Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

2

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

4

Overview of seismic panel activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1991, the DOE-EM appointed a Seismic Panel to develop seismic criteria that can be used for evaluation of underground storage tanks containing high level radioactive wastes. The Panel expects to issue the first draft of the criteria report in January 1992. This paper provides an overview of the Panel's activities and briefly discusses the criteria. 3 refs.

Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

6

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

7

Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Seismic Activity of the Earth, the Cosmological Vectorial Potential And Method of a Short-term Earthquakes Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To the foundation of a principally new short-term forecasting method there has been laid down a theory of surrounding us world's creation and of physical vacuum as a result of interaction of byuons - discrete objects. The definition of the byuon contains the cosmological vector-potential A_g - a novel fundamental vector constant. This theory predicts a new anisotropic interaction of nature objects with the physical vacuum. A peculiar "tap" to gain new energy (giving rise to an earthquake) are elementary particles because their masses are proportional to the modulus of some summary potential A_sum that contains potentials of all known fields. The value of A_sum cannot be larger than the modulus of A_g. In accordance with the experimental results a new force associated with A_sum ejects substance from the area of the weakened A_sum along a conical formation with the opening of 100 +- 10 and the axis directed along the vector A_sum. This vector has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10. Nearly 100% probability of an earthquake (earthquakes of 6 points strong and more by the Richter scale) arises when in the process of the earth rotation the zenith vector of a seismically dangerous region and/or the vectorial potential of Earth's magnetic fields are in a certain way oriented relative to the vector A_g. In the work, basic models and standard mechanisms of earthquakes are briefly considered, results of processing of information on the earthquakes in the context of global spatial anisotropy caused by the existence of the vector A_g, are presented, and an analysis of them is given.

Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov Jr.; A. A. Spitalnaya; A. A. Abramyan; V. A. Solodovnikov

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

Taner, M. Turhan

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Seismic active control by neutral networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

Tang, Yu

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Seismic active control by neural networks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to activate structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feed-forward neural network architecture and an adaptive back-propagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the back-propagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator's capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

Tang, Y.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Abstract This report describes the development and...

14

Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture of a Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic...

15

Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly...

Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Method for determining formation quality factor from seismic data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for calculating the quality factor Q from a seismic data trace. The method includes calculating a first and a second minimum phase inverse wavelet at a first and a second time interval along the seismic data trace, synthetically dividing the first wavelet by the second wavelet, Fourier transforming the result of the synthetic division, calculating the logarithm of this quotient of Fourier transforms and determining the slope of a best fit line to the logarithm of the quotient.

Taner, M. Turhan; Treitel, Sven

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

Revised crustal architecture of the southeastern Carpathian foreland from active and passive seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic data Dana M. Enciu,1 Camelia C. Knapp,1 and James H. Knapp1 Received 3 August 2008; revised 12 seismic data is employed in order to study the nature of the relationships between crustal seismicity with the Vrancea Seismogenic Zone (VSZ) of intermediate- depth seismicity, one of the most active earthquake- prone

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

18

Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Parra, Jorge O. (Helotes, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Methods for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

Fouch, Matthew J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2 3 4 Keywords16 Merapi Volcano, Volcano Seismology, Eruption Forecasting, Pre-eruptive Seismicity,17 RSAM. The main features of the seismic activity during the23 pre-eruptive period and the crisis are presented

Boyer, Edmond

22

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

23

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Real-Time Reservoir...

24

ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using factory prefabricated structural modules, for application to external event shell and base isolated structures.

E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Active Seismic Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to: navigation, searchAccionaAcruxManagementJump to:

26

Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

3-D Seismic Methods for Shallow Imaging Beneath Pavement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this dissertation focuses on survey design and acquisition of near-surface 3D seismic reflection and surface wave data on pavement. Increased efficiency for mapping simple subsurface interfaces through a combined use...

Miller, Brian

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ultra-Shallow Imaging Using 2D & 3D Seismic Reflection Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the survey design, acquisition, processing, and interpretation of ultra-shallow seismic reflection (USR) data in two and three dimensions. The application of 3D USR methods to image multiple...

Sloan, Steven D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Seismic wave generation systems and methods for cased wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration source (10) includes an armature bar (12) having a major length dimension, and a driver (20A) positioned about the armature bar. The driver (20A) is movably coupled to the armature bar (12), and includes an electromagnet (40). During operation the electromagnet (40) is activated such that the driver (20A) moves with respect to the armature bar (12) and a vibratory signal is generated in the armature bar. A described method for generating a vibratory signal in an object includes positioning the vibration source (10) in an opening of the object, coupling the armature bar (12) to a surface of the object within the opening, and activating the electromagnet (40) of the driver (20A) such that the driver moves with respect to the armature bar (12) and a vibratory signal is generated in the armature bar and the object.

Minto, James (Houston, TX); Sorrells, Martin H (Huffman, TX); Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Schroeder, Edgar C. (San Antonio, TX)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Contribution of Identified Active Faults to Near Fault Seismic Hazard in the Flinders Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Somerville1 , Peggy Quijada1 , Hong Kie Thio1 , Mike Sandiford2 and Mark Quigley2 1. URS Corporation estimates of fault slip rate from Quigley et al. (2006) to quantify the seismic activity rate on the faults of these models was used in conjunction with the active fault model. Quigley et al. (2006) identified a system

Sandiford, Mike

34

SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration, and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based

Cerveny, Vlastislav

35

Historical Information H. 6 SeismicIGround Motion Activity  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\l pGreen6 SeismicIGround

36

Methods and apparatus for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report on the CoRoT Evolution and Seismic Tools Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the work undertaken by the Evolution and Seismic Tools Activity (ESTA) team of the CoRoT Seismology Working Group. We have focused on two main tasks: Task 1 - now finished - has aimed at testing, comparing and optimising seven stellar evolution codes which will be used to model the internal structure and evolution of the CoRoT target stars. Task 2, still underway, aims at testing, comparing and optimising different seismic codes used to calculate the oscillations of models for different types of stars. The results already obtained are quite satisfactory, showing minor differences between the different numerical tools provided the same assumptions on the physical parameters are made. This work gives us confidence on the numerical tools that will be available to interpret the future CoRoT seismic data.

Monteiro, M J P F G; Montalban, J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Castro, M; Degl'Innocenti, S; Moya, A; Roxburgh, I W; Scuflaire, R; Baglin, A; Cunha, M S; Eggenberger, P; Fernandes, J; Goupil, M J; Hui-Bon-Hoa, A; Marconi, M; Marques, J P; Michel, E; Miglio, A; Morel, P; Pichon, B; Moroni, P G P; Provost, J; Ruoppo, A; Suárez, J C; Suran, M; Teixeira, T C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Crustal constraints on the origin of mantle seismicity in the Vrancea Zone, Romania: The case for active continental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crustal constraints on the origin of mantle seismicity in the Vrancea Zone, Romania: The case, Bucharest, Romania c Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania Received 17 November 2005 Abstract The Vrancea zone of Romania constitutes one of the most active seismic

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

39

Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

Christopher Liner

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method for enhancing low frequency output of impulsive type seismic energy sources and its application to a seismic energy source for use while drilling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for operating an impulsive type seismic energy source in a firing sequence having at least two actuations for each seismic impulse to be generated by the source. The actuations have a time delay between them related to a selected energy frequency peak of the source output. One example of the method is used for generating seismic signals in a wellbore and includes discharging electric current through a spark gap disposed in the wellbore in at least one firing sequence. The sequence includes at least two actuations of the spark gap separated by an amount of time selected to cause acoustic energy resulting from the actuations to have peak amplitude at a selected frequency.

Radtke, Robert P; Stokes, Robert H; Glowka, David A

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Methods and systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

Shook, G. Michael; LeRoy, Samuel D.; Benzing, William M.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

Frequency ratio method for seismic modeling of Gamma Doradus stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for obtaining asteroseismological information of a Gamma Doradus oscillating star showing at least three pulsation frequencies is presented. This method is based on a first-order asymptotic g-mode expression, in agreement with the internal structure of Gamma Doradus stars. The information obtained is twofold: 1) a possible identification of the radial order n and degree l of observed frequencies (assuming that these have the same l), and 2) an estimate of the integral of the buoyancy frequency (Brunt-Vaisala) weighted over the stellar radius along the radiative zone. The accuracy of the method as well as its theoretical consistency are also discussed for a typical Gamma Doradus stellar model. Finally, the frequency ratios method has been tested with observed frequencies of the Gamma Doradus star HD 12901. The number of representative models verifying the complete set of constraints (the location in the HR diagram, the Brunt-Vaisala frequency integral, the observed metallicity and frequencies and a re...

Moya, A; Amado, P J; Martin-Ruiz, S; Garrido, R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Method and apparatus for coupling seismic sensors to a borehole wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

West, Phillip B.

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Method Apparatus And System For Detecting Seismic Waves In A Borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method, apparatus and system for detecting seismic waves. A sensing apparatus is deployed within a bore hole and may include a source magnet for inducing a magnetic field within a casing of the borehole. An electrical coil is disposed within the magnetic field to sense a change in the magnetic field due to a displacement of the casing. The electrical coil is configured to remain substantially stationary relative to the well bore and its casing along a specified axis such that displacement of the casing induces a change within the magnetic field which may then be sensed by the electrical coil. Additional electrical coils may be similarly utilized to detect changes in the same or other associated magnetic fields along other specified axes. The additional sensor coils may be oriented substantially orthogonally relative to one another so as to detect seismic waves along multiple orthogonal axes in three dimensional space.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sumstine, Roger L. (St. George, UT)

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

46

Method for migrating seismic data by using ray tracing in determining two way travel times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for depth migrating ray traces before stacking comprising the steps of: receiving raw seismic data signals representing acoustic waves generated by a plurality of sources and detected by a plurality of receivers, each of said sources and said receivers having a surface position; generating a set of one way travel times for each surface position to all image points; storing said one way travel times; identifying a set of one way travel times from one source surface position to each of said image points; identifying a second set of one way travel times from one receiver surface position to each of said image points; calculating a two way travel time set to said image points by summing said set of one way travel times for said one source surface position and said second set of one way travel times for said one receiver surface position to each of said image points; mapping a seismic trace associated with a source and receiver combination represented by said two way travel time set; and displaying said map of said seismic trace associated with said source and receiver combination.

Wang, Sheinshion; Sinton, J.B.; Hanson, D.W.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare J.C. Mart´inez-Oliveros, H. Moradi, A characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic sig- natures produced

California at Berkeley, University of

50

The CoRoT Evolution and Seismic Tools Activity: Goals and Tasks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The forthcoming data expected from space missions such as CoRoT require the capacity of the available tools to provide accurate models whose numerical precision is well above the expected observational errors. In order to secure that these tools meet the specifications, a team has been established to test and, when necessary, to improve the codes available in the community. The CoRoT evolution and seismic tool activity (ESTA) has been set up with this mission. Several groups have been involved. The present paper describes the motivation and the organisation of this activity, providing the context and the basis for the presentation of the results that have been achieved so far. This is not a finished task as future even better data will continue to demand more precise and complete tools for asteroseismology.

Lebreton, Y; Montalban, J; Moya, A; Baglin, A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Goupil, M J; Michel, E; Provost, J; Roxburgh, I W; Scuflaire, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Validation needs of seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods applied to nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effort to validate seismic PRA methods is in progress. The work concentrates on the validation of plant response and fragility estimates through the use of test data and information from actual earthquake experience. Validation needs have been identified in the areas of soil-structure interaction, structural response and capacity, and equipment fragility. Of particular concern is the adequacy of linear methodology to predict nonlinear behavior. While many questions can be resolved through the judicious use of dynamic test data, other aspects can only be validated by means of input and response measurements during actual earthquakes. A number of past, ongoing, and planned testing programs which can provide useful validation data have been identified, and validation approaches for specific problems are being formulated.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method for determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for seismic characterization of subsurface Earth formations includes determining at least one of compressional velocity and shear velocity, and determining reservoir parameters of subsurface Earth formations, at least including density, from data obtained from a wellbore penetrating the formations. A quality factor for the subsurface formations is calculated from the velocity, the density and the water saturation. A synthetic seismogram is calculated from the calculated quality factor and from the velocity and density. The synthetic seismogram is compared to a seismic survey made in the vicinity of the wellbore. At least one parameter is adjusted. The synthetic seismogram is recalculated using the adjusted parameter, and the adjusting, recalculating and comparing are repeated until a difference between the synthetic seismogram and the seismic survey falls below a selected threshold.

Walls, Joel; Taner, M. Turhan; Dvorkin, Jack

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia, Indonesia Introduction Sulawesi Island, eastern Indonesia, is at the triple junction of the Paci®c (through- ABSTRACT In eastern Indonesia, the Central Sulawesi fault system consists of complex left-lateral strike

Vigny, Christophe

54

Probabilistic methods in seismic risk assessment for nuclear power plants: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art in seismic risk analysis applied to the design and siting of nuclear power plants was addressed in this meeting. Presentations were entered individually into the date base. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Temporal Integration of Seismic Traveltime Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse geophysical measurements and seismic imaging methods in particular are powerful techniques

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

HOFMAYER,C.H.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

62

Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

Rogers, Robert D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hamilton, Melinda A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Benson, Jennifer (Cockermouth, GB); Green, Martin J. (Wooton, GB); Milner, Timothy N. (Centerville, VA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Methods and apparatus of suppressing tube waves within a bore hole and seismic surveying systems incorporating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for attenuating waves in a bore hole, and seismic surveying systems incorporating the same. In one embodiment, an attenuating device includes a soft compliant bladder coupled to a pressurized gas source. A pressure regulating system reduces the pressure of the gas from the gas source prior to entering the bladder and operates in conjunction with the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in a bore hole to maintain the pressure of the bladder at a specified pressure relative to the surrounding bore hole pressure. Once the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid exceeds that of the gas source, bore hole fluid may be admitted into a vessel of the gas source to further compress and displace the gas contained therein. In another embodiment, a water-reactive material may be used to provide gas to the bladder wherein the amount of gas generated by the water-reactive material may depend on the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid.

West, Phillip B.; Haefner, Daryl

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Methods and apparatus of suppressing tube waves within a bore hole and seismic surveying systems incorporating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for attenuating waves in a bore hole, and seismic surveying systems incorporating the same. In one embodiment, an attenuating device includes a soft compliant bladder coupled to a pressurized gas source. A pressure regulating system reduces the pressure of the gas from the gas source prior to entering the bladder and operates in conjunction with the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in a bore hole to maintain the pressure of the bladder at a specified pressure relative to the surrounding bore hole pressure. Once the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid exceeds that of the gas source, bore hole fluid may be admitted into a vessel of the gas source to further compress and displace the gas contained therein. In another embodiment, a water-reactive material may be used to provide gas to the bladder wherein the amount of gas generated by the water-reactive material may depend on the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid.

West, Phillip B.; Haefner, Daryl

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold Juan--In this research, we consider the supervised learning problem of seismic phase classification. In seismology, knowledge of the seismic activity arrival time and phase leads to epicenter localization and surface

Meyer, Francois

68

Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic reflection tomography is a method for determining a subsurface velocity model from the traveltimes of seismic waves reflecting on geological interfaces.

