’ or ‘Portable’ small class UAVs will be particularly useful to the first responder. They require the least amount of training, no fixed infrastructure, and are capable of being launched and recovered from the point of emergency. All UAVs require wireless communication technologies for real- time applications. Typically on a small UAV, a low bandwidth telemetry link is required for command and control (C2), and systems health monitoring. If the UAV is equipped with a real-time Electro-Optical or Infrared (EO/Ir) video camera payload, a dedicated high bandwidth analog/digital link is usually required for reliable high-resolution imagery. In most cases, both the wireless telemetry and real-time video links will be integrated into the UAV with unity gain omni-directional antennas. With limited on-board power and payload capacity, a small UAV will be limited with the amount of radio-frequency (RF) energy it transmits to the users. Therefore, ‘packable’ and ‘portable’ UAVs will have limited useful operational ranges for first responders. This paper will discuss the limitations of small UAV wireless communications. The discussion will present an approach of utilizing a dynamic ground based real-time tracking high gain directional antenna to provide extend range stand-off operation, potential RF channel reuse, and assured telemetry and data communications from low-powered UAV deployed wireless assets.

  6. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  7. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  8. Recently substantial research has been devoted to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). One of a UAV's most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Abstract Recently substantial research has been devoted to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). One of a UAV's most demanding subsystem is vision. The vision subsystem must dynamically combine different algorithms as the UAV's goal and surrounding chang. To fully utilize the available hardware, a run time

  9. 1 http://www.mycopter.eu Enabling Technologies for Personal Aerial Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which results in environmental issues due to wasted fuel and loss of time and money. A study. Countless inceptions have already been studied in previous decades and some have even been built the social and technological aspects needed to set up a transportation system based on personal aerial

  10. Exploring 3D Gesture Metaphors for Interaction with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    metaphors for control and communication with Un- manned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) such as the Parrot AR Drone bundled with the AR Drone. We also discuss the trade-offs in the technique design metrics based on results and constructive test-beds [1]. With the arrival of low-cost robotics such as the Parrot AR Drone and Roomba, we

  11. Planning for Landing Site Selection in the Aerial Supply Delivery Aleksandr Kushleyev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Likhachev, Maxim

    quad-rotor helicopter provide a proof of concept for the planner. I. INTRODUCTION Autonomous aerial are considering and shows the steps required for completing the task. The helicopter (Figure 1(b)) needs analysis, the helicopter identifies 7 possible landing sites, shown in the same figure. These possible

  12. Dynamics and Performance of Tailless Micro Aerial Vehicle with Flexible Articulated Wings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Soon-Jo

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss the performance and stability of a tailless micro aerial's modulus and modulus of rigidity of a material Ib, Ip, ~J = second moment of area about the in-plane axis along the direction of bending, polar moment of area, and torsional stiffness of a cross section

  13. DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    DESIGN OF SMALL SCALE GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS FOR UNMANNED-AERIAL VEHICLES (AERSP 597/497-K) SPRING 814 865 9871 cxc11@psu.edu Summary : The proposed course is a three-credit gas turbine design course will be evaluated against (agreed) deadlines by the instructor. A number of lecturers from the gas turbine industry

  14. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA ABSTRACT Dam removal is often implemented to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall

  15. AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, Toronto, Canada Wind Field Estimation for Small Unmanned Aerial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langelaan, Jack W.

    AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference, Toronto, Canada Wind Field Estimation for Small of wind velocity and wind gradient) for small and mini unmanned aerial vehicles. The approach utilizes with estimating wind conditions to enable gust soaring. Since the motivation is small, low cost uavs (here small

  16. Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision wind-energy is one possible way to ex- tend flight duration for Unmanned Arial Vehicles. Wind-energy sources of wind energy available to exploit for this problem [5]: 1) Vertical air motion, such as thermal

  17. Fusion of Feature-and Area-Based Information for Urban Buildings Modeling from Aerial Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Fusion of Feature- and Area-Based Information for Urban Buildings Modeling from Aerial Imagery on Graph Cuts. The fusion pro- cess exploits the advantages of both information sources and thus yields the complete geometry of the build- ing. The fusion of those sparse features is very fragile as there is no way

  18. Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target Discovery and Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target of unmanned vehicles in mixed indoor/outdoor reconnaissance scenarios. We outline the tools and techniques microautonomous vehicles become available. In the scenarios that serve as the focus of this paper, an unmanned

  19. High Accuracy Ground Target Geo-location Using Autonomous Micro Aerial Vehicle Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Wing developed in-house (Figure 1). The PingWing won the 3rd US-European Micro Aerial Vehicle Competition (MAV07 used to geo-locate ground objects from a MAV platform are passive video cameras. The reason is that su

  20. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  1. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  3. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  4. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  5. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  6. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  7. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  9. Deployment and organization strategies for sampling- interpolation sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liaskovitis, Periklis G.

