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1

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical interaction of thermal fluids with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah, has resulted in the development of characteristic trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional perspective of chemical redistribution within this structurally-controlled hot-water geothermal system. Five distinctive elemental suites of chemical enrichment are

2

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal System Hydrothermal System (Redirected from Hydrothermal Systems) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in

3

Cody hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hot springs of Colter's Hell are the surface manifestations of a much larger hydothermal system. That system has been studied to define its extent, maximum temperature, and mechanism of operation. The study area covers 2700 km/sup 2/ (1040 mi/sup 2/) in northwest Wyoming. Research and field work included locating and sampling the hot springs, geologic mapping, thermal logging of available wells, measuring thermal conductivities, analyzing over 200 oil and gas well bottom-hole temperatures, and compiling and analyzing hydrologic data. These data were used to generate a model for the hydrothermal system.

Heasler, H.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Hydrothermal) (Redirected from Hydrothermal) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in one-third to one-half of the cost of a geothermal project. Copyright ©

5

Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Systems: A hydrothermal system is one that included fluid, heat, and permeability in a naturally occurring geological formation for the production of electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Geothermal production well at Imperial Valley, California. The drilling of production wells, such as this one in southern California, results in one-third to one-half of the cost of a geothermal project. Copyright ©

6

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

7

Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount Rainier, Washington Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A once massive hydrothermal system was disgorged from the summit of Mount Rainier in a highly destructive manner about 5000 years ago. Today, hydrothermal processes are depositing clayey alteration products that have the potential to reset the stage for similar events in the future. Areas of active hydrothermal alteration occur in three representative settings: 1. (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m2) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82°C at

8

A national drilling program to study the roots of active hydrothermal systems related to young magmatic intrusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The importance of studies of active hydrothermal-magma systems as part of a national continental scientific drilling program has been emphasized in numerous workshops and symposia. The present report, prepared by the Panel on Thermal Regimes of the Continental Scientific Drilling Committee, both reinforces and expands on earlier recommendations. The US Geodynamics Committee 1979 report of the Los Almos workshop, Continental Scientific Drilling Program, placed major emphasis on maximizing the scientific value of current and planned drilling by industry and government, supplementing these efforts with holes drilled solely for scientific purposes. Although the present report notes the importance of opportunities for scientific investigations that may be added on to current, mission-oriented drilling activities, the Panel on Thermal Regimes recognizes that such opportunities are limited and thus focused its study on holes dedicated to broad scientific objectives. 16 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems in the western U.S. utilizing newly-discovered near-infrared spectral properties. Knowledge of the origin and mineralogic relations of ammonium minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic analysis of ammonium minerals from two mercury- and gold-bearing

10

What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

12

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

13

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of

16

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern...

17

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic...

19

Hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10,000 B.P., into a thermal regime representing 100,000 years of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those observed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drill holes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hydrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old.

Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Duration of hydrothermal activity at Steamboat Springs, Nevada, from ages of spatially associated volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steamboat Springs is a presently active equivalent of epithermal gold-silver ore-forming systems. Hot-spring sinter deposits contain small amounts of gold, silver, mercury, antimony, and arsenic. Hot-spring activity probably started before extrusion of the basaltic andesite of Steamboat Springs. Old sinter from the Steamboat Springs system occurs in gravels above and below the basaltic andesite. Intense hydrothermal alteration, including almost complete replacement by hydrothermal potassium-feldspar, has affected the basaltic andesite. Three plagioclase separates of differing potassium content from fresh basaltic andesite yielded potassium-argon ages of 2.52 to 2.55 m.y. Basaltic andesite almost completely replaced by potassium-feldspar yielded an age of 1.1 m.y. The source of energy for the thermal convection system is probably a large rhyolitic magma chamber that supplied the pumice and from which the rhyolite domes were emplaced. Sanidine and obsidian from four of the rhyolite domes yielded potassium-argon ages of 1.15 to 1.52 m.y. and obsidian from one of the northeastern domes yielded apparent ages of 2.97 and 3.03 m.y. The data indicate that hydrothermal activity has occurred at Steamboat Springs, possibly intermittently, for more than 2-1/2 m.y. These data agree with other radiogenic age studies indicating 1- and 2-m.y. lifetimes for the hydrothermal systems that generate epithermal gold-silver deposits.

Silberman, M.L.; White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Dockter, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Periodic deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities observed by hydrophones at Mariana, Okinawa, and Mid?Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities were studied done by digital OBS/Hs(Ocean Bottom Seismometer / Hydrophone) at three hydrothermal vent areas

Kasahara Junzo; Sato Toshinori; Nishizawa Azusa; Fujioka Kantaro

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

24

Contact zones and hydrothermal systems as analogues to repository conditions  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste isolation efforts in the US are currently focused on examining basalt, tuff, salt, and crystalline rock as candidate rock types to encompass waste repositories. As analogues to near-field conditions, the distributions of radio- and trace-elements have been examined across contacts between these rocks and dikes and stocks that have intruded them. The intensive study of the Stripa quartz monzonite has also offered the opportunity to observe the distribution of uranium and its daughters in groundwater and its relationship to U associated with fracture-filling and alteration minerals. Investigations of intrusive contact zones to date have included (1) a tertiary stock into Precambrian gneiss, (2) a stock into ash flow tuff, (3) a rhyodacite dike into Columbia River basalt, and (4) a kimberlite dike into salt. With respect to temperature and pressure, these contact zones may be considered "worst-case scenario" analogues. Results indicate that there has been no appreciable migration of radioelements from the more radioactive intrusives into the less radioactive country rocks, either in response to the intrusions or in the fracture-controlled hydrological systems that developed following emplacement. In many cases, the radioelements are locked up in accessory minerals, suggesting that artificial analogues to these would make ideal waste forms. Emphasis should now shift to examination of active hydrothermal systems, studying the distribution of key elements in water, fractures, and alteration minerals under pressure and temperature conditions most similar to those expected in the near-field environment of a repository. 14 refs.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Flow and permeability structure of the Beowawe, Nevada hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of past geologic, geochemical, hydrological, pressure transient, and reservoir engineering studies of Beowawe suggests a different picture of the reservoir than previously presented. The Beowawe hydrothermal contains buoyant thermal fluid dynamically balanced with overlying cold water, as shown by repeated temperature surveys and well test results. Thermal fluid upwells from the west of the currently developed reservoir at the intersection of the Malpais Fault and an older structural feature associated with mid-Miocene rifting. A tongue of thermal fluid rises to the east up the high permeability Malpais Fault, discharges at the Geysers area, and is in intimate contact with overlying cooler water. The permeability structure is closely related to the structural setting, with the permeability of the shallow hydrothermal system ranging from 500 to 1,000 D-ft, while the deeper system ranges from 200 to 400 D-ft.

Faulder, D.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, S.D.; Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Power Services, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High-temperature hydrothermal systems in West Yunnan Province, China  

SciTech Connect

There are more than 660 thermal springs in West Yunnan Province, 30 of which are high-temperature hydrothermal systems with reservoir temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. All thermal springs in West Yunnan are under the control of tectonics, most of them distributed at anticlinoria of metamorphic rocks and granites. This paper discusses the relationship between thermal areas and tectonics, the correlation between thermal springs in West Yunnan and North Thailand, and the geothermal prospects in West Yunnan.

Laio, Z.; Tong, W.; Liu, S.; Zhao, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hydrothermal industrialization electric-power systems development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nature of hydrothermal resources, their associated temperatures, geographic locations, and developable capacity are described. The parties involved in development, required activities and phases of development, regulatory and permitting requirements, environmental considerations, and time required to complete development activities ae examined in detail. These activities are put in proper perspective by detailing development costs. A profile of the geothermal industry is presented by detailing the participants and their operating characteristics. The current development status of geothermal energy in the US is detailed. The work on market penetration is summarized briefly. Detailed development information is presented for 56 high temperature sites. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Design of novel hybrid controller for automatic generation control of hydrothermal system under open market scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of Automatic generation control (AGC) of a two-area hydrothermal system under open market scenario by considering a novel hybrid controller which combines the principles of variable structure controller (VSC) and conventional ... Keywords: AGC, VSC, deregulated system, hybrid controller, hydrothermal system, open market system

C. Srinivasa Rao; S. Siva Nagaraju; P. Sangameswara Raju

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than during the deposition of natural calcite-opal deposits.

S. Levy

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

The hydrothermal system in central Twin Falls County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study to define the areal extent and thickness of the hydrothermal reservoir in Twin Falls County and to propose a generalized conceptual model of the system. Specific objectives of the study, done in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, were to evaluate the existing resource as to its volume, temperature, pressure, and water chemistry, and to determine the effects of present development on the resource. The study was limited to Twin Falls County. Some geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the hydrothermal system were available from earlier studies. However, information about the subsurface at depths greater than 1000 feet was sparse. One well for which data were available was drilled to 2525 feet; several others were drilled to depths between 1200 and 2200 feet. Direct-current electrical resistivity soundings conducted during the summer of 1985 as part of the study provided valuable information about the subsurface at depths less than about 6000 feet. Interpretation of computer-generated subsurface profiles constructed from the soundings provided the basis for determining the thickness of the Idavada Volcanics over much of the study area. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Exploration strategy for high-temperature hydrothermal systems in Basin and Range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-phase strategy of exploration for high-temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the Basin and Range province features a balanced mix of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, hydrologic, and drilling activities. The strategy, based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program, provides justification for inclusion or exclusion of all pertinent exploration methods. With continuing research on methods of exploration for, and modeling of, convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. The basic strategy may vary with the geology or hydrology. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy should be particularly useful; many of its elements may apply in other geologic settings.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Strategy of exploration for high temperature hydrothermal systems in the basin and range province  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fifteen phase strategy of exploration for high temperature convective hydrothermal resources in the basin and range province, recommended herein, features a balanced mix of geological, geochemical, geophysical, hydrological, and drilling activities. The strategy is based on a study of data submitted under the Department of Energy's Industry Coupled Case Study Program. Justification for inclusion in or exclusion from the strategy of all pertinent geoscientific methods is given. With continuing research on methods of exploration for and modeling of convective hydrothermal systems, this strategy is expected to change and become more cost-effective with time. Variations on the basic strategy are to be expected where the geology or hydrology requires it. Personal preferences, budgetary constraints, time and land position constraints, and varied experience may cause industrial geothermal exploration managers to differ with our strategy. For those just entering geothermal exploration, the strategy is expected to be particularly useful.

Ward, S.H.; Ross, H.P.; Nielson, D.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal-magma systems: energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of five sites is being prepared as part of a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) review of thermal regimes for the purpose of scoping areas for future research and drilling activities. This background report: discusses the various energy transport processes likely to be encountered in a hydrothermal-magma system, reviews related literature, discusses research and field data needs, and reviews the sites from an energy transport viewpoint. At least three major zones exist in the magma-hydrothermal transport system: the magma zone, the hydrothermal zone, and the transition zone between the two. Major energy transport questions relate to the nature and existence of these zones and their evolution with time. Additional energy transport questions are concerned with the possible existence of critical state and super-critical state permeable convection in deep geothermal systems. A review of thermal transport models emphasizes the fact that present transport models and computational techniques far outweigh the scarcity and quality of deep field data.

Hardee, H.C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Modeling of the fault-controlled hydrothermal ore-forming systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary precondition for the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits is a strong focusing of hydrothermal flow as fluids move from the fluid source to the site of ore deposition. The spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposits favors the concept that such fluid flow focusing is controlled, for the most part, by regional faults which provide a low resistance path for hydrothermal solutions. Results of electric analog simulations, analytical solutions, and computer simulations of the fluid flow, in a fault-controlled single-pass advective system, confirm this concept. The influence of the fluid flow focusing on the heat and mass transfer in a single-pass advective system was investigated for a simplified version of the metamorphic model for the genesis of greenstone-hosted gold deposits. The spatial distribution of ore mineralization, predicted by computer simulation, is in reasonable agreement with geological observations. Computer simulations of the fault-controlled thermoconvective system revealed a complex pattern of mixing hydrothermal solutions in the model, which also simulates the development of the modern hydrothermal systems on the ocean floor. The specific feature of the model considered, is the development under certain conditions of an intra-fault convective cell that operates essentially independently of the large scale circulation. These and other results obtained during the study indicate that modeling of natural fault-controlled hydrothermal systems is instructive for the analysis of transport processes in man-made hydrothermal systems that could develop in geologic high-level nuclear waste repositories.

Pek, A.A.; Malkovsky, V.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Deep Borehole Measurements for Characterizing the Magma/Hydrothermal System at Long Valley Caldera, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magma Energy Program of the Geothermal Technology Division is scheduled to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in Long Valley Caldera, California in 1989. The drilling site is near the center of the caldera which is associated with numerous shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies. This deep well will present an unparalleled opportunity to test and validate geophysical techniques for locating magma as well as a test of the theory that magma is still present at drillable depths within the central portion of the caldera. If, indeed, drilling indicates magma, the geothermal community will then be afforded the unique possibility of examining the coupling between magmatic and hydrothermal regimes in a major volcanic system. Goals of planned seismic experiments that involve the well include the investigation of local crustal structure down to depths of 10 km as well as the determination of mechanisms for local seismicity and deformation. Borehole electrical and electromagnetic surveys will increase the volume and depth of rock investigated by the well through consideration of the conductive structure of the hydrothermal and underlying regimes. Currently active processes involving magma injection will be studied through observation of changes in pore pressure and strain. Measurements of in situ stress from recovered cores and hydraulic fracture tests will be used in conjunction with uplift data to determine those models for magmatic injection and inflation that are most applicable. Finally, studies of the thermal regime will be directed toward elucidating the coupling between the magmatic source region and the more shallow hydrothermal system in the caldera fill. To achieve this will require careful logging of borehole fluid temperature and chemistry. In addition, studies of rock/fluid interactions through core and fluid samples will allow physical characterization of the transition zone between hydrothermal and magmatic regimes.

Carrrigan, Charles R.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Abstract Data collected since 1985 from test drilling, fluid sampling, and geologic and geophysical investigations provide a clearer definition of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera than was previously available. This information confirms the existence of high-temperature (> 200°C) reservoirs within the volcanic fill in parts of the west moat. These

39

Faults and gravity anomalies over the East Mesa hydrothermal-geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed interpretations of gravity anomalies over geothermal systems may be extremely useful for mapping the fracture or fault systems that control the circulation of the thermal waters. This approach seems to be particularly applicable in areas like the Salton Trough where reactions between the thermal waters and the porous sediments produce authigenic-hydrothermal minerals in sufficient quantity to cause distinct gravity anomalies at the surface. A 3-D inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity anomaly over the East Mesa geothermal field was made to examine the densified volume of rock. We show that the data not only resolve a north-south and an intersecting northwest structure, but that it may be possible to distinguish between the active present-day hydrothermal system and an older and cooler part of the system. The densified region is compared spatially to self-potential, thermal and seismic results and we find a good concordance between the different geophysical data sets. Our results agree with previous studies that have indicated that the main feeder fault recharging the East Mesa reservoir dips steeply to the west.

Goldstein, N.E.; Carle, S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Daily combined economic emission scheduling of hydrothermal systems with cascaded reservoirs using self organizing hierarchical particle swarm optimization technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily optimum economic emission scheduling of hydrothermal systems is an important task in the operation of power systems. Many heuristic techniques such as differential evolution, and particle swarm optimization have been applied to solve this problem ... Keywords: Cascaded reservoirs, Combined economic emission scheduling (CEES), Hydrothermal systems, Self-organizing particle swarm optimization with time-varying acceleration coefficients (SOHPSO_TVAC)

K. K. Mandal; N. Chakraborty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Heat flow in relation to hydrothermal activity in the southern Black Rock Desert, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an investigation of the Gerlach NE KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) a number of heat-flow measurements were made in playa sediments of the southern Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. These data together with additional previously unpublished heat-flow values reveal a complex pattern of heat flow with values ranging between 1.0 to 5.0 HFU (40 to 100 mWm/sup -2/) outside of the hot springs area. The mean heat flow for the 13 reported sites in the southern Black Rock Desert is 1.8 +- 0.15 HFU (75 +- 6 mWm/sup -2/). The complexity of the pattern of heat flow is believed to arise from hydrothermal circulation supporting the numerous hot springs throughout the region. The fact that the lowest observed heat flow occurs in the deepest part of the basin strongly suggests that fluid movement within the basin represents part of the recharge for the hydrothermal system. A thermal balance for the system incorporating both anomalous conductive heat loss and convective heat loss from the spring systems indicate a total energy loss of about 8.0 Mcal/sec or 34 megawatts over an estimated 1000 km/sup 2/ region. Consideration of this additional heat loss yields a mean regional heat flow of 2.5 + HFU (100 + mWm/sup -2/) and warrants inclusion of this region in the Battle Mountain heat-flow high (Lachenbruch and Sass, 1977, 1978).

Sass, J.H.; Zoback, M.L.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal experiments on the partitioning of HCl and copper chloride in the system silicate melt-hydrosaline liquid-aqueous vapor are described. Modelling of the aqueous phase evolution process is discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and extensive travertine deposits have developed in these more distant localities. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration minerals and fluids...

48

New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (9) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Data collected since 1985 from test drilling, fluid sampling, and geologic and geophysical investigations provide a clearer...

49

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal-magma systems: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of five potential hydrothermal-magma sites for this facet of the Thermal Regimes part of the CSDP has been prepared for the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The five sites are: The Geysers-Clear Lake, CA, Long Valley, CA, Rio Grande Rift, NM, Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT, and Salton Trough, CA. This site assessment study has drawn together background information (geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and energy transport) on the five sites as a preliminary stage to site selection. Criteria for site selection are that potential sites have identifiable, or likely, hydrothermal systems and associated magma sources, and the important scientific questions can be identified and answered by deep scientific holes. Recommendations were made.

Luth, W.C.; Hardee, H.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (andor deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal analyses of...

51

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology...

52

Characterization of hydrothermal systems using simulated HyspIRI data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a proposed NASA satellite remote sensing system combining a visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer with over 200 spectral bands between 0.38--2.5 micrometers and an 8-band thermal infrared ...