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity C to apply an approach based on risk for the seismic assessment of existing buildings. In this innovative analytical seismic assessment methods, as the ratio between the capacity and the requirement of the current

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

Prieto, Germán A.

71

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

73

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity...

74

Stochastic and Deterministic Inversion Methods for History Matching of Production and Time-Lapse Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

localization method to improve data assimilation performance while capturing geologic continuities that affect the flow dynamics and preserving model variability among the ensemble of models. For the streamline-based inversion method, we derived saturation...

Watanabe, Shingo

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Seismic Modelling for the Sub-Basalt Imaging Problem Including an Analysis and Development of the Boundary Element Method   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The north-east Atlantic margin (NEAM) is important for hydrocarbon exploration because of the growing evidence of hydrocarbon reserves in the region. However, seismic exploration of the sub-surface is hampered by large ...

Dobson, Andrew

77

Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

Nugroho, Hendro [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia and Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakar (Indonesia)] [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia and Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakar (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technologyc Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technologyc Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Canadian Seismic Agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

A robust nonlinear semi-active control for base seismically-isolated structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actuators, typically, are viscous dampers whose parameters can be controlled by low power means. Passive of buildings and structures. In this work we consider actuators which consist of passive and semi to reach the ball is also provided. The semi-active control thus provides the control designer

Boyer, Edmond

83

Analysis of the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant: Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Volume 8, Seismic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used and the results obtained from the application of a simplified seismic risk methodology to the LaSalle County Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2. This study is part of the Level I analysis being performed by the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Using the RMIEP developed event and fault trees, the analysis resulted in a seismically induced core damage frequency point estimate of 6.OE-7/yr. This result, combined with the component importance analysis, indicated that system failures were dominated by random events. The dominant components included diesel generator failures (failure to swing, failure to start, failure to run after started), and condensate storage tank.

Wells, J.E.; Lappa, D.A.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Chuang, T.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, J.J.; Campbell, R.D.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Kincaid, R.H. [EQE, International, Irvine, CA (United States); Sues, R.H.; Putcha, C.S. [NTS Engineering, Long Beach, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

87

Active-Space Coupled-Cluster Methods Through Connected Quadruple...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methods Through Connected Quadruple Excitations. Active-Space Coupled-Cluster Methods Through Connected Quadruple Excitations. Abstract: This abstract is currently not available...

88

PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey and D. C. Braun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey develop the wave-mechanical formalism for phase-correlation computational seismic holography headinggs: Sun: activity -- Sun: helioseismology -- sunspots 1. INTRODUCTION Computational seismic

Braun, Douglas C.

89

Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of Existing Multi-Column Bent Bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of Existing Multi-Column Bent Bridges By Cole C. Mc ................................................................................................................................... 6 Seismic Activity in Western Washington State Approach ­ Bridge Modeling .............................................11 Seismic Excitations

90

Active-set methods for quadratic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

definite, the conjugate-gradient method can be applied.SQOPT switches to a conjugate-gradient method to solve for aand Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient-Related Methods, pages 92–

Wong, Elizabeth Lai Sum

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles Heather. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 2. Theory and method of seismic interferometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4.2. Seismic interferometry across the Scottish Highlands

92

Exploring the Earth’s subsurface with virtual seismic sources and receivers   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional methods of imaging the Earth’s subsurface using seismic waves require an identifiable, impulsive source of seismic energy, for example an earthquake or explosive source. Naturally occurring, ambient seismic waves form an ever...

Nicolson, Heather Johan

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity...

94

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central...

95

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful...

96

Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

97

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details...

98

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location...

99

Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be...

100

Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting S¨oren H¨auser and Jianwei Ma May 15, 2012 We propose a new method for seismic data reconstruction by directional weighted of thousands of meters with a good resolution, the seismic method has become the most commonly used geophysical

Steidl, Gabriele

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Canadian seismic agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HH Seismic hammer is a large, %22weight-drop%22 source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

Jones, Kyle Richard

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Micro-meteoroid seismic uplift and regolith concentration on kilometric scale asteroids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic shaking is an attractive mechanism to explain the destabilisation of regolith slopes and the regolith migration found on the surfaces of asteroids (Richardson et al. 2004; Miyamoto et al. 2007). Here, we use a continuum mechanics method to simulate the seismic wave propagation in an asteroid. Assuming that asteroids can be described by a cohesive core surrounded by a thin non-cohesive regolith layer, our numerical simulations of vibrations induced by micro-meteoroids suggest that the surface peak ground accelerations induced by micro-meteoroid impacts may have been previously under-estimated. Our lower bound estimate of vertical accelerations induced by seismic waves is about 50 times larger than previous estimates. It suggests that impact events triggering seismic activity are more frequent than previously assumed for asteroids in the kilometric and sub-kilometric size range. The regolith lofting is also estimated by a first order ballistic approximation. Vertical displacements are small, but lofting...

Garcia, Raphael F; Mimoun, David

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

Braun, Douglas C.

108

Seismic reflection imaging of underground cavities using open-source software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) includes provisions for an on-site inspection (OSI), which allows the use of specific techniques to detect underground anomalies including cavities and rubble zones. One permitted technique is active seismic surveys such as seismic refraction or reflection. The purpose of this report is to conduct some simple modeling to evaluate the potential use of seismic reflection in detecting cavities and to test the use of open-source software in modeling possible scenarios. It should be noted that OSI inspections are conducted under specific constraints regarding duration and logistics. These constraints are likely to significantly impact active seismic surveying, as a seismic survey typically requires considerable equipment, effort, and expertise. For the purposes of this study, which is a first-order feasibility study, these issues will not be considered. This report provides a brief description of the seismic reflection method along with some commonly used software packages. This is followed by an outline of a simple processing stream based on a synthetic model, along with results from a set of models representing underground cavities. A set of scripts used to generate the models are presented in an appendix. We do not consider detection of underground facilities in this work and the geologic setting used in these tests is an extremely simple one.

Mellors, R J

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Geologic Setting and Location Previous Work Stratigraphy of the Progreso Basin and Vicinity . . II METHODS Seismic Stratigraphic Analysis Magnetic Source Depth Determination III SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY . Seismic Depositional Sequences Seismic... proliferation of names and e. ges for the same rocks and formations complicates correlation between basins. The origin of the basins is not clear and the previous concepts of the evolution of the region h''s tsesis ol ows the style and format of the Bulletin...

Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Active-set prediction for interior point methods   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research studies how to efficiently predict optimal active constraints of an inequality constrained optimization problem, in the context of Interior Point Methods (IPMs). We propose a framework based on shifting/perturbing ...

Yan, Yiming

2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005...

113

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steck, Et Al., 1998) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

114

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W....

115

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001)...

116

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

117

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1993 - 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

118

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

119

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown...

120

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

122

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

123

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central...

124

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

125

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Nishimura, Et Al., 1997)...

126

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components.

Bonzon, L.L.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modification of Gaussian Elimination to the Complex Seismic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for solution of large and sparse systems with complex seismic observations has been developed by revising of the classical Gaussian elimination. The observation matrix is divided into a set of smaller cells that can be determined based on clusters of a seismic activity. Reliable inversion solutions with minimum error rating are selected within each cell, then solutions that are non-stable with respect to the same unknown are rejected After the final sifting the found unknowns are eliminated from the initial system with subsequent decreasing of its size. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate how the method can be applied to a real data set (a case study of the Nagano fault area, Central Japan). Results of processing of a huge volume of data and their importance for the Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) system are briefly discussed.

Smaglichenko, Tatyana A. [Institute of Oil and Gas Problems, Russian Academy of Science, Gubkina str.3, 119333, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Monitoring Seismic Attenuation Changes Using a 4D Relative Spectrum Method in Athabsca Heavy Oil Reservoir, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating heavy oil reservoirs is a common method for reducing the high viscosity of heavy oil and thus increasing the recovery factor. Monitoring these changes in the reservoir is essential for delineating the heated region ...

Shabelansky, Andrey Hanan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah Hughes University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 Key Terms: earthquake

Sheehan, Anne F.

134

Canadian seismic agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C., Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Frequency Ratio Method for the seismic modelling of gamma Doradus stars. II The role of rotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of rotation on the Frequency Ratio Method (Moya et al. 2005) is examined. Its applicability to observed frequencies of rotating gamma Doradus stars is discussed taking into account the following aspects: the use of a perturbative approach to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies; the effect of rotation on the observational Brunt-Vaisala integral determination and finally, the problem of disentangling multiplet-like structures from frequency patterns due to the period spacing expected for high-order gravity modes in asymptotic regime. This analysis reveals that the FRM produces reliable results for objects with rotational velocities up to 70 kms/s, for which the FRM intrinsic error increases one order of magnitude with respect to the typical FRM errors given in Moya et al. (2005). Our computations suggest that, given the spherical degree "l" identification, the FRM may be discriminating for m = 0 modes, in the sense that the method avoids any misinterpretation induced by the presence of rotation...

Suárez, J C; Martin-Ruiz, S; Amado, P J; Garrido, A G R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Decision analysis for seismic retrofit of structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of earthquakes as deterministic statements that will not occur for a long time rather than as probabilistic statements about the events (May 2004). Due to the aforementioned concerns regarding the decreased likelihood of building damage from seismic activity...-05, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA. Bai, J.-W., Hueste, M. B., and Gardoni, P. (2007). ?A probabilistic framework for the assessment of structural losses due to seismic events.? J. Struct. Engrg., submitted for review. Bracci, J. M...

Williams, Ryan J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 years of GOLF/SoHO observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights on the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 years of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument onboard the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges which are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly...

Salabert, D; Turck-Chieze, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

Merino, Sandra

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi of seismicity occurred in the Nantou region of central Taiwan. Among the seismic activities, eight Mw P 5 magnitudes took place from 1900 to 1998. Since the seismicity rate during the Chi-Chi postseismic period has

Wu, Yih-Min

143

Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables.

Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

145

Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface Geologic and Hydrologic Structure Within the Coso...

146

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Seismic characterization of fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

JM Carcione

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Double Seismic Zone of the Nazca Plate in Northern Chile: High Resolution Velocity Structure, Petrological Implications and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Double Seismic Zone of the Nazca Plate in Northern Chile: High Resolution Velocity Structure presents an interdisciplinary study of the Northern Chile Double Seismic Zone. First, a high resolution method. The double seismic zone (DSZ) is observed between 80 and 140 km depth and the two seismic planes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-ray, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time-distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential--field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant inverse correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

J. C. Martinez-Oliveros; H. Moradi; A-C. Donea

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

151

Potential impacts of vertical cable seismic: modeling, resolution and multiple attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical cable seismic methods are becoming more relevant as we require high quality and high resolution seismic data in both land and marine environments. Our goal in this thesis is to demonstrate the impacts of vertical cable surveying...

Wilson, Ryan Justin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

Mulhollan, Gregory A. (Dripping Springs, TX); Bierman, John C. (Austin, TX)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Role of temperature change in micro seismic activity during fluid injections in faulted and fractured zones. Part 1: Updating the thermal modelling in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the primary fossil energy resource and particularly use more renewable resources. This is even more vital the Swiss city of Basel, that stopped the project. This issue of large seismic event is also raised at other Geothermal Conference ARGEO-C3-DJIBOUTI. Exploring and harnessing the renewable and promising geothermal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

1985-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks, including Buildings Tom Egill Hauksson #12;SCSN: what does it encompass? · ~360 Seismic Stations · ~60 stations from partners SCSN/SCEDC total of ~26 FTE's #12;Crowd Sourced Networks · Current broadband seismic network

Greer, Julia R.

157

Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Seismic modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Abstract Seismic modelling is a computationally to produce realistic seismic traces intensive problem. A 2D syn- Rosemary Renautt and Johnny of seismic data. The two-dimensional wave equation which describes the propagation of stress waves

Renaut, Rosemary

158

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the Hanford Seismic Network, there were 337 triggers during the third quarter of fiscal year 2005. Of these triggers, 20 were earthquakes within the Hanford Seismic Network. The largest earthquake within the Hanford Seismic Network was a magnitude 1.3 event May 25 near Vantage, Washington. During the third quarter, stratigraphically 17 (85%) events occurred in the Columbia River basalt (approximately 0-5 km), no events in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km), and three (15%) in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km). During the first quarter, geographically five (20%) earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 10 (50%) earthquakes were associated with a major geologic structure, and 5 (25%) were classified as random events.

Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Compositions and methods for adoptive and active immunotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Modular aAPCs and methods of their manufacture and use are provided. The modular aAPCs are constructed from polymeric microparticles. The aAPCs include encapsulated cytokines and coupling agents which modularly couple functional elements including T cell receptor activators, co-stimulatory molecules and adhesion molecules to the particle. The ability of these aAPCs to release cytokines in a controlled manner, coupled with their modular nature and ease of ligand attachment, results in an ideal, tunable APC capable of stimulating and expanding primary T cells.

Fahmy, Tarek; Steenblock, Erin

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geophys. J. Int. (1999) 139, 317324 Fractal clustering of induced seismicity in The Geysers geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal area, California J. R. Henderson, D. J. Barton and G. R. Foulger Department of Geological Sciences geothermal field in California, an area where industrial activity induces seismicity. The seismicity of the build-up of the rate of water injection into the reservoir. Key words: fractal, geothermal, seismicity

Foulger, G. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Seismic cycle stress change in western Taiwan over the last M. Mouyen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Seismic cycle stress change in western Taiwan over the last 270 years M February 2010. [1] The island of Taiwan is affected by intense seismic activity, which includes large events as the disastrous 1999 ChiChi earthquake. To improve seismic hazard assessment in this area, we

Demouchy, Sylvie

162

Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

Burns, Daniel R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

THE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic reflection cannot (e.g. Liberty et al., 1999; Musil et al., 2002). The images producedTHE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY Geoff J properties is important in many fields. One method that can image the seismic velocity structure

Barrash, Warren

165

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Seismic fragility test of a 6-inch diameter pipe system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the test results and assessments of seismic fragility tests performed on a 6-inch diameter piping system. The test was funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted by ETEC. The objective of the test was to investigate the ability of a representative nuclear piping system to withstand high level dynamic seismic and other loadings. Levels of loadings achieved during seismic testing were 20 to 30 times larger than normal elastic design evaluations to ASME Level D limits would permit. Based on failure data obtained during seismic and other dynamic testing, it was concluded that nuclear piping systems are inherently able to withstand much larger dynamic seismic loadings than permitted by current design practice criteria or predicted by the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and several proposed nonlinear methods of failure analysis.

Chen, W. P.; Onesto, A. T.; DeVita, V.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity optimization method Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

optimization method Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activity optimization method Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Optimization 1-1...

171

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle [Tish

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

First and Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes seismic activity at and near the Hanford Site during the first and second quarters of FY 2004 (October 1, 2003-March 31, 2004).

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Second and Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the seismic activity on the Hanford Site during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of FY01

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Valenta, Michelle M.

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Abstract The...