    2009-01-01

    Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks andConference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks andprice: sensor placements ought to be done in an intelligent

  10. Acknowledgments: NASA Glenn Research Center (Grant #NNC04GB44G) College of Engineering Prof. Martin Abraham NASA envisions employing fuel cells running on jet fuel reformate for its uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), low emission alternative power (LE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), low emission alternative power (LEAP) missions and for transatlantic

  11. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

  12. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  13. Sandia Energy - Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blade Sensors and Instrumentation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Rotor Innovation Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation Rotor Blade Sensors and...

  14. MEMS Aluminum Nitride Technology for Inertial Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigevani, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    1, the growth of angular rate MEMS sensor is a growingdominant market in MEMS inertial sensors - with millions ofsector of the MEMS inertial sensor market. Being able to

  15. Category:Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°, -86.3376761°AnadromousASHRAE Climate

  16. Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Paul Breckenridge

    2007-05-01

    Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

  17. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  18. Energy-Quality Tradeoffs for Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    Energy-Quality Tradeoffs for Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks Sundeep Pattem1 , Sameera-of-magnitude energy savings with negligible difference in tracking quality. We then consider duty-cycled activation. In these sensor activation strategies, energy savings come at the expense of a reduction in the quality

  19. Characteristics of Indoor Disaster Environments and their impact on Simultaneous Localization and Mapping for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Siddharth

    2015-07-30

    Localization and Mapping UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle UGV Unmanned Ground Vehicle CD Characteristic Dimension US&R Urban Search and Rescue EM Expectation Maximization DOF Degrees of Freedom RMSE Root Mean Squared Error v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT...

  20. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  1. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  2. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  3. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  4. Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic University of California, Berkeley Sing Yiu Cheung, Sinem Coleri, and Pravin Varaiya 2 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle wireless sensor networks compete? 7 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle

  5. Wireless Sensor Networks: Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Ponoum, Ratcharit; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    The article discusses wireless sensor technologies for building energy monitoring and control. This article, also, addresses wireless sensor networks as well as benefits and challenges of using wireless sensors. The energy savings and market potential of wireless sensors are reviewed.

  6. Piezo-sensor self-diagnostics using electrical impedance measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G. H. (Gyu Hae); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Rutherford, A. C. (Amanda C.); Robertson, A. N. (Amy N.)

    2004-01-01

    This paper present the piezoelectric sensor self-diagnostic procedure that performs in-situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric materials (PZT) used for sensors and actuators in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The use of active-sensing piezoelectric materials has received considerable attention in the SHM community. A critical aspect of the piezoelectric active-sensing technologies is that usually large numbers of distributed sensors and actuators are needed to perform the required monitoring process. The sensor/actuator self-diagnostic procedure, where the sensors/actuators are confirmed to be functioning properly during operation, is therefore a critical component to successfully complete the SHM process and to minimize the false indication regarding the structural health. The basis of this procedure is to track the changes in the capacitive value of piezoelectric materials resulting from the sensor failure, which is manifested in the imaginary part of the measured electrical admittances. Furthermore, through the analytical and experimental investigation, it is confirmed that the bonding layer between the PZT and a host structure significantly contributes to the measured capacitive values. Therefore, by monitoring the imaginary part of the admittances, one can quantitatively assess the degradation of the mechanical/electrical properties of the PZT and its attachment to a host structure. This paper concludes with an experimental example to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sensor-diagnostic procedure.

  7. A Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedo, Kavi K; Mungur, Avinash; Mauritius, University of; Mauritius,; 10.5121/ijwmn.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Sensor networks are currently an active research area mainly due to the potential of their applications. In this paper we investigate the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for air pollution monitoring in Mauritius. With the fast growing industrial activities on the island, the problem of air pollution is becoming a major concern for the health of the population. We proposed an innovative system named Wireless Sensor Network Air Pollution Monitoring System (WAPMS) to monitor air pollution in Mauritius through the use of wireless sensors deployed in huge numbers around the island. The proposed system makes use of an Air Quality Index (AQI) which is presently not available in Mauritius. In order to improve the efficiency of WAPMS, we have designed and implemented a new data aggregation algorithm named Recursive Converging Quartiles (RCQ). The algorithm is used to merge data to eliminate duplicates, filter out invalid readings and summarise them into a simpler form which significantly reduce the amount of dat...