Fred A. Kruse; J. V. Taranik; W. M. Calvin; J. Michaels; E. F. Littlefield; M. Coolbaugh; B. A. Martini

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrothermal Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Hydrothermal Alteration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Alteration Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Alteration: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Opalized rock is often valued for its spectacular colors and it may indicate past hydrothermal activity (reference: https://uwaterloo.ca/earth-sciences-museum/what-earth/what-earth-minerals/what-earth-precious-opal) The heat and minerals of hydrothermal waters may result in the chemical alteration of rocks that it comes in contact with. The minerals that result from this alteration may be evidence of past hydrothermal activity. Opalization - alteration to opal. Argillization- alteration to clay minerals such as smectite, illite, and kaolinite which often form caprocks.

55

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Possible evidence for fluid-rock oxygen isotope disequilibrium in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is ample evidence from geothermal systems that isotope temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope fractionation between alteration phases and coexisting aquifer fluids agree closely with measured bore-hole temperatures. Similar, but limited evidence is found in epithermal vein deposits where isotopes temperature agree well with fluid inclusion homogenization temperature. Conversely, many hydrothermal systems exhibit varying degrees of fluid-rock oxygen isotope equilibration. There appears to be a crude relationship between increasing degree of equilibrium and increasing temperature and salinity. The observed variations in the degree of exchange may have resulted from local, self-sealing of the fracture network prior to equilibration. The ability for fracture to remain open or to propogate allowing continued fluid flow may be the deciding factor in the attainment of isotopic equilibration.

Cole, D.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Indications of mineral zoning in a fossil hydrothermal system at the Meager Creek geothermal prospect, British Columbia, Canada, from induced polarization studies  

SciTech Connect

By measuring the induced-polarization parameters m (chargeability) and tau (time-constant) we have found evidence that the center of a presumed fossil hydrothermal system at Meager Creek, British Columbia, lies south of the main manifestation of the present-day convective hydrothermal system. What implication this finding has for development of the present-day system is unknown. However, some of the fractures formed during the development of the fossil hydrothermal system may serve as conduits for fluids of the present-day system. The analysis is limited by the lack of availability of a good subsurface distribution of core samples. Nevertheless, a surface induced-polarization survey is expected to yield information about the geometry of the fossil system. Such knowledge would have implications not only for Meager Creek but for other hydrothermal systems of Cascades volcano type. 16 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Ward, S.H.; Zhao, J.X.; Groenwald, J.; Moore, J.N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

White, A.F.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

flow-controlling fractures; (5) deposits of CaCO3 at depth where flashing of brine to steam has occurred due to pressure release. The geochemical enrichments are not, in...

62

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Surface-discharging hydrothermal systems at Yucca Mountain: Examining the evidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses exposures of altered rock that have been thought to form by recent discharge of water from depth. They were examined to address a concern that hydrothermal processes could compromise the isolation capability of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Suspected hot-spring and hydrothermal-vent deposits are more likely the products of infiltration of meteoric water into newly deposited and still-hot pyroclastic flows >12 Myr ago.

Levy, S.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

65

Stochastic Lagrangian relaxation applied to power scheduling in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dynamic (multi-stage) stochastic programming model for the weekly cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal generation system under uncertain load is developed. The model involves a large number of mixed-integer (stochastic) decision variables and constraints linking time periods and operating power units. Astochastic Lagrangian relaxation scheme is designed by assigning (stochastic) multipliers to all constraints coupling power units. It is assumed that the stochastic load process is given (or approximated) by a nite number of realizations (scenarios) in scenario tree form. Solving the dual by a bundle subgradient method leads to a successive decomposition into stochastic single (thermal or hydro) unit subproblems. The stochastic thermal and hydro subproblems are solved by astochastic dynamic programming technique and by a speci c descent algorithm, respectively. A Lagrangian heuristics that provides approximate solutions for the rst stage (primal) decisions starting from the optimal (stochastic) multipliers is developed. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility andfornumbers of scenarios ranging from 5 to 100 and a time horizon from 7 to 9 days. The sizes of the corresponding optimization problems go up to 200.000 binary and 350.000 continuous variables, and more than 500.000 constraints.

M. P. Nowak; W. Rmisch

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Power management in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty by Lagrangian relaxation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a dynamic multistage stochastic programming model for the cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty in load, inflow to reservoirs and prices for fuel and delivery contracts. The stochastic load process is approximated by a scenario tree obtained by adapting a SARIMA model to historical data, using empirical means and variances of simulated scenarios to construct an initial tree, and reducing it by a scenario deletion procedure based on a suitable probability distance. Our model involves many mixed-integer variables and individual power unit constraints, but relatively few coupling constraints. Hence we employstochastic Lagrangian relaxation that assigns stochastic multipliers to the coupling constraints. Solving the Lagrangian dual by a proximal bundle method leads to successive decomposition into single thermal and hydro unit subproblems that are solved by dynamic programming and a specialized descent algorithm, respectively. The optimal stochastic multipliers are used in Lagrangian heuristics to construct approximately optimal first stage decisions. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility, with a time horizon of one week and scenario numbers ranging from 5 to 100. The corresponding optimization problems have up to 200,000 binary and 350,000 continuous variables, and more than 500,000 constraints.

Nicole Grwe-Kuska; Krzysztof C. Kiwiel; Matthias P. Nowak; Werner Rmisch; Isabel Wegner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

68

Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

WoldeGabriel, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal outflow occurs most commonly at the terminations of individual faults and where multiple faults interact. These areas of fault propagation and interaction are sites of elevated stress termed breakdown regions. Here, stress concentrations cause active fracturing and continual re-opening of fluid-flow conduits, permitting long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As

70

Influence of activity of CaSO4 ? 2H2O on hydrothermal formation of CaSO4 ? 0.5H2O whiskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theinfluence of the activity of calciumsulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 ? 2H2O) on the hydrothermal formation of CaSO4 ?0.5H2O whiskers was investigated in this paper, using commercial CaSO4 ? ...

S. C. Hou, L. Xiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And Siliclastic Rocks In The Valles Caldera With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drill hole VC-2B (total depth 1761.7 m (5780 ft); maximum temperature 295°C) was continuously cored through the Sulphur Springs hydrothermal system in the western ring-fracture zone of the 1.14 Ma Valles caldera. Among other units, the hole penetrated 760.2 m (2494.1 ft) of Paleozoic carbonate and

72

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 23-m.y.-old, fossil meteoric-hydrothermal system in the Lake City caldera (11 _ 14 km) has been mapped out by measuring Δ 18O values of 300 rock and mineral samples. Δ 18O varies systematically throughout the caldera, reaching values as low as -2. Great topographic relief, regional tilting, and variable degrees of erosion within the caldera all combine to give us a very complete section through the hydrothermal system, from the

73

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Seventeen K/Ar dates were obtained on illitic clays within Valles caldera (1.13 Ma) to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on Quaternary to Precambrian intracaldera and pre-caldera rocks in a large,

74

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evolution Of Hydrothermal Waters At Mount St Helens, Washington, Usa Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal water samples at Mount St. Helens collected between 1985 and 1989 and in 1994 are used to identify water types and describe their evolution through time. Two types of low temperature hydrothermal systems are associated with the 1980 eruptions and were initiated soon after emplacement of shallow magma and pyroclastic flows. The Loowit hot spring system is located in the breach zone and is associated with the magma conduit and nearby avalanche deposits, whereas the Pumice Plain (PP)

75

Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

elevated stress termed breakdown regions. Here, stress concentrations cause active fracturing and continual re-opening of fluid-flow conduits, permitting long-lived hydrothermal...

76

Comparative assessment of five potential sites for magma: hydrothermal systems - geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a comparative assessment for the Continental Scientific Drilling Program, geophysical data were used, to characterize and evaluate potential magma-hydrothermal targets at five drill sites in the western United States. The sites include Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico, and The Geysers-Clear Lake, Long Valley, and Salton Trough areas, California. This summary discusses the size, depth, temperature, and setting of each potential target, as well as relvant scientific questions about their natures and the certainty of their existence.

Kasameyer, P.

1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hydrothermal research and development assessment. Task force report: projections for electric systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is estimated that high temperature (greater than 150/sup 0/C or 300/sup 0/F) hydrothermal resources in the western United States have the potential for producing about 140,000 megawatts of electric power for 30 years. The objectives of the present analysis were to realistically evaluate the extent to which these resources might be utilized over the next 20 years, and to assess the probably impact of Federal programs on that utilization. The R and D assessment team interviewed industry personnel to determine the nature and the relative significance of investment decision criteria for developers and utilities. The results of these interviews were used to develop a probabilistic model to simulate the investment decision behavior of these two groups toward hydrothermal resources. Estimations of the characteristics of anticipated available resources (e.g., temperature, salinity, depth) and predictions of the geographic distribution of new resource discoveries were based upon the characteristics and distribution of known reservoirs. The impact of a minimal R and D program and the impact of expanded R and D program were estimated on the basis of its effect upon industry investment decision criteria (e.g., the cost of power). The Task Force estimates comparing three different scenarios: (1) no program, (2) minimal R and D, and (3) expanded R and D are presented.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Cellular Automata Breccia Simulator (CABS) and its application to rounding in hydrothermal breccias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution processes are ubiquitous in surficial and hydrothermal environments. Solution breccias are formed when dissolution processes dominate and are widely observed in hydrothermal systems. Distinct fragment shapes develop during dissolution and ... Keywords: Breccias, Cellular automata, Hydrothermal alteration, Numerical modelling, Simulation

M. Lalonde; G. Tremblay; M. Jbrak

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Selected geothermal resources data: hydrothermal convection systems in the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's research and land classification programs, from professional publications, and industry sources has been compiled in computer format. Location, surface manifestations, chemistry, physical properties, exploratory and development work, and references pertinent to 290 hydrothermal convection systems comprise the data base.

Renner, J.L.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions. The helium isotopic compositions of fluids produced from the Dixie Valley geothermal field range from 0.70 to 0.76 Ra, are among the highest values in the valley, and indicate that similar to 7.5% of the total helium is derived from the mantle. A lack of recent volcanics or other potential sources requires flow of mantle-derived helium up along the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An Optimization-Based Algorithm for Scheduling Hydrothermal Power Systems with Cascaded Reservoirs and Discrete Hydro Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An optimization-based algorithm is presented for the short-term scheduling of hydrothermal power systems using the Lagrangian relaxation technique. This paper concentrates on the solution methodology for hydro subproblems with cascaded reservoirs and discrete hydro constraints. Continuous reservoir dynamics and constraints, discontinuous operating regions, discrete operating states, and hydraulic coupling of cascaded reservoirs are considered in an integrated fashion. The key idea is to substitute out the reservoir dynamics and to relax the reservoir level constraints by using another set of multipliers, making a hydro subproblem unit-wise and stage-wise decomposable. The optimal generation level for each operating state at each hour can be obtained simply by minimizing a single variable function. Dynamic programming is then applied to optimize the operating states across the planning horizon with a small number of well-structured transitions. A modified subgradient algorithm is used...

Xiaohong Guan; Ernan Ni; Renhou Li; Peter B. Luh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

Norton, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A two-stage planning model for power scheduling in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A two-stage stochastic programming model for the short- or mid-term cost-optimal electric power production planning is developed. We consider the power generation in a hydro-thermal generation system under uncertainty in demand (or load) and prices for fuel and delivery contracts. The model involves a large number of mixed-integer (stochastic) decision variables and constraints linking time periods and operating power units. A stochastic Lagrangian relaxation scheme is designed by assigning (stochastic) multipliers to all constraints that couple power units. It is assumed that the stochastic load and price processes are given (or approximated) by a finite number of realizations (scenarios). Solving the dual by a bundle subgradient method leads to a successive decomposition into stochastic single unit subproblems. The stochastic thermal and hydro subproblems are solved by a stochastic dynamic programming technique and by a specific descent algorithm, respectively. A Lagrangian heuristics that provides approximate solutions for the primal problem is developed. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility and for numbers of scenarios ranging from 5 to 100 and a time horizon of 168 hours. The sizes of the corresponding optimization problems go up to 400.000 binary and 650.000 continuous variables, and more than 1.300.000 constraints. Keywords: stochastic programming, Lagrangian relaxation, unit commitment

Robert Nrnberg; Werner Rmisch

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Hydrothermal Program is to develop concepts which allow better utilization of geothermal energy to reduce the life-cycle cost of producing electricity from liquid-dominated, hydrothermal resources. Research in the program is currently ongoing in three areas: (1) Heat Cycle Research, which is looking at methods to increase binary plant efficiencies; (2) Materials Development, which is developing materials for use in geothermal associated environments; and (3) Advanced Brine Chemistry, with work taking place in both the brine chemistry modeling area and waste disposal area. The presentations during this session reviewed the accomplishments and activities taking place in the hydrothermal energy conversion program. Lawrence Kukacka, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made to develop materials for use in geothermal applications. This research has identified a large number of potential materials for use in applications from pipe liners that inhibit scale buildup and reduce corrosion to elastomers for downhole use. Carl J. Bliem, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, discussed preparations currently underway to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. The research will evaluate whether the projected 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Eugene T. Premuzic, Brookhaven National Laboratory, discussed advancements being made using biotechnology for treatment of geothermal residual waste; the various process options were discussed in terms of biotreatment variables. A treatment scenario and potential disposal costs were presented. John H. Weare, University of California, San Diego, discussed the present capabilities of the brine chemistry model he has developed for geothermal applications and the information it can provide a user. This model is available to industry. The accomplishments from the research projects presented in this session have been many. It is hoped that these accomplishments can be integrated into industrial geothermal power plant sites to assist in realizing the goal of reducing the cost of energy produced from the geothermal resource.

Robertson, David W.; LaSala, Raymond J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

Elliott, Douglas C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hydrothermal spallation drilling and advanced energy conversion technologies for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to study the various factors affecting the economic and technical feasibility of Engineered Geothermal Systems, with a special emphasis on advanced drilling technologies. The first part of ...

Augustine, Chad R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

Goff, F.; Waters, A.C. (eds.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

90

Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

92

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND...

93

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

94

Are there significant hydrothermal resources in the US part of the Cascade Range?  

SciTech Connect

The Cascade Range is a geothermal dichotomy. On the one hand, it is an active volcanic arc above a subducting plate and is demonstrably an area of high heat flow. On the other hand, the distribution of hydrothermal manifestations compared to other volcanic arcs is sparse, and the hydrothermal outflow calculated from stream chemistry is low. Several large estimates of undiscovered geothermal resources in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range prepared in the 1970s and early 1980s were based fundamentally on two models of the upper crust. One model assumed that large, partly molten, intrusive bodies exist in the upper 10 km beneath major volcanic centers and serve as the thermal engines driving overlying hydrothermal systems. The other model interpreted the coincident heat-flow and gravity gradients west of the Cascade crest in central Oregon to indicate a partly molten heat source at 10 {+-} 2 km depth extending {approx}30 km west from the axis of the range. Investigations of the past ten years have called both models into question. Large long-lived high-temperature hydrothermal systems at depths <3 km in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range appear to be restricted to silicic domefields at the Lassen volcanic center, Medicine Lake volcano, Newberry volcano, and possibly the Three Sisters. Federal land-use restrictions further reduce this list to Medicine Lake and Newberry. Dominantly andesitic stratocones appear to support only small transitory hydrothermal systems related to small intrusive bodies along the volcanic conduits. The only young caldera, at Crater Lake, supports only low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems. Most of the Cascade Range comprises basaltic andesites and has little likelihood for high-level silicic intrusions and virtually no potential for resultant large high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Undiscovered hydrothermal resources of the Cascade Range of the United States are substantially lower than previous estimates. The range does have potential for intermediate-temperature hot dry rock and localized low- to intermediate-temperature hydrothermal systems.

Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Guffanti, Marianne

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

Ballantyne, J.M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Particle swarm optimization technique based short-term hydrothermal scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle swarm optimization is applied to determine the optimal hourly schedule of power generation in a hydrothermal power system. A multi-reservoir cascaded hydroelectric system with a nonlinear relationship between water discharge rate, net head and ... Keywords: Cascaded reservoirs, Hydrothermal scheduling, Particle swarm optimization

K. K. Mandal; M. Basu; N. Chakraborty

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Portable active interrogation system.  

SciTech Connect

The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.); Brener, M. W. (Mathieu W.); Hollas, C. L. (Charles L.); Myers, W. L. (William L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation,...

100

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 87Sr/86Sr values of thermal waters and hydrothermal calcites of the Long Valley caldera geothermal system are more radiogenic than those of young intracaldera volcanic rocks. Five thermal waters display 87Sr/86Sr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

Currier, R.P. [comp.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Current California legislative and regulatory activity impacting geothermal hydrothermal commercialization: monitoring report No. 3. Report No. 1023  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current legislative activity covers the following: federal funds, state financial incentives, air quality bills, transmission line access, state energy agency reorganization, and state energy taxes. Current regulatory activities of the California Energy Commission, and the Lake County Air Pollution Control District are reviewed. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrothermal Systems as Indicators of Paleoclimate: an Example from the Great Basin, Western North America G.B. Arehart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by other chemical tests and can be eliminated from any data set that relates to meteoric water Tonopah F 19.0 -90 -112 Rain A 20.0 -141 -141 Rain A 20.7 -125 -125 Wonder F 22.0 -139 -139 Preble A 23.H., Presser, T.S. and Evans, W.C. 1983. Geochemistry of active geothermal systems in northern Basin and Range

Arehart, Greg B.

104

hydrothermal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrothermal hydrothermal Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords biopower csp geothermal hydropower hydrothermal Renewable Energy Technical Potential rooftop United States utility-scale wind Data text/csv icon United States Renewable Energy Technical Potential (csv, 7.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote

105

Selected data for hydrothermal-convection systems in the United States with estimated temperatures greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C: back-up data for US Geological Survey Circular 790  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compilation of data used in determining the accessible resource base for identified hydrothermal convection systems greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C in the United States are presented. Geographic, geologic, chemical, isotopic, volumetric, and bibliographic data and calculated thermal energy contents are listed for all vapor-dominated and hot-water systems with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than or equal to 90/sup 0/C and reservoir depths less than 3 km known to the authors in mid 1978. Data presented here is stored in the US Geological Survey's geothermal computer file GEOTHERM. Data for individual hydrothermal convection systems in each state are arranged geographically from north to south and west to east without regard to the type or temperature of the system. Locations of the systems and corresponding reference numbers are shown on map 1 accompanying US Geological Survey Circular 790.

Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Swanson, J.R.; Mabey, D.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Active metasomatism in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico: a telescoped low pressure/temperature metamorphic facies series  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, carbonate-cemented, quartzofeldspathic sediments of the Colorado River delta are being actively metasomatized into calc-silicate metamorphic rocks by reaction with alkali chloride brines between 200/sup 0/ and 370/sup 0/C, low fluid and lithostatic pressures, and low oxygen fugacities. Petrologic investigations of drill cores and cutting from over 50 wells in this field identified a prograde series of calc-silicate mineral zones which include as index minerals: wairakite, epidote, prehnite, and clinopyroxene. Associated divariant mineral assemblages are indicative of a very low pressure/temperature metamorphic facies series which encompasses the clay-carbonate, zeolite, greenschist, and amphibolite facies. This hydrothermal metamorphic facies series, which is becoming increasingly recognized in other active geothermal systems, is characterized by temperature-telescoped dehydration and decarbonation mineral equilibria. Its equivalent should now be sought in fossil hydrothermal systems.

Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.; Bird, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrothermal energy extraction, Auburn, New York: Final report: Volume 2, Chapters 6-10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses a hydrothermal energy extraction system in detail. General topics covered are: Reservoir circulation loop; HVAC buffer loop; and automatic temperature control system. (LSP)

Castor, T.P.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Life and hydrothermal vents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and hydrothermal vents Life and hydrothermal vents Name: williamh Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Are there biological communities near hydrothermal vents in the ocean? Is there any life inside the hydrothermal vent? Replies: If the presence of microorganisms in hot springs and geysers are any indication, I am certain there is life inside hydrothermal vents. These heat loving organisms are termed "thermophiles" and thrive where other life dies. They are able to survive in extreme heat due to the unique way their proteins are synthesized. The May 1993 Discover has a special article on thermophiles. wizkid Life at high temperature became very interesting to molecular biologists recently. The enormously useful technique known as PCR, (polymerase chain reaction), by which very small amounts of rare DNA can be amplified to large concentrations (Jurassic Park!), depends on having a DNA polymerase (the enzyme that synthesizes complementary DNA strands during replication of chromosomes), that can work at high temperatures, or at least can survive repeated high temperature cycles. PCR depends on synthesis of DNA followed by forced separation of the daughter strands at high temperature, followed by new synthesis, to amplify DNA exponentially. At any rate, normal bacterial polymerase will not work because the high temperature cycles kill it. Enter the now infamous, patented Taq polymerase, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a hot spring bacterium, which works after heating to up to 94 C! So knowledge of life at high temperature allowed molecular biologists to get PCR to work, with all its benefits in cloning very rare genes and amplifying small amounts of DNA for forensic work etc.

110

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

111

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and temperature, Coso Hot Springs geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Petrographic and geochemical analyses of cuttings from six wells in the Coso Hot Springs geothermal field show a systematic variation in the occurrence, texture, and composition of sericite that can be correlated with high permeability production zones and temperature. The wells studied intersect rhyolitic dikes and sills in the fractured granitic and dioritic

112

Forecasting Electricity Prices in an Optimization Hydrothermal Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an economic dispatch algorithm in a hydrothermal system within the framework of a competitive and deregulated electricity market. The optimization problem of one firm is described

J. M. Matas; L. Bayn; P. Surez; A. Argelles; J. Taboada

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integrated model for the natural flow regime in the Cerro Prieto hydrothermal system, B. C. , Mexico, based upon petrological and isotope geochemical criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of cuttings and core at Cerro Prieto have now been extended to more than 50 boreholes. The aims of this petrological and isotopic work are to determine the shape of the reservoir, its physical properties, and its temperature distribution and flow regime before the steam field was produced. A map showing the first occurrence of hydrothermal epidote shows a dome-shaped top to the steam-producing zone. The hottest of the mapped mineral zones - the biotite vermiculite zone - shows a dome displaced to the northeast relative to the epidote zone. Patterns of mineral zones observed in wells are consistent with patterns of oxygen isotopic ratios in calcite and quartz. Using both criteria all of the boreholes so far studied were classified as belonging to one of four different regimes. These are: (a) the thermal plume of upward flowing water close to boiling, marked by a regular sequence of prograde mineral zones and large isotopic shifts; (b) the discharge system where fluid leaks to the surface, as indicated by the occurrence of only a few low temperature mineral zones, which extend over large depth intervals with little isotope exchange; (c) the horizontal flow zone, in which boreholes penetrate reversals of both mineral zones and isotope shifts with increasing depth; and (d) the recharge zone where cold water is descending. Plotting these four types of boreholes on a map reveals a simple, consistent, pattern. This is interpreted to have been produced by a thermal plume dipping at 45/sup 0/ to the northeast.

Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Hoagland, J.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The value of rolling horizon policies for risk-averse hydro-thermal ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 7, 2010 ... Abstract: We consider the optimal management of a hydro-thermal power system in the mid and long terms. From the optimization point of view,...

115

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Whole-rock oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active geothermal systems within the caldera. The deep Clay Pit-1 and Mammoth-1 wells on the resurgent dome

116

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal plant outages in a large hydro-thermal power supply system a method in probabilistic simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of large computers has made a significant impact upon decision theory with their ability to generate a large number of simulations within a relatively short period of time. Better estimates of a system's capabilities and parameters can be ...

Charles W. Eastwood

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

119

Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCI and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in modifying a model in which the halogen (Cl and F) concentration in the mineral apatite in mid-crustal silicic plutonic systems can be used to make estimates of magmatic Cl and F concentrations at the time apatite was crystallizing is reviewed briefly. (MHR)

Piccoli, P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

Pearl, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

Rush, F.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Isotope and fluid inclusion studies of geological and hydrothermal processes, northern Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mineralization in the Hualgayoc district of northern Peru occurs in altered Miocene felsic intrusions and in mid-Cretaceous platform sedimentary rocks of the Goyllarisquizga, Inca, and Chulec formations. The ores occur both as stratiform and stratabound pyritiferous base-metal deposits (mantos), and as steeply dipping, sedimentary and intrusive rock-hosted base-metal veins. Igneous rocks in the district are affected by propylytic, sericitic-argillic, sericitic, potassic, and acid-sulfate alteration. K-Ar and Rb-Sr dating and geological evidence indicate multiple stages of intrusive activity and hydrothermal alteration, including close spatial emplacement of two or more separate Miocene magmatic-hydrothermal systems. K-Ar dates on sericite, hydrothermal biotite, and alunite indicate that the most important hydrothermal episodes in the district took place {approx}13.24 and 12.4 Ma. Other K-Ar dates on altered rocks in the district may reflect various amounts of resetting by the emplacement of the 9.05 {+-} 0.2 Ma Hualgayoc rhyodacite. A five-point Rb-Sr isochron for the San Miguel intrusion at Cerro Coymolache yields an age of 45 {+-} 3.4 Ma, which indicates much earlier magmatic activity in this area than recognized previously. Fluid inclusion and paragenetic studies reveal a clear temporal evolution of fluid temperature and chemistry in the San Agustin area at Hualgayoc. Gradually, ore formation shifted to precipitation of vein minerals in the brittle fractures as the mantos became less permeable and were sealed off. Vein formation continued from progressively cooler and more diluted fluids (down to {approx}150{degrees}C and 4.3 wt% NaCl equivalent) as the system waned. No evidence for phase separation is observed in the fluids until the very last paragenetic stage, which contributed no economic mineralization. 53 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

MacFarlane, A.W. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Prol-Ledesma, R.M. [Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Conrad, M.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) Revealed By Geophysical And Geochemical Approaches- Implications For General Fluid Flow Models On Volcanoes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: On March 15th 2007 a paroxysmal explosion occurred at the Stromboli volcano. This event generated a large amount of products, mostly lithic blocks, some of which impacted the ground as far as down to 200 m a.s.l., about 1.5 km far away from the active vents. Two days after the

126

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

127

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Partial equilibrium conditions occur between fluids and secondary minerals in the Valles hydrothermal system, contained principally in the Tertiary rhyolitic Bandelier Tuff. The mass transfer processes are governed by reactive phase compositions, surface areas, water-rock ratios, reaction rates, and fluid residence times. Experimental dissolution of the vitric phase of the tuff was congruent with respect to Cl in the solid and

129

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an active imaging system which has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and a receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination wile eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The distribution of hydrothermal circulation within active volcanoes is of importance in identifying regions of hydrothermal alteration which may in turn control explosivity, slope stability and sector collapse. Self-potential measurements, indicative of fluid circulation, were made within the crater of Mount St. Helens in 2000 and

131

A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector...

132

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption Active Solar Heating and Cooling Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating...

133

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users...

134

Abstract--A stochastic dynamic programming hydrothermal dispatch model to simulate a bid-based market is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on dynamic programming that optimizes and validates the bid prices strategies for each power plant in a hydro-thermal, and simulating them as if they were a single power plant. In a hydro-thermal system as the one simulated several plants. Emphasis is given to hydro reservoir modeling and to the assessment of their market power

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

135

Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Securitys Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSPs current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

Robert Evans

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies to obtain thermal energy (and other benefits) from a large body of water #12;Microgrid Customer ENERGY : Underground Technologies #12;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water

139

Cyclic coordinate descent in hydrothermal nonsmooth problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an algorithm, inspired by the cyclic coordinate descent method, which allows the solution of hydrothermal optimization problems involving pumped-storage plants. The proof of the convergence of the succession generated by the ... Keywords: Coordinate descent, Hydrothermal coordination, Optimal control, Zangwill's theorem

Luis Bayn; Jose M. Grau; Maria M. Ruiz; Pedro M. Surez

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

142

Comparative economics of passive and active systems  

SciTech Connect

As the interest in solar energy applications for residential space heating grows, it becomes imperative to evaluate the economic performance of alternative designs. One passive design is concentrated on--the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design--the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals--income tax credits and low interest loans--upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis for the U.S., with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Results of acid treatments in hydrothermal direct heat experiment wells  

SciTech Connect

Matrix acid treatments have been employed in two low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal wells with successful results. These two wells showed flow rate increases of 40% and 50%. The increased flow reduced the payback periods for the heating systems to nearly one-half of what they were before acidization. It is recommended that well designs in certain areas consider accommodating such acid stimulation techniques, if testing suggests they are warranted as a well completion tool.

Strawn, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

147

Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated Populus slurries to support development of a high-throughput pretreatment system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011 Submit your nextStuder et al. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011, 4:19 http://Studer et al. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011, 4:19 http://

Studer, Michael H; Brethauer, Simone; DeMartini, Jaclyn D; McKenzie, Heather L; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Definition: Hydrothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made.1 References x Ret LikeLike...

149

Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

Peterson, Andrew A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mesoporous titania nanocrystals by hydrothermal template growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous TiO2 nanocrystals have been synthetized by a classical sol-gel route integrated by an hydrothermal growth step using monomeric (dodecylpyridinium chloride, DPC) or dimeric gemini-like (GS3) surfactants as template directing agents. ...

Giuseppe Cappelletti; Silvia Ardizzone; Francesca Spadavecchia; Daniela Meroni; Iolanda Biraghi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

Craddock, Paul R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

153

Potential impact of R and D on hydrothermal energy cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potentital impact of the DOE/Geothermal Technology Development programs on the cost of geothermal power has been estimated using the computer program IMGEO.300. Results indicate a potential 30 to 40% cost reduction for hydrothermal systems with a 40 to 50% cost reduction potential for binary systems. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate the use of IMGEO. The initial results are tentative because the R and D goals have not been finalized and the code has not been completely validated.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly (Orlando, FL); Rossin, Joseph A. (Columbus, OH); Knapke, Michael J. (Columbus, OH)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

Active dc filter for HVDC systems  

SciTech Connect

This article is a case history of the installation of active dc filters for high-performance, low-cost harmonics filtering at the Lindome converter station in the Konti-Skan 2 HVDC transmission link between Denmark and Sweden. The topics of the article include harmonics, interference, and filters, Lindome active dc filter, active dc filter design, digital signal processor, control scheme, protection and fault monitoring, and future applications.

Zhang, W. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Asplund, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Abstract The Valles caldera in New Mexico hosts a high-temperature geothermal system, which is manifested in a number of hot springs discharging in and around the caldera. In order to determine the fluid pathways and the origin of chloride in this system, we measured 36Cl/Cl ratios in waters from high-temperature drill holes and from surface springs in this region. The waters fall into two general categories: recent meteoric water samples with low Cl- concentrations (< 10 mg/L) and relatively high 36Cl/Cl ratios

157

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities provides nuclear and fossil personnel with a faster and more accurate method for performing turbine measurement activities during an outage.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A system is proposed for the monitoring of changes in the underground structure of an active volcano over time by applying a transient electromagnetic method. The monitoring system is named ACTIVE, which stands for Array of Controlled Transient-electromagnetics for Imaging Volcano Edifice. The system consists of a transmitter dipole used to generate a controlled transient electromagnetic (EM) field and an array of receivers used to measure the vertical component of the transient magnetic

160

The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Definition: Hydrothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geological formation for the production of electricity.1 References http:www1.eere.energy.govgeothermalpdfshydrothermalfactsheet.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like...

163

Hydrothermal vent complexes associated with sill intrusionsin sedimentarybasins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 477 Discussion on structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin, South the paper by Svensen et al. (2006) on South African hydrothermal vents within the Karoo Basin, particularly for their interest in our paper on hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin (Svensen et al. 2006). Based

Podladchikov, Yuri

164

Self-organizing fuzzy control of active suspension systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-organizing fuzzy controller (SOFC) is proposed to control an active suspension system and evaluate its control performance. In complicated nonlinear system control, the SOFC continually updates the learning strategy in the form of fuzzy rules ...

Ruey-Jing Lian; Bai-Fu Lin; Wun-Tong Sie

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Collaboration among designers: analysing an activity for system development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workplace studies provide an important input to system development, yet there is no straightforward way of translating empirical results into requirements. This study contributes to the development of methods by reporting an activity theory based approach ... Keywords: activity theory, collaborative design, research methods, tabletop systems, understanding work for design

Kristina Lauche

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Hanson, Gregory R [ORNL; Sexton, Angela Kay [ORNL; Jones Jr, J P [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

Avery, D.E.

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's...

171

Phasor representation for narrowband active noise control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phasor representation is introduced to identify the characteristic of the active noise control (ANC) systems. The conventional representation, transfer function, cannot explain the fact that the performance will be degraded at some frequency for ...

Fu-Kun Chen; Ding-Horng Chen; Yue-Dar Jou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Active self-calibration of multi-camera systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for actively calibrating a multicamera system consisting of pan-tilt zoom cameras. After a coarse initial calibration, we determine the probability of each relative pose using a probability distribution based on the camera images. ...

Marcel Brckner; Joachim Denzler

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Potential of Malaysian activated carbon in dual purpose adsorption system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption capability of some locally produced activated charcoal (coconut shell) samples with methanol were taken under laboratory conditions. An experimental test rig was set up; data obtained from the experiments were fitted to Dubinin-Radushkevitch ... Keywords: Malaysian activated carbon, adsorption properties, coefficient of performance (COP), dual purpose system

M. A. Alghoul; M. Y. Sulaiman; K. Sopian; M. Yahya; Azami Zaharim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+): Global Activity Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS+) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

Vipin Arora

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hydrothermal electric and direct heat. Commercialization Phase III planning  

SciTech Connect

Nine environmental concerns have been identified: airborne effluents, waterborne effluents, noise, subsidence, enhanced seismicity, water use conflicts, land use, socioeconomic impacts, and system safety and occupational health. Resolution of these issues is expected to occur at staggered intervals over the next 8 to 10 years. Of these concerns, airborne emissions and water use conflicts are judged to have a medium likelihood of having research findings adverse to commercialization. Waterborne effluents and subsidence are also judged to have a medium likelihood. The other concerns--noise, enhanced seismicity, land use, socioeconomic impacts and system safety and occupational health--are judged to have a low likelihood of adverse findings. The overall environmental research and development plan related to hydrothermal electric and direct heat includes funds to assess the adequacy of candidate control technology options. However, it does not include the resource requirements to fully develop and demonstrate commercial control hardware, process modifications, and for strategies. The conclusions, stated as probabilities, are given.

Clusen, R.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

MTVS: a multi-task active-vision system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the architecture of an active-vision system that has been conceived to ease the concurrent utilization of a visual sensor by several tasks on a mobile robot. We describe in detail the functional architecture of the system and provide ...

D. Hernandez; J. Cabrera; A. Naranjo; A. Dominguez; J. Isern

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than...

179

Why Sequence Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents? The project focuses on using single-cell genomics to sequence nearly a dozen genomes of uncultivated bacteria that are found in...

180

Environmental Assessment -- Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. Construction-related impacts would be relatively minor. Construction of the facility will require the distance of about 1.7 ha (4.1 acres). No further disturbance is anticipated, unless it becomes necessary to replace the seepage pond with an injection well, because the production well is in service and adjacent roads and transmission lines are adequate. Disruption of competing land uses will be minimal, and loss of wildlife habitat will be acceptable. Noise should not significantly affect wildlife and local residents; the most noise activities (well drilling and flow testing) have been completed. Water use during construction will not be large, and impacts on competing uses are unlikely. Socio-economic impacts will be small because the project will not employ a large number of local residents and few construction workers will need to find local housing.