176

Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M [Columbus, OH

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

Bennett, Wendy D. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C. (Dublin, OH) [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M. (Columbus, OH) [Columbus, OH

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Shallow Seismic Investigation of Hydrogeologic Problems in the Brazos River Alluvium, Texas A&M Plantation, Burleson County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twenty-two shallow, reversed, seismic refraction profiles were conducted in the Brazos River floodplain to test the feasibility of using seismic methods to provide hydrogeologic information in this province. The specific objectives were to map...

McBrayer, M.A.

179

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earth¬quakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

First quarter Hanford seismic report for fiscal year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EW uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 311 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twelve seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree}N latitude and 119--120{degree}W longitude; 2 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 1 was a quarry blast. Two earthquakes appear to be related to a major geologic structure, no earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 9 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its con-tractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (E WRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 818 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Thirteen seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46-47{degree} N latitude and 119-120{degree} W longitude; 7 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 1 was an earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments, and 5 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Three earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 10 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the third quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 506 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twenty-seven seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree} N latitude and 119--120{degree} W longitude; 12 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Three earthquakes appear to be related to geologic structures, eleven earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the second quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

Advance Seismic Data Analysis Program: (The "Hot Pot Project")  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: To improve geothermal well target selection and reduce drilling risk through an innovative and advanced analytical method for interpreting seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures.

185

Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shear attenuation and impedance contrasts. We apply this method to study seismic inverse problems at various scales, from exploration-scale full-waveform inversion to global-scale...

187

Controllable seismic source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Canadian Seismic Agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics Harsh Gupta-3046 USA E-mail: vernon.cormier@uconn.edu Tel: 860-486-3547 Fax: 860-486-3346 #12;SEISMIC VISCOELASTIC ATTENUATION Synonyms Seismic intrinsic attenuation Definitions Linear viscoelastic attenuation. The loss

Cormier, Vernon F.

190

Inflection point analysis for Greek seismicity 1900-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seismicity of Greek region is studied under the prism of ESE & EDE methods for finding the inflection point of cumulative energy released. Main shocks are chosen from 106 years data. The result is that with both methods a critical time region exist at the end of 1982 to early 1983. After this time the seismicity tends to increase and gives remarkable events, like Athens Sep 1999 earthquake.

Demetris T. Christopoulos

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

A feasible active set method for strictly convex quadratic problems ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The given data yields the active-set-transition-graph depicted in Figure 1. ...... of the energy computed from the surface position and squared norm of its gradient.

2015-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Optimization Online - Active-set prediction for interior point methods ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 18, 2014 ... Abstract: We propose the use of controlled perturbations to address the challenging question of optimal active-set prediction for interior point ...

Coralia Cartis

2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. They also locate and identify sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consists of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY99 for stations in the HSN was 99.8%. There were 121 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year 1999. Fourteen triggers were local earthquakes; seven (50%) were in the Columbia River Basalt Group, no earthquakes occurred in the pre-basalt sediments, and seven (50%) were in the crystalline basement. One earthquake (7%) occurred near or along the Horn Rapids anticline, seven earthquakes (50%) occurred in a known swarm area, and six earthquakes (43%) were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer during the first quarter of FY99.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Textural evidence for recent co-seismic circulation of fluids in the Nojima fault zone, Awaji island, Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These carbonate-filled fractures are interpreted as the result of co-seismic hydraulic fracturing and upward very late in the evolution of the fault zone, and may be induced by co-seismic hydraulic fracturing.V. Keywords: Active fault; Co-seismic hydraulic fracturing; Fluid circulation; Carbonate infilling 0040

Demouchy, Sylvie

195

SEISMIC MONITORING APPLIED TO MINES SAFETY AND OPTIMAL DESIGN OF MINE LAYOUTS IN HARD ROCK MASS SITATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC MONITORING APPLIED TO MINES SAFETY AND OPTIMAL DESIGN OF MINE LAYOUTS IN HARD ROCK MASSRockMechanics, School of Mines ofNancy, France. ABSTRACT : The paper intends to show how seismic data can be usefĂĽlly rock, tabular situations are usually associated with induced, seismic activity, i.e. the occurrence

Boyer, Edmond

196

System and method for collisional activation of charged particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Seismic Attenuation Inversion with t* Using tstarTomog.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic attenuation is defined as the loss of the seismic wave amplitude as the wave propagates excluding losses strictly due to geometric spreading. Information gleaned from seismic waves can be utilized to solve for the attenuation properties of the earth. One method of solving for earth attenuation properties is called t*. This report will start by introducing the basic theory behind t* and delve into inverse theory as it pertains to how the algorithm called tstarTomog inverts for attenuation properties using t* observations. This report also describes how to use the tstarTomog package to go from observed data to a 3-D model of attenuation structure in the earth.

Preston, Leiph

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Guideline for the seismic technical evaluation of replacement items for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic qualification for equipment originally installed in nuclear power plants was typically performed by the original equipment suppliers or manufactures (OES/OEM). Many of the OES/OEM no longer maintain quality assurance programs with adequate controls for supplying nuclear equipment. Utilities themselves must provide reasonable assurance in the continued seismic adequacy of such replacement items. This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques which can be used to provide reasonable assurance that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. It also provides a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items (STERI) is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items. Guidance on supplier program requirements necessary to maintain continued seismic adequacy and on documentation of maintaining required seismic adequacy is also included.

Harris, S.P.; Cushing, R.W. (EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Johnson, H.W. (Programmatic Solutions, Smithtown, NY (United States)); Abeles, J.M. (System 1, Inc., Potomac, MD (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Geophysical Prospecting doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12026 A genetic algorithm for filter design to enhance features in seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to enhance features in seismic images M.G. Orozco-del-Castillo1 , C. Ortiz-Alem´an1, , J. Urrutia-Fucugauchi2 Received August 2011, revision accepted October 2012 ABSTRACT We present a novel method to enhance seismic, when convolved with the seismic image, appears to enhance the internal characteristics of salt bodies

Martin, Roland

200

Hanford annual second quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (ENN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 99.92%. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.46%. For the second quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 159 times. Of these triggers 14 were local earthquakes: 7 (50%) in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 (21%) in the pre-basalt sediments, and 4 (29%) in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant seismic event for the second quarter was on March 23, 1998 when a 1.9 Mc occurred near Eltopia, WA and was felt by local residents. Although this was a small event, it was felt at the surface and is an indication of the potential impact on Hanford of seismic events that are common to the Site.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DETECTABLE SEISMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE INTERACTION OF A PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE WITH EARTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Galaxies observed today are likely to have evolved from density perturbations in the early universe. Perturbations that exceeded some critical threshold are conjectured to have undergone gravitational collapse to form primordial black holes (PBHs) at a range of masses. Such PBHs serve as candidates for cold dark matter, and their detection would shed light on conditions in the early universe. Here, we propose a mechanism to search for transits of PBHs through/nearby Earth by studying the associated seismic waves. Using a spectral-element method, we simulate and visualize this seismic wave field in Earth's interior. We predict the emergence of two unique signatures, namely, a wave that would arrive almost simultaneously everywhere on Earth's free surface and the excitation of unusual spheroidal modes with a characteristic frequency spacing in free oscillation spectra. These qualitative characteristics are unaffected by the speed or proximity of the PBH trajectory. The seismic energy deposited by a proximal M{sup PBH} = 10{sup 15} g PBH is comparable to a magnitude M{sub w} = 4 earthquake. The non-seismic collateral damage due to the actual impact of such small PBHs with Earth would be negligible. Unfortunately, the expected collision rate is very low even if PBHs constituted all of dark matter, at {approx}10{sup -7} yr{sup -1}, and since the rate scales as 1/M{sup PBH}, fortunately encounters with larger, Earth-threatening PBHs are exceedingly unlikely. However, the rate at which non-colliding close encounters of PBHs could be detected by seismic activity alone is roughly two orders of magnitude larger-that is once every hundred thousand years-than the direct collision rate.

Luo Yang; Hanasoge, Shravan; Tromp, Jeroen [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Pretorius, Frans, E-mail: jtromp@princeton.edu [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Detectable seismic consequences of the interaction of a primordial black hole with Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxies observed today are likely to have evolved from density perturbations in the early universe. Perturbations that exceeded some critical threshold are conjectured to have undergone gravitational collapse to form primordial black holes (PBHs) at a range of masses. Such PBHs serve as candidates for cold dark matter and their detection would shed light on conditions in the early universe. Here we propose a mechanism to search for transits of PBHs through/nearby Earth by studying the associated seismic waves. Using a spectral-element method, we simulate and visualize this seismic wave field in Earth's interior. We predict the emergence of two unique signatures, namely, a wave that would arrive almost simultaneously everywhere on Earth's free surface and the excitation of unusual spheroidal modes with a characteristic frequency-spacing in free oscillation spectra. These qualitative characteristics are unaffected by the speed or proximity of the PBH trajectory. The seismic energy deposited by a proximal ${M^{PBH} = 10^{15}}$ g PBH is comparable to a magnitude $M_w=4$ earthquake. The non-seismic collateral damage due to the actual impact of such small PBHs with Earth would be negligible. Unfortunately, the expected collision rate is very low even if PBHs constituted all of dark matter, at ${\\sim 10^{-7} {yr}^{-1}}$, and since the rate scales as ${1/M^{PBH}}$, fortunately encounters with larger, Earth-threatening PBHs are exceedingly unlikely. However, the rate at which non-colliding close encounters of PBHs could be detected by seismic activity alone is roughly two orders of magnitude larger --- that is once every hundred thousand years --- than the direct collision rate.

Yang Luo; Shravan Hanasoge; Jeroen Tromp; Frans Pretorius

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Estimation of Seismic Load Demand for a Wind Turbine in the Time Domain: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbines installed in seismically active regions such as the Pacific Rim or the Mediterranean must consider loads induced by base shaking from an earthquake. To account for this earthquake risk, current International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) certification requirements provide a simplified method for calculating seismic loads which is intended to be conservative. Through the addition of capabilities, it is now possible to simulate earthquake loading of a wind turbine in conjunction other load sources such as wind and control system behavior using the FAST code. This paper presents a comparison of three earthquake loading scenarios of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine: idling; continued operation through an earthquake; and an emergency shutdown initiated by an earthquake. Using a set of 22 earthquake records, simulations are conducted for each load case. A summary of the resulting tower moment demand is presented to assess the influence of operational state on the resulting structural demand.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Uang, C.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 477 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2001 on the data acquisition system. Of these triggers, 176 were earthquakes. Forty-five earthquakes were located in the HSN area; 1 earthquake occurred in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 43 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, and 1 was earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Geographically, 44 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 1 earthquake was on a major structure, and no earthquakes were classified as random occurrences. The Horse Heaven Hills earthquake swarm area recorded all but one event during the first quarter of FY 2001. The peak of the activity occurred over December 12th, 13th, and 14th when 35 events occurred. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2001.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Valenta, Michelle M.

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

Wayne D. Pennington

2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray?induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 ?s) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux from man-made sources like 252Cf or Am-Be was removed.

Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Seismic Facies Characterization By Scale Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the years, there has been an ongoing struggle to relate well-log and seismic data due to the inherent bandwidth limitation of seismic data, the problem of seismic amplitudes, and the apparent inability to delineate ...

Herrmann, Felix J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Seismic Responses of Shot Span Bridge under Three Different Patterns of Earthquake Excitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the influence of three different types of seismic input methods on the longitudinal seismic response of a short, three-span, variable cross-section, reinforced concrete bridge. Research progress of the seismic model is introduced briefly. Finite element model is created for the bridge and time history analysis conducted. Three different types of illustrative excitations are considered: 1) the EI-Centro seismic wave is used as uniform excitations at all bridge supports; 2) fixed apparent wave velocity is used for response analysis of traveling wave excitations on the bridge; 3) conforming to a selected coherency model, the multiple seismic excitation time histories considering spatially variable effects are generated. The contrast study of the response analysis result under the three different seismic excitations is conducted and the influence of different seismic input methods is studied. The comparative analysis of the bridge model shows that the uniform ground motion input can not provide conservative seismic demands-in a number of cases it results in lower response than that predicted by multiple seismic excitations. The result of uniform excitation and traveling wave excitation shows very small difference. Consequently, multiple seismic excitations needs to be applied at the bridge supports for response analysis of short span bridge.

Zhou Daochuan; Chen Guorong [Department of Civil Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Lu Yan [School of Water Conservancy and Environment, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth`s subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

Deng, H.L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth's subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

Deng, H.L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

216

A Robust Aggregation Method for Quasi-blind Robots in an Active Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Robust Aggregation Method for Quasi-blind Robots in an Active Environment Nazim Fat is through an active environment (stigmergy) and the only information they can receive is the local detection of the waves produced by other robots. The active environment obeys a cellular automaton rule and is simulated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

Engineered enzymatically active bacteriophages and methods of uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides engineered bacteriophages that express at least one biofilm degrading enzyme on their surface and uses thereof for degrading bacterial biofilms. The invention also provides genetically engineered bacteriophages expressing the biofilm degrading enzymes and proteins necessary for the phage to replicate in different naturally occurring biofilm producing bacteria. The phages of the invention allow a method of biofilm degradation by the use of one or only a few administration of the phage because the system using these phages is self perpetuating, and capable of degrading biofilm even when the concentration of bacteria within the biofilm is low.

Collins, James J (Newton, MA); Kobayashi, Hideki (Yokohama, JP); Kearn, Mads (Ottawa, CA); Araki, Michihiro (Minatoku, JP); Friedland, Ari (Boston, MA); Lu, Timothy Kuan-Ta (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method of making terbium activated yttrium aluminate phosphor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the method of making Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Tb phosphor, the method comprising: (a) forming a uniform mixture of source materials for Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Tb phosphor and barium fluoride with the barium fluoride being present in the mixture at a level of from about 0.254 to about 0.761 weight percent; and (b) firing the mixture at an elevated temperature to react the source materials to form Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Tb phosphor having an improved brightness of at least about 7.5% over the phosphor prepared as above the absent barium fluoride, with the 50% size of the phosphor prepared as above with BaF/sub 2/ as measured by Coulter Counter technique being from about 5 to about 7 micrometers in diameter and with from about 1% to about 6% of the phosphor having a size of greater than about 20 micrometers in diameter.

Kasenga, A.F.; Dann, J.N.

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Seismic modeling using the frozen Gaussian approximation Xu Yang, University of California Santa Barbara, Jianfeng Lu, Duke University, and Sergey Fomel, University of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic modeling using the frozen Gaussian approximation Xu Yang, University of California Santa the frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) for mod- eling seismic waves. The method belongs to the category of ray-based beam methods. It decomposes seismic wavefield into a set of Gaussian functions

Bigelow, Stephen

220

Friction-based control system for seismic energy dissipation with isolated stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The implementation of various structural control systems, such as passive, semi-active or active is not a new concept. They are incorporated in structures to increase the performance under seismic and/or wind loading either ...

