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1

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

2

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

3

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

4

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

5

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

6

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

7

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Passive Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Passive Seismic Techniques,...

8

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

9

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

10

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Definition: Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

techniques utilize vibrations from natural earthquakes or rupture processes (due to hydraulic stimulation) as a source for structural imaging of the subsurface.1 References ...

12

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity Using Empirical Matched Field Processing Techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to detect and locate more microearthquakes using the empirical matched field processing (MFP) method than can be detected using only conventional earthquake detection techniques. We propose that empirical MFP can complement existing catalogs and techniques. We test our method on continuous seismic data collected at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field during November 2009 and January 2010. In the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) earthquake catalog, 619 events were identified in our study area during this time frame and our MFP technique identified 1094 events. Therefore, we believe that the empirical MFP method combined with conventional methods significantly improves the network detection ability in an efficient matter.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C; Harris, D B

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves.

14

Seismic Monitoring Of Blasting Activity In Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two significant mining regions in Russia lie near Novosibirsk and at the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly. A small percentage of events from these areas trigger the International Monitoring System (IMS). We have studied IMS recordings of events from these areas with the main goal of better understanding how these blasts are detonated and how these events will be most effectively monitored using IMS data. We have collected ground-truth information on the mining blasts and crustal structure in the area to facilitate modeling of the events. We have focused on sifting out from further consideration routine mining events and identifying detonation anomalies. We define master traces to represent tight clusters of mining events and to be used to identify anomalous events. We have examined recordings of events from eight significant event clusters in the 500-km-long Kuzbass/Abakan mining trend near Novosibirsk. The recordings were made by the IMS station ZAL. We see significant variations in the P onset and early coda between different events in clusters. We have found strong evidence of a detonation anomaly in just one of the events (out of 178 examined). Differences in the onset wave trains are attributed largely to differences in the firing patterns. Time independent spectral modulations have been observed in seismic signals produced by delay-fired mining events in mining regions throughout the world. The Novosibirsk trend is no exception to this rule. Delay-fired events in many mining regions, such as Kuzbass/Abakan, are also commonly associated with enhanced long-period (2- to 8-s) surface waves. The mine blasts in Russian mining regions appear, seismically, to resemble large blasts recorded in other regions (such as Wyoming). Techniques found to be effective in Wyoming, reviewed by...

Michael Hedlin University; Michael A. H. Hedlin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

16

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

17

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

18

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

19

Historical Information H. 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6 SeismicIGround Motion 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity Book 3 The Effects of the Rulison Event on Buildings and Other Surface Structures DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. I I .* ,a - . . > - . ~ - ..+<#z*:<~:<:~.:$:.y;.$3s, 3898 OFF THE EFFECTS OF THE RULISON EVENT ON BUILDINGS AND OTHER SURFACE STRUCTURES Lloyd A. Lee and Roger E. Skjei January 14, 1970 John A. Blume & Associates Research Division San Francisco, California ORDER FROM CFSTl AS-!&L~L-~~ This page intentionally left blank THE EFFECTS OF THE RULISON EVENT ON BUILDINGS AND 'OTHER SURFACE STRUCTURES Lloyd A . Lee and Roger E. S k j e i John A. Blume & A s s o c i a t e s Research D i v i s i o n

20

Evaluation of fluid-modeling techniques in the seismic analysis of LMFBR reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid modeling is of great importance in the seismic analysis of the LMFBR primary system. If the fluid model used in the analysis is too simplified, the results could be very uncertain. On the other hand, if the model is too detailed, considerable difficulty might be encountered in the analysis. The objectives of this study are to examine the validity of the two commonly used fluid modeling techniques. i.e. simplified added mass method and lumped mass method and to provide some useful information on the treatment of fluid in seismic analysis. The validity of these two methods of analysis is examined by comparing the calculated seismic responses of a fluid-structure system based on these two methods with that calculated from a coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis in which the fluid is treated by continuum fluid elements.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

I Historical Information H. 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Historical Information Historical Information H. 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity Book 3 Seismic Data from Rulison DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. This page intentionally left blank S E I S M I C D A T A F R O M R U L I S O N ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SERVICES ADMINISTRATION COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY Prepared By SPECIAL SEISMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS BRANCH James N. Jordan, Chief Sponsored By U .S. ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY A C D ~ S T / R A - ~ ~ July 1970 This r e p o r t was supported by AcDA/ST/RA-82. The U . S. A r m s Control and Disarmament Agency w i l l n o t be r e s p o n s i b l e f o r information contained h e r e i n which may have been s u p p l i e d by o t h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n s o r c o n t r a c t o r s . This document i

22

Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Catania, viale A. Doria no 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and...

24

Passive seismic techniques for geothermal exploration. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1976-February 28, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts concentrated on the development and verification of forward modeling techniques and the processing and analysis of the teleseismic and gravity data bases for the Imperial Valley. Present capabilities include the forward modeling of surface observations of teleseismic travel-time residuals and gravity anomalies associated with three-dimensional variations in near-surface seismic velocities and densities. Considerable time was spent devising test cases that both verify the modeling programs and provide insight for the discretization scheme to be used for modeling the Imperial Valley. The teleseismic travel-time data base originally acquired during the first quarter of this project was subjected to various statistical tests for error analysis.

Savino, J.M.; Goff, R.C.; Jordan, T.H.; Lambert, D.G.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing

26

A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Survey Of Seismic Activity Near Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A five-week survey showed that seismic activity within 20 km of Wairakei Geothermal Field took place mainly at shallow depths (< 2 km), in or close to the Taupo Fault Belt, and occurred in swarms. Twenty-eight earthquakes, with magnitudes (M) between -1.3 and +2.8, were located; 43 other earthquakes, with M < 0.2, were recorded but could not be located. The distribution of located earthquakes did not correlate with known areas of surface geothermal activity. No located earthquake occurred beneath the

27

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utility of microearthquake data for characterizing the Northwest Geysers geothermal field and the Long Valley Caldera (LVC) was investigated. Three-dimensional (3-D) P- and S-wave seismic velocity models were estimated for the Coldwater Creek Steam Field (CCSF) in the Northwest Geysers region. Hypocenters relocated using these 3-D models appear to be associated with the steam producing zone, with a deeper cluster of hypocenters beneath an active injection well. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit strong correlation with geothermal exploitation. A 3-D differential attenuation model was also developed for the CCSF from spectral ratios corrected for strong site effects. High-velocity anomalies and low attenuation in the near surface correspond to Franciscan metagraywacke and greenstone units. Microearthquakes recorded at seismographic stations located near the metagraywacke unit exhibit high corner frequencies. Low-velocity anomalies and higher attenuation in the near surface are associated with sections of Franciscan melange. Near-surface high attenuation and high Vp/Vs are interpreted to indicate liquid-saturated regions affected by meteoric recharge. High attenuation and low Vp/Vs marks the steam producing zone, suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. The extent of the high attenuation and low Vp/Vs anomalies suggest that the CCSF steam reservoir may extend northwestward beyond the known producing zone. This study concludes that microearthquake monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool. Seismic velocity and attenuation structures as well as the distribution of microearthquake activity can be used to identify and delineate the geothermal reservoir, while temporal variations in these quantities would be useful in tracking changes during exploitation.

Romero, A.E. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Historical Information H.6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, SeismicIGround Motion Activity Book 3 Structural Response Studies for Project Rulison DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. S t r u c t u r a l Response Studies f o r P r o j e c t R U L I S O N P r e p a r e d under C o n t r a c t ATC26-13-99 f o r t h e Nevada Operations O f f i c e , USAEC J o h n A. B l u m e & A s s o c i a t e s R e s e a r c h D i v i s i o n san f r a n c i s c o N O T I C E This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness

29

Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION OF CO 2 IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS Joel Sminchak (sminchak@battelle.org; 614-424-7392) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820) Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43201 Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 Abstract Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO 2 make deep well injection of CO 2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection

30

Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

Barnhart, Kevin Scott

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Application of advanced seismic reflection imaging techniques to mapping permeable zones at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multifold seismic reflection data from the Dixie Valley geothermal field in Nevada were reprocessed using a nonlinear optimization scheme called simulated annealing to model subsurface acoustic velocities, followed by a pre-stack Kirchhoff migration to produce accurate and detailed depth-migrated images of subsurface structure. In contrast to conventional processing techniques, these methods account for significant lateral variations in velocity and thus have the potential ability to image steeply-dipping faults and fractures that may affect permeability within geothermal fields. The optimization scheme develops two-dimensional velocity models to within 6% of velocities obtained from well and surface geologic data. Only the seismic data (i.e., first arrival times of P waves) are used to construct the velocity models and pre-stack migration images, and no other a priori assumptions are invoked. Velocities obtained by processing individual seismic tracks were integrated to develop a block diagram of velocities to 2.3 km depth within the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Details of the tectonic and stratigraphic structure allowed three dimensional extension of the interpretations of two dimensional data. Interpretations of the processed seismic data are compared with well data, surface mapping, and other geophysical data. The Dixie Valley fault along the southeastern Stillwater Range Piedmont is associated with a pronounced lateral velocity gradient that is interpreted to represent the juxtaposition of relatively low velocity basin-fill strata in the hanging wall against higher velocity crystalline rocks in the footwall. The down-dip geometry of the fault was evaluated by inverting arrival times from a negative move-out event, which we associate with the dipping fault plane, on individual shot gathers for seismic line SRC-3 for the location and depth of the associated reflection points on the fault.

NONE

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012) 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2011 - 2012 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Map hydraulic structure within the field from seismic data Notes 2011: 16 years of seismicity were analyzed to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated since the 1980's. 2012: 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field were relocated using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for

33

Studies of the Correlation Between Ionospheric Anomalies and Seismic Activities in the Indian Subcontinent  

SciTech Connect

The VLF (Very Low Frequency) signals are long thought to give away important information about the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. It is recently established that the ionosphere may be perturbed due to seismic activities. The effects of this perturbation can be detected through the VLF wave amplitude. There are several methods to find this correlations and these methods can be used for the prediction of these seismic events. In this paper, first we present a brief history of the use of VLF propagation method for the study of seismo-ionospheric correlations. Then we present different methods proposed by us to find out the seismo-ionospheric correlations. At the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata we have been monitoring the VTX station at Vijayanarayanam from 2002. In the initial stage, we received 17 kHz signal and latter we received 18.2 kHz signal. In this paper, first we present the results for the 17 kHz signal during Sumatra earthquake in 2004 obtained from the terminator time analysis method. Then we present much detailed and statistical analysis using some new methods and present the results for 18.2 kHz signal. In order to establish the correlation between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what are the reference signals throughout the year. We present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators for the 18.2 kHz signal as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005 to 2008 when the solar activity was very low. In this case, the signal would primarily be affected by the Sun due to normal sunrise and sunset effects. Any deviation from this standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial (such as solar activities and other high energy phenomena). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of sixteen months and show that the correlations with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation in terminator shift takes place up to a couple of days prior to the seismic event. We introduce a new method where we find the effects of the seismic activities on D-layer preparation time (DLPT) and the D-layer disappearance time (DLDT). We identify those days in which DLPT and DLDT exhibit deviations from the average value and we correlate those days with seismic events. Separately, we compute the energy release by the earthquakes and using this, we compute the total energy released locally from distant earthquakes and find correlations of the deviations with them. In this case also we find pre-cursors a few days before the seismic events. In a third approach, we consider the nighttime fluctuation method (differently quantified than the conventional way). We analyzed the nighttime data for the year 2007 to check the correlation between the night time fluctuation of the signal amplitude and the seismic events. Using the statistical method for all the events of the year and for the individual individual earthquakes (Magnitude > 5) we found that the night time signal amplitude becomes very high on three days prior to the seismic events.

Sasmal, S. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata-700084 (India); Chakrabarti, S. K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata-700084 (India); S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Salt-Lake Kolkata-70098 (India); Chakrabarti, S. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata-700084 (India); Maharaja Manindra Chandra College, 20, Ramkanta Bose Street, Kolkata-700003 (India)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Passive seismic techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1976-November 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acquisition, generation and analysis of a teleseismic data base for the Imperial Valley are reported. Travel-time data were generated for 176 earthquakes at widely different azimuths and epicentral distances with respect to the 16 seismic stations in the Imperial Valley array (IVA). Several programs for preprocessing this data base, including error analysis routines, were written and applied to the teleseismic travel-time data.

Savino, J.M.; Jordan, T.H.; Lambert, D.G.; Goff, R.C.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 62 63 59 63 58 61 59 63 62 65 2001 61 61 63 65 64 60 58 56 54 58 59 58 2002 54 57 54 50 51 50 52 50 56 57 50 43 2003 40 41 41 40 38 39 41 43 39 39 38 42 2004 43 45 45 45 44 49 48 49 48 48 49 50 2005 52 53 51 50 55 57 54 55 56 57 57 58 2006 55 57 59 58 58 57 66 62 63 64 65 64 2007 63 63 68 71 70 69 69 71 73 77 79 75 2008 76 77 75 72 73 73 72 72 NA 77 72 73 2009 75 76 72 70 65 60 61 60 60 63 62 63 2010 64 65 63 66 67 67 67 65 64 62 62 62

36

Active load control techniques for wind turbines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Passive seismic techniques for geothermal exploration. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1977-May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts were concentrated on developing and applying various processing procedures to the seismic and gravity data and to the results of the forward modeling calculations. In parallel with the forward modeling efforts, an inversion scheme was formulated and developed for final modeling of the processed data sets for the Imperial Valley. A computer program was written to generate a regular grid of interpolated values of the gravity field based on a least square fit to a general quadratic surface of irregularly spaced observations. The resulting data set was subjected to extensive filtering and processing to produce a gravity data vector for input to the inversion scheme. Particular attention was paid to the baseline considerations encountered in the treatment of the gravity data and the impact of these considerations on the complexity of the inversion scheme.