None

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Rejection of non-meaningful activities for HMM-based activity recognition system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new test to distinguish between meaningful and non-meaningful HMM-modeled activity patterns in human activity recognition systems. Operating as a hypothesis test, alternative models are generated from available classes and the decision ... Keywords: Hidden Markov model, Likelihood ratio test, Pairwise likelihood ratio test, Pattern spotting

Xiao-Hui Liu; Chin-Seng Chua

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessing the role of ancient and active geothermal systems in oil-reservoir evolution in the eastern Basin and Range province, western USA. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of our research on the oil fields of the Basin and Range province of the western USA continue to support the following concept: Convecting, moderate-temperature geothermal systems in this region have fostered and in some cases critically influenced the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil. At one Basin-Range field (Grant Canyon), oil-bearing and aqueous fluid inclusions in late-stage hydrothermal quartz were entrapped at temperatures comparable to those now prevailing at reservoir depths (120--130{degrees}C); apparent salinities of the aqueous varieties match closely the actual salinity of the modern, dilute oil-field waters. The inclusion-bearing quartz has the oxygen-isotopic signature for precipitation of the mineral at contemporary temperatures from modern reservoir waters. Measured and fluid-inclusion temperatures define near-coincident isothermal profiles through the oil-reservoir interval, a phenomenon suggesting ongoing heat and mass transfer. These findings are consistent with a model whereby a still-active, convectively circulating, meteoric-hydrothermal system: (1) enhanced porosity in the reservoir rock through dissolution of carbonate; (2) hydrothermally sealed reservoir margins; (3) transported oil to the reservoirs from a deep source of unknown size and configuration; and (4) possibly accelerated source-rock maturation through an increase in the local thermal budget. Grant Canyon and other Basin-Range oil fields are similar to the oil-bearing, Carlin-type, sediment-hosted, disseminated gold deposits of the nearby Alligator Ridge district. The oil fields could represent either weakly mineralized analogues of these deposits, or perhaps an incipient phase in their evolution.

Hulen, J.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrothermal alteration in Oregon's Newberry Volcano No. 2: fluid chemistry and secondary-mineral distribution  

SciTech Connect

Newberry 2 was drilled in the caldera floor of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, by the US Geological Survey during 1979-81. The maximum temperature measured was 265C at the bottom of the hole, 932 m below the surface. Rocks recovered fr9om the drill hole are divided into three intervals on the basis of hydrothermal alteration and mineral deposition: (1) 0-290 m consists of unaltered, largely glassy volcanic material, with present temperatures ranging from 20 to 40C; (2) 290-700 m consists of permeable tuff layers, tuff breccia units, and brecciated and fractured rhyodacitic to dacitic lava flows, with temperatures ranging from 40 to 100C; (3) 700-932 m consists of impermeable andesitic to basaltic lava flows that generally show little effect of alteration, interlayered with permeable hydrothermally altered flow breccia, with temperatures gradually increasing from 100 at 700 m to 265C at 932 m. Hydrothermal alteration throughout the system is controlled by rock permeability, temperature, composition of geothermal fluids, and composition and crystallinity of host rocks. Rock alteration consists mainly of replacement of glass by clay minerals and, locally, zeolites, partial replacement of plagioclase phenocrysts by calcite +/- epidote +/- illite, and whole-rock leaching adjacent to fluids channels. Open-space deposition of hydrothermal minerals in fractures, vesicles, and interbreccia pore space is far more abundant than replacement. A cooling shallow convection system in the upper 700 m is indicated by the occurrence of hydrothermal minerals that were deposited in a slightly higher temperature environment than presently exists. Below 700 m, the heat flow is conductive, and fluid flow is controlled by horizontal lava flows. Homogenization temperatures of secondary quartz fluid inclusions were as high as 370C.

Keith, T.E.C.; Mariner, R.H.; Bargar, K.E.; Evans, W.C.; Presser, T.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpreted as representing steam condensate. Homogenizationsteam is balanced, on a mass basis, by the downward flow of condensate

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Systems Studies Department FY 78 activity report. Volume 2. Systems analysis. [Sandia Laboratories, Livermore  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Studies Department at Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) has two primary responsibilities: to provide computational and mathematical services and to perform systems analysis studies. This document (Volume 2) describes the FY Systems Analysis highlights. The description is an unclassified overview of activities and is not complete or exhaustive. The objective of the systems analysis activities is to evaluate the relative value of alternative concepts and systems. SLL systems analysis activities reflect Sandia Laboratory programs and in 1978 consisted of study efforts in three areas: national security: evaluations of strategic, theater, and navy nuclear weapons issues; energy technology: particularly in support of Sandia's solar thermal programs; and nuclear fuel cycle physical security: a special project conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Highlights of these activities are described in the following sections. 7 figures. (RWR)

Gold, T.S.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reliability assessment of active residential solar energy systems, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Experiences with active solar energy systems in the last few years have, in many cases, been less than encouraging. A quantification of the problem areas discovered in a sampling of the active residential solar energy systems in the state of Colorado is presented. While many problems were found, the potential for easy solution of the problems by design or installation refinement is great. Reported is a summary of the findings of the mechanical inspections of twelve systems during the 1978-79 winter. Only one system operated at its expected mechanical, thermal and economic performance level. Four other systems performed well mechanically, but only one of these had thermal performance meeting design expectations. The remaining seven systems did not work well mechanically or thermally. One significantly raised the utility bill of the residence on which it was installed. Poor system design was found to be the major cause of low performance. Also, installation quality was low and installation errors were frequent. Qualified solar system service was virtually unavailable. Nearly all the problems found were solvable using present technology. The greatest immediate need is for training of designers, installers and service people and support of off-market development of total systems.

Sharp, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N. [McNiff Light Industry, Harborside, ME (United States); Muljadi, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Polymer-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically arranged hydroxyapatite nanoceramic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flower-like hydroxyapatite (HA) nanostructures were synthesized by a polymer-assisted hydrothermal method. The thickness of the petals/plates decreased from 200 nm to 40 nm as the polymer concentration increased. The thickness also decreased as the hydrothermal ...

A. Joseph Nathanael, Sung Soo Han, Tae Hwan Oh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

Bennett, G.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration"

191

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

192

Property:UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Estimated conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from undiscovered hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

193

Using Active Customer Participation in Managing Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Smart Grid Distribution Advancement Introduction 3 #12;Smart Grid What would be new in smart grid1 Data Request Consumer Privacy Regulatory Requirements 15 #12;Distribution Operation Examples 16 #12Using Active Customer Participation in Managing Distribution Systems Visvakumar Aravinthan

Van Veen, Barry D.

194

Systems Engineering -MENG Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2009. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 37 Number Responded: 24 Response Rate: 65% Employer Title City State/Country Cayuga Medical Center Data Analyst Ithaca NY Delphi Systems Engineer Kokomo IN Electric Power Group Intern Pasadena CA

Lipson, Michal

195

Review: A survey of active and passive indoor localisation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the need for indoor localisation has increased. Earlier systems have been deployed in order to demonstrate that indoor localisation can be done. Many researchers are referring to location estimation as a crucial component in numerous ... Keywords: Indoor active localisation, Indoor passive localisation, Location estimation techniques

Gabriel Deak; Kevin Curran; Joan Condell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Symmetric Active/Active Metadata Service for High Availability Parallel File Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data-driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability of distributed storage systems. Past research focused on the active/standby model, where each active service has at least one redundant idle backup. However, interruption of service and even some loss of service state may occur during a fail-over depending on the used replication technique. In addition, the replication overhead for multiple metadata services can be very high. The research in this paper targets the symmetric active/active replication model, which uses multiple redundant service nodes running in virtual synchrony. In this model, service node failures do not cause a fail-over to a backup and there is no disruption of service or loss of service state. We further discuss a fast delivery protocol to reduce the latency of the needed total order broadcast. Our prototype implementation shows that metadata service high availability can be achieved with an acceptable performance trade-off using our symmetric active/active metadata service solution.

He, X. [Tennessee Technological University; Ou, Li [Tennessee Technological University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Chen, Xin [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Experimental Research of an Active Solar Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Solar is an abundant renewable energy, which is used more and more frequently with the emphasis on environment protection, especially in building heating. The different devised methods between an active solar heating system and normal heating system are discussed in this paper. Based on the design, construction, testing and economic analysis of a demonstration project with the solar heating system, this paper discusses how to connect the solar energy collector with the electricity heater and heating system in order to achieve the best state of comfort and energy savings. The real cost of running is calculated and compared with that of other heating methods. The traits and the scope of applications of the solar heating system and the problems in designing, installing and operating are indicated in this paper.

Gao, X.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Active solar heating-and-cooling system-development projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) projects with industry and academic institutions directed toward the development of cost effective, reliable, and publically acceptable active solar heating and cooling systems are presented. A major emphasis of the program is to insure that the information derived from these projects is made available to all members of the solar community who will benefit from such knowledge. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief summary of each of the 214 projects that were active during Fiscal Year 1980, and to provide sufficient information to allow the reader to acquire further details on specific projects. For clarity and convenience, projects are organized by either the program element or technology group as follows: (1) Program elements - Rankine Solar Cooling Systems; Absorption Solar Cooling Systems; Desiccant Solar Cooling Systems; Solar Space Heating Systems; Solar Hot Water Systems; Special Projects; and (2) Technology Groups - Solar Collector Technology; Solar Storage Technology; Solar Controls Technology; Solar Analysis Technology; and Solar Materials Technology. For further convenience, this book contains three indices of contracts, with listings by (1) organization, (2) contract number and (3) state where the project is performed. A brief glossary of terms used is also included at the end of the book.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrothermal time analysis of seed dormancy in true (botanical) potato seeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

germination and shoot-radicle elongation of Ambrosia artemisiifolia. Weed Science 47, 557­562. Hydrothermal

Bradford, Kent

200

Systems simulation and economic analysis for active solar cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A consistent methodology has been developed by which general solar cooling market capture goals have been translated into specific cost and performance goals for solar cooling systems and subsystems. Preliminary results indicate that realistic cost/performance goals can be established for active solar cooling systems and that, with aggressive development, these goals can be reached by the year 2000. As the technology develops, tax incentives will be required to bridge the gap between the actual costs and the cost goals, so that the scenario of an ever increasing share of market penetration can be maintained over the 1986 to 2000 time period.

Warren, M.; Wahlig, M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Safety Functions and Other Features of Lethal Activated Denial Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1193-2010 STD-1193-2010 April 2010 DOE STANDARD Safety Functions and Other Features of Lethal Activated Denial Systems U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1193-2010 i TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ...................................................................................................................... ii 1. SCOPE AND PURPOSE .........................................................................................1 2. APPLICABILITY ....................................................................................................1 3. NORMATIVE REFERENCES ................................................................................2

202

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

System Compatibility Research: 2011 Equipment Immunity Performance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) system compatibility work helps influence changes in the existing standards, leading to the creation of new or revised standards to improve compatibility with the electrical environment. The work also promotes the development of more compatible end-use equipment. The 2011 work included advising activities of standards development groups on various efforts and promoting concepts to achieve more robust end-use equipment within industry. In the standards aren...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydraulic characterization of hydrothermally altered Nopal tuff  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the mechanics of variably saturated flow in fractured-porous media is of fundamental importance to evaluating the isolation performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository for the Yucca Mountain site. Developing that understanding must be founded on the analysis and interpretation of laboratory and field data. This report presents an analysis of the unsaturated hydraulic properties of tuff cores from the Pena Blanca natural analog site in Mexico. The basic intent of the analysis was to examine possible trends and relationships between the hydraulic properties and the degree of hydrothermal alteration exhibited by the tuff samples. These data were used in flow simulations to evaluate the significance of a particular conceptual (composite) model and of distinct hydraulic properties on the rate and nature of water flow.

Green, R.T.; Meyer-James, K.A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rice, G. [George Rice and Associates, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay  

SciTech Connect

The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed {open_quotes}lock-in{close_quotes} amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound.

Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei Abstract Though exploring for hydrothermal resources is not new, advances in exploration technologies and the pursuit of less visible resources have created a need to outline exploration best practices. This multi-year study outlines 21 geothermal exploration regions in the Western United States. These regions were developed based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) physiographic regions, then adjusted to fit geothermal parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects

208

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

209

Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

O'Banion, K.; Layton, D.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Base hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of PBX-9404  

SciTech Connect

Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. They also examined products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Sanchez, J.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rational control of hydrothermal nanowire synthesis and its applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal nanowire synthesis is a rapidly emerging nanowire discipline that enables low temperature growth and batch process. It has a major impact on the development of novel energy conversion devices, high density ...

Joo, Jaebum

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

213

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness of the situation. Incident databases are excellent resources to learn from past mistakes; however, in order to be effective, incident databases need to be functional in disseminating the lessons learned to users. Therefore, this research is dedicated to improving user accessibility of incident databases. The objective of this research is twofold. The first objective is improving accessibility of the database system by allowing the option of word search as well as folder search for the users. This will satisfy research needs of users who are aware of the hazards at hand and need to access the relevant information. The second objective is to activate the database via integration of the database with an operational software. This will benefit research needs of users who are unaware of the existing hazards. Literature review and text mining of Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) database short reports are employed to develop an initial taxonomy, which is then refined and modified by expert review. The incident reports in MARS database is classified to the right folders in the taxonomy and implemented in a database system based on Microsoft Excel, where the users can retrieve information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords on hazardous substances and equipment is prepared. If the keywords exist in the MOC interface, they will be highlighted, and with the click of a button, will return up to ten relevant incident reports. Using an active and knowledge-based system, people can learn from incidents and near-misses and will be more active to reduce the frequency of recurring incidents.

Khan, Sara Shammni

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS * Mashuri L.consists of a hydronic solar space heating system with heat

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system  

SciTech Connect

The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Bertalot, L. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

OE's Smart Grid Activities in the Distribution System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1/2013 1 1/2013 1 National Academy of Engineering - BMED December 2008 www.oe.energy.gov U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 OE's Smart Grid Activities in the Distribution system September 2012 Patricia Hoffman Assistant Secretary December 2008 Mission  Drive Grid Modernization and Resiliency in the Energy Infrastructure  The formation of the Grid Technology Team is a recognition by DOE that we need to bring more resources to bear on grid modernization, coordinating effort from the Science programs, ARPA-E, and the other applied programs 2 December 2008 Desired Outcomes from this Workshop  Better shared understanding of the technology needs of the Distribution system  Identification of gaps in current research

218

System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Review of System Planning Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford November 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. Ian L. Pegg, The Catholic University of America Dr. Ray G. Wymer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ret.) Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The Review Team thanks Mr. Ben Harp, Office of River Protection (ORP), and Mr. James Honeyman, CH2M HILL, for their exceptional support during this review. Mr. Harp was the lead Department of Energy (DOE) representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Honeyman, and his staff, provided responsive support through technical presentations, telephone conferences, and numerous reference documents.

219

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating system with heat input and building loadBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATINGBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

222

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

223

Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sector sector NSTB November 2008 Hank Kenchington - Program Manager Office of Electricity of Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector * 2,000,000 Miles of Oil Pipelines * 1,300,000 Miles of Gas Pipelines * 2,000 Petroleum Terminals * ~1,000,000 Wells * Extensive Ports, Refineries, Transportation, and LNG Facilities * 160,000 Miles of Electrical Transmission lines * ~17,000 Generators; 985,000 Megawatts (net summer capacity) * Over 3,100 Electric Utilities, with 131 million customers Refinery Locations, Crude and Product Pipelines Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil & Gas LNG Import Facilities (Reactivation underway) Legend Interstate Pipelines Intrastate and Other Pipelines

224

Verification of numerical models for hydrothermal plume water through field measurements at TAG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal vents discharge superheated, mineral rich water into our oceans, thereby providing a habitat for exotic chemosynthetic biological communities. Hydrothermal fluids are convected upwards until they cool and reach ...

Wichers, Sacha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids from the northern Juan De Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of aqueous organic compounds derived from sedimentary organic matter has the potential to influence a range of chemical processes in hydrothermal vent environments. For example, hydrothermal alteration experiments ...

Cruse, Anna M. (Anna Marie)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Workshop on magma/hydrothermal drilling and instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussions, conclusions, and recommendations of the Magma/Hydrothermal Drilling and Instrumentation Workshop, Albuquerque, NM, May 31--June 2, 1978 are summarized. Three working groups were organized as follows: Drilling Location and Environment, Drilling and Completion Technology, and Logging and Instrumentation Technology. The first group discussed potential drilling sites and the environment that could be expected in drilling to magma depth at each site. Sites suggested for early detailed evaluation as candidate drilling sites were The Geysers-Clear Lake, CA, Kilauea, HI, Long Valley-Mono Craters, CA, and Yellowstone, WY. Magma at these sites is expected to range from 3 to 10 km deep with temperatures of 800 to 1100{sup 0}C. Detailed discussions of the characteristics of each site are given. In addition, a list of geophysical measurements desired for the hole is presented. The Drilling and Completion Group discussed limitations on current rotary drilling technology as a function of depth and temperature. The group concluded that present drilling systems can be routinely used to temperatures of 200{sup 0}C and depths to 10 km; drilling to 350{sup 0}C can be accomplished with modifications of present techniques, drilling at temperatures from 350{sup 0}C to 1100{sup 0}C will require the development of new drilling techniques. A summary of the limiting factors in drilling systems is presented, and recommendations for a program directed at correcting these limitations is described. The third group discussed requirements for instrumentation and established priorities for the development of the required instruments. Of highest priority for development were high resolution temperature tools, sampling techniques (core, formation fluids), chemical probes, and communications techniques. A description of instrumentation requirements for the postulated hole is given, and the tasks necessary to develop the required devices are delineated.

Varnado, S.G.; Colp, J.L. (eds.)

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Monodisperse spindle-like FeWO{sub 4} nanoparticles: Controlled hydrothermal synthesis and enhanced optical properties  

SciTech Connect

Monodisperse FeWO{sub 4} nanoparticles with specific spindle-like morphology have been synthesized in the presence of citric acid through hydrothermal process. In the synthesis route, citric acid played four roles such as the reducing agent, chelating regents, structure-directing agent and stabilizing agents. In addition, the morphology of FeWO{sub 4} was dramatically tuned by the pH value of the precursor medium. The optical properties of FeWO{sub 4} were investigated with UV-Vis spectra and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic experiments demonstrated that the decomposition efficiency of the monodisperse spindle-like FeWO{sub 4} nanoparticles is 74% after 30 min of UV irradiation, which displayed remarkable enhanced photodegradation activity compared with ordinary FeWO{sub 4} sample (57%) and normal TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts P-25 (56%). - Monodisperse spindle-like FeWO{sub 4} nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activities. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monodisperse spindle-like FeWO{sub 4} were synthesized with hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid plays key roles in the hydrothermal synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their morphology can be tuned with pH value of the precursor medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They show enhanced photocatalytic activities with irradiation of UV light.