  8. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  9. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  11. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of thePrograms:ModeRobotics:Robotics:Sensors Sensors

  13. Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

    2012-01-01

    GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

  14. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  15. An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area. Date of survey: September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

  16. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  17. Application of a wireless sensor node to health monitoring of operational wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R; Todd, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a developing field of research with a variety of applications including civil structures, industrial equipment, and energy infrastructure. An SHM system requires an integrated process of sensing, data interrogation and statistical assessment. The first and most important stage of any SHM system is the sensing system, which is traditionally composed of transducers and data acquisition hardware. However, such hardware is often heavy, bulky, and difficult to install in situ. Furthermore, physical access to the structure being monitored may be limited or restricted, as is the case for rotating wind turbine blades or unmanned aerial vehicles, requiring wireless transmission of sensor readings. This study applies a previously developed compact wireless sensor node to structural health monitoring of rotating small-scale wind turbine blades. The compact sensor node collects low-frequency structural vibration measurements to estimate natural frequencies and operational deflection shapes. The sensor node also has the capability to perform high-frequency impedance measurements to detect changes in local material properties or other physical characteristics. Operational measurements were collected using the wireless sensing system for both healthy and damaged blade conditions. Damage sensitive features were extracted from the collected data, and those features were used to classify the structural condition as healthy or damaged.

  18. Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport oftheir

  19. Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport oftheir(Technical

  20. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  1. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01

    because the film takes on SddFticardL water arrd swells beyond its nannal mmp. 'Ihen, the dawn me has gmater -is than mnnal, altlwkqh the sensor recwers its initial values after a short tine at 1- hrnaidity levels. The mqcmse me is eharn in Fig. 5...

  2. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  4. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  5. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  6. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  7. Composite sensor membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

    2008-03-18

    A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

  8. Miniaturized wireless sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecointre, Aubin; Dubuc, David; Katia, Grenier; Patrick, Pons; Aubert, Hervé; Muller, A; Berthou, Pascal; Gayraud, Thierry; Plana, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an overview of the wireless sensor networks. It is shown that MEMS/NEMS technologies and SIP concept are well suited for advanced architectures. It is also shown analog architectures have to be compatible with digital signal techniques to develop smart network of microsystem.

  9. IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

    2013-10-02

    The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: ? Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, ? Selects the right sensors for process conditions ? Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and ? Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

  10. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  11. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  12. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A. [Grupo MEMS, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S. [Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Buffa, F. A. [INTEMA Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  13. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  14. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  15. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  16. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  17. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  18. MHK ISDB/Sensors/Wave and Tide Sensor 5218 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ISDBSensorsWave and Tide Sensor 5218 < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company...

  19. Assess the Efficacy of an Aerial Distant Observer Tool Capable of Rapid Analysis of Large Sections of Collector Fields: FY 2008 CSP Milestone Report, September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Burkholder, F.; Gray, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2009-02-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing an aerial Distant Observer optical characterization tool for collector fields in concentrating solar power plants.

  20. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timo Peltola

    2015-03-12

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented.

  1. Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisholoy Goswami

    2005-10-11

    The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

  2. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  3. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  4. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  5. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  6. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  7. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  8. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  9. A wireless sensor tag platform for container security and integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaya, Ivan A.; Cree, Johnathan V.; Mauss, Fredrick J.

    2011-05-06

    Cargo containers onboard ships are widely used in the global supply chain. The need for container security is evidenced by the Container Security Initiative launched by the U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP). One method of monitoring cargo containers is using low power wireless sensor tags. The wireless sensor tags are used to set up a network that is comprised of tags internal to the container and a central device. The sensor network reports alarms and other anomalies to a central device, which then relays the message to an outside network upon arrival at the destination port. This allows the port authorities to have knowledge of potential security or integrity issues before physically examining the container. Challenges of using wireless sensor tag networks for container security include battery life, size, environmental conditions, information security, and cost among others. PNNL developed an active wireless sensor tag platform capable of reporting data wirelessly to a central node as well as logging data to nonvolatile memory. The tags, operate at 2.4 GHz over an IEEE 802.15.4 protocol, and were designed to be distributed throughout the inside of a shipping container in the upper support frame. The tags are mounted in a housing that allows for simple and efficient installation or removal prior to, during, or after shipment. The distributed tags monitor the entire container volume. The sensor tag platform utilizes low power electronics and provides an extensible sensor interface for incorporating a wide range of sensors including chemical, biological, and environmental sensors.

  10. UAV Design Activities in a University Environment Dr K.C. Wong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, K. C.