Savino, J.M.; Goff, R.C.; Rodi, W.L.; Jordan, T.H.; Alexander, J.H.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

39

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

40

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia, Indonesia Introduction Sulawesi Island, eastern Indonesia, is at the triple junction of the Paci®c (through- ABSTRACT In eastern Indonesia, the Central Sulawesi fault system consists of complex left-lateral strike

Vigny, Christophe

42

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Shevenell & De Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Lisa Shevenell, Ted De Rocher (2005) Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Shevenell_%26_De_Rocher,_2005)&oldid=401374" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

43

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

45

Numerical analysis of masonry-infilled reinforced concrete frames subjected to seismic loads and experimental evaluation of retrofit techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size effect in structures, ASCE J. Eng. Mech. Vol. 116, No.story brick shear walls, ASCE J. of Struct. Eng. Vol. 84,in seismic resistant building, ASCE J. of Struct. Eng. Vol.

Koutromanos, Ioannis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local,

47

A noise rejection deadbeat control technique for active power filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with power filter, active power filter has a lot of advantages and it is an efficient technique to eliminate or limit the harmonic pollution in power system. However, the control of active power filter is very complex, and the control of current ... Keywords: active power filter, current control technique, deadbeat control, noise rejection, periodic noise, resetting integrator, sampling noise

Li-Dan Zhou; Mansoor Mansoor; Qian Ai; Da Xie; Chen Chen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle Heimgartner, James B. Scott, Weston Thelen, Christopher R. Lopez, John N. Louie (2005) Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Refraction_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Heimgartner,_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=401382

49

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401371

50

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2005_-_2)&oldid=401360"

51

Seismic CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMIC CD Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Background Resource Findings and Recovery Timeline Oil Program ADIS Overview Gas Program ADIS Overview SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

52

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our passive seismic survey revealed a surprisingly high and sustained activity of local seismic events originating within the crust of Kilauea Iki. We recorded about 8000 events in a single day of operation at nail 17 with a seismograph having a peak magnification of 280,000 at 60 Hz (Fig. 10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii

53

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

54

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

55

Development of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology for Geothermal Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves. The first was an explosive package that generates a strong, azimuth-oriented, horizontal force vector when deployed in a conventional shot hole. This vector-explosive source has never been available to industry before. The second source was a dipole formed by operating two vertical vibrators in either a force or phase imbalance. Field data are shown that document the strong S-wave modes generated by these sources.

B. A. Hardage; J. L. Simmons, Jr.; M. DeAngelo

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital

57

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored.

58

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

59

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

60

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in abrine aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Continuous crosswell seismic monitoring of a small-scale CO2injection was accomplished with the development of a noveltubing-deployed piezoelectric borehole source. This piezotube source wasdeployed on the CO2 injection tubing, near the top of the saline aquiferreservoir at 1657-m depth, and allowed acquisition of crosswellrecordings at 15-minute intervals during the multiday injection. Thechange in traveltime recorded at various depths in a nearby observationwell allowed hour-by-hour monitoring of the growing CO2 plume via theinduced seismic velocity change. Traveltime changes of 0.2 to 1.0 ms ( upto 8 percent ) were observed, with no change seen at control sensorsplaced above the reservoir. The traveltime measurements indicate that theCO2 plume reached the top of the reservoir sand before reaching theobservation well, where regular fluid sampling was occuring during theinjection, thus providing information about the in situ buoyancy ofCO2.

Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

2006-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Study of effect of seismic displacements on landslide susceptibility zonation (LSZ) in Garhwal Himalayan region of India using GIS and remote sensing techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landslides are the most damaging and threatening aftereffect of seismic events in Garhwal Himalayas. It is evident from past seismic events in Uttarakhand, India that no other phenomena can produce landslides of so great in size and number as a single ... Keywords: Chamoli earthquake, Landslide, Seismic displacement

Naveen Pareek, Shilpa Pal, Mukat L. Sharma, Manoj K. Arora

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

64

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

65

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys Notes Different migration procedures were applied to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data. After carefully preprocessing seismic data, the 2-D and 2.5-D pre-stack depth migration of line 109 in the Coso Geothermal Field shows a well defined reflector at about 16,000 ft depth. Compared to the 2-D pre-stack migrated image, the 2.5-D pre-stack migrated image

66

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

67

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature

68

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

69

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze seismic data to develop reservoir models that characterize the geothermal system Notes Large-amplitude, secondary arrivals are modeled as scattering anomalies. Polarization and ray tracing methods determine the orientation and location of the scattering body. Two models are proposed for the scatterer: (1) a point scatterer located anywhere in a one-dimensional (1-D), layered velocity model; and (2) a dipping interface between two homogeneous half

70

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

71

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Figure 4 illustrates seismicity from January of 1969 to June of 1977 (Rapolla and Keller, 1984). During this span, most of the seismicity occurred in the region of the Geysers geothermal field. Additional clustered activity was noted to the north and east of the Collayomi Fault in the Clear Lake region. Curiously, no unusual earthquake activity was noted along the major trend of the Collayomi Fault. Instead, the Collayomi Fault seems to separate two areas of active seismicity. References Catherine K. Skokan (1993) Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States

72

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

73

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Active and passive seismic imaging of a hydraulic fracture in diatomite  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a comprehensive set of experiments including remote- and treatment-well microseismic monitoring, interwell shear-wave shadowing, and surface tiltmeter arrays, that was used to monitor the growth of a hydraulic fracture in the Belridge diatomite. To obtain accurate measurements, and extensive subsurface network of geophones was cemented spanning the diatomite formation in three closely spaced observation wells around the well to be fracture treated. Data analysis indicates that the minifracture and main hydraulic fracture stimulations resulted in a nearly vertical fracture zone (striking N26{degrees}E) vertically segregated into two separate elements, the uppermost of which grew 60 ft above the perforated interval. The interwell seismic effects are consistent with a side process zone of reduced shear velocity, which remote-well microseismic data independently suggest may be as wide as 40 ft. The experiments indicate complicated processes occurring during hydraulic fracturing that have significant implications for stimulation, waterflooding, in fill drilling, and EOR. These processes are neither well understood nor included in current hydraulic fracture models.

Vinegar, H.J.; Wills, P.B.; De Martini, D.C. (Shell Development Co. (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

76

Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques  

SciTech Connect

Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF{sub 6} gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques.

Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing a fault-zone trapped Rayleigh-type guided wave from microearthquake data. The wavelet transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling calculation suggests that the fault zone is {approx} 200m wide, and has a P wave velocity of 4.80 km/s and a S wave velocity of 3.00 km/s, which is sandwiched between two half spaces with relatively higher velocities (P wave velocity 5.60 km/s, and S wave velocity 3.20 km/s). zones having vertical or nearly vertical dipping fault planes.

SGP-TR-150-16

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401370"

79

Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden"

80

Direct-Current Resistivity At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Central Nevada Seismic At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New

82

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes In spite of the complications discovered in this b-value analysis of Kilauea's South Flank, there are many similarities with the case histories of the other volcanoes we have studied, and the correlation of high b-value anomalies withmagma reservoirs is confirmed.

83

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1975 - 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate thermal regime and potential of the system Notes Three-dimensional Q -1 model of the Coso Hot Springs known geothermal resource area was conducted. To complete the model a regional telemetered network of sixteen stations was operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; deployed a portable Centipede array of 26 three-component stations near the

84

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1998 - 2002 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two recent earthquake sequences near the Coso geothermal field show clear evidence of faulting along conjugate planes. Results from analyzing an earthquake sequence occurring in 1998 are presented and compared with a similar sequence that occurred in 1996. The two sequences followed mainshocks that occurred on 27 November, 1996 and 6 March, 1998. Both mainshocks ruptured approximately colocated regions of the same fault

85

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

86

Induced seismicity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

Segall, P.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND INDUCED SEISMICITY IN KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For some time the public has asked questions about seismic activity related to hydraulic fracturing and other oil-field related activities. In particular, there is concern that the energy that goes into the subsurface during hydraulic fracturing is sufficient to cause felt earthquakes. The following is a response to those questions. 1) Seismic activity that is related to human activities is generally referred to as induced seismicity or triggered seismicity. Induced seismicity is defined as seismic events attributable to human activities (National Research Council, 2012). The term triggered seismicity is also used to describe situations in which human activities could potentially trigger large and potentially damaging earthquakes (Shemeta et al., 2012). The following discussion uses only the term induced seismicity to refer to seismic activity in which human activity plays a role. 2) Because it uses energy to fracture rocks to release oil or natural gas, hydraulic fracturing does create microseismic events (of a magnitude less than 2.0). Felt earthquake activity (generally greater than a magnitude 3.0) resulting from hydraulic fracturing has been confirmed from only one location in the world (National Research Council, 2012). In the

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

89

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

90

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

91

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Technique for inferring sizes of stellar-active regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspection of spectroheliograms showing large, well-developed active regions generally show the sunspots to lead the associated plage, in the sense of the solar rotation. Measurements have been made from spectroheliograms of spot-plage offsets and compared with nearly contemporaneous integrated disk observations. Larger active regions generally show larger spot leads; however, information regarding active-region sizes and spot-plage offsets is not readily obtainable form stellar-type observations of the Sun.

Dobson-Hockey, A.K.; Radick, R.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

94

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2005 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis More detailed analysis of microearthquakes over a longer period of time Notes The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study (Julian, et al. 2003; Julian

95

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow

96

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

97

Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pritchett, 2004) Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general

98

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kilauea volcano has high seismicity, most of which is associated with specific fault zones on the volcano and with movement of magma at depth (Koyanagi and Endo, 1971; Koyanagi et al., 1976). Certain groups of earthquakes have been observed at very shallow depths, however, and some of these have been concentrated in a zone that lies near the resistivity anomaly and the center of inflation. The data show that this shallow

99

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1996 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To look at time dependent seismic tomography Notes Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio V p/V s at shallow depths. The period from 1996 through 2006 was studied, and the results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening

100

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401367

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine extent of low velocity body Notes An area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5 km beneath the array. An intense low-velocity body, which coincides with the surface expressions of late Pleistocene rhyolitic volcanism, high heat flow, and hydrothermal activity,

102

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425676"

103

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Andrew V. Newman, Timothy H. Dixon, Noel Gourmelen (2006) A Four-Dimensional Viscoelastic Deformation Model For Long Valley Caldera, California, Between 1995 And 2000 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Newman,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=425656"

104

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

105

Water Sampling At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

106

Seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fast History Matching of Time-Lapse Seismic and Production-Data for High Resolution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic data have been established as a valuable source of information for the construction of reservoir simulation models, most commonly for determination of the modeled geologic structure, and also for population of static petrophysical properties (e.g. porosity, permeability). More recently, the availability of repeated seismic surveys over the time scale of years (i.e., 4D seismic) has shown promising results for the qualitative determination of changes in fluid phase distributions and pressure required for determination of areas of bypassed oil, swept volumes and pressure maintenance mechanisms. Quantitatively, and currently the state of the art in reservoir model characterization, 4D seismic data have proven distinctively useful for the calibration of geologic spatial variability which ultimately contributes to the improvement of reservoir development and management strategies. Among the limited variety of techniques for the integration of dynamic seismic data into reservoir models, streamline-based techniques have been demonstrated as one of the more efficient approaches as a result of their analytical sensitivity formulations. Although streamline techniques have been used in the past to integrate time-lapse seismic attributes, the applications were limited to the simplified modeling scenarios of two-phase fluid flow and invariant streamline geometry throughout the production schedule. This research builds upon and advances existing approaches to streamline-based seismic data integration for the inclusion of both production and seismic data under varying field conditions. The proposed approach integrates data from reservoirs under active reservoir management and the corresponding simulation models can be constrained using highly detailed or realistic schedules. Fundamentally, a new derivation of seismic sensitivities is proposed that is able to represent a complex reservoir evolution between consecutive seismic surveys. The approach is further extended to manage compositional reservoir simulation with dissolution effects and gravity-convective-driven flows which, in particular, are typical of CO2 transport behavior following injection into deep saline aquifers. As a final component of this research, the benefits of dynamic data integration on the determination of swept and drained volumes by injection and production, respectively, are investigated. Several synthetic and field reservoir modeling scenarios are used for an extensive demonstration of the efficacy and practical feasibility of the proposed developments.

Rey Amaya, Alvaro

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monitoring natural subsidence and seismicity in the Imperial Valley as a basis for evaluating potential impacts of geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of work done on potential geologic effects of geothermal development are discussed. The key geological issues in the Imperial Valley are the potential for significant subsidence and seismicity which could be induced by geothermal production. The major technical problem is to develop techniques to distinguish between natural and induced activity. In both subsidence and seismicity studies, the projects augment the existing network to obtain additional information in critical areas; thus, local subsidence detection networks were added to the regional networks. The U.S. Geological Survey seismograph network was augmented to increase sensitivity to small earthquakes near the Salton Sea. Techniques being used and initial results are summarized briefly. (JGB)

Crow, N.B.; Kasamayer, P.W.