Guo, Jinxue; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Lu, Yibin [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)] [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China); Zhang, Xiao, E-mail: zhx1213@126.com [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)] [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China); Kuang, Shaoping; Hou, Wanguo [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)] [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, No.53, Zhengzhou Road, People's Republic of China, Qingdao, Shandong 266042 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

An organized effort to develop the hydrothermal energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a response to America's need for alternate energy sources, the US Department of Energy has a Geothermal Program. Within this program is a Hydrothermal category. Currently, a wide range of tasks are being addressed as part of the Hydrothermal Program. The tasks include Industrialization, Reservoir Technology, Hard Rock Penetration and Conversion Technology. It is thought that successes already made in this program combined with upcoming successes will increase the likelihood of geothermal energy becoming a contributor to our nation's future energy needs. 4 refs.

Taylor, K.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

An Organized Effort to Develop the Hydrothermal Energy Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a response to America's need for Alternate Energy sources, the U.S. Department of Energy has a Geothermal Program. Within this program is a Hydrothermal category. Currently, a wide range of tasks are being addressed as part of the Hydrothermal Program. The tasks include Industrialization, Reservoir Technology, Hard Rock Penetration and Conversion Technology. It is thought that successes already made in this program combined with upcoming successes will increase the likelihood of geothermal energy becoming a contributor to our nations future energy needs.

Taylor, Kenneth J.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Integration of hydrothermal-energy economics: related quantitative studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison of ten models for computing the cost of hydrothermal energy is presented. This comparison involved a detailed examination of a number of technical and economic parameters of the various quantitative models with the objective of identifying the most important parameters in the context of accurate estimates of cost of hydrothermal energy. Important features of various models, such as focus of study, applications, marked sectors covered, methodology, input data requirements, and output are compared in the document. A detailed sensitivity analysis of all the important engineering and economic parameters is carried out to determine the effect of non-consideration of individual parameters.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fundamental Chemistry And Thermodynamics Of Hydrothermal Oxidation Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) is a promising technology for the treatment of aqueous-fluid hazardous and mixed waste streams. Waste streams identified as likely candidates for treatment by this technology are primarily aqueous fluids containing hazardous organic compounds, and often containing inorganic compounds including radioisotopes (mixed wastes). These wastes are difficult and expensive to treat by conventional technologies (e.g. incineration) due to their high water content; in addition, incineration can lead to concerns related to stack releases. An especially attractive potential advantage of HTO over conventional treatment methods is the total containment of all reaction products within the overall system. The potential application of hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) technology for the treatment of DOE hazardous or mixed wastes has been uncertain due to concerns about safe and efficient operation of the technology. In principle, aqueous DOE wastes, including hazardous an d mixed waste, can be treated with this technology. Oxidation reactions are carried out in the aqueous phase at high temperatures ({approx}600 C), effectively converting organic waste constituents to nonhazardous materials (e.g., CO2). Inorganic materials which become insoluble in supercritical water may precipitate as scales adhering to components of the reactor, limiting reactor availability and necessitating frequent cleaning of the system. Also, most hazardous organic compounds contain heteroatoms (other than carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen). These heteroatoms, including halides (F, Cl, Br, I), sulfur, phosphorus, and some nitrogen groups, form strong mineral acids on oxidation of the organic compounds, resulting in a solution having low pH and high oxidation potential. This combination, in conjunction with the high temperatures and high fluid densities attained in both the heating and cooling regions of an HTO reactor, can lead to corrosion of structural materials (usually metal s) anticipated for use in HTO reactor construction. Methods have been suggested for mitigating the problems arising from the production of mineral acids and insoluble solids in HTO processes (Barnes et al., 1993). Previous work in this Laboratory centered on the problems arising from the presence of corrosive or insoluble inorganic compounds in HTO fluids (Simonson et al., 1993, 1994, 1995). However, significant gaps in our knowledge of process chemistry remained at the initiation of this project. It was not possible to determine accurately the properties of coexisting fluid phases; the solubilities of radioactive components of mixed wastes were unknown at high temperatures; and molecular level understanding of interparticle interactions was needed for reliable extrapolation of phenomenological equations for solution behavior beyond the range of experimental results. The present project was undertaken to address these deficiencies. The project was undertaken to provide fundamental information needed to support deployment decisions related to HTO technology, and no innovations in the technology per se were anticipated. Rather, the innovations of this project involved applying new or existing experimental and modeling approaches to studies of aqueous inorganic reactions and properties under the rigorous anticipated HTO operating conditions. This work was made possible in part through the support of researchers at ORNL and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy. This support has allowed significant, unique experimental and 2 computational resources to be developed for studies of aqueous solution chemistry at high temperatures and pressures.

Simonson, J.M.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

System design of active basestations based on dynamically reconfigurable hardware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing multiple modes to support dynamically changing environments, standards, and new services is prevalent in embedded systems, especially in mobile radio systems. Because such a system frequently contains time-constrained tasks, it is important ...

Athanassios Boulis; Mani B. Srivastava

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous species at elevated temperatures and pressures, this study provides the necessary foundation for future exploration into transport and depositional processes in polymetallic ore deposits. The HKF equation of state parameters for gold, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and silver sulfide and hydroxide complexes were derived from experimental equilibrium constants using nonlinear regression calculations. In order to ensure that the resulting parameters were internally consistent, those experiments utilizing incompatible thermodynamic data were re-speciated prior to regression. Because new experimental studies were used to revise the HKF parameters for H2S0 and HS-1, those metal complexes for which HKF parameters had been previously derived were also updated. It was found that predicted thermodynamic properties of metal complexes are consistent with linear correlations between standard partial molal thermodynamic properties. This result allowed assessment of several complexes for which experimental data necessary to perform regression calculations was limited. Oxygen fugacity-temperature diagrams were calculated to illustrate how thermodynamic data improves our understanding of depositional processes. Predicted thermodynamic properties were used to investigate metal transport in Carlin-type gold deposits. Assuming a linear relationship between temperature and pressure, metals are predicted to predominantly be transported as sulfide complexes at a total aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.05 m. Also, the presence of arsenic and antimony mineral phases in the deposits are shown to restrict mineralization within a limited range of chemical conditions. Finally, at a lesser aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.01 m, host rock sulfidation can explain the origin of arsenic and antimony minerals within the paragenetic sequence.

Bessinger, Brad; Apps, John A.

2003-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tracing element sources of hydrothermal mineral deposits: REE and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

inclusion studies are the only way to obtain direct evidence from these ... and eastern part of the Derbyshire Dome (Fig. 1). The ... calcite is more abundant in the western part of the vein ...... and hydrothermal fluids, it is hard to understand why.

237

A new model-free adaptive sliding controller for active suspension system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active suspension systems are designed to provide better ride comfort and handling capability in the automotive industry. Since the active suspension system has nonlinear and time-varying characteristics, it is difficult to establish an accurate dynamic ... Keywords: Active suspension, Functional approximation, Fuzzy compensation, Sliding control

Hung-Yi Chen; Shiuh-Jer Huang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Implementation and evaluation of active storage in modern parallel file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active Storage is a technology aimed at reducing the bandwidth requirements of current supercomputing systems, and leveraging the processing power of the storage nodes used by some modern file systems. To achieve both objectives, Active Storage moves ... Keywords: Active Storage, Lustre, NetCDF, PVFS2, Striped file

Juan Piernas-Canovas; Jarek Nieplocha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Application of a fuzzy enhance adaptive control on active suspension system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic active suspension systems have nonlinearity and time-varying dynamic behaviour. It is difficult to establish an accurate model for traditional controllers design. This unknown nonlinear dynamic system is approximated by an second order ... Keywords: active suspension system, adaptive control, fuzzy control, vehicle comfort

Shiuh-Jer Huang; Chiang-Wei Lin

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Lignocellulose Recalcitrance Screening by Integrated High Throughput Hydrothermal Pretreatment and Enzymatic Saccharification  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel 96-well multiplate reactor system for comparative analysis of lignocellulose recalcitrance via integrated hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. The system utilizes stackable nickel/gold-plated 96-well aluminum reactor plates, a clamping device fit to a standard Parr reactor, and robotics for efficient liquids and solids handling. A capacity of 20 plates allows up to 1,920 separate hydrothermal reactions per run. Direct and rapid analysis of key end-products, glucose and xylose, is facilitated by the use of glucose oxidase/peroxidase and xylose dehydrogenase-linked assays. To demonstrate efficacy, a set of 755 poplar core samples from the US Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center was tested. Total sugar release ranged from 0.17 to 0.64 g/g of biomass and correlated strongly with the ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignins in the samples. Variance among sample replicates was sufficiently minimal to permit clear assignment of differences in recalcitrance throughout this large sample set.

Selig, M. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Sykes, R. W.; Reichel, K. L.; Brunecky, R.; Himmel, M. E.; Davis, M. F.; Decker, S. R.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dielectric Constant of Hydrothermal Barium Titanate Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Opacified, Reinforced Aerogel for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Generators and Other Advanced Energy Systems Oxide Ceramic Materials for...

242

Hydrothermal alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA: DDH 1976-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot waters of the Roosevelt Thermal Area, Utah, have altered granitic rocks and detritus of the Mineral Range pluton, Utah. Alteration and mineral deposition recognized in a 200' drill core from DDH 1-76 is most intense in the upper 100 feet which consists of altered alluvium and opal deposits; the lower 100 feet is weakly altered quartz monzonite. Petrographic, x-ray, and chemical methods were used to characterize systematic changes in chemistry and mineralogy. Comparison of the alteration mineral assemblages with known water chemistry and equilibrium activity diagrams suggests that a simple solution equilibrium model cannot account for the alteration. A model is proposed in which upward moving thermal water supersaturated with respect to quartz and a downward moving cool water undersaturated with respect to quartz produces the observed alteration. An estimate of the heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration was made by calculating reaction enthalpies for alteration reactions at each depth. The estimated heat flow varied from .02 HFU (for 200' depth, 400,000 yr duration, and no sulfur oxidation) to 67 HFU (for 5,000' depth, 1,000 yr duration, and all sulfur oxidized from sulfide). Heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration are comparable with those from a cooling granitic magma.

Bryant, N.L.; Parry, W.T.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

System and method for collisional activation of charged particles  

SciTech Connect

A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of Eu/HNO{sub 3} aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to {approx}900 deg. C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly.

Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, St. Francis Xavier University, P.O. Box 5000, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); MS 954, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector (October 2005) This document is a compilation of the activities and initiatives concerning control system security that are influencing the standards process in the development of secure communication protocols and systems. Also contained in this report is a comparison of several of the sector standards, guidelines, and technical reports, demonstrating standards coverage by security topic. This work focuses on control systems standards applicable to the energy (oil, gas, and electric, but not nuclear) sector. Summary of CS Standards Activities in the Energy Sector.pdf More Documents & Publications

247

Systems Engineering -MENG Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an international student2008 Graduate and Professional Schools Employer Title City State/Country Amazon.com Software Engineer Seattle NY Apple Software Engineer Cupertino CA BAE Systems Software Eng. Wayne NJ Citi Surface Warfare Officer (Nuclear) Boston MA VSEA Electrical Systems Engineer II Boston MA www

Lipson, Michal

248

FrAT2.4 Introducing Back-up to Active Compressor Surge Control System ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: A novel method for introducing a back-up system to an active compressor surge control system is presented in this paper. Active surge control is a promising method for extending the compressor map towards and into the unstable area at low mass flow by stabilizing the surge phenomenon. The method also has potential for allowing operation at higher efficiencies. However, a failure in the active surge control system may endanger the compressor by entering deep surge as the compressor is allowed to operate in the stabilized surge area. We propose the use of a back-up system applied to the active system to keep the compressor safe should the active system fail. This paper present an active compressor surge control system with piston actuation combined with a blow off system as the back-up. Performance of the combined system is evaluated by simulating the system in situations where the piston is saturated or jammed. The combination results in a system with increased performance by taking advantage of both systems.

Nur Uddin; Jan Tommy Gravdahl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Symmetric active/active metadata service for high availability parallel file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability ... Keywords: Fault tolerance, Group communication, High availability, Metadata management, Parallel file systems

Xubin He; Li Ou; Christian Engelmann; Xin Chen; Stephen L. Scott

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Property:HydroSystem | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HydroSystem Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HydroSystem Property Type String Description A description of the hydrothermal system in the geothermal area This is a...

251

Geochemistry of a volcanic hydrothermal system at Mount Spurr, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Spurr is an ice and snow-covered andesitic volcano located at the northern extent of the Aleutian arc in south central Alaska. Previous workers have (more)

Garchar, Laura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in their drainage basins and where a large fraction of the solute flux follows thaw of ice cover in the spring months. Although the total river HCO3- flux is larger than the flux...

253

Pages that link to "Hydrothermal System" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Exploration and Confirmation ( links) Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction ( links) Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification...

254

Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Footwall Faulting at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Geothermal2009. Draft Version Dixie Valley Candidate ConservationAgreement. Dixie Valley Working Group. Potter D. , Urquhart

Forrest, Matthew James

255

Reservoir Fracturing in the Geysers Hydrothermal System: Fact or Fallacy?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proper application of proven worldwide fracture determination analyses adequately aids in the detection and enhanced exploitation of reservoir fractures in The Geysers steam field. Obsolete, superficial ideas concerning fracturing in this resource have guided various malformed judgements of the actual elusive trends. Utilizing regional/local tectonics with theoretical rack mechanics and drilling statistics, offers the most favorable method of fracture comprehension. Exploitation philosophies should favor lateral drilling trends along local tensional components and under specific profound drainage/faulting manifestations to enhance high productivities. Drill core observations demonstrate various degrees of fracture filling, brecciation, strain responses, and rock fracture properties, giving the most favorable impression of subsurface reservoir conditions. Considerably more work utilizing current fracturing principles and geologic thought is required to adequately comprehend and economically exploit this huge complex resource.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Hyperspectral (HyMap) data was used to map the location ofoutcrops of high temperature, hydrothermally alterated minerals(including alunite, pyrophyllite, and hematite) along a 15 kmswath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Mountain Range inDixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that severaloutcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and thatone outcrop, roughly 1 square kilometer in area, shows abundanthigh temperature alteration. Structural analysis of the alteredregion using a

257

Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Abstract Two-meter temperature surveys have been conducted at Salt Wells Basin and Lee-Allen Springs geothermal areas with the objective of distinguishing and

258

Mechanochemical-hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of fluoridated hydroxyapatite  

SciTech Connect

Fluoridated hydroxyapatite (FHAp) was successfully synthesized from the starting materials of CaCO{sub 3}, CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and CaF{sub 2} via a mechanochemical-hydrothermal route. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy identified the resultant powders as FHAp nanocrystals with the specific surface areas of up to 114.72 m{sup 2}/g. The mechanism study revealed that under such mechanochemical-hydrothermal conditions the formation reactions of FHAp were completed in two stages. The starting materials firstly reacted into a poorly crystallized calcium-deficient apatite and the complete incorporation of fluoride ions into apatite occurred in the second stage.

Zhang Huigang [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhu Qingshan [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China)]. E-mail: qszhu@home.ipe.ac.cn; Xie Zhaohui [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China)

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Why Sequence Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoacidophiles of Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents? Bacteria that live in hydrothermal vents on land and deep underwater need to be able to tolerate high temperatures and harsh, nutrient-poor environments with high concentrations of metals. As a result of living in such environments, however, these bacteria have enzymes that are stable at high temperatures, which could be useful for producing alternative fuels. Thermoacidophiles Photo: University of Delaware Aquificales bacteria are often found in thermal streams and associated with sulfide precipitation. Sequencing some of these bacterial genomes -- specifically, Thermocrinis ruber, S. rodmanii and S. kristjansonnii -- could provide researchers with so-called "anchor genomes" that would be applied in turn to studies already being done on microbial communities in

260

Systems Engineering -MENG Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2010. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 54 Number Responded: 23 Response Rate: 43% Employer Title City State/Country Applied Materials Senior Consultant Minneapolis MN G&W Electric Process Engineer Chicago IL Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Lipson, Michal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Information Science, Systems & Technology -Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 25 Number Responded: 16 Response Rate: 64% 2008 Graduate and Professional Schools College of Arts & Sciences of Agriculture & Life Sciences General Electric Info Management Leadership Program Milwaukee WI Google Software

Lipson, Michal

262

Systems Engineering -MENG Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2011. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 54 Number Responded: 36 Response Rate: 67% Employer Title City State/Country Applied Materials Columbus IN General Electric Design Engineer­ Home Energy Mgmt Louisville KY General Electric Operations

Lipson, Michal

263

A low cost, DC-coupled active vibration isolation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I designed and implemented an isolation system that interfaces with traditional air mounts for improved force disturbance rejection relative to passive optical tables.Force disturbance rejection and position ...