    UAV Design Activities in a University Environment Dr K.C. Wong School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering University of Sydney NSW 2006 Abstract Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) activities have remotely piloted aircraft being developed and operated over its 62 year history. More recently, a UAV

  11. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  12. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  13. U.S. IOOS Regional Association Ocean Acidificiation Monitoring Activities April 2013 update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Activity Funding Source ACT FY12 ­ pH sensor evaluation ACT Fy10 and FY11 ­ pCO2 sensor evaluation ACT and biogeochemical controls on OA. AOOS AOOS contributes funds to a consortium to support maintenance of OA sensors, AOOS funds were used to add OA sensors to an NSF-funded mooring in the Chukchi Sea, enabling

  14. Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    . Dif- ferent from image sensor and sound sensor, MEMS accelerometer sensor can measure some biomedical, Localization of footstep source, MEMS accelerometer, Personal health care, Sensor net- work, Smart home. 1Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured by MEMS

  15. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  16. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  17. MEMS Resonant Strain Sensor Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    Strap-down microelectromechanical MEMS sensors for high-gdate of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is a bitmicroelectromechanical resonant output gyroscope. MEMS 2002,

  18. SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    SensorGrid: Integrating Sensor Networks and Grid Computing Chen-Khong Tham1 and Rajkumar Buyya2 Keywords: Sensors, Sensor Networks, Grid computing, SensorML, SensorWeb. 1. Introduction Recent advances in electronic circuit miniaturization and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the creation

  19. Exploring LoadBalance to Dispatch Mobile Sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    ­sensing MEMS and wireless com­ munication technologies have promoted the development of wireless sensorExploring Load­Balance to Dispatch Mobile Sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks You­Chiun Wang, Wen, a hybrid sensor network consisting of static and mobile sensors is considered, where static sensors

  20. Sensors and Actuators A 137 (2007) 147156 A single inputsingle output mass sensor based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    reserved. Keywords: MEMS; Resonant sensor; Chemical and biological sensors; Mass sensor; Localization the inherent advantages MEMS-based sensor plat- forms have over their macroscale counterparts, namelySensors and Actuators A 137 (2007) 147­156 A single input­single output mass sensor based

  1. Trading Computation & Precision for Energy in Wireless Sensor Networks with Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    Trading Computation & Precision for Energy in Wireless Sensor Networks with Applications, and how we affect our environment. The limited energy of those sensors poses the challenge of using such systems in an energy efficient man- ner to perform various activities. In many of these activi- ties

  2. Joint Charging and Rate Allocation for Utility Maximization in Sustainable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Daji

    repository of a sensor node is co-affected by three factors: uncontrollable ambient energy harvesting, communication, and sensing activities while guaranteeing non-empty energy repositories at all sensor nodes. JCRA. Harvesting ambient energy such as solar [1], wind [2], and vibration [3] has been a cost- free

  3. Towards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor Alessio Benavoli and Luigi Chisci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisci, Luigi

    Towards optimal energy-quality tradeoff in tracking via sensor networks Alessio Benavoli and Luigi and which nodes to activate around the target's location so as to attain an appropriate quality-energy about the current sensor energy status. This is certainly efficient in terms of tracking quality

  4. Z .Sensors and Actuators B 60 1999 228237 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersensorb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    variety of hydrogen gas sensors, most are based on electronic devices and use palladium as the active mem hydrogen sensor system based on photopyroelectric purely-thermal-wave interference Chinhua Wang, Andreas hydrogen gas detection has been developed as a next generation device to earlier Z .photopyroelectric PPE

  5. Preprint version 2012 IEEE/RSJ Int. Conf. on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Vilamoura, Portugal Aerial Grasping of a Moving Target with a Quadrotor UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerial Grasping of a Moving Target with a Quadrotor UAV Riccardo Spica, Antonio Franchi, Giuseppe Oriolo of planning a trajectory that connects two arbitrary states while allowing the UAV to grasp a moving target-scale Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are popu- lar robotic platforms because of their low cost, versatility

  6. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  7. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  8. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  9. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  10. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  11. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  12. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  13. Chemoresistive gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1987-06-23

    A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

  14. Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded or Revolutions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded ­ or Revolutions? Roger Wattenhofer Computer. This paper wants to motivate the distributed algorithms community to study sensor networks. We discuss why community, a sensor network essentially is ­ a database. The distributed algorithms community should join

  15. Mutual information based tracking with mobile sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russ, John A., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    In order to utilize mobile sensor nodes in a sensing and estimation problem, one must carefully consider the optimal placement of those sensor nodes and simultaneously account for the cost incurred in moving the sensor ...

  16. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor ...

  17. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15

    or fault tolerance capability of a sensor system. The redundancy degree of sensors plays two important roles pertaining to the robustness of a sensor network. First, the redundancy degree provides proper parameter values for robust estimator; second, we can...

  18. High Accuracy Sensor Aided Inertial Navigation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanandan, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    initialization. 3. The advent of MEMS sensors in the 1990s.MEMS based sensors have several favor- able properties. TheSystems (MEMS) based inertial sensors in the 1990s has led

  19. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  20. Selective chemical detection by energy modulation of sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Otagawa, T.