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Date: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 Innovation for Our Energy Future Shyam S. Kocha: NREL Yannick Garsany: EXCET/NRL Deborah Myers: ANL https://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/webinars.html Outline 1) Background 2) Experimental Aspects of RDE Testing 3) Basic Measurement Technique & Analysis 4) Parameters Affecting RDE Activity Measurements 1) Impact of Film Deposition & Drying Techniques 2) Impact of Ink Formulation 3) Impact of Nafion Incorporation 4) Impact of particle size effects 5) Correlation with MEA data 5) Electrocatalyst Durability using RDE Measurements 6) Summary 2 Background PEMFC MEA Thin-film RDE Trends of activity and durability in Rotating Disc Electrode (RDE)

110

Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

112

Seismic Activity of the Earth, the Cosmological Vectorial Potential And Method of a Short-term Earthquakes Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To the foundation of a principally new short-term forecasting method there has been laid down a theory of surrounding us world's creation and of physical vacuum as a result of interaction of byuons - discrete objects. The definition of the byuon contains the cosmological vector-potential A_g - a novel fundamental vector constant. This theory predicts a new anisotropic interaction of nature objects with the physical vacuum. A peculiar "tap" to gain new energy (giving rise to an earthquake) are elementary particles because their masses are proportional to the modulus of some summary potential A_sum that contains potentials of all known fields. The value of A_sum cannot be larger than the modulus of A_g. In accordance with the experimental results a new force associated with A_sum ejects substance from the area of the weakened A_sum along a conical formation with the opening of 100 +- 10 and the axis directed along the vector A_sum. This vector has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10. Nearly 100% probability of an earthquake (earthquakes of 6 points strong and more by the Richter scale) arises when in the process of the earth rotation the zenith vector of a seismically dangerous region and/or the vectorial potential of Earth's magnetic fields are in a certain way oriented relative to the vector A_g. In the work, basic models and standard mechanisms of earthquakes are briefly considered, results of processing of information on the earthquakes in the context of global spatial anisotropy caused by the existence of the vector A_g, are presented, and an analysis of them is given.

Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov Jr.; A. A. Spitalnaya; A. A. Abramyan; V. A. Solodovnikov

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

114

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

115

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

116

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

117

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

118

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

119

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

120

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

122

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Seismic Regionalization In Northeast Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize seismicity in support of nuclear explosion monitoring for the continental regions of northeast Russia, we have been analyzing information obtained from regional seismic network operators. Our goal is to merge catalog, bulletin, waveform, and other ground truth data from several regional networks into a comprehensive data set that we will use for various seismic research projects. To date we have compiled a bulletin from published and unpublished event data of about 200,000 events and over 150,000 arrival times. We have also determined that the Russian regional network catalogs are contaminated with mining-explosion events. Hence, one of our primary efforts is to identify mining events when possible and move them into a separate bulletin from the natural earthquakes. We have extended our preliminary analysis of explosion contamination of Russian seismicity catalogs using temporal analysis into the Irkutsk and Chita districts and the Buryat Republic. Based on analysis of epicenters and origin times reported in Material po Seismichnost' Sibiri for 1970 -- 1993, it is likely that considerable explosion contamination occurs in the gold (Bodaibo, northern Irkutsk Region, and in the Chita region), mica (Vitim, northern Irkutsk Region), and other mining areas (Bushulei, Nerchinsk, and Petrovsk in the Buryat and Chita areas). Explosion contamination is also observed in northernmost Mongolia in the mining and industrial district near Darkhan. Explosions associated with the construction of the Baikal-Amur Mainline Railroad are likely, as was observed in the Amur district; however, the amount of natural seismicity dominates the activity and makes it impossible to resolve the railroad separately. In conjunction with the Magadan Seismic Network operators,...

Kevin Mackey Kazuya; Kazuya Fujita; Lee K. Steck; Hans E. Hartse

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Preparation of Activated Carbon from Oil Sands Coke by Chemical and Physical Activation Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oil sands coke is a by-product resulting from the upgrading of heavy crude bitumen to light synthetic oil. This research investigates the preparation of activated (more)

Morshed, Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Seismic Loading for FAST: May 2011 - August 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As more wind farms are constructed in seismically active regions, earthquake loading increases in prominence for design and analysis of wind turbines. Early investigation of seismic load tended to simplify the rotor and nacelle as a lumped mass on top of the turbine tower. This simplification allowed the use of techniques developed for conventional civil structures, such as buildings, to be easily applied to wind turbines. However, interest is shifting to more detailed models that consider loads for turbine components other than the tower. These improved models offer three key capabilities in consideration of base shaking for turbines: 1) The inclusion of aerodynamics and turbine control; 2) The ability to consider component loads other than just tower loads; and 3) An improved representation of turbine response in higher modes by reducing modeling simplifications. Both experimental and numerical investigations have shown that, especially for large modern turbines, it is important to consider interaction between earthquake input, aerodynamics, and operational loads. These investigations further show that consideration of higher mode activity may be necessary in the analysis of the seismic response of turbines. Since the FAST code is already capable of considering these factors, modifications were developed that allow simulation of base shaking. This approach allows consideration of this additional load source within a framework, the FAST code that is already familiar to many researchers and practitioners.

Asareh, M. A.; Prowell, I.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

130

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 18 Phospholipids: Structures and Physicochemical Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 18 Phospholipids: Structures and Physicochemical Activities Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 7F901335BDC265F6CD236F34E0A1D72F AOCS Press ...

131

Identification of MHF (massive hydraulic fracturing) fracture planes and flow paths: A correlation of well log data with patterns in locations of induced seismicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical steps in developing a hot dry rock geothermal system is the creation of flow paths through the rock between two wellbores. To date, circulation systems have only been created by drilling one wellbore, hydraulically fracturing the well (which induces microearthquakes), locating the microearthquakes and then drilling a second wellbore through the zone of seismicity. A technique for analyzing the pattern of seismicity to determine where fracture planes are located in the seismically active region has recently been developed. This allows us to distinguish portions of the seismically active volume which are most likely to contain significant flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the seismic method are confirmed by borehole temperature and caliper logs which indicate where permeable fractures and/or zones of weakness intersect the wellbores. A geometric model based on these planes and well log data has enhanced our understanding of the reservoir flow paths created by fracturing and is consistent with results obtained during production testing of the reservoir.

Dreesen, D.; Malzahn, M.; Fehler, M.; Dash, Z.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Knowledge Assisted Visualization: Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present novel techniques for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting information ... Keywords: 2D textures, 3D textures, Illustrative visualization, Knowledge-assisted visualization, Rapid interpretation, Seismic interpretation

Daniel Patel; yvind Sture; Helwig Hauser; Christopher Giertsen; M. Eduard Grller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

136

Guideline for the Seismic Technical Evaluation of Replacement Items for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques for reasonably assuring that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements. Meeting such requirements is necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. The guideline also offers a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

IPEEE Seismic Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes results of the seismic portion of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) conducted for each U.S. nuclear plant. Utilities can use trends developed from these results -- together with their individual plant-specific results -- to address future seismic issues on a risk-informed basis.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Seismic Fragility Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Seismic Fragility Applications Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for performing fragility analysis as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA). These cost-effective and practical procedures and the resulting SPRA can support risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications. To download a pdf file of the product description for this report, click here.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1983 - 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the

140

Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes On a more local scale, Faulds et al. (2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006) have conducted structural analysis and detailed geologic mapping at a number of sites throughout Nevada and have found that productive geothermal systems typically occur in one of several structural settings, including step-overs in normal fault zones, near the ends of major normal faults where the faults break into multiple splays, in belts of overlapping faults, at fault

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141

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa

142

Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

Thomas, Dan M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

144

Definition: Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the subsurface.1 References http:www.slb.commediaFilesevaluationbooksfundamentalsofboreholeseismictechnologyoverview.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like...

145

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Californium-252 in situ activation and photon detection techniques for uranium ore deposit evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Four different techniques are evaluated for borehole analysis of uranium and thorium ores. Methods involving (1) detection of fission product photons following /sup 252/Cf activation, (2) detection of low-energy uranium and thorium gamma-rays, (3) direct measurement of the 1001-keV photon from /sup 234m/Pa, a progeny of /sup 238/U, and (4) isotopic excitation x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy are evaluated. The first two techniques are found too unsuitable for most low grade ores. The third is found to be suitable for the in-situ analysis of uranium ores only, and the fourth method is shown to be a superior, cost effective method for both uranium and thorium ore analysis.

Brodzinski, R.L.; Wogman, N.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey At Central Nevada Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

149

Non-extensive statistical analysis of seismicity in the area of Javakheti, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of earthquake magnitudes in the Javakheti highlands was analyzed using a non-extensive statistical approach. The earthquakes occurring from 1960 to 2008 in this seismically active area of Southern Caucasus were investigated. The seismic ... Keywords: Dynamics, Energy density characteristic, Modified frequency-magnitude relationship, Non-extensivity parameter, Seismicity, Time series

T. Matcharashvili; T. Chelidze; Z. Javakhishvili; N. Jorjiashvili; U. Fra Paleo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Seismic Ruggedness of Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relay GERS (Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra) provide utilities with generic seismic capability for more than 100 electrical relays most commonly used in nuclear power plants. The data can be used directly for the assessment of relays in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, "Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Plants" and for the Individual Plant Evaluation for External Events (IPEEE) for resolution of USNRC severe accident policy issues.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

157

Subtask 2.2 - Creating A Numerical Technique for Microseismic Data Inversion  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical and geophysical monitoring are the techniques which can complement each other and provide enhancement in the solutions of many problems of geotechnical engineering. One of the most promising geophysical techniques is passive seismic monitoring. The essence of the technique is recording the acoustic signals produced in the subsurface, either naturally or in response to human activity. The acoustic signals are produced by mechanical displacements on the contacts of structural elements (e.g., faults, boundaries of rock blocks, natural and induced fractures). The process can be modeled by modern numerical techniques developed in geomechanics. The report discusses a study that was aimed at the unification of the passive seismic monitoring and numerical modeling for the monitoring of the hydraulic fracture propagation. The approach adopted in the study consisted of numerical modeling of the seismicity accompanying hydraulic fracture propagation and defining seismic attributes and patterns characterizing the process and fracture parameters. Numerical experiments indicated that the spatial distribution of seismic events is correlated to geometrical parameters of hydrofracture. Namely, the highest density of the events is observed along fracture contour, and projection of the events to the fracture plane makes this effect most pronounced. The numerical experiments also showed that dividing the totality of the events into groups corresponding to the steps of fracture propagation allows for reconstructing the geometry of the resulting fracture more accurately than has been done in the majority of commercial applications.

Anastasia Dobroskok; Yevhen Holubnyak; James Sorensen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles  

SciTech Connect

Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential limitations.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goddard, Braden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peerani, Paolo [European Commission, EC-JRC-IPSC

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down

166

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This Summary Report is the first of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 2 is the Systems Analysis of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 3 documents the results of the fragility screening for the review. The three volumes demonstrate how the seismic margin review guidance (NUREG/CR-4482) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Seismic Design Margins Program can be applied. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Prassinos, P.G.; Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Develop Seismic Equipment List (SEL) * Perform seismic screening - Perform DOEEH-0545 seismic walkdowns - Perform structural and anchorage seismic analysis to DOEEH-...

172

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF THE COSO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF THE COSO USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: During December of 1999, approximately 32 miles of seismic data were acquired within the Coso Geothermal Field, Inyo County, California, as part of a detailed seismic investigation undertaken by the US Navy Geothermal Program Office. Data acquisition was designed to make effective use of advanced data processing methods, which include Optim's proprietary nonlinear velocity optimization technique and pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The nonlinear optimization technique is used to obtain high

174

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic monitoring is a technique to seismically image an area utilizing earthquakes originating from distances greater than 1,000 km from the measurement site.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A teleseism is the tremor caused by an earthquake that is very far away. According to the USGS, the term, teleseismic refers to earthquakes that occur more than 1000 km from the measurement site. Often teleseismic events can be picked up only by seismometers that are in low background noise locations; whereas, in general, a tremor of a magnitude 5.3 earthquake can be seen anywhere in the world with modern seismic

176

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

177

Seismic scaling laws revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at fast speed Local energy balance Gc U Dc slip friction i n i Es = U Gc #12; Main result: Energy Mo= DSL3 D S L Moment Seismic energy ES=¿ D S L3 Es Mo Energy moment ratio #12; Thus Es ~ 105 Mo ~ U Summary of Observed Radiated Energy vs Moment log Mo=1.5 Mw9.6 Beroza et al, 2001 #12

Madariaga, Raúl

178

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

180

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology August 12, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization. By pushing the limits of seismic-while-drilling technology, the patent-pending SeismicPULSER system provides more accurate geo-steering for the discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves, facilitating new field development and improving well economics. Drill-bit seismic-while-drilling techniques use a downhole acoustic source and receivers at the surface to create real-time images that allow

182

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

183

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

184

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

186

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Mat Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building types including high-rise residential towers, healthcare, and ... bearing pressure for transient loads (wind or seismic ... Tower Seismic Force ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources What links...