Miu, Kevin Kar-Leung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Design of a grey-prediction self-organizing fuzzy controller for active suspension systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-organizing fuzzy controllers (SOFCs) have excellent learning capabilities. They have been proposed for the manipulation of active suspension systems. However, it is difficult to select the parameters of an SOFC appropriately, and an SOFC may extensively ... Keywords: Active suspension systems, Grey-prediction algorithm, Self-organizing fuzzy controller

Jeen Lin, Ruey-Jing Lian

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Transformation of UML activity diagrams into analyzable systems and software blueprints construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a standard language for software blueprints, UML can be used to visualize, specify, construct and document software-intensive system of heritage. In the UML, the activity diagrams often are widely used to workflow and ... Keywords: activity diagram, system description, unified modeling language, visualize

Chien-Yuan Lai; Dong-Her Shih; Hsiu-Sen Chiang; Ching-Chiang Chen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NH3- H2O absorption systems used for research and student activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of the sustainable development and of the future environment and energy concerns, a new laboratory was developed based on absorption systems (a chiller-heater and a heat pump). The installation together with the proposed experimental activity ... Keywords: absorption systems, education and research activity, environment, heat pump

Ioan Boian; Alexandru Serban; Stan Fota; Florea Chiriac

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

268

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Locating an active fault zone in Coso geothermal field by analyzing seismic guided waves from microearthquake data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Active fault systems usually provide high-permeability channels for hydrothermal outflow in geothermal fields. Locating such fault systems is of a vital importance to plan geothermal production and injection drilling, since an active fault zone often acts as a fracture-extensive low-velocity wave guide to seismic waves. We have located an active fault zone in the Coso geothermal field, California, by identifying and analyzing

269

Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (<100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C); (2) the illite zone (100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C); (3) the chlorite zone (230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C to 290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C); and (4) the feldspar zone (>290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

System Compatibility Research: 2012 Equipment Immunity Performance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary focus of EPRIs system compatibility work is to promote the development of standards and equipment designs that will improve compatibility of the electrical grid with end-use customer equipment. In 2012, this work included advising research working groups and standards development working groups with the latest test data and research information that is relevant to various standards efforts. In the standards arena, individuals from EPRI helped to move along the development of an ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solar power system requiring no active control device  

SciTech Connect

A solar power system has a photovoltaic array having a locus of peak power points for various insolation levels, a voltage-dependent variable resistance load such as a water electrolysis unit electrically connected to the array, and a demand-dependent variable resistance load such as a dc to ac inverter connected in parallel with the electrolysis unit. The electrolysis unit or other voltage-dependent variable resistance load has a voltage-current characteristic in which the operating point is displaced from the array's peak power point for most insolation levels. The characteristic is displaced towards higher voltage-lower current operating points. The inverter may move the operating point of the photovoltaic array toward its peak power point when the load requires power. The system may be designed so that the array operates within about 5 percent of its peak power point over a wide range of inverter power demands. A fuel cell may be connected in parallel with the array to provide power to the inverter at low insolation levels, at night or in low sunlight. The fuel cell may use the hydrogen produced by the electrolysis unit for fuel. The total photovoltaic power made available by the system of this invention is generally greater than 95 percent and often greater than 98 percent of the maximum power which the photovoltaic array may produce for many insolation levels.

Tison, R.R.

1982-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Preparation of Ag{sub 2}S-Graphene nanocomposite from a single source precursor and its surface-enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescent activity  

SciTech Connect

Ag{sub 2}S-Graphene nanocomposite was prepared via a relatively facile hydrothermal method, using a single-source molecular (silver diethyldithiocarbamate [Ag(DDTC)]) as precursor and graphene sheets as a support material. The composite was characterized by X-ray power diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, Raman spectra and fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results show that the Ag{sub 2}S-Graphene nanocomposite displays surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for graphene oxide and reveals relatively better fluorescence property compared with pure Ag{sub 2}S. Highlights: {yields} Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles are deposited on graphene sheets via a single source precursor. {yields} Graphene oxide is reduced to graphene in the hydrothermal reaction process. {yields} Ag{sub 2}S-Graphene system displays surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity and relatively better fluorescence property.

Pan Shugang; Liu Xiaoheng, E-mail: xhliu@mail.njust.edu.cn; Wang Xin

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Active spectroscopic measurements using the ITER diagnostic system  

SciTech Connect

Active (beam-based) spectroscopic measurements are intended to provide a number of crucial parameters for the ITER device being built in Cadarache, France. These measurements include the determination of impurity ion temperatures, absolute densities, and velocity profiles, as well as the determination of the plasma current density profile. Because ITER will be the first experiment to study long timescale ({approx}1 h) fusion burn plasmas, of particular interest is the ability to study the profile of the thermalized helium ash resulting from the slowing down and confinement of the fusion alphas. These measurements will utilize both the 1 MeV heating neutral beams and a dedicated 100 keV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. A number of separate instruments are being designed and built by several of the ITER partners to meet the different spectroscopic measurement needs and to provide the maximum physics information. In this paper, we describe the planned measurements, the intended diagnostic ensemble, and we will discuss specific physics and engineering challenges for these measurements in ITER.

Thomas, D. M. [ITER Organization, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Counsell, G. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Johnson, D. [US ITER Project Office, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Vasu, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Zvonkov, A. [Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'', Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hydrothermal Alteration Mineral Mapping Using Hyperspectral Imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hyperspectral (HyMap) data was used to map the location of outcrops of high temperature, hydrothermally alterated minerals (including alunite, pyrophyllite, and hematite) along a 15 km swath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Mountain Range in Dixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that several outcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and that one outcrop, roughly 1 square kilometer in area, shows abundant high temperature alteration. Structural analysis of the altered region using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) suggests that this outcrop is bounded on all sides by a set of cross-cutting faults. This fault set lies within the Dixie Valley Fault system (Caskey et al. 1996). Both the intense alteration in this area and the presence of cross-cutting faults indicate a high probability of recent hot fluid escape.

Kennedy-Bowdoin, T; Martini, B A; Silver, E A; Pickles, W L

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

Srinivasachar, Srivats (Sturbridge, MA); Benson, Steven (Grand Forks, ND); Crocker, Charlene (Newfolden, MN); Mackenzie, Jill (Carmel, IN)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Potential benefits of geothermal electrical production from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential national benefits of geothermal electric energy development from the hydrothermal resources in the West are estimated for several different scenarios. The U.S. electrical economy is simulated by computer using a linear programming optimization technique. Under most of the scenarios, benefits are estimated at $2 to $4 billion over the next 50 years on a discounted present value basis. The electricity production from hydrothermal plants reaches 2 to 4 percent of the national total, which will represent 10 to 20 percent of the installed capacity in the West. Installed geothermal capacity in 1990 is estimated to be 9,000 to 17,000 Mw(e). The geothermal capacity should reach 28,000 to 65,000 Mw(e) by year 2015. The ''most likely'' scenario yields the lower values in the above ranges. Under this scenario geothermal development would save the utility industry $11 billion in capital costs (undiscounted); 32 million separative work units; 64,000 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; and 700 million barrels of oil. The most favorable scenario for geothermal energy occurs when fossil fuel prices are projected to increase at 5 percent/year. The benefits of geothermal energy then exceed $8 billion on a discounted present value basis. Supply curves were developed for hydrothermal resources based on the recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment, resource characteristics, and projected power conversion technology and costs. Geothermal plants were selected by the optimizing technique to fill a need for ''light load'' plants. This infers that geothermal plants may be used in the future primarily for load-following purposes.

Bloomster, C.H.; Engel, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Hydraulically-activated operating system for an electric circuit breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This operating system comprises a fluid motor having a piston, a breaker-opening space at one side of the piston, and a breaker-closing space at its opposite side. An accumulator freely communicates with the breaker-opening space for supplying pressurized fluid thereto during a circuit-breaker opening operation. A normally-closed valve located on the breaker-closing-side of the piston is openable to release liquid from the breaker-closing space so that pressurized liquid in the breaker-opening space can drive the piston in an opening direction. Means is provided for restoring the valve to its closed position following the circuit-breaker opening operation. An impeded passage affords communication between the accumulator and the breaker-closing space to allow pressurized liquid to flow from the accumulator to the breaker-closing space and develop a pressure therein substantially equal to accumulator pressure when the valve is restored to closed position following breaker-opening. This passage is so impeded that the flow therethrough from the accumulator into the breaker-closing space is sufficiently low during initial opening motion of the piston through a substantial portion of its opening stroke as to avoid interference with said initial opening motion of the piston.

Imam, Imdad (Secane, PA); Barkan, Philip (Stanford, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In western North America, a number of geothermal systems derive their heat from magmas or cooling intrusions. The interior of the Great Basin however, is characterized by widespread amagmatic geothermal activity that owes its existence to high crustal heat flow and active extensional tectonics. Both the magmatically heated and extensional fluid types in the Great Basin have recently, or are currently, depositing gold. Quaternary to Pliocene-aged gold deposits with adjacent high-temperature (≤ 150°C)

283

A comparative energetic analysis of active and passive emission control systems adopting standard emission test cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work aims at analysing and comparing the thermal performances of active and passive aftertreatment systems. A one-dimensional transient model has been developed in order to evaluate the heat exchange between the solid and the exhaust gas ...

Angelo Algieri, Mario Amelio, Pietropaolo Morrone

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

Mazzini, Adriano

285

TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependent computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 1, Numerical methods and input instructions  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the numerical methods, current capabilities, and the use of the TEMPEST (Version L, MOD 2) computer program. TEMPEST is a transient, three-dimensional, hydrothermal computer program that is designed to analyze a broad range of coupled fluid dynamic and heat transfer systems of particular interest to the Fast Breeder Reactor thermal-hydraulic design community. The full three-dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion, continuity, and heat transport are solved for either laminar or turbulent fluid flow, including heat diffusion and generation in both solid and liquid materials. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design of a hybrid type self-powered active sussension system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, authors propose a new hybrid type self-powered active suspension system for ground vehicles. System is composed of an electronic control unit (ECU), a power electronics module, and electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) bank, a permanent ...

Hakan Sahin; Naoto Fukushima; Takahiro Mochizuki; Ichiro Hagiwara

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Adaptive algorithms for sensor activation in renewable energy based sensor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upcoming sensor networks would be deployed with sensing devices with energy harvesting capabilities from renewable energy sources such as solar power. A key research question in such sensor systems is to maximize the asymptotic event detection probability ... Keywords: Adaptive algorithms, Energy harvesting sensor systems, Sensor activation, Temporal correlations

Neeraj Jaggi, Sreenivas Madakasira, Sandeep Reddy Mereddy, Ravi Pendse

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Active Distributed Power Systems Functional Structures for Real-Time Operation of Sustainable Energy Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Present power system will face great challenges in several areas depending on the market economy, extensive global integration and constant need for more electric power, (more)

Svensson, Jrgen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A novel statistical time-series pattern based interval forecasting strategy for activity durations in workflow systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting workflow activity durations is of great importance to support satisfactory QoS in workflow systems. Traditionally, a workflow system is often designed to facilitate the process automation in a specific application domain where activities ... Keywords: Activity duration, Interval forecasting, Statistical time series, Time-series patterns, Workflow system

Xiao Liu; Zhiwei Ni; Dong Yuan; Yuanchun Jiang; Zhangjun Wu; Jinjun Chen; Yun Yang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Transmission System Efficiency and Utilization Improvement: Summary of R&D Activity and Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes the activities, findings, and main conclusions derived from the development of EPRI R&D Program 172 - Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World.BackgroundEPRI R&D Program 172, Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World, was initiated in 2008 and finalized in 2012. The main objective of the program was to assist utilities to prepare for operating a power-delivery system ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydrothermal research and development assessment. Task Force report: projections for direct-heat applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low and moderate temperature hydrothermal resources suitable for direct-heat applications have been identified in 37 states. The extent to which three resources might be used over the next 20 years were evaluated and the probable impact of Federal programs on hydrothermal resource utilization was assessed. The use types that comprise the bulk of the market were determined. Representative firms and municipalities were interviewed to determine their willingness to use hydrothermal energy, and to determine the investment decision criteria that would influence their actions. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Low temperature hydrothermal destruction of organics in Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate and develop a low temperature hydrothermal process (HTP) for the destruction of organics that are present wastes temporarily stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Organic compounds contribute to tank waste safety issues, such as hydrogen generation. Some organic compounds act as complexants, promoting the solubility of radioactive constituents such as {sup 90}Sr and {sup 241}Am, which is undesirable for waste pretreatment processing. HTP is thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that is typically operated between 250{degrees}C and 375{degrees}C and approximately 200 atm. Testing with simulated tank waste, containing a variety of organics has been performed. The distribution of strontium, cesium and bulk metals between the supernatant and solid phases as a function of the total organic content of the waste simulant will be presented. Test results using simulant will be compared with similar tests conducted using actual radioactive waste.

Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Hart, T.R.; Poshusta, J.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Integration of hydrothermal energy economics related quantitative studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of the existing hydrothermal energy economics related quantitative studies is provided. The objective is to present the similarities and differences in methodology and assumptions, and explain the impact of these differences on the energy price estimates. A brief summary of the study categories, economic evaluation methodology, technical and economic assumptions and major outputs of the studies is presented. The relative importance and the likely effects of the most important technical and economic factors on the cost of energy are discussed. The sensitivity analysis results provided are useful in judging the credibility as well as the relative weaknesses and strengths of the various cost of energy estimation studies. The major conclusions of the evaluation and the recommendations for future research are presented.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Principles of passive and active cooling of mirror-based hybrid systems employing liquid metals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents principles of passive and active cooling that are suitable to mirrorbased hybrid, nuclear fission/fusion systems. It is shown that liquid metal lead-bismuth cooling of the mirror machine with 25 m height and 1.5 GW thermal power is feasible both in the active mode during the normal operation and in the passive mode after the reactor shutdown. In the active mode the achievable required pumping power can well be below 50 MW, whereas the passive mode provides enough coolant flow to keep the clad temperature below the damage limits.

Anglart, Henryk [Div. of Nuclear Technology, School of Engineering Sciences, Royal Institute of Technology Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106-91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

1. Accelerator Driven Systems and Their Applications 1.1 History of Accelerator Driven System Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 1990s, accelerator driven systems (ADS) subcritical assemblies driven by high power proton accelerators through a spallation target which is neutronically coupled to the core have been proposed for addressing certain missions in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Institutes throughout the world have conducted numerous programs evaluating the role of ADS in nuclear waste transmutation and energy production. In 1995, the National Research Council (NRC) issued a report on transmutation technologies [1], which included an evaluation of one ADS concept that was under study at that time: a large-scale system that proposed using a ~100-MW accelerator to drive a thermal, molten salt subcritical core. The NRC recognized the numerous complexities associated with the system, including the fact that, at that time, much of the high-power accelerator technology required for that ADS system had yet to be demonstrated. Consequently, the NRC report did not look favorably upon ADS. In 1999 the US Congress directed the DOE to evaluate Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concepts and prepare a roadmap to develop the technology. This roadmap [2] identified the technical issues to be resolved, assessed the impact of ATW on high-level waste disposition, and estimated the scale and cost of deploying ATW to close the fuel cycle. It also recommended that Congress fund a $281M six-year program of trade studies and R&D on key technology issues that would support a future

Mueller G; S. Nagaitsev C; J. Nolen A; E. Pitcher E; R. Rimmer F; R. Sheffield E; M. Todosow B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Current Activities at the ACRELab Renewable Energy Systems Test T.L. Pryor1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· A 27.5 kVA diesel genset · A 20 kW Westwind/ACRE wind turbine · A 20 kW AES three phase inverter and a 5 kW diesel generator. The large system test facility consisted of a battery bank (configurableVA diesel generator #12;Current Activities at the ACRELab Renewable Energy Systems Test Facility Pryor ISES

300

Hydrothermal synthesis of Sb2S3nanorods using iodine via redox mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystalline antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) with nanorods morphology was successfully prepared via hydrothermal method by the reaction of elemental sulfur, antimony, and iodine as starting materials with high yield at 180C for 24 ...

Abdolali Alemi; Sang Woo Joo; Younes Hanifehpour; Aliakbar Khandar; Ali Morsali; Bong-Ki Min

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks by the EO-1 Hyperion sensor, Northern Danakil Depression, Eritrea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An EO-1 Hyperion scene was used to identify and map hydrothermally altered rocks and a Precambrian metamorphic sequence at and around the Alid volcanic dome, at the northern Danakil Depression, Eritrea. Mapping was coupled with laboratory analyses, including ...

Ronen Gersman; Eyal Ben-Dor; Michael Beyth; Dov Avigad; Michael Abraha; Alem Kibreab

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by scuba divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with a regulated filling ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by SCUBA divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with regulated filling rate to ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

304

A Review of Market Monitoring Activities at U.S. Independent System Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03LBNL-53975 A Review of Market Monitoring Activities at U.S. Independent System Operators Charles Goldman, Bernie C. Lesieutre, and Emily Bartholomew Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Energy Analysis

305

1280-MHz Active Array Radar Wind Profiler for Lower Atmosphere: System Description and Data Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An L-band radar wind profiler was established at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadanki, India (13.5N, 79.2E), to provide continuous high-resolution wind measurements in the lower atmosphere. This system utilizes a fully active array ...