    1985-05-20

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting, identifying, and quantifying a component of a sampled fluid includes a sensor which chemically reacts with the component of interest or a derivative thereof, an electrical heating filament for heating the sample before it is applied to the sensor, and modulating means for continuously varying the temperature of the filament (and hence the reaction rate) between two values sufficient to produce the chemical reaction. In response to this thermal modulation, the sensor produces a modulated output signal, the modulation of which is a function of the activation energy of the chemical reaction, which activation energy is specific to the particular component of interest and its concentration. Microprocessor means compares the modulated output signal with standard responses for a plurality of components to identify and quantify the particular component of interest. 4 figs.

  1. Inter-sensor propagation delay estimation using sources of opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Rémy; Michel, Olivier; Lacoume, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Propagation delays are intensively used for Structural Health Monitoring or Sensor Network Localization. In this paper, we study the performances of acoustic propagation delay estimation between two sensors, using sources of opportunity only. Such sources are defined as being uncontrolled by the user (activation time, location, spectral content in time and space), thus preventing the direct estimation with classical active approaches, such as TDOA, RSSI and AOA. Observation models are extended from the literature to account for the spectral characteristics of the sources in this passive context and we show how time-filtered sources of opportunity impact the retrieval of the propagation delay between two sensors. A geometrical analogy is then proposed that leads to a lower bound on the variance of the propagation delay estimation that accounts for both the temporal and the spatial properties of the sources field.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF SIGNAL PROCESSING TOOLS AND HARDWARE FOR PIEZOELECTRIC SENSOR DIAGNOSTIC PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OVERLY, TIMOTHY G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PARK, GYUHAE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FARRAR, CHARLES R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-09

    This paper presents a piezoelectric sensor diagnostic and validation procedure that performs in -situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric (PZT) sensor/actuator arrays used in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The validation of the proper function of a sensor/actuator array during operation, is a critical component to a complete and robust SHM system, especially with the large number of active sensors typically involved. The method of this technique used to obtain the health of the PZT transducers is to track their capacitive value, this value manifests in the imaginary part of measured electrical admittance. Degradation of the mechanical/electric properties of a PZT sensor/actuator as well as bonding defects between a PZT patch and a host structure can be identified with the proposed procedure. However, it was found that temperature variations and changes in sensor boundary conditions manifest themselves in similar ways in the measured electrical admittances. Therefore, they examined the effects of temperature variation and sensor boundary conditions on the sensor diagnostic process. The objective of this study is to quantify and classify several key characteristics of temperature change and to develop efficient signal processing techniques to account for those variations in the sensor diagnostis process. In addition, they developed hardware capable of making the necessary measurements to perform the sensor diagnostics and to make impedance-based SHM measurements. The paper concludes with experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  3. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  4. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  5. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  6. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  7. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  8. Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    INVITED P A P E R Wireless Sensor Networks for Healthcare In healthcare, there is a strong need, wireless sensor networks for healthcare have emerged in the recent years. In this review, we present some representative applications in the healthcare domain and describe the challenges they introduce to wireless

  9. The Tenet Architecture for Tiered Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    a sensor network architecture: Lowering the waistline. InJ. Hill et al. System architecture directions for networkThe Tenet Architecture for Tiered Sensor Networks Omprakash

  10. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  11. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  12. Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: University of...

  13. New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency New Sensor Network Technology Increases Manufacturing Efficiency April 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE supported Eaton...

  14. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01

    2.2 Wireless Magnetic Sensors Vehicle Detection2.3 Vehicle Re-Identification Using Wireless MagneticPerformance iv 6 Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications for

  15. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  16. CQAR: Closed Quarter Aerial Robot Design for Reconnaissance, Surveillance and Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Paul

    drexel.edu and the current prototype. Section V presents a 14-gram avionics package consisting of an optic flow sensor and motor controller. Autonomous flight behaviors like collision avoid- ance [14

  17. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN); McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  18. Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Monday, March 29, 2010 A Bendable Heart Sensor New flexible electronics can better chart the heart a more detailed picture of the electrical activity of a beating heart. This high-resolution electrical map could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of heart abnormalities by pinpointing areas

  19. Header for SPIE use Multi-sensor Robot Navigation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    in an environment. Active (sensor- emitter) tracking technologies require powered-device installation, limiting of position (trajectory), velocity and heading. In the present approach we have neglected earth rotation Assembly) and because of the relatively small area of the trajectory. The scope of this experiment

  20. Collaborative Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks using Measurement Co-Occurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    activity of many WSN applica- tions. We focus on applications in which each sensor con- tinuously monitors the targets of interests in a field, and the base station is interested in getting every (discrete enumer

  1. HandWave : design and manufacture of a wearable wireless skin conductance sensor and housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Marc D

    2005-01-01

    This thesis report details the design and manufacture of HandWave, a wearable wireless Bluetooth skin conductance sensor, and dedicated housing. The HandWave collects Electrodermal Activity (EDA) data by measuring skin ...