Iliadis, Charalampos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, fourteen local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter (May 18, 2008 - magnitude 3.7 Mc) was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, five earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter occurred on May 18 (magnitude 3.7 Mc) and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. This earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded in the 46-47 N. latitude / 119-120 W. longitude sector since 1975. The May 18 event, not reported as being felt on the Hanford site or causing any damage, was communicated to the PNNL Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and the 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 12 times larger than the peak acceleration (0.17%) observed at the 300 Area SMA station and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy Agency |Award ofRenewable EnergySecurity &Seismic

223

Latest development in seismic texture analysis for subsurface structure, facies, and reservoir characterization: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In exploration geology and geophysics, seismic texture is still a developing concept that has not been sufficiently known, although quite a number of different algorithms have been published in the literature. This paper provides a review of the seismic texture concepts and methodologies, focusing on latest developments in seismic amplitude texture analysis, with particular reference to the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and the texture model regression (TMR) methods. The GLCM method evaluates spatial arrangements of amplitude samples within an analysis window using a matrix (a two-dimensional histogram) of amplitude co-occurrence. The matrix is then transformed into a suite of texture attributes, such as homogeneity, contrast, and randomness, which provide the basis for seismic facies classification. The TMR method uses a texture model as reference to discriminate among seismic features based on a linear, least-squares regression analysis between the model and the data within an analysis window. By implementing customized texture model schemes, the TMR algorithm has the flexibility to characterize subsurface geology for different purposes. A texture model with a constant phase is effective at enhancing the visibility of seismic structural fabrics, a texture model with a variable phase is helpful for visualizing seismic facies, and a texture model with variable amplitude, frequency, and size is instrumental in calibrating seismic to reservoir properties. Preliminary test case studies in the very recent past have indicated that the latest developments in seismic texture analysis have added to the existing amplitude interpretation theories and methodologies. These and future developments in seismic texture theory and methodologies will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the geologic implications of the seismic texture concept and to an improved geologic interpretation of reflection seismic amplitude

Gao, Dengliang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mathematical model of the seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) in non crystalline substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mathematical model of seismic electromagnetic waves in non crystalline substances is developed and the solutions are discussed to show the possibility of improving the electromagnetic waves especially the electric field. The shear stress of the medium in fourth order tensor gives the equation of motion. Analytic methods are selected for the solutions written in Hansen vector form. From the simulated SEMS, the frequency of seismic waves has significant effects to the SEMS propagating characteristics. EM waves transform into SEMS or energized seismic waves. Traveling distance increases once the frequency of the seismic waves increases from 100% to 1000%. SEMS with greater seismic frequency will give seismic alike waves but greater energy is embedded by EM waves and hence further distance the waves travel.

Dennis, L. C. C.; Yahya, N.; Daud, H.; Shafie, A. [Electromagnetic cluster, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Use of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guide Implementation of Nonlinear Seismic Ground Response Analysis Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhou, G. S. ?1980?. “Wave propagation method of site seismicUse of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guidesolutions for body wave propagation through an elastic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV and RPV cavity of the VVER-440 reacto rand located axially at the position of maximum power and at the position of the weld. Both of these methods (the effective source and the adjoint function) are briefly described in the present paper. The paper also describes their application to the solution of fast neutron fluence and detectors activities for the VVER-440 reactor. (authors)

Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Stellar activity as noise in exoplanet detection I. Methods and application to solar-like stars and activity cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of exoplanets using any method is prone to confusion due to the intrinsic variability of the host star. We investigate the effect of cool starspots on the detectability of the exoplanets around solar-like stars using the radial velocity method. For investigating this activity-caused "jitter" we calculate synthetic spectra using radiative transfer, known stellar atomic and molecular lines, different surface spot configurations, and an added planetary signal. Here, the methods are described in detail, tested and compared to previously published studies. The methods are also applied to investigate the activity jitter in old and young solar-like stars, and over a solar-like activity cycles. We find that the mean full jitter amplitude obtained from the spot surfaces mimicking the solar activity varies during the cycle approximately between 1 m/s and 9 m/s. With a realistic observing frequency a Neptune mass planet on a one year orbit can be reliably recovered. On the other hand, the recovery of an Ea...

Korhonen, H; Piskunov, N; Hackman, T; Juncher, D; Jarvinen, S P; Joergensen, U G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

Snieder, Roel

231

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communi¬cations procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Double active shielded magnetic field gradient design with minimum inductance method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physics DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Approved as to style and content by: F. R. Huson (Chair of Committee) Steve Wry (Member) Edward...

Wang, Xu

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Estimation Of Reservoir Properties From Seismic Data By Smooth Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional joint inversion methods reqnire an a priori prescribed operator that links the reservoir properties to the observed seismic response. The methods also rely on a linearized approach to the solution that makes ...

Saggaf, Muhammad M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Integrated system for seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the various features of the Seismic Module of the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures). This system was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and capability of nuclear power plant facilities. The CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the features of the Seismic Module in particular. The development of the Seismic Module of the CARES system is based on an approach which incorporates all major aspects of seismic analysis currently employed by the industry into an integrated system that allows for carrying out interactively computations of structural response to seismic motions. The code operates on a PC computer system and has multi-graphics capabilities. It has been designed with user friendly features and it allows for interactive manipulation of various analysis phases during the seismic design process. The capabilities of the seismic module include (a) generation of artificial time histories compatible with given design ground response spectra, (b) development of Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions associated with the seismic input, (c) deconvolution analysis using vertically propagating shear waves through a given soil profile, and (d) development of in-structure response spectra or corresponding PSD's. It should be pointed out that these types of analyses can also be performed individually by using available computer codes such as FLUSH, SAP, etc. The uniqueness of the CARES, however, lies on its ability to perform all required phases of the seismic analysis in an integrated manner. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Bridging 3D seismic onshore: Lodgepole play highlights promise and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent major discoveries by Conoco Inc. and Duncan Oil in the Lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation of the Williston basin show that finding major oil reserves is still possible in the US and that 3D seismic methods have the capability to locate them. The implications are profound for independent oil and gas producers, who traditionally concentrate their operations in the mature US. Like major companies, independents are profiting form use of 3D seismic methods. The Williston basin successes show how independents might use 3D seismic methods to identify opportunities in a region once considered to be drilled up. Both the increasing use of these technologies by independents as well as the experiences major companies have had with them are well-documented. The paper discusses the Lodgepole discoveries, rejuvenation of the US oil and gas industry, stratigraphic information available by 3D seismic means, economic impact, and implications of 30 seismic work in the US.

O`Connor, R.B. Jr. [Wavetech Geophysical Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

238

Hanford annual first quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 98.5%. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.1%. For the first quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 184 times. Of these triggers 23 were local earthquakes: 7 in the Columbia River Basalt Group, and 16 in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant earthquakes in this quarter were a series of six events which occurred in the Cold Creek depression (approximately 4 km SW of the 200 West Area), between November 6 and November 11, 1997. All events were deep (> 15 km) and were located in the crystalline basement. The first event was the largest, having a magnitude of 3.49 M{sub c}. Two events on November 9, 1997 had magnitudes of 2.81 and 2.95 M{sub c}, respectively. The other events had magnitudes between 0.7 and 1.2 M{sub c}.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hanford quarterly seismic report - 97B seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for activities ranging from waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organizations works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Seismic Monitoring staff. Most stations and five relay sites are solar powered. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY97 for stations in the HSN was 97.23% and for stations of the EWRN was 99.93%. For fiscal year (FY) 1997 second quarter (97B), the acquisition computer triggered two hundred and forth-eight times. Of these triggers three were local earthquakes: one in the pre-basalt sediments, and two in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments are discussed in the report.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hanford quarterly seismic report - 97C seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington. Quarterly report, April 1, 1997--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for activities ranging from waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Seismic Monitoring staff. Most stations and five relay sites are solar powered. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY97 for stations in the HSN was 100% and for stations of the EWRN was 99.99%. For fiscal year (FY) 1997 third quarter (97C), the acquisition computer triggered 183. Of these triggers twenty one were local earthquakes: sixteen in the Columbus River Basalt Group, one in the pre-basalt sediments, and four in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments are discussed in the report.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: a concluding look  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was started in 1978 with the goal of developing tools and data bases to compute the probability of earthquake - caused radioactive release from commercial nuclear power plants. These tools and data bases were to help NRC to assess seismic safety at nuclear plants. The methodology to be used was finalized in 1982 and applied to the Zion Nuclear Power Station. The SSMRP will be completed this year with the development of a more simplified method of analysis and a demonstration of its use on Zion. This simplified method is also being applied to a boiling-water-reactor, LaSalle.

Cummings, G.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Investigating the point seismic array concept with seismic rotation measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatially-distributed arrays of seismometers are often utilized to infer the speed and direction of incident seismic waves. Conventionally, individual seismometers of the array measure one or more orthogonal components of rectilinear particle motion (displacement, velocity, or acceleration). The present work demonstrates that measure of both the particle velocity vector and the particle rotation vector at a single point receiver yields sufficient information to discern the type (compressional or shear), speed, and direction of an incident plane seismic wave. Hence, the approach offers the intriguing possibility of dispensing with spatially-extended received arrays, with their many problematic deployment, maintenance, relocation, and post-acquisition data processing issues. This study outlines straightforward mathematical theory underlying the point seismic array concept, and implements a simple cross-correlation scanning algorithm for determining the azimuth of incident seismic waves from measured acceleration and rotation rate data. The algorithm is successfully applied to synthetic seismic data generated by an advanced finite-difference seismic wave propagation modeling algorithm. Application of the same azimuth scanning approach to data acquired at a site near Yucca Mountain, Nevada yields ambiguous, albeit encouraging, results. Practical issues associated with rotational seismometry are recognized as important, but are not addressed in this investigation.

Abbott, Robert E.; Aldridge, David Franklin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for non-referential defect characterization using fractal encoding and active contours  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for identification of anomalous structures, such as defects, includes the steps of providing a digital image and applying fractal encoding to identify a location of at least one anomalous portion of the image. The method does not require a reference image to identify the location of the anomalous portion. The method can further include the step of initializing an active contour based on the location information obtained from the fractal encoding step and deforming an active contour to enhance the boundary delineation of the anomalous portion.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

Srinivasachar, Srivats (Sturbridge, MA); Benson, Steven (Grand Forks, ND); Crocker, Charlene (Newfolden, MN); Mackenzie, Jill (Carmel, IN)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

Dohner, Jeffrey L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

SWENSON, C.E.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Non-parametric geodesic active regions: Method and evaluation for cerebral aneurysms segmentation in 3DRA and CTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-parametric geodesic active regions: Method and evaluation for cerebral aneurysms segmentation compares to other alternative techniques based on deformable models, namely parametric geodesic active aneurysm; Geodesic active regions; Differential invariants; Non-parametric probability estimation; Model

Frangi, Alejandro

251

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Activity_report_davide.doc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inversion of anisotropy parameters of the overburden and reservoir from seismic data. Davide Gei, OGS, Italy. Most of the activity performed with Professor ...

255

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Methods for Analysis of Seismic Michael Fehler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Basic assumption of Energy-Flux model of Frankel and Wennerberg (1987) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; Earth) and coda Q is scattering Q · Frankel and Wennerberg (Energy Flux Model) propose coda Q is intrinsic Q; energy removed from total wavefield #12;Amplitude at long lapse-time is proportional to source

258

Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material. 23 figs.

Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

Babayev, Gulam R. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Seismic response analyses for reactor facilities at Savannah River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactor facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were designed during the 1950's. The original seismic criteria defining the input ground motion was 0.1 G with UBC (uniform building code) provisions used to evaluate structural seismic loads. Later ground motion criteria have defined the free field seismic motion with a 0.2 G ZPA (free field acceleration) and various spectral shapes. The spectral shapes have included the Housner spectra, a site specific spectra, and the US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Reg. Guide 1.60 shape. The development of these free field seismic criteria are discussed in the paper. The more recent seismic analyses have been of the following type: fixed base response spectra, frequency independent lumped parameter soil/structure interaction (SSI), frequency dependent lumped parameter SSI, and current state of the art analyses using computer codes such as SASSI. The results from these computations consist of structural loads and floor response spectra (used for piping and equipment qualification). These results are compared in the paper and the methods used to validate the results are discussed. 14 refs., 11 figs.

Miller, C.A. Costantino, C.J. (City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Xu, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Testing the potential and limitations of seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe the advantage of using singular value decomposition as a diagnostic tool for exploring the potential and limitations of seismic data. Using stellar models coupled with the expected errors in seismic and complementary data we can predict the precision in the stellar parameters. This in turn allows us to quantify if and to what extent we can distinguish between various descriptions of the interior physical processes. This method can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical problems, and here I present one such example which shows that the convective core overshoot parameter can be constrained with one identified mode if the pulsating component is in an eclipsing binary system.

Orlagh L. Creevey

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 270 triggers during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 229 triggers during the third quarter on the primary recording system. During the second quarter, 22 seismic events were located; 11 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 6 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Two earthquakes appear to be related to major geologic structures, eight earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. During the third quarter, 23 seismic events were located; 11 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 4 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 4 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 4 were quarry blasts. Five earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, six earthquakes formed a new swarm near the Horse Heavens Hills and Presser, Washington, and eight earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the second or third quarters of FY 1999.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental techniques (LGIT), LCPC, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble Abstract Seismic vulnerability analysis. This curve is particularly interesting in moderate seismic areas. This methodology is applied to the Grenoble

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Evaluation of strategies for seismic design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current trends in seismic design require a new approach, oriented in satisfying motion related design requirements and limiting both structural and non-structural damage. Seismic isolation and damping devices are currently ...

Tsertikidou, Despoina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Seismic Attribute Analysis Using Higher Order Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic data processing depends on mathematical and statistical tools such as convolution, crosscorrelation and stack that employ second-order statistics (SOS). Seismic signals are non-Gaussian and therefore contain information beyond SOS. One...

Greenidge, Janelle Candice

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Multiphase fluid flow and time lapse seismics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse seismic surveys aim to monitor the migration and dispersal of the CO2 ... of CO2-brine flow and seismic wave propagation to model and monitor CO2 ...

santos

272

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Noisy clocks and silent sunrises: measurement methods of daily activity pattern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity or ambient temperature and thus of the sun's position in the sky: time of sunrise, zenith; distribution of activity. Correspondence Pierre Nouvellet. Current address: Biology and Environmental Science with the actual position of the sun. To demonstrate the important difference between these methods of analysis, we

Courchamp, Franck

274

Development of a HT Seismic Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The program objective is to design; fabricate and field test two high temperature (HT) seismic tools in an EGS application.

275

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reservoir monitoring using induced seismicity at a petroleum field in Oman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents methods of analysis and results from a petroleum reservoir monitoring application using induced seismicity data. The dissertation work is comprised of four major studies, each focusing on a different ...

Sarkar, Sudipta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure Among African Elephants The Elephant's Secret Sense in Namibia as she first develops the hypothesis that elephants can communicate using seismic signals. Science documenting the elephants' listening behavior and responses to seismic cues. However, these scientific

Munshi-South, Jason

278

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

Santos, Juan

279

Seismic, shock, and vibration isolation - 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at a conference on pressure vessels and piping. Topics covered include: Design of R-FBI bearings for seismic isolation; Benefits of vertical and horizontal seismic isolation for LMR nuclear reactor units; and Some remarks on the use and perspectives of seismic isolation for fast reactors.