P. Srinivasulu; P. Yasodha; P. Kamaraj; T. N. Rao; A. Jayaraman; S. N. Reddy; S. Satyanarayana

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps EGS Links Related documents and websites DOE EGS Technical Roadmap DOE EGS Systems Demonstration Projects How EGS Works (Animation) EGS Development (Animation) EGS Schematic.jpg ] Dictionary.png Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are human engineered hydrothermal reservoirs developed for commercial use as an alternative to naturally

307

Overview of biomass thermochemical conversion activities funded by the biomass energy systems branch of DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively involved in the development of renewable energy sources through research and development programs sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch. The overall objective of the thermochemical conversion element of the Biomass Energy Systems Program is to develop competitive processes for the conversion of renewable biomass resources into clean fuels and chemical feedstocks which can supplement fuels from conventional sources. An overview of biomass thermochemical conversion projects sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch is presented in this paper.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Ergun, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

309

Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Improved computational schemes for the numerical modeling of hydrothermal resources in Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) solution technique, is shown to be extremely effective when applied to the finite-difference solution of conductive and convective heat transfer in geologic systems. The CGS method is compared to the Successive Over/Under Relaxation schemes, a version of the Gaussian elimination method, and the Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) approach. The CGS procedure converges at least ten times faster than the nearest competitor. The model is applied to the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, located in northwestern Wyoming. Modeled results are compared with measured temperature-depth profiles and results from other studies. The temperature decrease from 72{degree}C to 54{degrees}C along the crest of the Thermopolis anticline is shown to result from cooling of the geothermal fluid as it moves to the southeast. Modeled results show correct general trends, however, a time-varying three-dimensional model will be needed to fully explain the effects of mixing within the aquifers along the crest of the anticline and thermal affects of surface surface topography. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

Heasler, H.P.; George, J.H.; Allen, M.B.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A U-Th Calcite Isochron Age From An Active Geothermal Field In New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We report here the first U-Th disequilibrium age for a hydrothermal mineral from an active geothermal system in New Zealand. Vein calcite recovered from a depth of 389 m in Well Thm-1 at the Tauhara geothermal field has an age of 99±44 ka BP. This age was determined using a leachate-leachate isochron technique on four silicate containing sub-samples of calcite from a single vein. Although the error on this isochron age is considerable, it is significantly younger than the earlier

313

Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Development and Testing Final Report- Phase 4  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a research and development (R&D) program to design and optimize an active desiccant-vapor compression hybrid rooftop system. The primary objective was to combine the strengths of both technologies to produce a compact, high-performing, energy-efficient system that could accommodate any percentage of outdoor air and deliver essentially any required combination of temperature and humidity, or sensible heat ratio (SHR). In doing so, such a product would address the significant challenges imposed on the performance capabilities of conventional packaged rooftop equipment by standards 62 and 90.1 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The body of work completed as part of this program built upon previous R&D efforts supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and summarized by the Phase 3b report ''Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC Units'' (Fischer and Sand 2002), in addition to Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000; and Fischer and Sand 2004. All initial design objectives established for this development program were successfully achieved. The performance flexibility desired was accomplished by a down-sized active desiccant wheel that processes only a portion of the supply airflow, which is pre-conditioned by a novel vapor compression cycle. Variable-speed compressors are used to deliver the capacity control required by a system handling a high percentage of outdoor air. An integrated direct digital control system allows for control capabilities not generally offered by conventional packaged rooftop systems. A 3000-cfm prototype system was constructed and tested in the SEMCO engineering test laboratory in Columbia, MO, and was found to operate in an energy-efficient fashion relative to more conventional systems. Most important, the system offered the capability to independently control the supply air temperature and humidity content to provide individual sensible and latent loads required by an occupied space without over-cooling and reheating air. The product was developed using a housing construction similar to that of a conventional packaged rooftop unit. The resulting integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) is similar in size to a currently available conventional rooftop unit sized to provide an equivalent total cooling capacity. Unlike a conventional rooftop unit, the IADR can be operated as a dedicated outdoor air system processing 100% outdoor air, as well as a total conditioning system capable of handling any ratio of return air to outdoor air. As part of this R&D program, a detailed investigation compared the first cost and operating cost of the IADR with costs for a conventional packaged approach for an office building located in Jefferson City, MO. The results of this comparison suggest that the IADR approach, once commercialized, could be cost-competitive with existing technology--exhibiting a one-year to two-year payback period--while simultaneously offering improved humidity control, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency.

Fischer, J

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hydrothermal preparation, characterization and property research of flowerlike ZnO nanocrystals built up by nanoflakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, flowerlike ZnO nanocrystals were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal route in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), employing Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and KOH as the starting reactants. The phase and morphology of the product were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and select area electron diffraction (SAED). The optical properties of the product were studied. Some factors influencing the morphology of the final product including reaction time, temperature and amounts of the surfactant were discussed. Researches showed that the flowerlike ZnO nanocrystals had a good photo-catalytic activity for degradation of safranine T under 254 nm UV light irradiation. The electrochemical research of the product showed that flowerlike ZnO nanocrystals could promote electron transfers between catechol and the Au electrode. A possible formation mechanism was also suggested based on the results of the experiments.

Ni Yonghong [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)], E-mail: niyh@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Wu Guogen; Zhang Xiaolei; Cao Xiaofeng; Hu Guangzhi; Tao Ali; Yang Zhousheng; Wei Xianwen [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 1, Equations and numerics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in Cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the Cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits of modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. This volume, Volume I - Equations and Numerics, describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. The final volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, presents results of numerical simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and comparisons with experimental data. 4 refs.

McCann, R.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

PROMETHEE: An Alpha Low Level Waste Assay System Using Passive and Active Neutron Measurement Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a passive-active neutron assay system for alpha low level waste characterization at the French Atomic Energy Commission is discussed. Less than 50 Bq[{alpha}] (about 50 {mu}g Pu) per gram of crude waste must be measured in 118-l 'European' drums in order to reach the requirements for incinerating wastes. Detection limits of about 0.12 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu in total active neutron counting, and 0.08 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu coincident active neutron counting, may currently be detected (empty cavity, measurement time of 15 min, neutron generator emission of 1.6 x 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} [4{pi}]). The most limiting parameters in terms of performances are the matrix of the drum - its composition (H, Cl...), its density, and its heterogeneity degree - and the localization and self-shielding properties of the contaminant.

Passard, Christian [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Mariani, Alain [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Jallu, Fanny [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Romeyer-Dherbey, Jacques [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Recroix, Herve [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Rodriguez, Michel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Loridon, Joel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Denis, Caroline [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Toubon, Herve [COGEMA (France)

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low temperature hydrothermal processing of organic contaminants in Hanford tank waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batch and continuous flow reactor tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have shown that organics similar to those present in the single-shell and double-shell underground storage tanks at Hanford can be decomposed in the liquid phase at relatively mild temperatures of 150[degree]C to 350[degree]C in an aqueous process known as hydrothermal processing (HTP). The organics will react with the abundant oxidants such s nitrite already present in the Hanford tank waste to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. No air or oxygen needs to be added to the system. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures to produce formate and ammonia and may also react with nitrates or other oxides. During testing, the organic carbon was transformed first to oxalate at[approximately]310[degree]C and completely oxidized to carbonate at [approximately]350[degree]C accompanied by hydroxide consumption. Solids were formed at higher temperatures, causing a small-diameter outlet tube to plug. The propensity for plugging was reduced by diluting the feed with concentrated hydroxide.

Jones, E.O.; Pederson, L.R.; Freeman, H.D.; Schmidt, A.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Babad, H. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Low temperature hydrothermal processing of organic contaminants in Hanford tank waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batch and continuous flow reactor tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have shown that organics similar to those present in the single-shell and double-shell underground storage tanks at Hanford can be decomposed in the liquid phase at relatively mild temperatures of 150{degree}C to 350{degree}C in an aqueous process known as hydrothermal processing (HTP). The organics will react with the abundant oxidants such s nitrite already present in the Hanford tank waste to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and ammonia. No air or oxygen needs to be added to the system. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures to produce formate and ammonia and may also react with nitrates or other oxides. During testing, the organic carbon was transformed first to oxalate at{approximately}310{degree}C and completely oxidized to carbonate at {approximately}350{degree}C accompanied by hydroxide consumption. Solids were formed at higher temperatures, causing a small-diameter outlet tube to plug. The propensity for plugging was reduced by diluting the feed with concentrated hydroxide.

Jones, E.O.; Pederson, L.R.; Freeman, H.D.; Schmidt, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Babad, H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device  

SciTech Connect

A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA); Mauger, Joseph (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Eric H. (Mountain View, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The global unified parallel file system (GUPFS) project: FY 2002 activities and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Unified Parallel File System (GUPFS) project is a multiple-phase, five-year project at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center to provide a scalable, high performance, high bandwidth, shared file system for all the NERSC production computing and support systems. The primary purpose of the GUPFS project is to make it easier to conduct advanced scientific research using the NERSC systems. This is to be accomplished through the use of a shared file system providing a unified file namespace, operating on consolidated shared storage that is directly accessed by all the NERSC production computing and support systems. During its first year, FY 2002, the GUPFS project focused on identifying, testing, and evaluating existing and emerging shared/cluster file system, SAN fabric, and storage technologies; identifying NERSC user input/output (I/O) requirements, methods, and mechanisms; and developing appropriate benchmarking methodologies and benchmark codes for a parallel environment. This report presents the activities and progress of the GUPFS project during its first year, the results of the evaluations conducted, and plans for near-term and longer-term investigations.

Butler, Gregory F.; Lee, Rei Chi; Welcome, Michael L.

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chemical and biological systems for regenerating activated carbon contaminated with high explosives  

SciTech Connect

Activated carbon has been used as a substrate for efficiently removing high explosives (HEs) from aqueous and gaseous waste streams. Carbon that is saturated with HEs, however, constitutes a solid waste and is currently being stored because appropriate technologies for its treatment are not available. Because conventional treatment strategies (i.e., incineration, open burning) are not safe or will not be in compliance with future regulations, new and cost-effective methods are required for the elimination of this solid waste. Furthermore, because the purchase of activated carbon and its disposal after loading with HEs will be expensive, an ideal treatment method would result in the regeneration of the carbon thereby permitting its reuse. Coupling chemical and biological treatment systems, such as those described below, will effectively meet these technical requirements. The successful completion of this project will result in the creation of engineered commercial systems that will present safe and efficient methods for reducing the quantities of HE-laden activated carbon wastes that are currently in storage or are generated as a result of demilitarization activities. Biological treatment of hazardous wastes is desirable because the biodegradation process ultimately leads to the mineralization (e.g., conversion to carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, and water) of parent compounds and has favorable public acceptance. These methods will also be cost- effective because they will not require large expenditures of energy and will permit the reuse of the activated carbon. Accordingly, this technology will have broad applications in the private sector and will be a prime candidate for technology transfer.

Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Stenstrom, M.K.; Heilmann, H.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Civil and Engineering Dept.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nano-crystalline powders and suspensions generated using a flow-through hydrothermal process, Part 1: Characterization  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of ultra-fine, nano-crystalline powders and suspensions have been produced using Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS). These materials include single and multi-component iron-, 11 zirconium-, titanium-, nickel-, and chromium-oxide/oxyhydroxide powders. RTDS is a flow-through hydrothermal process capable of producing nano-crystalline particulate material at rates of up to 100 grams of solid per hour. We present the results of characterization efforts on RTDS iron oxyhydroxide and zirconium oxide systems. As-collected RTDS suspensions were characterized using optical light scattering. Separated RTDS powders were evaluated using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, gas adsorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, and chemical analysis.

Darab, J.G.; Buehler, M.F.; Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An active system for the detection of special fissile material in small watercraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to increasing terrorist threats and illegal proliferation of nuclear material and technology, there is a need for increased research in the area of detection of smuggled fissile material, some of which is designated by the International Atomic Energy Agency as special fissile material. This thesis focuses on a hypothetical scenario in which a terrorist organization has managed to smuggle an amount of special fissile material onto a personal recreational watercraft and sail it into a marina. If the boat could be forced to go through a detector system, then the contents could be interrogated and a determination made of whether any special fissile material was aboard. This thesis examines the hypothesis that active interrogation may be used successfully in the detection of special fissile material in such an environment. It shows that it is feasible to use an active neutron system to detect a significant quantity of special fissile material onboard a small boat via the differential dieaway technique. The MCNP Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the use of a pulsed neutron generator to induce fission in the fissile material and then estimate the detector response. The detector modeled was based on elastic scattering-induced recoil protons using pure hydrogen gas. There was a significant difference between the system with and without the presence of fissile material, and the estimated detector response for the system with fissile material present was shown to be sufficiently greater than the response due to background radiation only. Additionally, dose was estimated and found to be small enough that the system would not likely pose a significant radiological health risk to passengers on the boat.

Johansen, Norman Alfan, III

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparative economics of passive and active systems: residential space heating applications  

SciTech Connect

The economic performance of alternative designs are evaluated. One passive design is emphasized, the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design, the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals, income tax credits and low interest loans, upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis, with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford EM Project: WTP ETR Report Date: November 2008 ETR-18 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) are scheduled for completion in 2017, with radioactive waste processing scheduled to begin in 2019. An estimated 23 to 35 years will then be required to complete high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. However, vitrification of low-activity waste (LAW) may extend the WTP mission duration by decades more if supplemental LAW processing beyond the capacity of the present facility is not incorporated. The purpose of this independent review was to

328

Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to further the development of wind energy resources in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program and its Wind Powering America Initiative. Some of the elements of NREL's GIS data used in wind energy activities include wind measurement sites, transmission lines, federal facility information, and modeled wind resources. More complex GIS analyses can define relationships among the mapped wind energy resources, potential energy load characterization, and utility integration problems. A GIS is an outstanding tool for wind energy activities because data can be readily updated and the results of the GIS analyses can be expressed as charts, tables, and maps. These outputs are in digital formats that allow the results of GIS analyses to be quickly and efficiently distributed to the wind energy industry.

Heimiller, D. M.; Haymes, S. R.

2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

A comparison of hydrothermal reservoirs of the Western United States. Topical Report 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a portion of the results from a one-year feasibility study sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to assess the feasibility of constructing a 25 to 50 MWe geothermal power plant using low salinity hydrothermal fluids as the energy source. It contains the results of a comparative study of sixteen hydrothermal reservoirs in the US. The reservoirs were selected for comparison on the basis of available data, development potential, and representativeness of known hydrothermal reservoirs in the US. Six reservoir and fluid criteria were considered the most important in determining the development and power conversion potential: depth and lithology, reservoir temperature, tested flow rate per well, fluid chemistry, magnitude of the reserve and reinjection potential. These criteria were evaluated for each of the selected reservoirs.

Meidav, H. Tsvi; Sanyal, Subir

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lithology and hydrothermal alteration determination from well logs for the Cerro Prieto Wells, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the characteristics of geophysical well logs against the sand-shale series of the sedimentary column of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico. The study shows that the changes in mineralogy of the rocks because of hydrothermal alteration are not easily detectable on the existing logs. However, if the behavior of clay minerals alone is monitored, the onset of the hydrothermally altered zones may be estimated from the well logs. The effective concentration of clay-exchange cations, Q/sub v/, is computed using the data available from conventional well logs. Zones indicating the disappearance of low-temperature clays are considered hydrothermally altered formations with moderate to high-permeability and temperature, and suitable for completion purposes.

Ershaghi, I.; Ghaemian, S.; Abdassah, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Low temperature hydrothermally synthesized nanocrystalline orthorhombic LiMnO2 cathode material for lithium-ion cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline orthorhombic LiMnO2 particles with an average particle size of about 35 nm in diameter were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal process at 160-180 C from trimanganese tetroxide (Mn3O4) prepared ... Keywords: hydrothermal process, lithium ion battery, nanocrystalline, orthorhombic LiMnO2, solvothermal process

Mengqiang Wu; Ai Chen; Rongqing Xu; Yue Li

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin and hydrothermal vent complexes (HVC) in the Karoo Basin in South Africa. The HVC formed during phreatic eruptions from the lower stratigraphic units of the Karoo Basin shows that the vitrinite reflectance and d15 N

Svensen, Henrik

333

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Case studies of low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six development projects are examined that use low- (less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F)) to-moderate (90 to 150/sup 0/C (194 to 302/sup 0/F)) temperature geothermal resources. These projects were selected from 22 government cost-shared projects to illustrate the many facets of hydrothermal development. The case studies describe the history of this development, its exploratory methods, and its resource definition, as well as address legal, environmental, and institutional constraints. A critique of procedures used in the development is also provided and recommendations for similar future hydrothermal projects are suggested.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase I, Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation is based on an analysis of existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies. The principle source of data used was the oil and gas well files maintained by the NDGS. A computer library was created containing all the necessary oil and gas well data in the North Dakota Geological Survey oil and gas well files. Stratigraphic data, bottomhole-temperature data, and chemical data are presented in map form to show the geothermal gradient, temperature, and depth of potential hydrothermal aquifers and the chemical characteristics of potential hydrothermal aquifers.

Harris, K.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Advanced window wall systems have the potential to provide demand response by reducing peak electric loads by 20-30% in many commercial buildings through the active control of motorized shading systems, switchable window coatings, operable windows, and ventilated double-skin facade systems. These window strategies involve balancing daylighting and solar heat gains, heat rejection through ventilation, and night-time natural ventilation to achieve space-conditioning and lighting energy use reductions without the negative impacts on occupants associated with other demand responsive (DR) strategies. This paper explores conceptually how advanced window systems fit into the context of active load management programs, which cause customers to directly experience the time-varying costs of their consumption decisions. Technological options are suggested. We present pragmatic criteria that building owners use to determine whether to deploy such strategies. A utility's perspective is given. Industry also provides their perspectives on where the technology is today and what needs to happen to implement such strategies more broadly in the US. While there is significant potential for these advanced window concepts, widespread deployment is unlikely to occur with business-as-usual practice. Technologically, integrated window-lighting-HVAC products are underdeveloped. Implementation is hindered by fragmented labor practices, non-standard communication protocols, and lack of technical expertise. Design tools and information products that quantify energy performance, occupant impacts, reliability, and other pragmatic concerns are not available. Interest within the building industry in sustainability, energy-efficiency, and increased occupant amenity, comfort, and productivity will be the driving factors for these advanced facades in the near term--at least until the dust settles on the deregulated electricity market.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Levi, Mark S.; Blanc, Steven L.; McConahey, Erin; McClintock, Maurya; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Sbar, Neil L.; Myser, Michael P.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales  

SciTech Connect

Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Advanced window wall systems have the potential to provide demand response by reducing peak electric loads by 20-30% in many commercial buildings through the active control of motorized shading systems, switchable window coatings, operable windows, and ventilated double-skin facade systems. These window strategies involve balancing daylighting and solar heat gains, heat rejection through ventilation, and night-time natural ventilation to achieve space-conditioning and lighting energy use reductions without the negative impacts on occupants associated with other demand responsive (DR) strategies. This paper explores conceptually how advanced window systems fit into the context of active load management programs, which cause customers to directly experience the time-varying costs of their consumption decisions. Technological options are suggested. We present pragmatic criteria that building owners use to determine whether to deploy such strategies. A utility's perspective is given. Industry also provides their perspectives on where the technology is today and what needs to happen to implement such strategies more broadly in the US. While there is significant potential for these advanced window concepts, widespread deployment is unlikely to occur with business-as-usual practice. Technologically, integrated window-lighting-HVAC products are underdeveloped. Implementation is hindered by fragmented labor practices, non-standard communication protocols, and lack of technical expertise. Design tools and information products that quantify energy performance, occupant impacts, reliability, and other pragmatic concerns are not available. Interest within the building industry in sustainability, energy-efficiency, and increased occupant amenity, comfort, and productivity will be the driving factors for these advanced facades in the near term--at least until the dust settles on the deregulated electricity market.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Levi, Mark S.; Blanc, Steven L.; McConahey, Erin; McClintock, Maurya; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Sbar, Neil L.; Myser, Michael P.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

340

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

342

Multiwavelength optical observations of the chromospherically active binary system MS Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here a continuation of our ongoing project of multiwavelength optical observations aimed at studying the chromosphere of active binary systems using the information provided for several optical spectroscopic features that are formed at different heights in the chromosphere (Montes et al. 1997, 1998; Sanz-Forcada et al. 1998). In this contribution we focus our study on the preliminar analysis of the active binary system MS Ser. We have taken H$\\alpha$ and H$\\beta$ spectra in 1995 with the Coude Spectrograph at 2.2m telescope in Calar Alto, and high resolution SOFIN echelle spectra (covering H_alpha, H_beta, Na I D_{1} and D_{2}, He I D_{3}, Mg I b triplet, Ca II H & K, and Ca II infrared triplet lines) in 1998 with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) in La Palma. A strong emission in the Ca II H & K and Ca II IRT lines, coming from the primary component (recently classified as K2IV) is observed. One of the Ca II H & K spectra (at orbital phase near quadrature) reveals that the secondary (G8V) also exhibit a small emission. A near complete and variable filling-in of the H_alpha and H_beta is obtained after the application of the spectral subtraction technique. We detect also some seasonal variations between these two observing runs and in comparation with our previous Ca II H & K observations taken in 1993 (Montes et al. 1995).