  2. Handling Failures of Static Sensor Nodes in Wireless Sensor Network by Use of Mobile Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Flávio Rech

    usage and applicability of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) [1] [2]. Nevertheless, sensor nodes can fail, and influence WSN dependability [3]. In order to face this problem, and exploring the fact that WSN use several of nodes that in general compose a WSN provides good results. Neighbor nodes can monitor each others

  3. Comparing the accuracy of machine classified landsat imagery to manually delineated aerial photographs for county appraisal district use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falter, Matthew Palmer

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of a computer classified satellite image to human classified aerial Photographs, and to determine the accuracy of the satellite image for land-use/land-cover mapping of forested areas. One 1...

  4. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    (UAV) Images José Manuel Peña1* , Jorge Torres-Sánchez1 , Ana Isabel de Castro1 , Maggi Kelly2 of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near

  5. Number of lightning discharges causing damage to lightning arrester cables for aerial transmission lines in power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, E. P. [Electric Power Scientific Research Institute (VNIIE), branch of OAO 'NTTs Elektroenergetika' (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15

    Damage by lightning discharges to lightning arrester cables for 110-175 kV aerial transmission lines is analyzed using data from power systems on incidents with aerial transmission lines over a ten year operating period (1997-2006). It is found that failures of lightning arrester cables occur when a tensile force acts on a cable heated to the melting point by a lightning current. The lightning currents required to heat a cable to this extent are greater for larger cable cross sections. The probability that a lightning discharge will develop decreases as the amplitude of the lightning current increases, which greatly reduces the number of lightning discharges which damage TK-70 cables compared to TK-50 cables. In order to increase the reliability of lightning arrester cables for 110 kV aerial transmission lines, TK-70 cables should be used in place of TK-50 cables. The number of lightning discharges per year which damage lightning arrester cables is lowered when the density of aerial transmission lines is reduced within the territory of electrical power systems. An approximate relationship between these two parameters is obtained.

  6. EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK OF AERIAL ULTRA-LOW VOLUME APPLICATIONS OF PYRETHRINS). A human health risk assessment conducted by Peterson et al. (2006) for truck-mounted ultra-low volume (ULV to epidemic levels and dispersed to all 58 counties in the state, and was associated with low

  7. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo­ tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  8. Ion mobility sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  9. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  10. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  11. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen Andreas (Rochester, NY); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Neutzler, Jay Kevin (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-12-14

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  12. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  13. Decentralized TDOA Sensor Pairing in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Wei; Lihua, Xie; Wendong, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    a wireless sensor network (WSN). Most of the existing worksWe consider a multihop WSN. Given a team of nodes per-us represent a multihop WSN as a graph defined by , where is

  14. Implementation of an Onboard Visual Tracking System with Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qadir, Ashraf; Neubert, Jeremiah

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a visual tracking system that is capable or running real time on-board a small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle). The tracking system is computationally efficient and invariant to lighting changes and rotation of the object or the camera. Detection and tracking is autonomously carried out on the payload computer and there are two different methods for creation of the image patches. The first method starts detecting and tracking using a stored image patch created prior to flight with previous flight data. The second method allows the operator on the ground to select the interest object for the UAV to track. The tracking system is capable of re-detecting the object of interest in the events of tracking failure. Performance of the tracking system was verified both in the lab and during actual flights of the UAV. Results show that the system can run on-board and track a diverse set of objects in real time.

  15. Mathematical model of unmanned aerial vehicle used for endurance autonomous monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-10

    The paper purpose is to present some aspects regarding the control system of unmanned aerial vehicle - UAV, used to local observations, surveillance and monitoring interest area. The calculus methodology allows a numerical simulation of UAV evolution in bad atmospheric conditions by using nonlinear model, as well as a linear one for obtaining guidance command. The UAV model which will be presented has six DOF (degrees of freedom), and autonomous control system. This theoretical development allows us to build stability matrix, command matrix and control matrix and finally to analyse the stability of autonomous UAV flight. A robust guidance system, based on uncoupled state will be evaluated for different fly conditions and the results will be presented. The flight parameters and guidance will be analysed.