Chung, H. (Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)); Mostaghel, N. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to: navigation, searchAccionaAcruxManagementJump

282

Logistic Regression Applied to Seismic Discrimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The usefulness of logistic discrimination was examined in an effort to learn how it performs in a regional seismic setting. Logistic discrimination provides an easily understood method, works with user-defined models and few assumptions about the population distributions, and handles both continuous and discrete data. Seismic event measurements from a data set compiled by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) of Chinese events recorded at station WMQ were used in this demonstration study. PNNL applied logistic regression techniques to the data. All possible combinations of the Lg and Pg measurements were tried, and a best-fit logistic model was created. The best combination of Lg and Pg frequencies for predicting the source of a seismic event (earthquake or explosion) used Lg{sub 3.0-6.0} and Pg{sub 3.0-6.0} as the predictor variables. A cross-validation test was run, which showed that this model was able to correctly predict 99.7% earthquakes and 98.0% explosions for this given data set. Two other models were identified that used Pg and Lg measurements from the 1.5 to 3.0 Hz frequency range. Although these other models did a good job of correctly predicting the earthquakes, they were not as effective at predicting the explosions. Two possible biases were discovered which affect the predicted probabilities for each outcome. The first bias was due to this being a case-controlled study. The sampling fractions caused a bias in the probabilities that were calculated using the models. The second bias is caused by a change in the proportions for each event. If at a later date the proportions (a priori probabilities) of explosions versus earthquakes change, this would cause a bias in the predicted probability for an event. When using logistic regression, the user needs to be aware of the possible biases and what affect they will have on the predicted probabilities.

BG Amindan; DN Hagedorn

1998-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei : The SOLA method for time-series inversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper a new method is presented to find the transfer function of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. The subtractive optimally localized averages (SOLA) method is a modified version of the Backus-Gilbert method and is presented as an alternative to the more often used maximum-entropy method. The SOLA method has been developed for use in helioseismology. It has been applied to the solar oscillation frequency splitting data currently available to deduce the internal rotation rate of the sun. The original SOLA method is reformulated in the present paper to cope with the slightly different problem of inverting time series. We use simulations to test the viability of the method and apply the SOLA method to the real data of the Seyfert-1 galaxy NGC 5548. We investigate the effects of measurement errors and how the resolution of the TF critically depends upon both the sampling rate and the photometric accuracy of the data. A uuencoded compressed postscript file of the paper which includes the figures is available by anonymous ftp at ftp://solaris.astro.uu.se/pub/articles/atmos/frank/PijWan.uue

Frank P. Pijpers; Ignaz Wanders

1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Methods and apparatuses for preparing a surface to have catalytic activity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods and apparatuses that utilize mass spectrometry for preparation of a surface to have catalytic activity through molecular soft-landing of mass selected ions. Mass spectrometry is used to generate combinations of atoms in a particular geometrical arrangement, and ion soft-landing selects this molecular entity or combination of entities and gently deposits the entity or combination intact onto a surface.

Cooks, Robert G. (West Lafayette, IN); Peng, Wen-Ping (West Lafayette, IN); Ouyang, Zheng (West Lafayette, IN); Goodwin, Michael P. (West Lafayette, IN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 A method to evaluate the level of solar activity at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 A method to evaluate the level of solar activity at 3 the remainder of a progressing solar cycle 4 K.J. Li a,b,*, J. Qiu b , F.Y. Xiang c , P.X. Gao a , T.W. Su a 5 a Solar Physics Division, National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, CAS, Kunming 650011, China 6 b Big Bear

289

Hanford Seismic Annual Report and Fourth Quarter Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network. (EWRN) consist of 40 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. A major reconfiguration of the HSN was initiated at the end of this quarter and the results will be reported in the first quarter report for next fiscal year (FY2000). For the HSN, there were 390 triggers during the fourth quarter of fiscal year(FY) 1999 on the primary recording system. With the implementation of dual backup systems during the second quarter of the fiscal year and an overall increase observed in sensitivity, a total of 1632 triggers were examined, identified, and processed during this fiscal year. During the fourth quarter, 24 seismic events were located by the HSN within the reporting region of 46 degrees to 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees to 120 degrees west longitude 9 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 10 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement; and 2 were quarry blasts. One earthquake appears to be related to a major geologic structure, 14 earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 7 earthquakes were random occurrences.

AC Rohay; DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of neutron spectra in varied environments by the foil-activation method with arbitrary trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron spectra have been measured by the foil-activation method in 13 different environments in and around the Sandia Pulsed Reactor, the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor. The spectra were obtained by using the SANDII code in a manner that was not dependent on the initial trial. This altered technique is better suited for the determination of spectra in environments that are difficult to predict by calculation, and it tends to reveal features that may be biased out by the use of standard trial-dependent methods. For some of the configurations, studies have also been made of how well the solution is determined in each energy region. The experimental methods and the techniques used in the analyses are thoroughly explained. 34 refs., 51 figs., 40 tabs.

Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

Justin Coleman; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch) September 14, 2009 Seismic Tomography Seismic tomography is the science of interpreting seismic measurements (seismograms) to derive information about the structure of the Earth. This course does not cover the techniques of seismic observation

Boschi, Lapo

295

Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained {approx}1500 absolute P and S arrival times and {approx}3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Event locations do not change greatly when 3D velocity structure is included. Three-dimensional velocity structure, where resolvable, does not differ greatly from our optimized 1D model, indicating that the improved 1D model is adequate for routine event location. Finally, we calculated moment magnitudes, MW, for nearly 155 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). The fact that most of the relocated events occur below the known sedimentary structures extending to 7 km suggests that they are tectonic in origin. Shallow events within the sedimentary crust in the (southern) Minagish region may be related to oil field activities, although the current study cannot unambiguously determine the source of current seismicity in Kuwait. The improved velocity model reduces the scatter of travel time residuals relative to the locations reported in the KNSN bulletin and may be used for ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in Kuwait.

Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Source Characterization of the August 6, 2007 Crandall Canyon Mine Seismic Event in Central Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On August 6, 2007 a local magnitude 3.9 seismic event occurred at 08:48:40 UTC in central Utah. The epicenter is within the boundaries of the Crandall Canyon coal mine (c.f. Pechmann et al., this volume). We performed a moment tensor analysis with complete, three-component seismic recordings from stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah, and EarthScope. The analysis method inverts the seismic records to retrieve the full seismic moment tensor, which allows for interpretation of both shearing (e.g., earthquakes) and volume-changing (e.g., explosions and collapses) seismic events. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007. Our study does not address the actual cause of the mine collapse.

Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Polarized seismic and solitary waves run-up at the sea bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polarization effects in hydrodynamics are studied. Hydrodynamic equation for the nonlinear wave is used along with the polarized solitary waves and seismic waves act as initial waves. The model is then solved by Fourier spectral and Runge-Kutta 4 methods, and the surface plot is drawn. The output demonstrates the inundation behaviors. Consequently, the polarized seismic waves along with the polarized solitary waves tend to generate dissimilar inundation which is more disastrous.

Dennis, L. C.C.; Zainal, A. A.; Faisal, S. Y. [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2010, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 873 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 259 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 324 regional and teleseismic events. There were 210 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. One hundred and fifty-five earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this fiscal year were a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al. 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, 2010b, and 2010c). Most events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with the largest event recorded on February 4, 2010 (3.0Mc). The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging approximately 1.5 km deep) placing the swarm within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Based upon the last two quarters (Q3 and Q4) data, activity at the Wooded Island area swarm has largely subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will continue to monitor for activity at this location. The highest-magnitude events (3.0Mc) were recorded on February 4, 2010 within the Wooded Island swarm (depth 2.4 km) and May 8, 2010 on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline (depth 3.0 km). This latter event is not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al. 2007). With regard to the depth distribution, 173 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 19 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 178 earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 4 earthquakes occurred on or near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and 28 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered several times by the Wooded Island swarm events and the events located on or near the Saddle Mountain anticline. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network during fiscal year 2010 occurred February 4, 2010 (Wooded Island swarm event), approximately 2 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) with no action required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Devary, Joseph L.; Hartshorn, Donald C.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During FY 2009, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded nearly 3000 triggers on the seismometer system, which included over 1700 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 370 regional and teleseismic events. There were 1648 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. Recording of the Wooded Island events began in January with over 250 events per month through June 2009. The frequency of events decreased starting in July 2009 to approximately 10-15 events per month through September 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with 47 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.3 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The highest-magnitude event (3.0Mc) occurred on May 13, 2009 within the Wooded Island swarm at depth 1.8 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 1613 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 18 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 17 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 1630 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 18 earthquakes were classified as random events. The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake “swarms” have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

Qian, Zhongping

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

302

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the method while others are intended to be representative of basic geological features such as salt domes. We also present a theoretical model to understand the performance of the pWFC algorithm. We evaluate the performance of the proposed parallel...

Jain, Tarun K

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO2 Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Phase 1 of the Weyburn Project (2000-2004), 4D reflection seismic data were used to map CO{sub 2} migration within the Midale reservoir, while an extensive fluid sampling program documented the geochemical evolution triggered by CO{sub 2}-brine-oil-mineral interactions. The aim of this task (3b.11) is to exploit these existing seismic and geochemical data sets, augmented by CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O injection and HC/H{sub 2}O production data toward optimizing the reservoir model and thereby improving site characterization and dependent predictions of long-term CO{sub 2} storage in the Weyburn-Midale reservoir. Our initial project activities have concentrated on developing a stochastic inversion method that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. This report describes the technical approach we have followed, the data that supports it, and associated implementation activities. The report fulfills deliverable D1 in the project's statement of work. Future deliverables will describe the development of the stochastic inversion tool that uses geochemical data to optimize the reservoir model.

Ramirez, A L; Hao, Y; White, D; Carle, S; Dyer, K; Yang, X; Mcnab, W; Foxall, W; Johnson, J

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fractal Interrelationships in Field and Seismic Data Thomas H. Wilson (wilson @wvugeo.wvnet.edu; 304-293-5603)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal Interrelationships in Field and Seismic Data Thomas H. Wilson (wilson @wvugeo Size scaling interrelationships are evaluated in this study using a fractal model. Fractal models relief, drainage, topographic relief and active fault patterns. The fractal properties of structural

Wilson, Thomas H.

308

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION platform for distributed hybrid testing #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN? Celestina Overview Implementation Validation Next steps #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

309

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental-TA Project #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Partners (Users) · METU Ragueneau · SCHOECK (Germany): Steffen Scheer, Seref Diler #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

310

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION Database: Architecture and implementation #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN Conclusions #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES 3 SERIES Concluding

311

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

313

INVERSE SCATTERING OF SEISMIC DATA WITH THE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the inverse scattering of seismic reflection data making use of the generalized Radon transform. Through an extension, the relevant transform attains ...

1910-61-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

santos

315

Optimization Online - Constrained optimization in seismic reflection ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 7, 2004 ... Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos (Frederic.Delbos ***at*** ifp.fr)

F. Delbos

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Finite Element Approximation of Coupled Seismic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numerical approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in 2D bounded fluid- saturated porous media, with absorbing boundary conditions at ...

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

zyserman

318

Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

Reidel, S.P.

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that in a declining oil reservoir, seismic waves sent acrosswells. Because oil reservoirs are often at kilometers orproximity to the oil reservoir. Our analysis suggests there

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

230Th/U ages Supporting Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This product represents a USGS Administrative Report that discusses samples and methods used to conduct uranium-series isotope analyses and resulting ages and initial 234U/238U activity ratios of pedogenic cements developed in several different surfaces in the Hanford area middle to late Pleistocene. Samples were collected and dated to provide calibration of soil development in surface deposits that are being used in the Hanford Site-Wide probabilistic seismic hazard analysis conducted by AMEC. The report includes description of sample locations and physical characteristics, sample preparation, chemical processing and mass spectrometry, analytical results, and calculated ages for individual sites. Ages of innermost rinds on a number of samples from five sites in eastern Washington are consistent with a range of minimum depositional ages from 17 ka for cataclysmic flood deposits to greater than 500 ka for alluvium at several sites.

Paces, James B. [U.S. Geological Survey] [U.S. Geological Survey

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Seismic data acquisition at the FACT site for the CASPAR project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since May 2010, we have been recording continuous seismic data at Sandia's FACT site. The collected signals provide us with a realistic archive for testing algorithms under development for local monitoring of explosive testing. Numerous small explosive tests are routinely conducted around Kirtland AFB by different organizations. Our goal is to identify effective methods for distinguishing these events from normal daily activity on and near the base, such as vehicles, aircraft, and storms. In this report, we describe the recording system, and present some observations of the varying ambient noise conditions at FACT. We present examples of various common, non-explosive, sources. Next we show signals from several small explosions, and discuss their characteristic features.

Jones, Kyle R.; Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Structure/piping sensitivity studies for the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a NRC-funded, multi-year program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). One of the goals of the program is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I, a probabilistic computational procedure was developed for the seismic safety assessment. In Phase II, sensitivity studies were performed, codes and models were improved, and analysis of the Zion plant was completed.

Shieh, L.C.; O'Connell, W.J.; Johnson, J.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A New Seismic Data System for Determining Nuclear Test Yields At the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important capability in conducting underground nuclear tests is to be able to determine the nuclear test yield accurately within hours after a test. Due to a nuclear test moratorium, the seismic method that has been used in the past has not been exercised since a non-proliferation high explosive test in 1993. Since that time, the seismic recording system and the computing environment have been replaced with modern equipment. This report describes the actions that have been taken to preserve the capability for determining seismic yield, in the event that nuclear testing should resume. Specifically, this report describes actions taken to preserve seismic data, actions taken to modernize software, and actions taken to document procedures. It concludes with a summary of the current state of the data system and makes recommendations for maintaining this system in the future.

LEE, JONATHAN W.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

325

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

326

DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

327

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of...

328

Poroelastic modeling of seismic boundary conditions across a fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeability of a fracture can affect how the fracture interacts with seismic waves. ... characteristic parameters that control the seismic response of single ...

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Seismic Loading for FAST: May 2011 - August 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As more wind farms are constructed in seismically active regions, earthquake loading increases in prominence for design and analysis of wind turbines. Early investigation of seismic load tended to simplify the rotor and nacelle as a lumped mass on top of the turbine tower. This simplification allowed the use of techniques developed for conventional civil structures, such as buildings, to be easily applied to wind turbines. However, interest is shifting to more detailed models that consider loads for turbine components other than the tower. These improved models offer three key capabilities in consideration of base shaking for turbines: 1) The inclusion of aerodynamics and turbine control; 2) The ability to consider component loads other than just tower loads; and 3) An improved representation of turbine response in higher modes by reducing modeling simplifications. Both experimental and numerical investigations have shown that, especially for large modern turbines, it is important to consider interaction between earthquake input, aerodynamics, and operational loads. These investigations further show that consideration of higher mode activity may be necessary in the analysis of the seismic response of turbines. Since the FAST code is already capable of considering these factors, modifications were developed that allow simulation of base shaking. This approach allows consideration of this additional load source within a framework, the FAST code that is already familiar to many researchers and practitioners.