188

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Novel Technique for Improving Hardware Trojan Detection and Reducing Trojan Activation Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transitions in the circuit would be attributed to state bits and it is expected that activities converge or more transitions inside Trojan circuit so that it improves the effectiveness of transient power of nets with low transition rate, we will eliminate hard-to-activate sites in a design. This would result

Plusquellic, James

191

Layout techniques for radiation hardening of standard CMOS active pixel sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a radiation hardened Active Pixel Sensor implemented in a standard 0.35?m CMOS process. The integrated circuit is composed of a 64x64 pixel matrix with a 25?m pixel pitch and has four different pixel architectures. There ... Keywords: CMOS, active pixel sensor, radiation hardeness

Leo Huf Campos Braga; Suzana Domingues; Milton F. Rocha; Leonardo Bruno S; Fernando Campos; Filipe V. Santos; Antonio Carneiro Mesquita; Mrio Vaz Silva; Jacobus W. Swart

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Performance evaluation of indoor localization techniques based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of networks for indoor localization based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices is evaluated in terms of the accuracy, complexity, and costs. In the active device case, the terminal to be located measures the power transmitted ...

Damiano De Luca; Franco Mazzenga; Cristiano Monti; Marco Vari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

194

Third Quater Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, 16 local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. The largest event (magnitude 2.0) occurred on April 16, 2007 and was located 4 km southwest of the 400 Area in the Columbia River basalts at a depth of approximately 3 km. Stratigraphically, 7 earthquakes occurred in the Columbia River basalts (approximately 0-5 km depth), 1 earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km depth), and 8 earthquakes in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km depth). Geographically, 8 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, and 8 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford SMA network was triggered on the 300 Area and the 400 Area SMA by the 2.0 Mc seismic event that occurred on April 16, 2007. The maximum vertical acceleration was 0.07 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.05% g at the 300 Area SMA, 13.5 km from the event. At the 400 Area SMA, only 5.2 km from the event, the maximum vertical acceleration was 0.25 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.23% g. These are the first recordings of a small local earthquake on the SMA network. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 8 times larger than the peak accelerations observed at the 400 Area and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Micromachined silicon seismic transducers  

SciTech Connect

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cost Reduction Activities in France for Installing Cable: Mechanical Laying Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past few decades, there has been increasing public objection to the undesirable visual impact of overhead power lines. Utilities face difficulties in obtaining authorization to build new overhead lines. This situation has led to the power industry's current interest in underground cable techniques. Buried insulated cable faces two difficulties, technical and economic, both depending on the level of voltage. At medium voltage (essentially 20 kilovolts), the optimization of cable systems, combined w...

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

Zucca, J.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Evans, J.R. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Virginia Regional Seismic Network. Final report (1986--1992)  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Virginia Regional Seismic Network was one of the few fully calibrated digital seismic networks in the United States. Continued operation has resulted in the archival of signals from 2,000+ local, regional and teleseismic sources. Seismotectonic studies of the central Virginia seismic zone showed the activity in the western part to be related to a large antiformal structure while seismicity in the eastern portion is associated spatially with dike swarms. The eastern Tennessee seismic zone extends over a 300x50 km area and is the result of a compressive stress field acting at the intersection between two large crustal blocks. Hydroseismicity, which proposes a significant role for meteoric water in intraplate seismogenesis, found support in the observation of common cyclicities between streamflow and earthquake strain data. Seismic hazard studies have provided the following results: (1) Damage areas in the eastern United States are three to five times larger than those observed in the west. (2) Judged solely on the basis of cataloged earthquake recurrence rates, the next major shock in the southeast region will probably occur outside the Charleston, South Carolina area. (3) Investigations yielded necessary hazard parameters (for example, maximum magnitudes) for several sites in the southeast. Basic to these investigations was the development and maintenance of several seismological data bases.

Bollinger, G.A.; Sibol, M.S.; Chapman, M.C.; Snoke, J.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US). Seismological Observatory

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: NEW SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, EASTERN CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in Mesozoic crystalline rocks that host a producing geothermal field. The reflection data were processed in two steps that incorporate new seismic imaging methods: (1) Pwave first arrivals in the seismic data were inverted for subsurface acoustic velocities using a non-linear simulated annealing approach; and (2) 2-D Velocity tomograms obtained from the inversions were

202

Characterization of Induced Seismicity in a Petroleum Reservoir: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid production and injection in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs generally results in induced seismic activity. In this paper we study the microseismic activity in a petroleum field in Oman. The microearthquake data ...

Sze, Edmond

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

High-resolution seismic studies applied to injected geothermal fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution microseismicity studies to the problem of monitoring injected fluids is one component of the Geothermal Injection Monitoring Project at LLNL. The evaluation of microseismicity includes the development of field techniques, and the acquisition and processing of events during the initial development of a geothermal field. To achieve a specific detection threshold and location precision, design criteria are presented for seismic networks. An analysis of a small swarm near Mammoth Lakes, California, demonstrates these relationships and the usefulness of high-resolution seismic studies. A small network is currently monitoring the Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plant at Casa Diablo as it begins production.

Smith, A.T.; Kasameyer, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the sites seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

210

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Concepts and techniques: Active electronics and computers in safety-critical accelerator operation  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires an extensive Access Control System to protect personnel from Radiation, Oxygen Deficiency and Electrical hazards. In addition, the complicated nature of operation of the Collider as part of a complex of other Accelerators necessitates the use of active electronic measurement circuitry to ensure compliance with established Operational Safety Limits. Solutions were devised which permit the use of modern computer and interconnections technology for Safety-Critical applications, while preserving and enhancing, tried and proven protection methods. In addition a set of Guidelines, regarding required performance for Accelerator Safety Systems and a Handbook of design criteria and rules were developed to assist future system designers and to provide a framework for internal review and regulation.

Frankel, R.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies EGS Program is installing, operating, and/or interfacing seismic arrays at multiple Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites. The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality

214

REPROCESSING OF SHALLOW SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA TO IMAGE FAULTS NEAR A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

Shallow seismic reflection data from Bear Creek Valley on the Oak Ridge Reservation demonstrates that spectral balancing and tomographic refraction statics can be important processing tools for shallow seismic data. At this site, reprocessing of data which had previously yielded no useable CMP stacked sections was successful after application of these processing techniques.

DOLL, W.E.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze three-dimensional Vp/Vs variation Notes A tomographic inversion for the 3D variations of the Vp/V s, the ratio of compressional to shear velocity, was performed. Iterative back projection of 2966 shear and compressional wave travel time residuals from local earthquakes recorded on vertical instruments reveals that Vp/Vs is generally high at the surface and decreases systematically to 10 km depth. Near Devil's Kitchen in the Coso Geothermal Area, Vp/Vs values are very low near the surface, consistent with measured values for steam-dominated

216

Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations  

SciTech Connect

Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

SWENSON, C.E.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

219

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation Small Modular Reactors SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

Babayev, Gulam R. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) seismic network is a significant new development for regional seismic velocity modeling and potential geothermal resource development. While very sparse compared to exploration scale applications, this network nevertheless affords regional modelers with unprecedented resolution and uniformity of coverage. The network is funded by the National Science Foundation through a major earth sciences initiative called Earthscope (www.earthscope.org). The network is

225

Neotectonics and seismicity of the Clearlake region in northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, topographic, and seismic methods were used to locate faults in the vicinity of Clearlake in northern California. The geological method, which seeks faults as discontinuities in the lithotope, found faults in the Tertiary-Cretaceous rocks east of Burns Valley. The topographic method, which is used to produce Fault Evaluation Reports, found a very active fault zone, the Konocti Bay fault zone, south of Highlands arm. It also found some active faults north of Highlands arm, in the eastern part of Burns Valley and on the lakeshore near Oak Park. The seismic method is the most enduring of the three methods but is limited by location accuracy; the results improve as monitoring continues because of increases in the density of events and improvements in the crustal velocity model. The seismic method identified faulting along the valley at Borax Lake and possibly also on a line running northeast from the city of Clearlake. The latter may be associated with the Burns Valley fault or with the line of scoria domes which runs parallel to it. Seismic observations over longer periods at higher resolution will be required in order to determine the location of active faults near the city. 47 refs., 13 figs.

Burns, K.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE program on seismic characterization for regions of interest to CTBT monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the DOE programs on Geophysical Characterization of (1) the Middle East and North Africa (ME-NA) and (2) Southern Asia (SA) is to provide the Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFRAC) with the analytic tools and knowledge base to permit effective verification of Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) compliance in those regions. The program also aims at using these regionalizations as models for the development of a detailed prescription for seismic calibration and knowledge base compilation in areas where the US has had little or no previous monitoring experience. In any given region, the CTBT seismic monitoring system will depend heavily on a few key arrays and/or three-component stations, and it will be important to know as much as possible about the physical properties of the earth`s crust and upper mantle: (1) in the vicinity of these stations, (2) in areas of potential earthquake activity or commercial blasting in the region containing the stations, and (3) along the propagation path from the sources to the stations. To be able to discriminate between various source types, we will also need to know how well the various event characterization techniques perform when they are transported from one tectonic or geologic environment to another. The Department of Energy`s CMT R&D program plan (DOE, 1994), which includes the ME-NA and SA characterization programs, incorporates an iterative process that combines field experiments, computer modeling and data analysis for the development, testing, evaluation and modification of data processing algorithms as appropriate to achieve specific US monitoring objectives. This process will be applied to seismic event detection, location and identification.

Ryall, A.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weaver, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Experimental implementation of active force control and iterative learning technique to a two-link arm driven by penumatic artificial muscles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the practical viability and feasibility of an active force control (AFC) technique incorporating an iterative learning (IL) algorithm known as AFCAIL applied to a two-link planar arm actuated by a pair of pneumatic artificial muscles ... Keywords: active force control, hardware-in-the-loop simulation, iterative learning, pneumatic artificial muscle

M. Mailah; H. H. Mun; S. Kazi; H. Jahanabadi

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

3-D seismic acquisition gains momentum in transition zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrocarbon-rich Gulf of Mexico continues to be an active seismic data acquisition arena, with seismic crews working at a rapid-fire pace to acquire 3-D databases on a regional scale. Lately, however, many contractors are looking shoreward to what will be the next active site for data acquisition and exploratory drilling--the coastal transition zone, which extends roughly five miles either side of the coastline. Diverse terrain causes acquisition efforts to shift frequently between land, water and marsh. Each environment carries its own unique acquisition requirements, which means a wide variety of equipment must be constantly available. Need for multiple permits from multiple sources lends itself to a formidable permitting maze, and environmental problems are prevailing in this sensitive wetlands area. With this in mind, Fairfield and Seismic Exchange, Inc., have teamed in a joint venture to produce the world`s largest non-exclusive 3-D seismic transition zone program. The project will build on Fairfield`s massive shallow water effort, which is nearly complete.

Lawrence, M.A. [Fairfield Industries Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

A new way to infer variations of the seismic solar radius  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the mean phase of waves propagating all the way from the far side of the Sun to the front side, as measured by seismic holography, varies with time. The change is highly anticorrelated with solar cycle activity and is consistent with other recent results on the variation of the seismic radius of the Sun. The phase change that we observe corresponds to a few kilometers difference in the seismic solar radius from solar maximum to solar minimum in agreement with inferrences from global helioseismology studies.

Hernandez, I Gonzalez; Hill, F; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/L87

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

Sornette, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Seismic reconnaissance of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active seismic methods using high-explosive sources and nondestructive energy sources were used to determine seismic velocities, signal detectability, and subsurface geologic structure in the vicinity of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area. Positions of several faults have been determined. A synthetic seismogram has been created that shows good agreement with recorded reflection records taken near exploratory borehole GT-2.

Kintzinger, P.R.; West, F.G.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Probabilistic economic evaluation of substation seismic upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology for deciding whether or not to implement seismic design modifications at Southern California Edison's (SCE) Substation facilities. The method considers the potential for substation capability loss resulting from earthquake damage, cost of seismic modification made today, the cost of damage restoration after that modification is made, the cost of doing nothing now, and the site specific earthquake probability. Based on these findings, recommendations for seismic modifications of substation facilities could be made.

Ong, T.L.; Ensign, R.L.; Martin, D.F.; Richter, H.L. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2009, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded nearly 3000 triggers on the seismometer system, which included over 1700 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 370 regional and teleseismic events. There were 1648 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. Recording of the Wooded Island events began in January with over 250 events per month through June 2009. The frequency of events decreased starting in July 2009 to approximately 10-15 events per month through September 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with 47 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.3 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The highest-magnitude event (3.0Mc) occurred on May 13, 2009 within the Wooded Island swarm at depth 1.8 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 1613 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 17 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 1630 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 18 earthquakes were classified as random events. The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

248

Tentative Framework for Development of Advanced Seismic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3-30 4. Conceptual Reformulation of Seismic Design Parameters ..... ... 4-5 4.4.1 Maximum Considered Earthquake Basis for the RM Factor ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Seismic surface wave tomography of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The K-901 data have been examined and a preliminary Single Valued Decomposition inversion has been obtained. The preliminary data indicates a need for additional seismic data to ground-truth the inversion. The originally proposed gravity data acquisition has been dropped because sufficient gravity data are now available for a preliminary analysis and because the seismic data are considered more critical to the interpretation. The proposed prototype for the portable acquisition and analysis system was developed during the first year and will be used in part of the acquisition of additional seismic data.'