  16. Nonlinear Decelerator for Payloads in Aerial Delivery Systems. I: Design and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lyons; M. Ginther; P. Mascarenas; E. Rickard; J. Robinson; J. Braeger; H. Liu; A. Ludu

    2014-08-19

    We study the dynamics and the optimization of the shock deceleration supported by a payload when its airborne carrier impacts the ground. We build a nonlinear elastic model for a container prototype and an elastic suspension system for the payload. We model the dynamics of this system and extract information on maximum deceleration, energy transfer between the container and payload, and energy resonant damping. We designed the system and perform lab experiments for various terminal velocities and types of grounds (cement, grass, sand water, etc.). The results are compared with the theoretical model and results are commented, including predictions for deceleration at different types of ground impact. The results can be used for aerial delivery systems, splash-down of capsules, recoveries, weather balloons, coastal surveying systems, or the new introduced goal-line technology in sport competitions.

  17. UAV sensor and survivability issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01

    This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

  18. Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  19. Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors Shijun Qiu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors (Abstract) Shijun Qiu;References 1. Alag, S, K. Goebel, and A.M. Agogino, "A Framework for Intelligent Sensor Validation, Sensor, 1020 2. Alag, S, A.M. Agogino, and M.. Morjaria, " A Methodology for Intelligent Sensor Measurement

  20. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  1. Particulate matter sensor with a heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

    2011-08-16

    An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

  2. Novel Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palitha Jayaweera; Francis Tanzella

    2005-03-01

    SRI International (SRI) is developing ceramic-based microsensors to detect exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems under this DOE NETL-sponsored research project. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes attached to a solid state electrolyte and are designed to operate at the high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. The sensors can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. The ultimate objective is to develop sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package, along with data acquisition and control software and hardware, so that the information can be used for closed-loop control in novel advanced power generation systems. This report details the Phase I Proof-of-Concept, research activities performed from October 2003 to March 2005. SRI's research work includes synthesis of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, software development, and demonstration of pulse voltammetric analysis of NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO gases on catalytic electrodes.

  3. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  4. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  5. Sensor networks for social networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farry, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis outlines the development of software that makes use of Bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real-world phenomena using data obtained from sensor networks. ...

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Yibo

    2010-01-01

    The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

  7. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  8. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30

    piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber...

  9. Application Independent Energy Efficient Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virmani, Deepali; Ghanshyam,; Ahlawat, Khyati; Noble,

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor networks are dense networks of small, low-cost sensors, which collect and disseminate environmental data and thus facilitate monitoring and controlling of physical environment from remote locations with better accuracy. The major challenge is to achieve energy efficiency during the communication among the nodes. This paper aims at proposing a solution to schedule the node's activities to reduce the energy consumption. We propose the construction of a decentralized lifetime maximizing tree within clusters. We aim at minimizing the distance of transmission with minimization of energy consumption. The sensor network is distributed into clusters based on the close proximity of the nodes. Data transfer among the nodes is done with a hybrid technique of both TDMA/ FDMA which leads to efficient utilization of bandwidth and maximizing throughput.

  10. Single particle electrochemical sensors and methods of utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schoeniger, Joseph (Oakland, CA); Flounders, Albert W. (Berkeley, CA); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Los Gatos, CA); Wally, Karl (Lafayette, CA); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Janek, Richard P. (Oakland, CA)

    2006-04-04

    The present invention discloses an electrochemical device for detecting single particles, and methods for using such a device to achieve high sensitivity for detecting particles such as bacteria, viruses, aggregates, immuno-complexes, molecules, or ionic species. The device provides for affinity-based electrochemical detection of particles with single-particle sensitivity. The disclosed device and methods are based on microelectrodes with surface-attached, affinity ligands (e.g., antibodies, combinatorial peptides, glycolipids) that bind selectively to some target particle species. The electrodes electrolyze chemical species present in the particle-containing solution, and particle interaction with a sensor element modulates its electrolytic activity. The devices may be used individually, employed as sensors, used in arrays for a single specific type of particle or for a range of particle types, or configured into arrays of sensors having both these attributes.

  11. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  12. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  13. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  14. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (17 Eric Alan Lane, Tijeras, NM 87059); Alford, W. J. (3455 Tahoe, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Gruetzner, James K. (9407 Shoehone, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  15. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  16. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  17. A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Articles A Summary Review of Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring performance and health. KEYWORDS: wireless sensors, structural monitoring, dam- age detection, smartb). Called structural health monitoring (SHM), this new paradigm offers an auto- mated method

  18. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  19. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  20. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  1. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Senturia, Stephen D. (Brookline, MA); Huber, Robert J. (Bountiful, UT)

    1998-01-01

    A combustible gas sensor that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 .mu.m thick.times.10 .mu.m wide.times.100, 250, 500, or 1000 .mu.m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 .mu.m-thick protective CVD Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac).sub.2 onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500.degree. C.; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300.degree. C. (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H.sub.2 concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N.sub.2 /O.sub.2 mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used.