Asareh, M. A.; Prowell, I.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded over 800 local earthquakes during the second quarter of FY 2009. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. Most of the events were considered minor (magnitude (Mc) less than 1.0) with 19 events in the 2.0-2.9 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.9 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude and the shallowness of the Wooded Island events have made them undetectable to most area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity, and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center, have reported feeling some movement. The Hanford SMA network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration values recorded by the SMA network were approximately 2-3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressures that have built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake “swarms” have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, PNNL will continue to monitor the activity continuously. Outside of the Wooded Island swarm, four earthquakes were recorded. Three earthquakes were classified as minor and one event registered 2.3 Mc. One earthquake was located at intermediate depth (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments) and three earthquakes at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, two earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 771 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2009. Nearly all of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during the January – March 2009 time period and reported in the previous quarterly report (Rohay et al, 2009). The frequency of Wooded Island events has subsided with 16 events recorded during June 2009. Most of the events were considered minor (magnitude (Mc) less than 1.0) with 25 events in the 2.0-3.0 range. The estimated depths of the Wooded Island events are shallow (averaging less than 1.0 km deep) with a maximum depth estimated at 2.2 km. This places the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. However, some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the area of highest activity and individuals living in homes directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. The Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer (SMA) network was triggered numerous times by the Wooded Island swarm events. The maximum acceleration value recorded by the SMA network was approximately 3 times lower than the reportable action level for Hanford facilities (2% g) and no action was required. The swarming is likely due to pressure that has built up, cracking the brittle basalt layers within the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG). Similar earthquake “swarms” have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. Quakes of this limited magnitude do not pose a risk to Hanford cleanup efforts or waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

Caucasus Seismic Information Network: Data and Analysis Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geology and tectonics of the Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) are highly variable. Consequently, generating a structural model and characterizing seismic wave propagation in the region require data from local seismic networks. As of eight years ago, there was only one broadband digital station operating in the region – an IRIS station at Garni, Armenia – and few analog stations. The Caucasus Seismic Information Network (CauSIN) project is part of a nulti-national effort to build a knowledge base of seismicity and tectonics in the region. During this project, three major tasks were completed: 1) collection of seismic data, both in event catalogus and phase arrival time picks; 2) development of a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the region obtained through crustal tomography; 3) advances in geological and tectonic models of the region. The first two tasks are interrelated. A large suite of historical and recent seismic data were collected for the Caucasus. These data were mainly analog prior to 2000, and more recently, in Georgia and Azerbaijan, the data are digital. Based on the most reliable data from regional networks, a crustal model was developed using 3-D tomographic inversion. The results of the inversion are presented, and the supporting seismic data are reported. The third task was carried out on several fronts. Geologically, the goal of obtaining an integrated geological map of the Caucasus on a scale of 1:500,000 was initiated. The map for Georgia has been completed. This map serves as a guide for the final incorporation of the data from Armenia and Azerbaijan. Description of the geological units across borders has been worked out and formation boundaries across borders have been agreed upon. Currently, Armenia and Azerbaijan are working with scientists in Georgia to complete this task. The successful integration of the geologic data also required addressing and mapping active faults throughout the greater Caucasus. Each of the major faults in the region were identified and the probability of motion were assessed. Using field data and seismicity, the relative activity on each of these faults was determined. Furthermore, the sense of motion along the faults was refined using GPS, fault plane solutions, and detailed field studies. During the course of the integration of the active fault data, the existence of the proposed strike slip Borjomi-Kazbeki fault was brought into question. Although it had been incorporated in many active tectonic models over the past decade, field geologists and geophysicists in Georgia questioned its existence. Detailed field studies were carried out to determine the existence of the fault and estimate the slip along it; and it was found that the fault zone did not exist. Therefore, the convergence rate in the greater Caucasus must be reinterpreted in terms of thrust mechanisms, instead of strike-slip on the Borjomi-Kazbeki fault zone.

Randolph Martin; Mary Krasovec; Spring Romer; Timothy O'Connor; Emanuel G. Bombolakis; Youshun Sun; Nafi Toksoz

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

Liberty, L. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface] [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Critical assessment of seismic and geomechanics literature related to a high-level nuclear waste underground repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive literature assessment has been conducted to determine the nature and scope of technical information available to characterize the seismic performance of an underground repository and associated facilities. Significant deficiencies were identified in current practices for prediction of seismic response of underground excavations in jointed rock. Conventional analytical methods are based on a continuum representation of the host rock mass. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicate that, in jointed rock, the behavior of the joints controls the overall performance of underground excavations. Further, under repetitive seismic loading, shear displacement develops progressively at block boundaries. Field observations correlating seismicity and groundwater conditions have provided significant information on hydrological response to seismic events. However, lack of a comprehensive model of geohydrological response to seismicity has limited the transportability conclusions from field observations. Based on the literature study, matters requiring further research in relation to the Yucca Mountain repository are identified. The report focuses on understanding seismic processes in fractured tuff, and provides a basis for work on the geohydrologic response of a seismically disturbed rock mass. 220 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

Kana, D.D.; Vanzant, B.W.; Nair, P.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Brady, B.H.G. [ITASCA Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (USA)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

339

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyA JumpSeagoville,SecretEmissionsSeismic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Methods of communicating activities in pollution abatement by five hundred major industrial corporations in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHODS OF COMMUNICATING ACTIVITIES IN POLLUTION ABATEMENT BY FIVE HUNDRED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES A Thesis by CHRISTINE ANN OUINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Educational Administration (Public Relations) METHODS OF COMMUNICATING ACTIVITIES IN POLLUTION ABATEMENT BY FIVE HUNDRED MAJOR INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES A...

Quinn, Christine Ann

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Application of electrical methods to measure microbial activity in soils: Preliminary microcosm results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the geophysical technique known as self-potential to the measurement of microbial activity was tested on laboratory microcosms containing ferric iron and iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella alga BrY. Measurements of the electrical response of silver-coated copper electrodes distributed along a Teflon probe inserted into sterile and inoculated layers containing either ferric chloride, ferric citrate, or ferric oxide rich soil were recorded over hours or days. Strong electrical signals reached values more negative than {minus}400 mV for all types of inoculated ferric iron layers. Electric signals in sterile control layers, by contrast, rarely reached values more negative than {minus}150 mV. These preliminary experiments indicate that it may be possible to apply the self-potential geophysical method to monitor bioremediation in the field.

Cox, B.L. Sweet, A.; Majer, E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nonlinear regularization techniques for seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of several nonlinear regularization techniques are discussed in the framework of 3D seismic tomography. Traditional, linear, l{sub 2} penalties are compared to so-called sparsity promoting l{sub 1} and l{sub 0} penalties, and a total variation penalty. Which of these algorithms is judged optimal depends on the specific requirements of the scientific experiment. If the correct reproduction of model amplitudes is important, classical damping towards a smooth model using an l{sub 2} norm works almost as well as minimizing the total variation but is much more efficient. If gradients (edges of anomalies) should be resolved with a minimum of distortion, we prefer l{sub 1} damping of Daubechies-4 wavelet coefficients. It has the additional advantage of yielding a noiseless reconstruction, contrary to simple l{sub 2} minimization ('Tikhonov regularization') which should be avoided. In some of our examples, the l{sub 0} method produced notable artifacts. In addition we show how nonlinear l{sub 1} methods for finding sparse models can be competitive in speed with the widely used l{sub 2} methods, certainly under noisy conditions, so that there is no need to shun l{sub 1} penalizations.

Loris, I. [Mathematics Department, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: igloris@vub.ac.be; Douma, H. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Nolet, G. [Geosciences Azur, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS/IRD, 250 Rue Albert Einstein, Sophia Antipolis 06560 (France); Daubechies, I. [Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Fine Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Regone, C. [BP America Inc., 501 Westlake Park Blvd., Houston, TX 77079 (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

Stephen R. Novascone

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

REVIEW OF PRACTICE FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED/BURIED NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SEISMIC LOADINGS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by many design considerations, several conceptual designs for advanced reactors have proposed that the entire reactor building and a significant portion of the steam generator building will be either partially or completely embedded below grade. For the analysis of seismic events, the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect and passive earth pressure for these types of deeply embedded structures will have a significant influence on the predicted seismic response. Sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a research program to assess the significance of these proposed design features for advanced reactors, and to evaluate the existing analytical methods to determine their applicability and adequacy in capturing the seismic behavior of the proposed designs. This paper summarizes a literature review performed by BNL to determine the state of knowledge and practice for seismic analyses of deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear containment type structures. Included in the paper is BNL's review of the open literature of existing standards, tests, and practices that have been used in the design and analysis of DEB structures. The paper also provides BNL's evaluation of available codes and guidelines with respect to seismic design practice of DEB structures. Based on BNL's review, a discussion is provided to highlight the applicability of the existing technologies for seismic analyses of DEB structures and to identify gaps that may exist in knowledge and potential issues that may require better understanding and further research.

XU,J.HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.GRAVES,H.

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active- and combustion synthesis. A combination of combustion and reactive solution approaches leads to so- called solution (aqueous) combustion synthesis (SCS) method.[1­3] Typically SCS involves a self-sustained reaction

Mukasyan, Alexander

348

Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrothermal al- teration would combine to reduce the effectiveness of standard 3-D seismic processing.

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian 1 , F. ASCE ABSTRACT Seismic and impedance calculations; assessment of foundation performance under the design seismic loads; and in the case of existing bridges, if deemed necessary, design of seismic retrofit measures. The outcomes of each

Yegian, Mishac

351

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

352

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Structural concepts and details for seismic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Canadian Seismic Agreement. Annual report, July--June 1990: Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Efficient Smoothing and Interpolation of Velocity Models for Seismic Wavefront Construction Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wavefront construction (WFC) method is an effective tool to compute seismic ray fields and has wide applications. This paper applies the WFC method to a heterogeneous earth model represented as a 3-D grid instead of a sequence of smooth layers...

Chen, Bo

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

ten Brink, Uri S.

357

Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction 1 Seismic Wave of alluvial deposits have a major influence on seismic wave propagation and amplification. However influence seismic wave propagation near the free surface. In this paper, the influence of surface structures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes earthquake activity within approximately 65 km of Yucca Mountain site during the October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006 time period (FY05-06). The FY05-06 earthquake activity will be compared with the historical and more recent period of seismic activity in the Yucca Mountain region. The relationship between the distribution of seismicity and active faults, historical patterns of activity, and rates of earthquakes (number of events and their magnitudes) are important components in the assessment of the seismic hazard for the Yucca Mountain site. Since October 1992 the University of Nevada has compiled a catalog of earthquakes in the Yucca Mountain area. Seismicity reports have identified notable earthquake activity, provided interpretations of the seismotectonics of the region, and documented changes in the character of earthquake activity based on nearly 30 years of site-characterization monitoring. Data from stations in the seismic network in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is collected and managed at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). Earthquake events are systematically identified and cataloged under Implementing Procedures developed in compliance with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program. The earthquake catalog for FY05-06 in the Yucca Mountain region submitted to the Yucca Mountain Technical Data Management System (TDMS) forms the basis of this report.

Smith, Ken

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

active fault segments: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fault activation Kuzmanov, Georgi 140 Early stage evolution of growth faults: 3D seismic insights from the Levant Basin, Eastern Mediterranean Materials Science Websites...

362

{sup 3}He+{sup 4}He astrophysical factor study using activation method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, [2] pointed out the big difference for the S{sub 34}(0) ('old' experimental data) when experimental results were grouped starting from the main two methods: S{sub 34}(0) = 0.507(16)keVb for the direct capture and S{sub 34}(0) = 0.572(26)keVb for the activation. Its importance for the Standard Solar Model was the reason to ask for new measurements to understand the discrepancy. 'New' results solved this issue by equalizing the above values, but introduced a new situation to clarify: a discrepancy between the S{sub 34}(E) variations for 'old' and 'new' data at higher energies than E{sub CM} 1.0MeV. 'Old' theoretical models, used for extrapolating the S{sub 34}(E) to the stellar energies, couldn't explain this new behavior. New experimental data was required, again, by theorists. We started this project with the main goal to clarify the situation. Here are the results.

Bordeanu, C. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, POB.51 (Hungary)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

SMACS. Probabilistic Seismic Analysis System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SMACS (Seismic Methodology Analysis Chain with Statistics) system of computer programs is one of the major computational tools of the U.S. NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). SMACS is comprised of the core program SMAX, which performs the SSI response analyses, five preprocessing programs, and two postprocessors. The preprocessing programs include: GLAY and CLAN, which generate the nominal impedance matrices and wave scattering vectors for surface-founded structures; INSSIN, which projects the dynamic properties of structures to the foundation in the form of modal participation factors and mass matrices; SAPPAC, which projects the dynamic and pseudostatic properties of multiply-supported piping systems to the support locations, and LNGEN, which can be used to generate the multiplication factors to be applied to the nominal soil, structural, and subsystem properties for each of the response calculations in accounting for random variations of these properties. The postprocessors are: PRESTO, which performs statistical operations on the raw data from the response vectors that SMAX produces to calculate best fit lognormal distributions for each response location, and CHANGO, which manipulates the data produced by PRESTO to produce other results of interest to the user. Also included is the computer program SAP4 (a modified version of the University of California, Berkeley SAPIV program), a general linear structural analysis program used for eigenvalue extractions and pseudostatic mode calculations of the models of major structures and subsystems. SAP4 is used to prepare input to the INSSIN and SAPPAC preprocessing programs. The GLAY and CLAN programs were originally developed by J.E. Luco (UCSD) and H.L. Wong (USC).

Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Mraz, M.J. [EQE Incorporated, San Ramon, CA (United States); Bumpus, S.; Gerhard, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants'' as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,'' dated February 1991 and Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,'' dated March 1, 1991.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)); von Riesemann, W.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. (Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schiff, A.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Ibanez, P. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated ``Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants`` as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, ``Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,`` dated February 1991 and ``Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,`` dated March 1, 1991.

Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); von Riesemann, W.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. [Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schiff, A.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ibanez, P. [Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II Prepared by: Environment, Health and Safety Division Environmental Services Group May 2010 Revision 1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.1.1 Demolition of Building 25/25B

369

Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

Werthmüller, Dieter

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Non-physical energy in seismic interferometry   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-physical arrivals produced by seismic interferometry, the process whereby Green’s functions are synthesized between two points by cross-correlation, crossconvolution or deconvolution, are often considered to provide ...

King, Simon James

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

Van Voorhis, David

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cutting Costs by Locating High Production Wells: A Test of the Volcano seismic Approach to Finding ''Blind'' Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, Duke University and the Kenyan power generation company, KenGen, conducted a microearthquake monitoring experiment at Longonot volcano in Kenya. Longonot is one of several major late Quaternary trachyte volcanoes in the Kenya Rift. They study was aimed at developing seismic methods for locating buried hydrothermal areas in the Rift on the basis of their microearthquake activity and wave propagation effects. A comparison of microearthquake records from 4.5 Hz, 2 Hz, and broadband seismometers revealed strong high-frequency site and wave-propagation effects. The lower frequency seismometers were needed to detect and record individual phases. Two-dozen 3-component 2- Hz L22 seismographs and PASSCAL loggers were then distributed around Longonot. Recordings from this network located one seismically active area on Longonot's southwest flank. The events from this area were emergent, shallow (<3 km), small (M<1), and spatially restricted. Evidently, the hydrothermal system in this area is not currently very extensive or active. To establish the nature of the site effects, the data were analyzed using three spectral techniques that reduce source effects. The data were also compared to a simple forward model. The results show that, in certain frequency ranges, the technique of dividing the horizontal motion by the vertical motion (H/V) to remove the source fails because of non-uniform vertical amplification. Outside these frequencies, the three methods resolve the same, dominant, harmonic frequencies at a given site. In a few cases, the spectra can be fit with forward models containing low velocity surface layers. The analysis suggests that the emergent, low frequency character of the microearthquake signals is due to attenuation and scattering in the near surface ash deposits.