Long, T.L.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

251

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and...

252

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

The development of a selection criteria model for the type of seismic retrofitting scheme applicable to Philippine buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Philippine Archipelago lies in a highly sensitive position in the Asian continent, named the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and it is one of the most seismically active and disaster prone areas in the world. In the Philippines, ...

Angeles, Kathryn Patricia V. (Kathryn Patricia Velayo)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

Apparatus and method for detecting seismic waves  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an apparatus for transducing seismic signals and a method for placing said apparatus for detecting seismic signals. The apparatus comprises at least one geophone preferably embedded in a polymeric material contained in a tubular member. A lower portion of the tubular member preferably contains ballast. The tubular member is preferably cemented into a borehole.

O' Brien, T.T.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Seismicity of the Coso Range, California | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Coso Range, California of the Coso Range, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity of the Coso Range, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 16-station seismographic network, approximately 40 km north-south by 30 km east-west, was installed in the Coso Range, California, in September 1975 as part of a geological and geophysical assessment of the geothermal resource potential of range. During the first 2 years of network operations, 4216 local earthquakes (0.5< or =m< or =3.9) defined zones of seismicity that strike radially outward from a Pleistocene rhyolite field located near the center of the Coso Range. Most earthquakes were located in zones showing a general northwest trend across the range.

259

Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Deformation and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County, California, observations and modeling using satellite radar interferometry Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data collected in the Coso geothermal area, eastern California, during 1993-1999 indicate ground subsidence over a approximately 50 km 2 region that approximately

260

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 771 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2009. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during the January March 2009 time period and reported in the previous quarterly report (Rohay et al, 2009). The frequency of Wooded Island events has subsided with 16 events recorded during June 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (magnitude (Mc) less than 1.0) with 25 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.2 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

262

Caucasus Seismic Information Network: Data and Analysis Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geology and tectonics of the Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) are highly variable. Consequently, generating a structural model and characterizing seismic wave propagation in the region require data from local seismic networks. As of eight years ago, there was only one broadband digital station operating in the region an IRIS station at Garni, Armenia and few analog stations. The Caucasus Seismic Information Network (CauSIN) project is part of a nulti-national effort to build a knowledge base of seismicity and tectonics in the region. During this project, three major tasks were completed: 1) collection of seismic data, both in event catalogus and phase arrival time picks; 2) development of a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the region obtained through crustal tomography; 3) advances in geological and tectonic models of the region. The first two tasks are interrelated. A large suite of historical and recent seismic data were collected for the Caucasus. These data were mainly analog prior to 2000, and more recently, in Georgia and Azerbaijan, the data are digital. Based on the most reliable data from regional networks, a crustal model was developed using 3-D tomographic inversion. The results of the inversion are presented, and the supporting seismic data are reported. The third task was carried out on several fronts. Geologically, the goal of obtaining an integrated geological map of the Caucasus on a scale of 1:500,000 was initiated. The map for Georgia has been completed. This map serves as a guide for the final incorporation of the data from Armenia and Azerbaijan. Description of the geological units across borders has been worked out and formation boundaries across borders have been agreed upon. Currently, Armenia and Azerbaijan are working with scientists in Georgia to complete this task. The successful integration of the geologic data also required addressing and mapping active faults throughout the greater Caucasus. Each of the major faults in the region were identified and the probability of motion were assessed. Using field data and seismicity, the relative activity on each of these faults was determined. Furthermore, the sense of motion along the faults was refined using GPS, fault plane solutions, and detailed field studies. During the course of the integration of the active fault data, the existence of the proposed strike slip Borjomi-Kazbeki fault was brought into question. Although it had been incorporated in many active tectonic models over the past decade, field geologists and geophysicists in Georgia questioned its existence. Detailed field studies were carried out to determine the existence of the fault and estimate the slip along it; and it was found that the fault zone did not exist. Therefore, the convergence rate in the greater Caucasus must be reinterpreted in terms of thrust mechanisms, instead of strike-slip on the Borjomi-Kazbeki fault zone.

Randolph Martin; Mary Krasovec; Spring Romer; Timothy O'Connor; Emanuel G. Bombolakis; Youshun Sun; Nafi Toksoz

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Category:Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geophysical Techniques page? For detailed information on Geophysical Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geophysical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geophysical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total. E [+] Electrical Techniques‎ (2 categories) 5 pages G [×] Gravity Techniques‎ 3 pages M [×] Magnetic Techniques‎ 3 pages S [+] Seismic Techniques‎ (2 categories) 2 pages Pages in category "Geophysical Techniques" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. D DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-Á-La-Masse) E Electrical Techniques G Gravity Techniques M Magnetic Techniques

265

Program on Technology Innovation: Effects of Seismicity and Rockfall on Long-Term Performance of the Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the effort to obtain regulatory approval for construction, it is necessary to estimate the effects due to seismic activity and rockfall on long-term performance of the candidate high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previously, EPRI analyzed the consequences of a single seismic event (EPRI report 1011812, September 2005). The present report is the latest of a series of independent EPRI assessments of Yucca Mountain project-related activities....

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Towards a bayesian seismotectonic zoning for use in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA)  

SciTech Connect

The mathematical representation of seismic sources is an important part of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. It reflects the association of the seismicity with the tectonically-active geological structures evidenced by seismotectonic studies. Given that most active faults are not characterized well enough, seismic sources are generally defined as areal zones, delimited with finite boundary polygons, within which the geological features of active tectonics and the seismicity are deemed homogeneous (e.g., focal depth, seismicity rate, and maximum magnitude). Besides the lack of data (e.g., narrow range of recorded magnitudes), the application of this representation generates different problems: 1) a large sensitivity of resulting hazard maps on the location of zone boundaries, while these boundaries are set by expert decision; 2) the zoning can not represent any variation in faulting mechanism; 3) the seismicity rates are distributed throughout the zones and we lose the location of the determinant information used for their calculation. We propose an exploratory study for an alternative procedure in area source modeling. First, different data (e.g., geomorphology, geology, fault orientations) will be combined by using automated spatial partitioning (investigation of both supervised and unsupervised methods) in order to obtain several information classes, which may be defined as areal source zones. Then, a given hypocenter belonging to a given ''zone'', from now on called seismicity model, will be expressed by a probability computed from the 2D (spatial) probability density function (pdf) for the active tectonic model used as an a priori and updated with specific data from seismicity catalogs (e.g., focal mechanism) or other new data sources (e.g., geomorphology, subsurface exploration). This hypocenter will thus be allowed to contribute to several models, with weights given by the value of the pdf for each model. The annual rate of occurrence, for a given model, will be calculated by the weighted average of the different hypocenter contributions contained in this model. Future applications will couple the seismicity models to Ground Motion Prediction Equations. In consequence, the results will provide the full spectrum of variability in the hazard and will highlight zones badly constrained and deserving to be more studied.

Le Goff, Boris; Fitzenz, Delphine [CGE, University of Evora (Portugal); Beauval, Celine [LGIT-IRD (France)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Trolley Seismic Uplift Constraint Design Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MCO Handling Machine (MHM) trolley moves along the top of the MHM bridge girders on east-west oriented rails. To prevent trolley wheel uplift during a seismic event, passive uplift constraints are provided as shown in Figure 1-1. North-south trolley wheel movement is prevented by flanges on the trolley wheels. When the MHM is positioned over a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) storage tube, east-west seismic restraints are activated to prevent trolley movement during MCO handling. The active seismic constraints consist of a plunger, which is inserted into slots positioned along the tracks as shown in Figure 1-1. When the MHM trolley is moving between storage tube positions, the active seismic restraints are not engaged. The MHM has been designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis (Reference 3) reported seismic uplift restraint loading and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed with the east-west seismic restraints activated and the uplift restraints experiencing only vertical loading. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the east-west trolley restraints are not engaged. For this case, the associated trolley movements would result in east-west lateral loads on the uplift constraints due to friction, as shown in Figure 1-2. During preliminary evaluations, questions were raised as to whether the EDERER calculations considered the latest ALSTHOM seismic analysis loads (See NCR No. 00-SNFP-0008, Reference 5). Further evaluation led to the conclusion that the EDERER calculations used appropriate vertical loading, but the uplift restraints would need to be re-analyzed and modified to account for lateral loading. The disposition of NCR 00-SNFP-0008 will track the redesign and modification effort. The purpose of this calculation is to establish bounding seismic loads (vertical and horizontal) for input into the uplift restraint hardware redesign calculations. To minimize iterations on the uplift redesign effort, efforts were made to assure that the final loading input was reasonable but unquestionably on the conservative side.

SWENSON, C.E.

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis  

SciTech Connect

The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Weigand, J. [Vibronics Inc. (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cutting Costs by Locating High Production Wells: A Test of the Volcano seismic Approach to Finding ''Blind'' Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, Duke University and the Kenyan power generation company, KenGen, conducted a microearthquake monitoring experiment at Longonot volcano in Kenya. Longonot is one of several major late Quaternary trachyte volcanoes in the Kenya Rift. They study was aimed at developing seismic methods for locating buried hydrothermal areas in the Rift on the basis of their microearthquake activity and wave propagation effects. A comparison of microearthquake records from 4.5 Hz, 2 Hz, and broadband seismometers revealed strong high-frequency site and wave-propagation effects. The lower frequency seismometers were needed to detect and record individual phases. Two-dozen 3-component 2- Hz L22 seismographs and PASSCAL loggers were then distributed around Longonot. Recordings from this network located one seismically active area on Longonot's southwest flank. The events from this area were emergent, shallow (<3 km), small (M<1), and spatially restricted. Evidently, the hydrothermal system in this area is not currently very extensive or active. To establish the nature of the site effects, the data were analyzed using three spectral techniques that reduce source effects. The data were also compared to a simple forward model. The results show that, in certain frequency ranges, the technique of dividing the horizontal motion by the vertical motion (H/V) to remove the source fails because of non-uniform vertical amplification. Outside these frequencies, the three methods resolve the same, dominant, harmonic frequencies at a given site. In a few cases, the spectra can be fit with forward models containing low velocity surface layers. The analysis suggests that the emergent, low frequency character of the microearthquake signals is due to attenuation and scattering in the near surface ash deposits.

Eylon Shalev; Peter E. Malin; Wendy McCausland

2002-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

A look-ahead synthesis technique with backtracking for switching activity reduction in low power high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research work done has shown that power consumption in digital integrated circuits can be effectively reduced by reducing the switching activity occurring on the functional modules. High-level synthesis of digital integrated circuits for low power often ... Keywords: High-level synthesis, Low power, Simultaneous scheduling and binding, Switching activity

Xianwu Xing; Ching Chuen Jong

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Assessment of seismic resistance of a basilica-type church under earthquake loading: Modelling and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a finite element methodology for the static and dynamic non-linear analysis of historical masonry structures is described and applied to a case study. A basilica-type masonry church is analysed in order to assess its structural behaviour ... Keywords: Earthquake loading, FE modeling seismic vulnerability, Historical masonry building, Non-linear analysis, Strengthening techniques

Michele Betti; Andrea Vignoli

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells  

SciTech Connect

The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components.

Bonzon, L.L.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Data Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Data Techniques: The collection, processing, and interpretation of data from various methods so accurate interpretations can be made about the subject matter. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Data techniques are any technique where data is collected and organized in a manner so that the information is useful for geothermal purposes. The

277

Parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data was presented. Classical approach to travel time tomography assumes straight line of seismic rays between sources and receives points and isotropy of geological ... Keywords: inverse problem, master-slave paradigm, seismic anisotropy, seismic tomography

Maciej Dwornik; Anna Pi?ta

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Advanced Methods for Determination of Seismic Fragilities: Seismic Fragilities Using Scenario Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) is an increasingly important means of assessing the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The standard approach for incorporating the seismic hazard into an SPRA is to use the uniform hazard spectra (UHS), which is computed independently at each spectral frequency, resulting in an equal probability of exceeding the ground motion at any frequency. As a result, the UHS may not be representative of an actual earthquake spectrum, and is a potential source of con...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

Seismic fragility and retrofitting for a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of seismic retrofitting applied to enhance seismic performance was assessed for a five-story reinforced concrete (RC) flat-slab building structure in the central United States. In addition to this, an assessment of seismic fragility that relates the probability of exceeding a performance level to the earthquake intensity was conducted. The response of the structure was predicted using nonlinear static and dynamic analyses with synthetic ground motion records for the central U.S. region. In addition, two analytical approaches for nonlinear response analysis were compared. FEMA 356 (ASCE 2000) criteria were used to evaluate the seismic performance of the case study building. Two approaches of FEMA 356 were used for seismic evaluation: global-level and member-level using three performance levels (Immediate Occupancy, Life Safety and Collapse Prevention). In addition to these limit states, punching shear drift limits were also considered to establish an upper bound drift capacity limit for collapse prevention. Based on the seismic evaluation results, three possible retrofit techniques were applied to improve the seismic performance of the structure, including addition of shear walls, addition of RC column jackets, and confinement of the column plastic hinge zones using externally bonded steel plates. Finally, fragility relationships were developed for the existing and retrofitted structure using several performance levels. Fragility curves for the retrofitted structure were compared with those for the unretrofitted structure. For various performance levels to assess the fragility curves, FEMA global drift limits were compared with the drift limits based on the FEMA member-level criteria. In addition to this, performance levels which were based on additional quantitative limits were also considered and compared with FEMA drift limits.