  2. Calorimetric gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricco, A.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Smith, J.H.; Moreno, D.J.; Manginell, R.P.; Senturia, S.D.; Huber, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A combustible gas sensor is described that uses a resistively heated, noble metal-coated, micromachined polycrystalline Si filament to calorimetrically detect the presence and concentration of combustible gases. The filaments tested to date are 2 {micro}m thick {times} 10{micro}m wide {times} 100, 250, 500, or 1000 {micro}m-long polycrystalline Si; some are overcoated with a 0.25 {micro}m-thick protective CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer. A thin catalytic Pt film was deposited by CVD from the precursor Pt(acac){sub 2} onto microfilaments resistively heated to approximately 500 C; Pt deposits only on the hot filament. Using a constant-resistance-mode feedback circuit, Pt-coated filaments operating at ca. 300 C (35 mW input power) respond linearly, in terms of the change in supply current required to maintain constant resistance (temperature), to H{sub 2} concentrations between 100 ppm and 1% in an 80/20 N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixture. Other catalytic materials can also be used. 11 figs.

  3. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  4. Fault Tolerant Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, Iosif; Han, Qi; Mehrotra, Sharad; Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of Continuous Selection Queries over Sensor Dataevaluation of continuous selection queries (CSQs) over sensor-sensor suffices and there is no Fault Tolerant Evaluation of

  5. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G; ATLAS SCT Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    bias resistors. 6. Sensor Evaluation and Quality AssuranceHowever, an extensive evaluation of sensor characteristics6.3. Evaluation and Quality Assurance of irradiated sensors

  6. Rethinking Data Fusion-Based Services in Tiered Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantu, Karthik; Sukhatme, Gaurav

    2006-01-01

    conference on Embedded networked sensor systems, New York,conference on Embedded networked sensor systems, New York,Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, 2003, pp.

  7. Magic of Numbers in Networks of Wireless Image Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Mohammed; Ahmadian, Shaun; Zats, David; Laufer, Rafael; Estrin, D

    2006-01-01

    are solved on the battery- operated image sensor nodes andwith wireless battery-operated image sensors, we havedepicts a network of battery- operated image sensors placed

  8. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  9. Efficient Radio Communication for Energy Constrained Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    metrics in energy constrained wireless sensor networks. ” InRouting in Energy-Constrained Wireless Sensor Net- works. ”adaptive energy-efficient MAC protocol for wireless sensor

  10. Secure routing in wireless sensor networks: attacks and countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan

    against sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks­­sinkholes two novel classes of previously undocumented attacks against sensor net- works 1 ­­sinkhole attacks

  11. Secure Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Attacks and Countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks --- sinkholes and HELLO two novel classes of previously undoc­ umented attacks against sensor networks 1 -- sinkhole attacks

  12. Secure Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Attacks and Countermeasures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, David

    sensor networks, introduce two classes of novel attacks against sensor networks --- sinkholes and HELLO­ umented attacks against sensor networks 1 -- sinkhole attacks and HELLO floods. #15; We show

  13. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01

    the fabrication of the MEMS sensors from the readout system,mechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramicmechanical infrared sensors based on MEMS polymer-ceramic

  14. Design of a four rotor unmanned aerial vehicle capable of sustaining zero-roll and zero-pitch flight using vector thrusting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilton, Danny Charles

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, remote controlled airplanes and helicopters equipped with video cameras have been used by the movie industry, photographers, and for surveillance. The military deploys these unmanned aerial vehicles ...

  15. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H. (Castro Valley, CA); Berry, Nina M. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-09-20

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  16. Estimation algorithm for autonomous aerial refueling using a vision based relative navigation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Roshawn Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    . This thesis develops a Kalman filter to be used in combination with the VisNav sensor to improve the quality of the relative navigation solution during autonomous probe and drogue refueling. The performance of the Kalman filter is examined in a closed...

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, H.A.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. An Architecture for Multi-Sensor Fusion in Mobile Environments Datong Chen, Albrecht Schmidt, Hans-Werner Gellersen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Datong

    for multi-sensor fusion, applied for environment awareness of personal mobile devices. The working environment of personal mobile devices changes dynamically depending on their user's activities. Equipped with sensors, mobile devices can obtain an awareness of their mobile working environment, to improve

  19. The role of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh vacuum study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    active transition metals such as platinum and palladium, show great promise as sen- sors for hydrogenThe role of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh of oxygen in hydrogen sensing by a platinum-gate silicon carbide gas sensor: An ultrahigh vacuum study Yung

  20. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.