Eylon Shalev; Peter E. Malin; Wendy McCausland

2002-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Oil and Gas CDT Quantification of hydraulic fracturing induced seismic risks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantification Overview Hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" is a technique that uses fluids, pumped at high. Seismic risks due to hydraulic fracturing have been identified following the fracking activities predictions of the coupled multi-physics phenomenon of fracking might arise from two primary sources

Henderson, Gideon

376

SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seismic Fragility Analysis of a Degraded Condensate Storage Tank  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory are conducting a collaborative research project to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the goals of this collaboration endeavor is to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The essential part of this collaboration is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of SSCs and ultimately on the safety of NPPs. A recent search of the degradation occurrences of structures and passive components (SPCs) showed that the rate of aging related degradation in NPPs was not significantly large but increasing, as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). The condition and performance of major aged NPP structures such as the containment contributes to the life span of a plant. A frequent misconception of such low degradation rate of SPCs is that such degradation may not pose significant risk to plant safety. However, under low probability high consequence initiating events, such as large earthquakes, SPCs that have slowly degraded over many years could potentially affect plant safety and these effects need to be better understood. As part of the KAERI-BNL collaboration, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. CSTs were shown to have a significant impact on the seismic core damage frequency of a nuclear power plant. The seismic fragility capacity of the CST was developed for five cases: (1) a baseline analysis where the design condition (undegraded) is assumed, (2) a scenario with degraded stainless steel tank shell, (3) a scenario with degraded anchor bolts, (4) a scenario with anchorage concrete cracking, and (5) a perfect correlation of the above three degradation scenarios. This paper will present the methodology for the time-dependent fragility calculation and discuss the insights drawn from this study. To achieve a better understanding of the effects of aging on the performance of structures and passive components (SPCs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs), the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are collaborating to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider age-related degradation of SPCs. The rate of age-related degradation of SPCs was not found to be significantly large, but increasing as the plants get older. The slow but increasing rate of degradation of SPCs can potentially affect the safety of the older plants and become an important factor in decision making in the current trend of extending the operating license period of the plants (e.g., in the U.S. from 40 years to 60 years, and even potentially to 80 years). In this paper, a condensate storage tank (CST) was analyzed to estimate its seismic fragility capacities under various postulated degradation scenarios. This paper will present the methodology for the time-dependent fragility calculation and discuss the insights drawn from this study.

Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I-K.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Wiener filtering with a seismic underground array at the Sanford Underground Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A seismic array has been deployed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the former Homestake mine, South Dakota, to study the underground seismic environment. This includes exploring the advantages of constructing a third-generation gravitational-wave detector underground. A major noise source for these detectors would be Newtonian noise, which is induced by fluctuations in the local gravitational field. The hope is that a combination of a low-noise seismic environment and coherent noise subtraction using seismometers in the vicinity of the detector could suppress the Newtonian noise to below the projected noise floor for future gravitational-wave detectors. In this paper, we use Wiener filtering techniques to subtract coherent noise in a seismic array in the frequency band 0.05 -- 1\\,Hz. This achieves more than an order of magnitude noise cancellation over a majority of this band. We show how this subtraction would benefit proposed future low-frequency gravitational wave detectors. The variation in the Wiener filter coefficients over the course of the day, including how local activities impact the filter, is analyzed. We also study the variation in coefficients over the course of a month, showing the stability of the filter with time. How varying the filter order affects the subtraction performance is also explored. It is shown that optimizing filter order can significantly improve subtraction of seismic noise, which gives hope for future gravitational-wave detectors to address Newtonian noise.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms; Nelson Christensen; Vladimir Dergachev; Riccardo DeSalvo; Shivaraj Kandhasamy; Vuk Mandic

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

EXPLORING FOR SUBTLE MISSION CANYON STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS WITH ELASTIC WAVEFIELD SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A source-receiver geometry was designed for a 9C3D seismic survey in Montrail County, North Dakota, that will involve the largest number of active 3-component stations (1,800 to 2,100) ever attempted in an onshore U.S. multicomponent seismic survey. To achieve the data-acquisition objectives, 3-component geophone strings will be provided by the Bureau of Economic Geology, Dawson Geophysical, and Vecta Technology. Data acquisition will commence in late October 2003. The general objective of this study is to demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for exploring for subtle oolitic-bank reservoirs in the Mission Canyon Formation of the Williston Basin. The work tasks done during this report period concentrated on developing an optimal design for the seismic survey. This first semiannual report defines the geographical location and geometrical shape of the survey and documents the key acquisition parameters that will be implemented to yield high-fold, high-resolution 9-component seismic data.

John Beecherl

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - active power method Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Nonlinear Loads Jos Mahomar, Luis Morn... active power filters. The algorithm is proved by simulation in a multibus industrial power distribution... system and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Lane, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Lane, Michael

383

Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

Bernreuter, D. L

1981-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE standard guidelines for use of probabilistic seismic hazard curves at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard is intended to provide guidance in the use of the seismic hazard curves developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Experience to-date has shown that application of these methodologies can yield significantly different results. In response to this issue, a Seismic Working Group (SWG) has been formed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters to coordinate the application of these methodologies within DOE in a consistent manner. The position developed by the SWG and contained in this Standard is intended for immediate use in developing seismic hazard estimates at DOE sites for the evaluation of new and existing, nuclear and non-nuclear DOE facilities. This Standard is needed not only to address the LLNL/EPRI issue but also to assure that state-of-the-art seismic hazard methods are incorporated into DOE standards as soon as possible. The DOE is currently involved in a joint program with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and EPRI to evaluate these existing probabilistic seismic hazard methodologies and to develop recommendations for an improved methodology for the 1990`s. The final product of this effort is expected to result in more stable hazard estimates and will supersede this Standard in approximately two years.

Not Available

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several of the new generation nuclear power plant designs have structural configurations which are proposed to be deeply embedded. Since current seismic analysis methodologies have been applied to shallow embedded structures (e.g., ASCE 4 suggest that simple formulations may be used to model embedment effect when the depth of embedment is less than 30% of its foundation radius), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory with the objective of investigating the extent to which procedures acceptable for shallow embedment depths are adequate for larger embedment depths. This paper presents the results of a study comparing the response spectra obtained from two of the more popular analysis methods for structural configurations varying from shallow embedment to complete embedment. A typical safety related structure embedded in a soil profile representative of a typical nuclear power plant site was utilized in the study and the depths of burial (DOB) considered range from 25-100% the height of the structure. Included in the paper are: (1) the description of a simplified analysis and a detailed approach for the SSI analyses of a structure with various DOB, (2) the comparison of the analysis results for the different DOBs between the two methods, and (3) the performance assessment of the analysis methodologies for SSI analyses of deeply embedded structures. The resulting assessment from this study has indicated that simplified methods may be capable of capturing the seismic response for much deeper embedded structures than would be normally allowed by the standard practice.

XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C. (BNL); GRAVES, H. (US NRC).

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Automatic deployment of a 2-D geophone array for efficient ultra-shallow seismic imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Data acquisition and preliminary processing strate- 324gies, Geophysics, 63, 1434?1450. 325Burridge, R., J. Graham, K. Shillcutt, R. Hirsh, and D. Kortenkamp (2003), 326Experiments with an EVA assistant Robot, paper presented at 7th Inter- 327national.... Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union. 0094-8276/06/2006GL025902$05.00 LXXXXX 1of4 103 acquire conventional ultra-shallow 3-D seismic data. The 104 method could be adapted to allow robotic shallow seismic 105 surveys in areas where people cannot...

Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Steeples, Don W.; Czarnecki, Gerard P.; Sloan, Steven D.; Eslick, Robert C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation`s (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

Dinh, Tuan V. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate there through to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex. 23 figs.

Dinh, T.V.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

3D seismic imaging of buried Younger Dryas mass movement flows: Lake Windermere, UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, , Luke J.W. Pinson a , Jonathan M. Bull a , Justin K. Dix a , Timothy J. Henstock a , John W. Davis offshore using tradi- tional 3D seismic methods (e.g., Frey-Martinez et al., 2005; Gee et al., 2006; Bull.g., Frey-Martinez et al., 2005). From this, a well- developed set of indicators for flow direction

Southampton, University of

391

The Ensemble Kalman Filter adapted for Time-Lapse seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Lapse Seismic data are frequently used in History Matching of reservoir production data. The ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a method that conditions on observations as the appear. It uses an n-member ensemble results. ------------------------------------------------- Petroleum Geostatistics 2007 Cascais, Portugal

Eidsvik, Jo

392

A Comparison of Strategies for Seismic Interferometry Roel Snieder Masatoshi Miyazawa Evert Slob Ivan Vasconcelos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on cross-correlation, deconvolution, and the solution of an integral equation, respectively. For systems Present Address: I. Vasconcelos ION Geophysical, GXT Imaging Solutions, Egham, Surrey, UK 123 Surv Geophys Green's function extraction, daylight imaging, the virtual source method, and seismic interferometry

Snieder, Roel

393

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Canadian Seismic Agreement: Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division (GD) of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) during the period June 1986 to June 1987 and supported in part by the NRC agreement. The activities include ECTN and portable network developments, datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Drysdale, J.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

Yuh, Sung H.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

civilization documentary, economic, social and even political or spiritual value #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERINGS E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION of Research Infrastructures in Performance-based Earthquake Engineering Shaking table testing of models

398

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are primarily the result of spurious identification and incorrect association of phases, and of excessive variability in estimates for the velocity and direction of incoming seismic phases. The mitigation of these causes has led to the development of two complimentary techniques for classifying seismic sources by testing detected signals under mutually exclusive event hypotheses. Both of these techniques require appropriate calibration data from the region to be monitored, and are therefore ideally suited to mining areas or other sites with recurring seismicity. The first such technique is a classification and location algorithm where a template is designed for each site being monitored which defines which phases should be observed, and at which times, for all available regional array stations. For each phase, the variability of measurements (primarily the azimuth and apparent velocity) from previous events is examined and it is determined which processing parameters (array configuration, data window length, frequency band) provide the most stable results. This allows us to define optimal diagnostic tests for subsequent occurrences of the phase in question. The calibration of templates for this project revealed significant results with major implications for seismic processing in both automatic and analyst reviewed contexts: • one or more fixed frequency bands should be chosen for each phase tested for. • the frequency band providing the most stable parameter estimates varies from site to site and a frequency band which provides optimal measurements for one site may give substantially worse measurements for a nearby site. • slowness corrections applied depend strongly on the frequency band chosen. • the frequency band providing the most stable estimates is often neither the band providing the greatest SNR nor the band providing the best array gain. For this reason, the automatic template location estimates provided here are frequently far better than those obtained by analysts. The second technique is that of matched field processing whereby spatial covariance

Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis methods for solar heating and cooling applications: passive and active systems. 2nd edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief descriptions of analysis methods and design tools which are valuable in performing parametric studies of candidate designs are presented in this brochure. The methods included range from rules-of-thumb for builders to the simulation packages used by researchers. (MHR)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Computation of seismic attenuation and dispersion due to ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 23, 2006 ... Seismic attenuation and dispersion are numerically computed for synthetic porous materials that contain arbitrary amounts of mesoscopic-.

masson@localhost.localdomain (masson)

2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

First Quarter Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the earthquake data collected from October 2005 to December 2005 from the Hanford Seismic Network

Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

Snieder, Roel

406

Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling SERIES Workshop: "Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation" 8 - 9 February 2012, Istanbul, Turkey C. Z. Chrysostomou, N. Kyriakides, P. Kotronis, P. Roussis, M. Poljansek, F. Taucer RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic

407

Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora Department of Computer Science of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), primarily through detection and localization of seismic events. We nuclear explosions. A global network of seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound sensors

Russell, Stuart

408

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

Southern California, University of

409

Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES) M.N. Fardis University of Patras, Greece SUMMARY: Through the 4-year project SERIES (Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures of their research. It also helps them to enhance their potential, by jointly developing novel seismic testing

410

Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using vector-sensor beamforming the problem of estimating the shape parameters of seismic wavefields in linear arrays. The purpose of the subsurface layers from the seismic wavefields registered by surface sensors. However, only the waves

Spagnolini, Umberto

411

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

412

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION General Committee Final workshop Ispra (IT), May 30 th, 2013 MAID project : Seismic behavior of L- and T-shaped unreinforced Masonry shear walls including Acoustic Isolation Devices #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

413

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION, In memory of Prof. Roy Severn #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES · Project Framework · Experimental Campaign · Outcome Outline #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

414

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

Genaud, Stéphane

415

Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel Christian Michelsen Research¨oller § Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms, Vienna University of Technology, Austria ABSTRACT Seismic present a novel system for rapidly interpret- ing and visualizing seismic volumetric data. First we

416

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA MARIT ULVMOEN Department of Mathematical of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data in a 3D reservoir. The inversion relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic data, and it follows the lines

Eidsvik, Jo

417

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data Marit Ulvmoen Summary The focus of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data. The target zone is a 3D reservoir model. The likelihood model relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic

Eidsvik, Jo

418

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

419

Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

Carr, D.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

DEMONSTRATION OF NONLINEAR SEISMIC SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION AND APPLICABILITY TO NEW SYSTEM FRAGILITY CURVES SEISMIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it wasn’t the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of the seismic input for use in the seismic safety margins research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly outlines the overall systems approach being developed for the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. The unique features of the approach being taken to reduce the uncertainty in the seismic input for this program are discussed. These unique features will include extensive use of expert opinion, earthquake rupture simulation studies and the way in which the seismic hazard is incorporated into the overall systems analysis. Some very preliminary results are also given for the Zion site which is the power plant chosen for analysis in Phase I of the program.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Chung, D.H.

1980-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery electrode material comprises a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

Varma, R.

1983-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery electrode material comprising a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

Varma, Ravi (Hinsdale, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

A method for using polyethylene passive samplers to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemical activity in sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to aid in the determination of the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, a method for the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices for measuring chemical ...

Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Seismic Search for Strange Quark Nuggets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to one ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

Eugene T. Herrin; Doris C. Rosenbaum; Vigdor L. Teplitz

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

A new method to estimate annual solar wind parameters and contributions of different solar wind structures to geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study two sets of local geomagnetic indices from 26 stations using the principal component (PC) and the independent component (IC) analysis methods. We demonstrate that the annually averaged indices can be accurately represented as linear combinations of two first components with weights systematically depending on latitude. We show that the annual contributions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and high speed streams (HSSs) to geomagnetic activity are highly correlated with the first and second IC. The first and second ICs are also found to be very highly correlated with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind speed, respectively, because solar wind speed is the most important parameter driving geomagnetic activity during HSSs while IMF strength dominates during CMEs. These results help in better understanding the long-term driving of geomagnetic activity and in gaining information about the long-term evolution of solar wind parameters and the different sol...