Bai, Jong-Wha

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

282

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

283

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell ...  

Tom Daley and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have invented a seismic source that can be operated while fluid is being injected or withdrawn from an aquifer or oil well.

284

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

286

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provides. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder of an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping. 4 figs.

Hardee, H.C.

1990-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Three-dimensional seismic imaging of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The source interval was 100 feet while the source line spacing was 400 feet. The sources were comprised of 4 vibrator trucks arranged in a box array. Seismic processing involved, among other steps, the picking of over 700,000 of the possible one million traces to determine first arrival travel times, normal moveout correction, 3-D stack, deconvolution, time migration, and depth conversion. The final data set represents a 3-D cube of the subsurface structure in the reservoir. Additionally, the travel times were used to perform tomographic inversions for velocity estimates to support the findings of the surface seismic imaging. The results suggest the presence of at least one dominant fault responsible for the migration of fluids in the reservoir. Furthermore, it is suggested that this feature might be part of a fault system that includes a graben structure.

Feighner, M.; Gritto, R.; Daley, T.M.; Keers, H.; Majer, E.L.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes earthquake activity within approximately 65 km of Yucca Mountain site during the October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006 time period (FY05-06). The FY05-06 earthquake activity will be compared with the historical and more recent period of seismic activity in the Yucca Mountain region. The relationship between the distribution of seismicity and active faults, historical patterns of activity, and rates of earthquakes (number of events and their magnitudes) are important components in the assessment of the seismic hazard for the Yucca Mountain site. Since October 1992 the University of Nevada has compiled a catalog of earthquakes in the Yucca Mountain area. Seismicity reports have identified notable earthquake activity, provided interpretations of the seismotectonics of the region, and documented changes in the character of earthquake activity based on nearly 30 years of site-characterization monitoring. Data from stations in the seismic network in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is collected and managed at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). Earthquake events are systematically identified and cataloged under Implementing Procedures developed in compliance with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program. The earthquake catalog for FY05-06 in the Yucca Mountain region submitted to the Yucca Mountain Technical Data Management System (TDMS) forms the basis of this report.

Smith, Ken

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Small-scale stress heterogeneity in the Anza seismic gap, southern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focal mechanism inversions reveal significant lateral variations in stress orientations along the Anza segment of the San Jacinto fault zone. The most notable stress anomaly is within the 20-km aseismic (seismic gap) portion of the fault zone, where {sigma}{sub 1}, the maximum compressive stress, is nearly horizontal and is oriented at 74{degrees} {+-} 13{degrees} relative to the fault strike. This contrasts with orientations ranging from 62{degrees} {+-} 11{degrees} to 49{degrees} {+-} 7{degrees} along the more seismically active portions of the fault zone immediately to the northwest and southeast of the seismic gap. Regional stress results, found by inverting all focal mechanisms simultaneously, indicate that {sigma}{sub 1} is horizontal and trends north-south, while {sigma}{sub 3} is horizontal and trends east-west. Approximately, 15 km west of the seismic gap, in the off-fault Cahuilla swarm area, {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 3} solutions are rotated clockwise by about 25{degrees} relative to the regional model. Roughly, 10 km southeast of the seismic gap near the Buck Ridge fault, {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 3} are rotated counterclockwise by about 10{degrees} relative to the regional solution. Northwest of the seismic gap along the fault zone, {sigma}{sub 3} plunges about 30{degrees} from the horizontal, correlating with a local increase in reverse faulting between the Hot Springs and San Jacinto faults. Southeast of the seismic gap, {sigma}{sub 1} plunges about 45{degrees} from the horizontal, correlating with a local increase in normal faulting in the trifurcation region of the Buck Ridge, Clark, and Coyote Creek faults. The authors propose a simple mechanical model in which a block rotation superimposed on the dominant right-lateral strike-slip motion of the fault zone satisfies the first-order observations of stress orientation, faulting, and horizontal surface strain. 51 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Hartse, H.E.; Fehler, M.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Aster, R.C. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Scott, J.S.; Vernon, F.L. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, La Jolla, CA (United States)

1994-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

Magnetotelluric Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotelluric Techniques Magnetotelluric Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetotelluric Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Magnetotelluric Techniques:

294

Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Techniques Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Determination of lithology, grain size Stratigraphic/Structural: Thickness and geometry of rock strata, fracture identification Hydrological: Porosity, permeability, water saturation Thermal: Formation temperature with depth Dictionary.png Downhole Techniques: Downhole techniques are measurements collected from a borehole environment which provide information regarding the character of formations and fluids

295

Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Techniques Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: may be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: may be inferred Hydrological: may be inferred Thermal: may be inferred Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques: Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Geophysical techniques measure physical phenomena of the earth such as gravity, magnetism, elastic waves, electrical and electromagnetic waves.

296

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

297

VLF Technique and Science in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations and on board satellites to study various wave-plasma interactive phenomena. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) system to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the geomagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere routes. The time frequency spectra indicate presence of dispersion and various cut-off frequencies providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss, hisslers etc., which can be heard on an earphone with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of various anomalous characteristics over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted propagation, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE effects, D-region ionisation perturbations due to solar and stellar x- and {gamma} ray emissions and detecting precursors of seismic activities are a few problems which will gain from low latitude studies. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively noise free to observe rare and new phenomena requiring better SNR to detect such changes. The VLF signals emanating from the active seismic zones would require high sensitivity of the system and suitable network of transmitting and receiving stations. Results obtained on whistlers and related studies from a number of Indian stations covering geomagnetic latitude range between 13-24 deg. N are mentioned and reviewed in the background of theoretical understanding of the lightning return stroke signal elements, VLF propagation through cold plasma, ionospheric wave guide mode, electron precipitation due to cyclotron resonance and production of ionisation in the D-region due to solar/stellar UV/X/{gamma}-rays. Further use of the VLF technique in terms of improving both observational data for real time monitoring/modelling of geophysical phenomena and exploring space weather conditions are considered as part of a future Indian programme.

Chakravarty, S. C. [Member, Governing Body, Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata (India)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Short-range wireless sensor networks for high density seismic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new oil and gas reservoir. The envisioned production peak of current oil and gas reservoirs is pushing for sub-surface diagnostic (for small earthquake monitoring) and exploration (for new oil and gas Receivers time Delivery time Source Receivers Shot Gas/Oil/Water Gas/Oil/Water Dip-slip fault Active seismic

Spagnolini, Umberto

300

Louisiana Gulf Coast seismicity induced by geopressured-geothermal well development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuous microseismic monitoring networks have been established around three US Department of Energy geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have on subsidence and growth fault activation. The results obtained from this monitoring have shown several unusual characteristics associated with Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases and the other with only surface wave signatures. The latter type comprises over 99% of the reported 1000+ microseismic event locations. The problem with the slow-moving surface-wave signature events is that rainfall and weather-associated frontal passages seem closely related to these periods of seismic activity at all three wells. After relatively short periods and low levels of flow testing at the Parcperdue and Sweet Lake prospects, seismic monitoring has shown little credible correlation to inferred growth fault locations during periods of flow testing. Longer periods and higher volumes of flow testing at the Rockefeller Refuge prospect should provide a truer indication of induced seismicity attributable to geopressured-geothermal development. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Stevenson, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and its application to the Coso and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurements of temporal changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and assume that any differences in the structural results arise from real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural

303

Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 Dependent Seismic Tomography of the Coso Geothermal Area, 1996-2004 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network at the Coso geothermal area, California. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio VP/VS at shallow depths. These changes result predominately from progressive relative increase in VS with respect to VP, and could result from processes associated with geothermal operations such as decrease in fluid pressure

304

Seismic response analyses of the base-isolated building at Tohoku  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seismic response analyses of the base-isolated building at Tohoku Seismic response analyses of the base-isolated building at Tohoku University Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Engineering Analysis Multimedia Bookmark and Share EA Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to the Engineering Analysis Department Seismic response analyses of the base-isolated building at Tohoku

305

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

306

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

308

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological drilling hazards are a major concern in the ics. drilling and development of offshore reservoirs. Some of these hazards may display high amplitudes on seismic profiles and some may be associated with stratigraphic features. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with channel sand deposits may indicate potential accumulations of hydrocarbons in reservoirs. However, shallow hydrocarbon accumulations are rarely of production size. More often, they are potential geological drilling hazards that could inhibit the development of petroleum resources from deeper hydrocarbon-bearing layers. Traditionally, existing and potential geologic hazards are identified by interpretation of high-resolution site survey data, acquired specifically for drilling hazard delineation. This paper describes a new technique for drilling hazard identification using a conventional 3D seismic amplitude dataset. An event coherence calculation program is applied to a 3D seismic dataset to derive seismic attributes sufficient to highlight structural and stratigraphic discontinuities in the area. A resultant 3D difference cube is used to establish fault framework and to detect spatial distribution of channel deposits in the area and their geometries. Superposition of the difference cube on seismic amplitude data allows simultaneous display of structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and reflectivity information. Therefore, it is used for the delineation of channels, which show anomalous amplitudes, identification of their dimensions and spatial locations, and implication of gas-charged sand distribution within the detected channel. The paper gives a detailed description of a workflow, which was found sufficient for delineation of likely gas-charged sand channels, and discusses the ways to adjust the proposed workbox to specific objectives.

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Techniques Modeling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Modeling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Modeling Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data and Modeling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock types, rock chemistry, stratigraphic layer organization Stratigraphic/Structural: Stress fields and magnitudes, location and shape of permeable and non-permeable structures, faults, fracture patterns Hydrological: Visualization and prediction of the flow patterns and characteristics of geothermal fluids, hydrothermal fluid flow characteristics, up-flow patterns

310

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

311

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Seismic studies of a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, 850 microearthquakes, ranging in magnitudes from -3 to 0, were located reliably using arrival times recorded at a set of 5 downhole geophone stations. A subset of these events were located using an upgraded hodogram technique. The seismicity defines a tabular zone with horizontal extent of 900 m, vertical extent of 800 m, and thickness of 150 m. This zone strikes N340/sup 0/E, and dips 75/sup 0/ to the east; its position indicates that no hydraulic connection between the two predrilled wells could be achieved by the fracturing. The distribution of locations obtained from arrival times shows good agreement with those derived from hodograms. Well constrained fault plane solutions were determined for 26 of the larger microearthquakes observed at a surface seismic net. Most solutions display one nearly vertical nodal plane that strikes close to N - S, and a T axis that trends roughly E - W, in agreement with regional indicators of the least principal stress direction. 9 refs., 6 figs.

House, L.; Keppler, H.; Kaieda, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Seismic hazard analysis overview and executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Specific Spectra Project (SSSP) described in this report was a multi-year study funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The main objective of this project was to provide assistance to the NRC by developing estimates of the seismic hazard at the nine oldest nuclear power plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains which were included in the SEP. This volume gives brief overview of the SEP and the SSSP including a discussion of the formal elicitation of expert opinion used to obtain a subjective representation of parameters that affect seismic hazard and the development of the seismic hazard at the nine SEP facilities.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Minichino, C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR5741 Proceedings, Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Frames Gaithersburg, MD ...

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

Seismic Qualification Case Study for a New Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and compares methods used for the seismic qualification of safety related equipment at nuclear power plants and examines an alternative, hybrid approach. The report investigates the costs and lead times for each seismic qualification approach and also discusses the seismic capacity definitions that result from the application of each qualification approach. The report includes a case study that applies the new approach to the seismic qualification of an inverter.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Program on Technology Innovation: Effects of Multiple Seismic Events and Rockfall on Long-Term Performance of the Yucca Mountain Re pository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the effort to obtain regulatory approval for construction, it is necessary to estimate the effects due to seismic activity and rockfall on long-term performance of the candidate high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previously, EPRI analyzed the consequences of a single seismic event (EPRI report 1011812, September 2005). The present report is the latest of a series of independent EPRI assessments of Yucca Mountain project-related activities....

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Category:Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Downhole Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Downhole Techniques page? For detailed information on Downhole Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Downhole Techniques Add.png Add a new Downhole Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B [×] Borehole Seismic Techniques‎ 2 pages F [×] Formation Testing Techniques‎ O [×] Open-Hole Techniques‎ W [×] Well Log Techniques‎ 17 pages [×] Well Testing Techniques‎ 8 pages

325

DeepNet: An Ultrafast Neural Learning Code for Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect

A feed-forward multilayer neural net is trained to learn the correspondence between seismic data and well logs. The introduction of a virtual input layer, connected to the nominal input layer through a special nonlinear transfer function, enables ultrafast (single iteration), near-optimal training of the net using numerical algebraic techniques. A unique computer code, named DeepNet, has been developed, that has achieved, in actual field demonstrations, results unattainable to date with industry standard tools.

Barhen, J.; Protopopescu, V.; Reister, D.

1999-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

Not Available

1991-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

RISC-3 Seismic Assessment Guidelines: Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for establishing reasonable confidence that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear plants, categorized as RISC-3 under the 10 CFR 50.69 Risk Informed Safety Categorization Process, will perform their required functions under design basis seismic conditions.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2009 December 31, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has accumulated 37 years of earthquake data (1972-2009). This report covers the earthquake activity from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2009 and is a continuation of previous annual reports on earthquake activity surrounding the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) and within and near the INL. It discusses the earthquake activity that has occurred around the local region and within a 161-km radius around the INL centered at 43? 39.00' N, 112? 47.00' W). It discusses the seismic station and strong motion accelerograph instrumentation used to record earthquake data and how they were analyzed. It also includes a brief discussion of continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) stations co-located at INL seismic stations.