Holappa, Lauri; Asikainen, Timo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The application of high-resolution 3D seismic data to model the distribution of mechanical and hydrogeological properties of a potential host rock for the deep storage of radioactive waste in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive wastes, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has conducted an extensive characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock and surrounding formations in the Eastern Paris Basin. As part of this project, an accurate 3D seismic derived geological model is needed. The paper shows the procedure used for building the 3D seismic constrained geological model in depth by combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons, consistent seismic velocity model and elastic impedance in time. It also shows how the 3D model is used for mechanical and hydrogeological studies. The 3D seismic field data example illustrates the potential of the proposed depth conversion procedure for estimating density and velocity distributions, which are consistent with the depth conversion of seismic horizons using the Bayesian Kriging method. The geological model shows good agreement with well log data obtained from a reference we...

Mari, Jean-Luc

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2009 – December 31, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has accumulated 37 years of earthquake data (1972-2009). This report covers the earthquake activity from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2009 and is a continuation of previous annual reports on earthquake activity surrounding the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) and within and near the INL. It discusses the earthquake activity that has occurred around the local region and within a 161-km radius around the INL centered at 43? 39.00' N, 112? 47.00' W). It discusses the seismic station and strong motion accelerograph instrumentation used to record earthquake data and how they were analyzed. It also includes a brief discussion of continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) stations co-located at INL seismic stations.

N. S. Carpenter; S. J. Payne; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques.

Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles method for many-electron dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles (TD-RASSCF-S) method is presented for investigating TD many-electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. Adopting the SCF notion from the muticonfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method and the RAS scheme (single-orbital excitation concept) from the TD configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) method, the TD-RASSCF-S method can be regarded as a hybrid of them. We prove that, for closed-shell $N_{\\rm e}$-electron systems, the TD-RASSCF-S wave function can be fully converged using only $N_{\\rm e}/2+1\\le M\\le N_{\\rm e}$ spatial orbitals. Importantly, based on the TD variational principle, the converged TD-RASSCF-S wave function with $M= N_{\\rm e}$ is more accurate than the TDCIS wave function. The accuracy of the TD-RASSCF-S approach over the TDCIS is illustrated by the calculation of high-order harmonic generation spectra for one-dimensional models of atomic helium, beryllium, and carbon in an intense laser pulse. The electronic dynamics during the process is investigated by analyzing the behavior of electron density and orbitals. The TD-RASSCF-S method is accurate, numerically tractable, and applicable for large systems beyond the capability of the MCTDHF method.

Haruhide Miyagi; Lars Bojer Madsen

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles method for many-electron dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field singles (TD-RASSCF-S) method is presented for investigating TD many-electron dynamics in atoms and molecules. Adopting the SCF notion from the muticonfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method and the RAS scheme (single-orbital excitation concept) from the TD configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) method, the TD-RASSCF-S method can be regarded as a hybrid of them. We prove that, for closed-shell N{sub e}-electron systems, the TD-RASSCF-S wave function can be fully converged using only N{sub e}/2 + 1 ? M ? N{sub e} spatial orbitals. Importantly, based on the TD variational principle, the converged TD-RASSCF-S wave function with M = N{sub e} is more accurate than the TDCIS wave function. The accuracy of the TD-RASSCF-S approach over the TDCIS is illustrated by the calculation of high-order harmonic generation spectra for one-dimensional models of atomic helium, beryllium, and carbon in an intense laser pulse. The electronic dynamics during the process is investigated by analyzing the behavior of electron density and orbitals. The TD-RASSCF-S method is accurate, numerically tractable, and applicable for large systems beyond the capability of the MCTDHF method.

Miyagi, Haruhide; Bojer Madsen, Lars [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

A new approach to integrate seismic and production data in reservoir models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A great deal of effort is devoted to reducing the uncertainties in reservoir modeling. For example, seismic properties are used to improve the characterization of interwell properties by providing porosity maps constrained to seismic impedance. Another means to reduce uncertainties is to constrain the reservoir model to production data. This paper describes a new approach where the production and seismic data are simultaneously used to reduce the uncertainties. In this new approach, the primary geologic parameter that controls reservoir properties is identified. Next, the geophysical parameter that is sensitive to the dominant geologic parameter is determined. Then the geology and geophysics are linked using analytic correlations. Unfortunately, the initial guess resulted in a reservoir model that did not match the production history. Since the time required for trial and error matching of production history is exorbitant, an automatic history matching method based on a fast optimization method was used to find the correlating parameters. This new approach was illustrated with an actual field in the Williston Basin. Upscalling problems do not arise since the scale is imposed by the size of the seismic bin (66m, 219 ft) which is the size of the simulator gridblocks.

Ouenes, A.; Chawathe, A.; Weiss, W. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active seismic methods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

443

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2EnergyDepartment ofNews NewsNickn t

444

A simple synthesis method of sulfur-free Fe-N-C catalyst witih high ORR activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To try to deconvolute which factors affect the activity and durability of metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) type non-precious catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), M-N-C catalysts based on ion chloride, polyaniline (PANI) and Ketjen Black carbon support were synthesized using different synthetic conditions. The catalysts were characterized electrochemically and tested as cathodes for Hydrogen fuel cells. PANI is usually chemically oxidative polymerized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant. To eliminate sulfur in the synthesized catalysts, a simple synthesis method using ion chloride as oxidant for aniline polymerization was developed. Two different aniline polymerization conditions led to very different product morphologies. Synthesized at low initial proton concentration, the final product was composed of dense micrometer sized particles. A decomposable salt was found to be able to prohibit PANI cross linking during the drying and annealing process and thus led to porous product. The porous catalyst has much higher ORR activity than the dense product due to more accessible active sites. Synthesized at high proton concentration, the catalyst appeared to be porous. The decomposable salt treatment did not make too much improvement in the porous structure and electrochemical activity. However, fuel cell testing using air as cathode feeder indicates that the salt treatment improves mass transfer in the cathode layer. Catalyst synthesized using this simple method has performance comparable to our state-of-the art catalyst synthesized in a much more complicated procedure. The factor that sulfur sources are completely eliminated in the synthesis suggests that sulfur is not necessary for the ORR catalysis activity.

Ding, Zhongfen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnston, Christina M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A ROBUST ABSOLUTE DETECTION EFFICIENCY CALIBRATION METHOD UTILIZING BETA/GAMMA COINCIDENCE SIGNATURES AND ISOTOPICALLY PURIFIED NEUTRON ACTIVATED RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to calibrate the absolute efficiency of gas cell radiations detectors have utilized a number of methodologies which allow adequate calibration but are time consuming and prone to a host of difficult-to-determine uncertainties. A method that extrapolates the total source strength from the measured beta and gamma gated beta coincidence signal was developed in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It has become clear that it is possible to achieve more consistent results across a range of isotopes and a range of activities using this method. Even more compelling is the ease with which this process can be used on routine samples to determine the total activity present in the detector. Additionally, recent advances in the generation of isotopically pure radioxenon samples of Xe-131m, Xe-133, and Xe-135 have allowed these measurement techniques to achieve much better results than would have been possible before when using mixed isotopic radioxenon source. This paper will discuss the beta/gamma absolute detection efficiency technique that utilizes several of the beta-gamma decay signatures to more precisely determine the beta and gamma efficiencies. It will than compare these results with other methods using pure sources of Xe-133, Xe-131m, and Xe-135 and a Xe-133/Xe-133m mix.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Systems for low frequency seismic and infrasound detection of geo-pressure transition zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for determining the existence and characteristics of a gradational pressurized zone within a subterranean formation are disclosed. One embodiment involves employing an attenuation relationship between a seismic response signal and increasing wavelet wavelength, which relationship may be used to detect a gradational pressurized zone and/or determine characteristics thereof. In another embodiment, a method for analyzing data contained within a response signal for signal characteristics that may change in relation to the distance between an input signal source and the gradational pressurized zone is disclosed. In a further embodiment, the relationship between response signal wavelet frequency and comparative amplitude may be used to estimate an optimal wavelet wavelength or range of wavelengths used for data processing or input signal selection. Systems for seismic exploration and data analysis for practicing the above-mentioned method embodiments are also disclosed.

Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); LeRoy, Samuel D. (Houston, TX); Benzing, William M. (Tulsa, OK)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Baker, W.E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Seismic analyses of equipment in 2736-Z complex. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the structural qualification for the existing equipment when subjected to seismic loading in the Plutonium Storage Complex. It replaces in entirety Revision 0 and reconciles the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) comments on Revision 0. The Complex consists of 2736-Z Building (plutonium storage vault), 2736-ZA Building (vault ventilation equipment building), and 2736-ZB Building (shipping/receiving, repackaging activities). The existing equipment structurally qualified in this report are the metal storage racks for 7 inch and lard cans in room 2 of Building 2736-Z; the cubicles, can holders and pedestals in rooms 1, 3, and 4 of Building 2736-Z; the ventilation duct including exhaust fans/motors, emergency diesel generator, and HEPA filter housing in Building 2736-ZA; the repackaging glovebox in Building 2736-ZB; and the interface duct between Buildings 2736-Z and 2736-ZA.

Ocoma, E.C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Mohammed Y is required to optimize hydrocarbon production. A rock containing parallel fractures can be seismically to the seismic wavelength. Seismic anisotropy may be detectable from attributes of pre-stack 3-D seismic data

Ali, Mohammed

454

Seismic isolation of Advanced LIGO gravitational waves detectors: Review of strategy, instrumentation, and performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isolating ground-based interferometric gravitational wave observatories from environmental disturbances is one of the great challenges of the advanced detector era. In order to directly observe gravitational waves, the detector components and test masses must be highly inertially decoupled from the ground motion not only to sense the faint strain of space-time induced by gravitational waves, but also to maintain the resonance of the very sensitive 4 km interferometers. This article presents the seismic isolation instrumentation and strategy developed for Advanced LIGO interferometers. It reviews over a decade of research on active isolation in the context of gravitational wave detection, and presents the performance recently achieved with the Advanced LIGO observatory. Lastly, it discusses prospects for future developments in active seismic isolation and the anticipated benefits to astrophysical gravitational wave searches. Beyond gravitational wave research, the goal of this article is to provide detailed is...

Matichard, F; Mittleman, R; Mason, K; Kissel, J; McIver, J; Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Abbott, S; Allwine, E; Barnum, S; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Celerier, C; Clark, D; Coyne, D; DeBra, D; DeRosa, R; Evans, M; Foley, S; Fritschel, P; Giaime, J A; Gray, C; Grabeel, G; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Hillard, M; Hua, W; Kucharczyk, C; Landry, M; Roux, A Le; Lhuillier, V; Macleod, D; Macinnis, M; Mitchell, R; Reilly, B O; Ottaway, D; Paris, H; Pele, A; Puma, M; Radkins, H; Ramet, C; Robinson, M; Ruet, L; Sarin, P; Shoemaker, D; Stein, A; Thomas, J; Vargas, M; Venkateswara, K; Warner, J; Wen, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Interlocked optimization and fast gradient algorithm for a seismic inverse problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} A 2D extension of the 1D nonlinear inversion of well-seismic data is given. {yields} Appropriate regularization yields a well-determined large scale inverse problem. {yields} An interlocked optimization loop acts as an efficient preconditioner. {yields} The adjoint state method is used to compute the misfit function gradient. {yields} Domain decomposition method yields an efficient parallel implementation. - Abstract: We give a nonlinear inverse method for seismic data recorded in a well from sources at several offsets from the borehole in a 2D acoustic framework. Given the velocity field, approximate values of the impedance are recovered. This is a 2D extension of the 1D inversion of vertical seismic profiles . The inverse problem generates a large scale undetermined ill-conditioned problem. Appropriate regularization terms render the problem well-determined. An interlocked optimization algorithm yields an efficient preconditioning. A gradient algorithm based on the adjoint state method and domain decomposition gives a fast parallel numerical method. For a realistic test case, convergence is attained in an acceptable time with 128 processors.

Metivier, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.metivier@gmail.com [LAGA, Universite Paris XIII, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93000 Epinay-Villetaneuse (France)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nonlinear Seismic Correlation Analysis of the JNES/NUPEC Large-Scale Piping System Tests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization/Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (JNES/NUPEC) large-scale piping test program has provided valuable new test data on high level seismic elasto-plastic behavior and failure modes for typical nuclear power plant piping systems. The component and piping system tests demonstrated the strain ratcheting behavior that is expected to occur when a pressurized pipe is subjected to cyclic seismic loading. Under a collaboration agreement between the US and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a correlation analysis of the large-scale piping system tests using derailed state-of-the-art nonlinear finite element models. Techniques are introduced to develop material models that can closely match the test data. The shaking table motions are examined. The analytical results are assessed in terms of the overall system responses and the strain ratcheting behavior at an elbow. The paper concludes with the insights about the accuracy of the analytical methods for use in performance assessments of highly nonlinear piping systems under large seismic motions.

Nie,J.; DeGrassi, G.; Hofmayer, C.; Ali, S.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: Phase II program plan (FY 83-FY 84)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is an NRC-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its goal is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. As currently planned, the SSMRP will be completed in September, 1984. This document presents the program plan for work to be done during the remainder of the program. In Phase I of the SSMRP, the necessary tools (both computer codes and data bases) for performing a detailed seismic risk analysis were identified and developed. Demonstration calculations were performed on the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. In the remainder of the program (Phase II) work will be concentrated on developing a simplified SSMRP methodology for routine probabilistic risk assessments, quantitative validation of the tools developed and application of the simplified methodology to a Boiling Water Reactor. (The Zion plant is a pressurized water reactor.) In addition, considerable effort will be devoted to making the codes and data bases easily accessible to the public.

Bohn, M.P.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cover, L.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Shieh, L.C.; Shukla, S.N.; Wells, J.E.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control-concrete composite structures; Material properties variability; Seismic design; capacity design. 1 GENERAL CONTEXT

Boyer, Edmond

459

Correlelations between the Anomalous Behaviour of the Ionosphere and the Seismic Events for VTX-MALDA VLF Propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important application of the VLF signals is that it contains possible information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In other words, in near future, it may be possible to predict seismic events by judging signatures of VLF signals. In this paper, we present the result of the monitoring of the VLF signals collected in the Malda branch of ICSP, located in Malda, West Bengal, for four years (2005, 2007-09) and we try to find out the co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes. Here we use that VLF signals which are transmitted from the VTX station (18.2 KHz), located near Vijayanarayanam in Tamilnadu, about 2290 km away from the receiver. To find out the co-relation of the ionospheric activities with the seismic events such as earthquake, first we have to study the average signal throughout the year. For this, we plot the so-called standardized calibration curve using the four years data. Here we use a total of 481 no. of data. To establish the co-relation between the ionospheric activities and the seismic events, we use the data of the year 2008 and we found that the deviations of the anomalous data are co-related with the seismic event. We found that the highest deviation takes place one day prior to the seismic events. We also calculated the 'D-layer preparation time'(DLPT) and the 'D-layer disappearance time'(DLDT) for the data of 2008 and tried to establish the co-relation between the anomalous DLPT and DLDT with the