N. S. Carpenter; S. J. Payne; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

334

Seismic reprocessing, interpretation and petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, Llanos Basin, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Llanos Basin, in Eastern Colombia, is the major oil-producing province in the country. In recent years, exploration in this basin has been focused towards plays in the Llanos foothills, where proven thrust traps present the possibility of large discoveries. However, the Llanos foreland still remains an attractive exploration target due to lower risk plays linked to proven production mechanisms. One giant field and over 51 smaller fields have been discovered. The basin, with an exploration well density of 1:500 1=2, can hardly be considered mature. Improvements in seismic data processing, sequence stratigraphic analysis and a better understanding of the petroleum systems have led to a renewed interest in the Llanos foreland in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An integrated geophysical and geological study was done to evaluate the petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, located 35-km southwest of the giant Cano Limon Field. The purpose of the project was to reprocess approximately 200 km of mid 1980s seismic, integrate the interpretation of the seismic data with the available well and geologic data, create a sequence stratigraphic framework and describe the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Reprocessing the seismic data gave an improved image of the subsurface from previous processing. The implementations of techniques like refraction statics, pre-stack linear noise attenuation (FK Filter), surface consistent residual statics, dip moveout (DMO), post stack signal enhancement (FK Weighting) and finite difference migration improved the static solutions, signal noise to ratio and imaging of the fault planes. The interpretation of the seismic data led to the dentition of the structural styles, deformation history, paleotopography and identification of seismic facies. The sequence stratigraphic framework was built from the integration of the seismic, well and regional data. 5 transgressive-regressive sequences were identified in the Upper Cretaceous to Early Oligocene rocks. Two prospective areas were identified within the East Cano Rondon Area. One of them is related to the proven play of fault bounded anticlinal structures. Three gelds in the vicinity of the study area have proven reserves in this play. The second prospect is based on a new play that is being proposed. The play involves the stratigraphic pinchout of basal transgressive sands deposited in the topographic lows created by wrench fault tectonics. The two prospects could have up to an estimated 759 MMBO.

Molina, German D

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

5h Other Seismic Stakeholder InteractionsGlenn Kelly- Appendix 5 Seismic.wpd Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioning plants. During the course of the workshop, presentations by the NRC and the industry concluded that spent fuel pools possess substantial capability beyond their design basis to with stand seismic events but that variations in seismic capacity existed due to plant specific designs and locations. The consensus was that the risk was low enough that precise quantification was not necessary to support exemption requests but that this needed to be confirmed on a plant specific basis with deterministic criteria. It was recommended that a simple spent fuel pool (SFP) vulnerability check list be developed to provide additional assurance that no beyond-design-basis seismic structural vulnerabilities exist at decommissioning plants. Enclosed for your review is the "Seismic Screening Criteria For Assessing Potential Pool Vulnerabilities At Decommissioning Plants." Please contact me at (202) 739-8110 or by e-mail (apn@.nei.org) if you have any questions or if a meeting should be scheduled to discuss the enclosed seismic checklist.

Glenn Kelly Aee Attached; George Hubbard; Aee Attached; Glenn Kelly; Alan Nelson; Alan Nelson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetic Techniques Magnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Presence of magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Stratigraphic/Structural: Mapping of basement structures, horst blocks, fault systems, fracture zones, dykes and intrusions. Hydrological: The circulation of hydrothermal fluid may impact the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. Thermal: Rocks lose their magnetic properties at the Curie temperature (580° C for magnetite) [1] and, upon cooling, remagnetize in the present magnetic field orientation. The Curie point depth in the subsurface may be determined in a magnetic survey to provide information about hydrothermal activity in a region.

339

Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Techniques Gravity Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gravity Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Gravity Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. Stratigraphic/Structural: Delineation of steeply dipping formations, geological discontinuities and faults, intrusions and the deposition of silicates due to hydrothermal activity. Hydrological: Density of sedimentary rocks are strongly influenced by fluid contained within pore space. Dry bulk density refers to the rock with no moisture, while the wet bulk density accounts for water saturation; fluid content may alter density by up to 30%.(Sharma, 1997)

340

The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This collaborative project will perform the following tasks to fully define the nature and extent of the geothermal reservoir underlying the Jemez Reservation: - Conduct 1-6,000-scale geologic mapping of 6 mi2 surrounding the Indian Springs area. - Using the detailed geologic map, locate one N-S and two E-W seismic lines and run a seismic survey of 4 mi2; reduce and analyze seismic data using innovative high-resolution seismic migration imaging techniques developed by LANL, and integrate with 3-D audio-frequency MT/MT data acquired at the same area for fault and subsurface structure imaging and resource assessment.

342

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Seismic Record Processing Program (SRP), Version 1.03  

SciTech Connect

The Seismic Record Processing Program (SRP) is an interactive computer code developed for the calculation of artificial earthquake records that comply with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan. The basic objective of SRP is the calculation of artificial seismic time histories that correspond to Design Response Spectra specified in the US Atomic Energy Commission Regulatory Guide 1.60 and/or the Power Spectral Density (PSD) requirements of the NRC Standard Review Plan. However, SRP is a general computer code and can accommodate any arbitrarily specified Target Response Spectra (TRS) or PSD requirements. In addition, among its other futures, SRP performs quadratic baseline correction and calculates correlations factors for a set of up to three earthquake records. This manual is prepared in two parts. The first part describes the methodologies and criteria used while the second is a user`s manual. In section 1 of the first part, the techniques used for the adjustment of a given earthquake record to a required TRS family of curves for a set of specified damping ratios are presented. Similarly, in section 2 of the first part, the PSD of an earthquake record is compared to a target PSD and adjusted accordingly. Sections 3 and 4 of the first part deal with the subjects of baseline correction and correlation of earthquake records, respectively. The second part is the user`s manual. The user`s manual contains a list of the computer hardware requirements, instructions for the program installation, a description of the user generated input files, and a description of all the program menus and commands.

Karabalis, D.L.; Cokkinides, G.J.; Rizos, D.C. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Definition: Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Geophysical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geophysical Techniques Geophysics is the study of the structure and composition of the earth's interior.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic)

346

Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE.

Barlow, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Budnitz, R. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Industry Approach to Seismic Severe Accident Policy Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utilities with industry recommended guidelines for cost-effective seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20. Guidance is provided on application of seismic probabilistic risk assessment and seismic margin methods for full-, focused-, and reduced-scope evaluations. It provides strategies for coordinating these evaluations with similar reviews needed for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

350

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

351

Microsoft Word - Calpine EGS_Seismic Eval Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Environmental Impacts of Induced Seismicity at the Calpine Enhanced Geothermal System Project, The Geysers, California prepared for RMT, Inc. 4 West Fourth Avenue,...

352

APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH DOE SEISMICITY PROTOCOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the "Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems". Calpine Corporation and other Geysers geothermal operators have long been...

353

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

354

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

355

Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2% in 50 years. Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: Southern California Earthquake Center...

356

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

357

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

358

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

359

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

360

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. Awardees (Company Institution) OSKI Energy, LLC Awardee Website http:www.oskienergy.com Partner 1 Optim, Inc Partner 2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design Guidelines Program Plan for New and Existing Buildings FEMA-445 / August 2006 ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismic Design of Steel Special Concentrically Braced Frame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. 8 ... Dr. John (Jay) L. Harris, III, managed the project to produce this Technical Brief for EL. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Correlelations between the Anomalous Behaviour of the Ionosphere and the Seismic Events for VTX-MALDA VLF Propagation  

SciTech Connect

One of the most important application of the VLF signals is that it contains possible information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In other words, in near future, it may be possible to predict seismic events by judging signatures of VLF signals. In this paper, we present the result of the monitoring of the VLF signals collected in the Malda branch of ICSP, located in Malda, West Bengal, for four years (2005, 2007-09) and we try to find out the co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes. Here we use that VLF signals which are transmitted from the VTX station (18.2 KHz), located near Vijayanarayanam in Tamilnadu, about 2290 km away from the receiver. To find out the co-relation of the ionospheric activities with the seismic events such as earthquake, first we have to study the average signal throughout the year. For this, we plot the so-called standardized calibration curve using the four years data. Here we use a total of 481 no. of data. To establish the co-relation between the ionospheric activities and the seismic events, we use the data of the year 2008 and we found that the deviations of the anomalous data are co-related with the seismic event. We found that the highest deviation takes place one day prior to the seismic events. We also calculated the 'D-layer preparation time'(DLPT) and the 'D-layer disappearance time'(DLDT) for the data of 2008 and tried to establish the co-relation between the anomalous DLPT and DLDT with the seismic events, if any. We compare our result with the VLF signals received from other places.

Ray, Suman; Sasmal, S. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata 700084 (India); Chakrabarti, S. K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata 700084 (India); S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Choudhury, A. K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, Malda Branch, Atul Market, Malda 731101 (India)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate tectonics In this paper, we analyse the distributions of number of events (N) and seismic energy (E

Doglioni, Carlo

365

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

366

Tomographic imaging of rock conditions ahead of mining using the shearer as a seismic source - A feasibility study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roof falls due to poor rock conditions in a coal longwall panel may threaten miner's life and cause significant interruption to mine production. There has been a requirement for technologies that are capable of imaging the rock conditions in longwall coal mining, ahead of the working face and without any interruption to production. A feasibility study was carried out to investigate the characteristics of seismic signals generated by the continuous coal cutter (shearer) and recorded by geophone arrays deployed ahead of the working face, for the purpose of seismic tomographic imaging of roof strata condition before mining. Two experiments were conducted at a coal mine using two arrays of geophones. The experiments have demonstrated that the longwall shearer generates strong and low-frequency (similar to 40 Hz) seismic energy that can be adequately detected by geophones deployed in shallow boreholes along the roadways as far as 300 m from the face. Using noise filtering and signal cross correlation techniques, the seismic arrival times associated with the shearer cutting can be reliably determined. It has proved the concept that velocity variations ahead of the face can be mapped out using tomographic techniques while mining is in progress.

Luo, X.; King, A.; Van de Werken, M. [CSIRO, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

Apted, M.J. [Monitor Scientific, 3900 S. Wadsworth Blvd., Denver, CO 80235 (United States); Kemeny, J.M. [University of Arizona, Dept. Mining and Geological Engineering, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Martin, C.D. [University of Alberta, Dept. Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB T6G 2W2 (Canada); James, R.J. [Anatech Corp., 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Remote Sensing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Sensing Techniques Remote Sensing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Remote Sensing Techniques: Remote sensing utilizes satellite and/or airborne based sensors to collect information about a given object or area. Remote sensing data collection methods can be passive or active. Passive sensors (e.g., spectral imagers) detect natural radiation that is emitted or reflected by the object or area

369

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation  

SciTech Connect

Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a ??sub-porosity? within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The ??sub-porosity? may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in the report and the full details of the research and approach are contained in the publications found in the Attachment section of this report. A list of presentation and publications of all work associated with this grant is also provided.

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue University

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

Yoshida, Nozomu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 1-13-1, Miyagi (Japan)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Structural analysis of an LMFBR shield assembly duct under thermo-mechanical and seismic loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the stress analysis performed to assess structural adequacy of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) core removable shield assemblies. Removable shield assemblies are located in the peripheral region of the core (between blanket assemblies and the fixed radial shield), and are subjected to severe cross-sectional thermal gradients and seismic loads requiring a relatively complex duct load pad design. For cost-effectiveness, the analysis was conducted in two stages. First, an elasto-plastic seismic stress analysis was performed using a detailed nonlinear finite element model (with gaps) of the load pad configuration. Next, in order to determine the total strain accumulation and the creep-fatigue damage the maximum seismic stresses combined with the ''worst'' thermal stresses from a single assembly model were used to perform a simplified inelastic analysis using two sets of material properties to bound the changing material conditions during reactor operation. This work demonstrated the necessity and applicability of the two simplified analysis techniques in elevated temperature structural design, i.e., the treatment of time-dependent degradation of material properties due to temperature and nuclear irradiation, and the use of time-independent finite element stress analysis results to perform a simplified creep-fatigue analysis.

Malik, S.N.; Sazawal, V.K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

378

Test Series 4: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Exide EMP-13 battery cells  

SciTech Connect

This report, the fourth in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of a 27-year old lead-antimony Exide EMP-13 cells from the recently decommissioned Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; and multicell (five-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of nine electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations. None of the nine cells failed during the actual seismic tests when a range of ZPAs up to 1.5 g was imposed. Subsequent discharge capacity tests of five of the cells showed, however, that none of the cells could deliver the accepted standard of 80% of their rated electrical capacity for 3 hours. In fact, none of the 5 cells could deliver more than a 33% capacity. Two of the seismically tested cells and one untested, low capacity cell were disassembled for examination and metallurgical analyses. The inspection showed the cells to be in poor condition. The negative plates in the vicinity of the bus connections were extremely weak, the positive buses were corroded and brittle, negative and positive active material utilization was extremely uneven, and corrosion products littered the cells.

Bonzon, L.L.; Hente, D.B.; Kukreti, B.M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J.D.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.D.; Aucoin, B.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Seismic refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system in southeastern Idaho is a convective hot water system, presently being developed to demonstrate the production of electricity from low-temperature (approx. 150 0C) water. Interpretation of seismic refraction recordings in the area yielded compressional velocities from near the surface to the crystalline basement at a maximum depth of approximately 1600 m. The results show a complex sequence of sediments and volcanic flows overlying basement. Velocities in the sedimentary section vary laterally. Correlation with well data suggests

382

Estimation of Seismic Load Demand for a Wind Turbine in the Time Domain: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbines installed in seismically active regions such as the Pacific Rim or the Mediterranean must consider loads induced by base shaking from an earthquake. To account for this earthquake risk, current International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) certification requirements provide a simplified method for calculating seismic loads which is intended to be conservative. Through the addition of capabilities, it is now possible to simulate earthquake loading of a wind turbine in conjunction other load sources such as wind and control system behavior using the FAST code. This paper presents a comparison of three earthquake loading scenarios of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine: idling; continued operation through an earthquake; and an emergency shutdown initiated by an earthquake. Using a set of 22 earthquake records, simulations are conducted for each load case. A summary of the resulting tower moment demand is presented to assess the influence of operational state on the resulting structural demand.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Uang, C.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Historical Information H.6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1973 January 1973 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. This report was prepared as an amount of work sponsored by the United Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, - subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Available from the National Technical Information Service, U. S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, V A 2 2 1 5 1 - \ J STATISTICAL CORRELATION OF OBSERVED GROUND MOTION

384

Historical Information H.6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. - - 9 0 R i 4. BLUfzE 8 1888CIiTE8 R E 8 E h R e B BVl8l@fl - -- SAN FRANCISCO L E G A L N O T I...

385

Historical Information H.6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BUILDING DAMAGE PROJECT RULISON by I . Farhoomand and R . E. Scholl John A. Blume & Associates Research Division San Francisco, California September, 1971 Prepared under...

386

Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Application of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Microzonation Procedure in Bulgaria and Validation of the Seismic Input Against Eurocode 8  

SciTech Connect

The earthquake record and the Code for design and construction in seismic regions in Bulgaria have shown that the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria is exposed to a high seismic risk due to local shallow and regional strong intermediate-depth seismic sources. The available strong motion database is quite limited, and therefore not representative at all of the real hazard. The application of the neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment procedure for two main Bulgarian cities has been capable to supply a significant database of synthetic strong motions for the target sites, applicable for earthquake engineering purposes. The main advantage of the applied deterministic procedure is the possibility to take simultaneously and correctly into consideration the contribution to the earthquake ground motion at the target sites of the seismic source and of the seismic wave propagation in the crossed media. We discuss in this study the result of some recent applications of the neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure to the cities of Sofia and Russe. The validation of the theoretically modeled seismic input against Eurocode 8 and the few available records at these sites is discussed.

Ivanka, Paskaleva [CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Mihaela, Kouteva [CLSMEE-BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Franco, Vaccari [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Panza, Giuliano F. [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

3D seismic interpretation, reservoir characteristics and petroleum prospects for South Marsh Island OCS Blocks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Marsh OCS Blocks, located approximately 150 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, contain a 100-million-barrel oil field. In recent years, exploration in this area has focused on plays in Pleistocene salt-related rollover structures with reservoirs of fluvial-deltaic sandstones and proven high oil-producing potential. After more than twenty years of exploration, exploitation and producing, this area remains an attractive target for exploration with its potentially high-quality reservoirs that have not been drilled. The I, K and L reservoirs of the Pleistocene have contributed to the majority of the production of over 100 million barrels of oil and near 200 billion cubic feet of natural gas. More than 90 well penetrations in these sands show great stratigraphic diversity within short distances, making the ability to accurately determine whether sand lenses have been adequately produced or bypassed essential for production opportunities for operators. New 3D seismic processing and interpretation techniques have been applied to interpret 3D seismic data with significantly improved accuracy. This has led to a renewed interest in the South Marsh area in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An interactive 3D-seismic interpretation has been carried out for the entire area. The objectives of this study are to conduct 3D seismic interpretation, to build a depositional environment model that encompasses the different sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphic framework by using the prestack time migrated 3D volume and existing well control, to study rock properties using seismic modeling and well data to explain seismic attribute response, and to study the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Three horizons were mapped from well, seismic, and petrophysical data for the I, K and L formation tops respectively. Structure styles were well-defined by the 3D seismic interpretation. Well correlation has been completed for I, K and L formations throughout the study area. Reservoirs were studied vertically and horizontally. Reservoir types and properties were identified. One prospect related to the proven play of fault-bounded anticline structures was identified within the area. The plays involve the stratigraphic pinch out of basal transgressive sands deposited in the flank of the structure.

Duan, Ling

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Well Log Techniques At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

390

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

392

Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

Majer, E.L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of borehole electromagnetic and seismic detection of fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of downhole high-frequency techniques for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. The first method used an electromagnetic wave at 30 to 300 MHz, vhf frequencies. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole vhf radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole. Similar experiments were also conducted using seismic waves at 4.5 to 6 KHz. The transmitter and the receiver in this case were located in separate boreholes. During this experiment, reflections from the slot were obtained only with the transducers oriented for shear wave illumination and detection. These results suggest that a high-frequency shear wave can also be used to detect fractures away from a borehole.

Chang, H.T.; Suhler, S.A.; Owen, T.E.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A new look at 3D seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

New ways are being developed to quickly extract and more thoroughly analyze the information contained in the 3D seismic data. These interpretation techniques were used to evaluate a 3D survey at Fortescue field (Gippsland basin, Australia) before starting a 13-well infill drilling program in 1994. Oil was discovered in the top of the LaTrobe (TOL) group at Fortescue field. Following appraisal drilling and platform installation, production started in 1983. To mitigate recent production decline and develop remaining reserves, a 13-well infill drilling program was proposed in 1993. Fortescue field is a west-southwest dipping monocline with oil trapped stratigraphically beneath an erosional unconformity in 13 separate elastic reservoirs. The reservoirs dip approximately 2{degree} more steeply than the overlying erosional truncation surface, causing older sections to progressively subcrop in an easterly direction. The 13 proposed infill wells relied completely or partially on oil being trapped structurally updip from existing completions. To effectively capture these reserves, wells were targeted to intersect reservoirs along the low-angle sand truncation face. The ability to identify and map the top and base reservoir edges along the subcrop surface was critical for well success. The goal of this study was to quickly and accurately identify nine reservoir subcrop edges, determine the remaining reserves updip from existing completions, and identify the geological risk associated with each proposed well.

Vinson, T.E.; Standley, P.; Jager, G.; Kidd, G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Microearthquake monitoring and seismic imaging at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

We are monitoring two high-frequency, high-resolution microearthquake networks at The Geysers. The first network consists of 16 stations and is located in the northwest portion of the Geysers. This array is in an area that is representative of a high-temperature, deep, reservoir environment. The second network consists of 13 stations located in the southeast Geysers around the location of the cooperative injection experiment. We are using the data from the networks to compute velocity and attenuation images and earthquake parameters such as precise location and rate and manner of energy release. Our goal is to evaluate the use of this information to manage steam release from geothermal reservoirs. We are supporting this effort with laboratory measurements of velocity and attenuation on Geysers core samples under varying degrees of saturation to help us better interpret our seismic images. To date we find that microearthquake activity follows injection activity, and the dry, low-pressure portions of the reservoir are characterized by low velocity and high attenuation.

Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Romero, A.; Kirkpatrick, A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multi-offset vertical seismic profiles: fracture and fault identification for Appalachian basin reservoirs - two case examples  

SciTech Connect

Many Appalachian basin reservoirs occur in older rocks that are commonly fractured and faulted. These fractures and faults very often act as the reservoir trapping mechanism, especially in lithologies with no log-detectable matrix porosity. Traditional logging techniques, although possibly showing fault or fracture presence in the well bore, seldom provide clues to the extent of fracturing or location of nearby faults. Surface seismic data should show faults and perhaps even fracturing, but showing these features is often not possible in rugged terrain or in areas with thick coverings of unconsolidated surface material. Traditional seismic also has resolutions lower than that needed to detect small faults (less than 70 ft). Two case examples are shown from the northern Appalachian basin. The first example utilizes Schlumberger's slim hole seismic tool in cased holes in an area of thick unconsolidated glacial material along the Bass Island trend of western New York. The second example utilizes Schlumberger's SAT tool in an open-hole environment in an area of northwestern Pennsylvania with disturbed surface bedding and poor conventional surface seismic returns. The slim hole tool provides good data but with only slightly greater resolution than surface Vibroseis data. The SAT tool provides excellent resolution (down to 25 ft) in highly disturbed bedding.

Wyatt, D.E.; Bennett, B.A.; Walsh, J.J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ELIMINATING CONSERVATISM IN THE PIPING SYSTEM ANALYSIS PROCESS THROUGH APPLICATION OF A SUITE OF LOCALLY APPROPRIATE SEISMIC INPUT MOTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Seismic analysis is of great importance in the evaluation of nuclear systems due to the heavy influence such loading has on their designs. Current Department of Energy seismic analysis techniques for a nuclear safety-related piping system typically involve application of a single conservative seismic input applied to the entire system [1]. A significant portion of this conservatism comes from the need to address the overlapping uncertainties in the seismic input and in the building response that transmits that input motion to the piping system. The approach presented in this paper addresses these two sources of uncertainty through the application of a suite of 32 input motions whose collective performance addresses the total uncertainty while each individual motion represents a single variation of it. It represents an extension of the soil-structure interaction analysis methodology of SEI/ASCE 43-05 [2] from the structure to individual piping components. Because this approach is computationally intensive, automation and other measures have been developed to make such an analysis efficient. These measures are detailed in this paper.

Anthony L. Crawford; Robert E. Spears, Ph.D.; Mark J. Russell

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of seismic sloshing of reactor tanks considering submerged components and seismic isolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the seismic sloshing response of a large pool-type reactor tank with several deck-mounted components is presented. The main objective of the study is to investigate the effects of internal components on the sloshing response and to determine the sloshing loads on the components. The study shows that the presence of internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequencies of a tank with internal components are considerably higher than those of a tank without internals. The higher sloshing frequencies reduce the sloshing wave height on the free surface but the dynamic pressures of the fluid are increased. The effects of seismic isolation on sloshing response are also presented.

Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques (Redirected from Electromagnetic Sounding Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

402

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

403

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

404

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques (Redirected from Ground Electromagnetic Methods) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

405

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

406

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

407

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description Historically, areas where the Earth surface is covered by an exposed high-velocity rock layer have been locations where conventional, single-component, seismic P-waves have failed to provide usable geological information. The research will use new seismic sources that emphasize shear waves and new seismic data-acquisition technology based on cable-free data recording to acquire seismic research data across two sites covered with surface-exposed highvelocity rocks. Research tasks will involve acquiring, processing, and interpreting both conventional seismic data and multicomponent seismic data. Scientists at BEG will analyze well logs, cores, and reservoir test data to construct geological models of the targeted geology across each study site.

408

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

N Reactor Seismic Task Force analysis and fix summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program (SEP) and the Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program (ASEP) were established to implement recommendations made earlier by study groups assessing the safety of N Reactor. The recommendations which dealt with seismic issues were assigned to Safety Enhancement Programs, Defense Reactor Programs for implementation. A Seismic Task Force was assembled to perform the analyses, design the modifications, direct the performance of the work and provide program management of the effort to seismically qualify the facility. This document identifies the reports published by the task force to resolve each of the seismic issues raised by safety assessments. The reports, in turn, provide a list of recommended fixes (Fixes are potential problems, not resolved in the engineering analyses, which require repair, cleanup or modifications to hardware to establish seismic qualification). The purpose of this report is to provide a guide to seismic fixes implemented by the Seismic Task Force. This information is provided in the form of a ``fix log`` which lists fixes according to the report which recommended them and identifies the work authorization (WA), engineering documentation (Design Change, Field Change Notice or Engineering Change Notice) and acceptance dates for each fix. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Planning Tools For Seismic Risk Mitigation. Rules And Applications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, Italian urban planning research in the field of seismic risk mitigation are renewing. In particular, it promotes strategies that integrate urban rehabilitation and aseismic objectives, and also politicizes that are directed to revitalizes urban systems, coupling physical renewal and socio-economic development.In Italy the first law concerning planning for seismic mitigation dates back 1974, the law n. 64 'Regulation for buildings with particular rules for the seismic areas' where the rules for buildings in seismic areas concerning also the local hazard. This law, in fact, forced the municipalities to acquire, during the formation of the plans, a preventive opinion of compatibility between planning conditions and geomorphology conditions of the territory. From this date the conviction that the seismic risk must be considered inside the territorial planning especially in terms of strategies of mitigation has been strengthened.The town planners have started to take an interest in seismic risk in the [80]s when the Irpinia's earthquake took place. The researches developed after this earthquake have established that the principal cause of the collapse of buildings are due to from the wrong location of urban settlements (on slopes or crowns) After Irpinia's earthquake the first researches on seismic risk mitigation, in particular on the aspects related to the hazards and to the urban vulnerability were made.

De Paoli, Rosa Grazia [Department of Landscape Planning, Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z