J. Sanz-Forcada; D. Montes; M. J. Fernandez-Figueroa; E. De Castro; M. Cornide

1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Velocity-Dependent Friction and Diffusion for Grains in Neutral Gases, Dusty Plasmas and Active Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent and universal description of friction and diffusion for Brownian particles (grains) in different systems, as a gas with Boltzmann collisions, dusty plasma with ion absorption by grains, and for active particles (e.g., cells in biological systems) is suggested on the basis of the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation. Restrictions for application of the Fokker-Planck equation to the problem of velocity-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients are found. General description for this coefficient is formulated on the basis of master equation. Relation of the diffusion coefficient in the coordinate and velocity spaces is found for active (capable to transfer momentum to the ambient media) and passive particles in the framework of the Fokker-Planck equation. The problem of anomalous space diffusion is formulated on the basis of the appropriate probability transition (PT) function. The method of partial differentiation is avoided to construct the correct probability distributions for arbitrary distances, what is important for applications to different stochastic problems. Generale equation for time-dependent PT function is formulated and discussed. Generalized friction in the velocity space is determined and applied to describe the friction force itself as well as the drag force in the case of a non-zero driven ion velocity in plasmas. The negative friction due to ion scattering on grains exists and can be realized for the appropriate experimental conditions.

S. A. Trigger; G. J. F. van Heijst; P. P. J. M. Schram

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Velocity-Dependent Friction and Diffusion for Grains in Neutral Gases, Dusty Plasmas and Active Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent and universal description of friction and diffusion for Brownian particles (grains) in different systems, as a gas with Boltzmann collisions, dusty plasma with ion absorption by grains, and for active particles (e.g., cells in biological systems) is suggested on the basis of the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation. Restrictions for application of the Fokker-Planck equation to the problem of velocity-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients are found. General description for this coefficient is formulated on the basis of master equation. Relation of the diffusion coefficient in the coordinate and velocity spaces is found for active (capable to transfer momentum to the ambient media) and passive particles in the framework of the Fokker-Planck equation. The problem of anomalous space diffusion is formulated on the basis of the appropriate probability transition (PT) function. The method of partial differentiation is avoided to construct the correct probability distributions for arbitrary distances, what is important for applications to different stochastic problems. Generale equation for time-dependent PT function is formulated and discussed. Generalized friction in the velocity space is determined and applied to describe the friction force itself as well as the drag force in the case of a non-zero driven ion velocity in plasmas. The negative friction due to ion scattering on grains exists and can be realized for the appropriate experimental conditions.

S. A. Trigger; G. J. F. Van Heijst; P. P. J. M. Schram

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EASY-II: a system for modelling of n, d, p, ? and ? activation and transmutation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EASY-II is designed as a functional replacement for the previous European Activation System, EASY-2010. It has extended nuclear data and new software, FISPACT-II, written in object-style Fortran to provide new capabilities for predictions of activation, transmutation, depletion and burnup. The new FISPACT-II code has allowed us to implement many more features in terms of energy range, up to GeV; incident particles: alpha, gamma, proton, deuteron and neutron; and neutron physics: self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, pathways analysis, sensitivity and error estimation using covariance data. These capabilities cover most application needs: nuclear fission and fusion, accelerator physics, isotope production, waste management and many more. In parallel, the maturity of modern general-purpose libraries such as TENDL-2012 encompassing thousands of target nuclides, the evolution of the ENDF format and the capabilities of the latest generation of processing codes PREPRO-2012, NJOY2012 and CALENDF-2010 have allowed the FISPACT-II code to be fed with more robust, complete and appropriate data: cross-sections with covariance, probability tables in the resonance ranges, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and 24 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are placed in evaluated data files up to an incident energy of 200 MeV. The resulting code and data system, EASY-II, includes many new features and enhancements. It has been extensively tested, and also benefits from the feedback from wide-ranging validation and verification activities performed with its predecessor.

Jean-Christophe Sublet; James Eastwood; Guy Morgan; Arjan Koning; Dimitri Rochman

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target  

SciTech Connect

A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hormone-Behavior Correlates among Male and Female Psychopathic Participants: Relationship to Gray's Model of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aimed to identify the role of hormonal substrates in relation to Grays (1987) model of the behavioral inhibition (BIS) and activation (BAS) systemsconstructs (more)

Ghebrial, Marian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geochemistry and hydrothermal alteration at selected Utah hot springs. Final report: Volume 3 (revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of Na-K-Ca geothermometry to warm springs in Utah indicates several areas with sufficiently high apparent temperatures to be of interest as geothermal exploration targets. A zone of warm springs in the Bonneville Basin show Na-K-Ca temperatures from 150/sup 0/C to 233/sup 0/C. Examination of Great Salt Lake, Bonneville sediment pore water, and Jordan Valley well-water chemistry indicates that mixing a small percent of these fluids with warm spring water can cause substantial errors in Na-K-Ca temperature estimates. Other saline deposits which may influence Na-K-Ca temperature estimates are the Paradox formation in southeastern Utah, the Muddy Creek formation in southwestern Utah, the Arapien shale in central Utah, the Preuss formation in northeastern Utah, and Playa salts in much of western Utah. The Roosevelt KGRA is the most attractive target identified by Na-K-Ca geothermometry. Hydrothermal alteration, heavy metal distribution, and water chemistry provide additional characterization of the Roosevelt system. Chemistry of a cool water seep (25/sup 0/C) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 241/sup 0/C and SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 125/sup 0/C. A Phillips well flowing from below 1500' (457m) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 262/sup 0/C, SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 262/sup 0/C, and K of 1.5 times the surface spring value. The near surface alteration assemblage is best explained in terms of a decrease in pH of near surface fluids as sulfide oxidizes. Increasing potassium and pH with depth indicates that a K-feldspar stable zone may be intersected with deeper drilling. Geology and alteration were mapped in the Monroe KGRA. (JGB)

Parry, W.T.; Benson, N.L.; Miller, C.D.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EPRI Pre-Conference Workshop: Active Distribution System Management for Integration of Distributed Resources Research, Development a nd Demonstration Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of the EPRI Pre-Conference Workshop: Active Distribution System Management for Integration of Distributed ResourcesResearch, Development and Demonstration Needs, held December 9, 2008. This workshop presented over 20 projects related to active distribution management for distributed energy resource (DER) integration.

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

356

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

357

Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates  

SciTech Connect

A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

Understanding the Formation and Evolution of Ceria Nanoparticles Under Hydrothermal Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and evolution of ceria nanoparticles during hydrothermal synthesis was investigated by in-situ total scattering and powder diffraction. The nucleation of pristine crystalline ceria nanoparticles originated from previously unknown cerium dimer complexes. The nanoparticle growth was highly accelerated under supercritical conditions.

Tyrsted, Christoffer; rnsbjerg; #8197; Jensen, Kirsten Marie; Bjesen, Espen Drath; Lock, Nina; Christensen, Mogens; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Brummerstedt; #8197; Iversen, Bo (Aarhus); (Columbia)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid material is one of the most important factors for production of bioethanol. Conversion for production of sugars for bio ethanol and an alkali free solid material for combustion in an incineration). After combined hydrothermal treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis the maximum sugar, yields were 30 g

360

Recently developed well test insrumentation for low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering drawings, assembly instructions, and recommended usage for several of the instruments developed for low and moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal well testing are presented. Included are the drawings for: a downhole pressure and temperature instrument, a multi-conductor cablehead, a line driver to be used with the downhole pressure and temperature instrument, and a fluid-level detector.

Solbau, R.; Goranson, C.B.; Benson, S.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The global unified parallel file system (GUPFS) project: FY 2003 activities and results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testbed system to conduct investigations and evaluations oftestbed system to conduct investigations and evaluations of

Butler, Gregory F.; Baird, William P.; Lee, Rei C.; Tull, Craig E.; Welcome, Michael L.; Whitney, Cary L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL: Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Geographic Information Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL Preprint January 2001 * NREL/CP-500-29164 D.M. Heimiller S.R. Haymes To be presented at the 39 th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting Reno, Nevada January 8-11, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

363

Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

oxygen isotope compositions of cores and cuttings from Long Valley exploration wells show that the Bishop Tuff has been an important reservoir for both fossil and active...

364

Supercapacitive Properties of Hydrothermally Synthesized Co3O4 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of Light Weight Structure for Wind Turbine Tower by Using Nano- Materials Development of Highly Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for Composite...

365

Hydrothermally Stable, Low-Temperature NOx Reduction NH3 ...  

aging. In contrast, the conventional, commercially available chabazite SCR catalyst, Cu-SSZ-13, exhibits high activity only in 200-550 C range.

366

Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Active Gain-control System for Avalanche Photo-Diodes under Moderate Temperature Variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are promising light sensor for various fields of experimental physics. It has been argued, however, that variation of APD gain with temperature could be a serious problem preventing APDs from replacing traditional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in some applications. Here we develop an active gain-control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. As a performance demonstration of the proposed system, we have tested the response of a scintillation photon detector consisting of a 5x5 mm^2 reverse-type APD optically coupled with a CsI(Tl) crystal. We show that the APD gain was successfully controlled under a temperature variation of DT = 20deg, within a time-cycle of 6000 sec. The best FWHM energy resolution of 6.1+-0.2 % was obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, and the energy threshold was as low as 6.5 keV, by integrating data from +20deg - 0deg cycles. The corresponding values for -20deg - 0deg cycles were 6.9+-0.2 % and 5.2 keV, respectively. These results are comparable, or only slightly worse than that obtained at a fixed temperature. Our results suggest new potential uses for APDs in various space researches and nuclear physics. As examples, we briefly introduce the NeXT and Cute-1.7 satellite missions that will carry the APDs as scientific instruments for the first time.

J. Kataoka; R. Sato; T. Ikagawa; J. Kotoku; Y. Kuramoto; Y. Tsubuku; T. Saito; Y. Yatsu; N. Kawai; Y. Ishikawa; N. Kawabata

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system  

SciTech Connect

The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

Veilleux, J. M. (John M.)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Packaged residential active-solar space-conditioning system. Appendix E. System performance monitoring. Final subcontract report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the testing of four solar space heating systems that had cost and performance characteristics equalling or exceeding competing conventional heating systems. Design concepts for these systems were solicited from the solar industry and field tested by Vitro Corporation. The designers of the four prototype systems were: Calmac Manufacturing Corporation, Contemporary Systems, Inc., Honeywell Inc., and Trident Energy Systems. Vitro Corporation reports the results of field test performance for the four packaged space heating systems. Their review presents the primary performance factors for all systems, comparing them to the best National Solar Data Network (NSDN) space heating systems. Performance factors evaluated and reported on were: collection subsystem efficiency, collector array operational efficiency, percentage of incident solar delivered to loads, collector coefficients of performance, system coefficients of performance, percent collected solar to load, and solar energy to loads/ft/sup 2/ collector/day. The data indicate that these packaged space heating systems compare well with the most recent National Solar Data Network systems.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

FRESH ACTIVITY IN OLD SYSTEMS: RADIO AGNs IN FOSSIL GROUPS OF GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first systematic 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum survey of fossil galaxy group candidates. These are virialized systems believed to have assembled over a gigayear in the past through the merging of galaxy group members into a single, isolated, massive elliptical galaxy and featuring an extended hot X-ray halo. We use new photometric and spectroscopic data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to determine that three of the candidates are clearly not fossil groups. Of the remaining 30 candidates, 67% contain a radio-loud (L{sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of their dominant elliptical galaxy. We find a weak correlation between the radio luminosity of the AGN and the X-ray luminosity of the halo suggesting that the AGN contributes to energy deposition into the intragroup medium. We only find a correlation between the radio and optical luminosity of the central elliptical galaxy when we include X-ray-selected, elliptically dominated non-fossil groups, indicating a weak relationship between AGN strength and the mass assembly history of the groups. The dominant elliptical galaxy of fossil groups is on average roughly an order of magnitude more luminous than normal group elliptical galaxies in optical, X-ray, and radio luminosities and our findings are consistent with previous results that the radio-loud fraction in elliptical galaxies is linked to the stellar mass of a population. The current level of activity in fossil groups suggests that AGN fueling continues long after the last major merger. We discuss several possibilities for fueling the AGN at the present epoch.

Hess, Kelley M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Wilcots, Eric M.; Hartwick, Victoria L., E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: vhartwick@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Prospecting for Hydrothermal Vents Using Moored Current and Temperature Data: Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal and inertial currents and profuse hydrothermal discharge at recently erupted Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, cause relatively large and rapid temperature (T) changes in the near-bottom water column. Measurements show short-term T ...

J. W. Lavelle; M. A. Wetzler; E. T. Baker; R. W. Embley

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

Buckman, Kate Lynn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target  

SciTech Connect

A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design of hybrid optio-vision tracking system with active RFID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation in current RFID technology with an envision design of a hybrid setup with Active RFID and camera technology. Current Active RFID technologies focus on dynamic mesh networks with complex functionality on ...

Hilton, Eric, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-53975 A Review of Market Monitoring Activities at U.S.Markets .9 Market Monitoring Units: Organization and

Goldman, Charles; Lesieutre, Bernie C.; Bartholomew, Emily

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical performance of NiO microspheres with different nanoscale building blocks  

SciTech Connect

NiO microspheres were successfully obtained by calcining the Ni(OH){sub 2} precursor, which were synthesized via the hydrothermal reaction of nickel chloride, glucose and ammonia. The products were characterized by TGA, XRD and SEM. The influences of glucose and reaction temperature on the morphologies of NiO samples were investigated. Moreover, the possible growth mechanism for the spherical morphology was proposed. The charge/discharge test showed that the as-prepared NiO microspheres composed of nanoparticles can serve as an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor due to the spherical hollow structure. -- Graphical Abstract: Fig. 5 is the SEM image of NiO that was prepared in the different hydrothermal reaction temperatures. It showed that reaction temperature played a crucial role for the morphology of products.

Wang Ling; Hao Yanjing; Zhao Yan [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Lai Qiongyu, E-mail: laiqy5@hotmail.co [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Xu Xiaoyun [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Acid-Base Behavior in Hydrothermal Processing of Wastes - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major obstacle to development of hydrothermal oxidation technology has been a lack of scientific knowledge of chemistry in hydrothermal solution above 350 C, particularly acid-base behavior, and transport phenomena, which is needed to understand corrosion, metal-ion complexation, and salt precipitation and recovery. Our objective has been to provide this knowledge with in situ UV-visible spectroscopic measurements and fully molecular computer simulation. Our recent development of relatively stable organic UV-visible pH indicators for supercritical water oxidation offers the opportunity to characterize buffers and to monitor acid-base titrations. These results have important implications for understanding reaction pathways and yields for decomposition of wastes in supercritical water.

Johnston, K.; Rossky, P.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrothermal pretreatment to prevent scale during liquefaction of certain solid carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by hydrothermal pretreatment. The said pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The said pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1000 to about 4400 psia. Temperature during said pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 500.degree. to about 700.degree. F.

Stone, John B. (Houston, TX); Floyd, Frank M. (Baytown, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects  

SciTech Connect

A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Tapping the earth's geothermal resources: Hydrothermal today, magma tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper discusses geothermal resources, what it is, where it is, and how to extract energy from it. The materials research activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory related to geothermal energy extraction are discussed. These include high-temperature, light-weight polymer cements, elastomers, biochemical waste processing techniques, and non-metallic heat exchanger tubing. The economics of geothermal energy is also discussed. (ACR)

Kukacka, L.E.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Exploratory benefit-cost analysis of environmental controls on hydrothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the value of environmental benefits generated by environmental regulation of hydrothermal sites was initiated to compare these benefits with the estimated costs of regulation. Primary objectives were to 1) evaluate the environmental damages caused by unregulated hydrothermal resource development, 2) use existing environmental and economic data to estimate the dollar value of preventing expected environmental damages at two sites, and 3) compare the benefits and costs of preventing the damages. The sites chosen for analyses were in the Imperial Valley at Heber and Niland, California. Reasons for this choice were 1) there is a high level of commercial interest in developing the Heber known geothermal resource area (KGRA) and the Salton Sea KGRA; 2) the potential for environmental damage is high; 3) existing data bases for these two sites are more comprehensive than at other sites. The primary impacts analyzed were those related to hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions and those related to disposal of spent hydrothermal brine. (MHR)

Scott, M.J.; Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; King, M.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

CBM processes are applicable to maintenance activities on complex systems. Southwest Research Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems · Jet engines · Wind turbine generators · Marine diesel engines · Natural gas compression

Chapman, Clark R.

387

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.1 Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System Process in Maintenance Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Process in Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Process in Maintenance Activities 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's ISMS process with regard to maintenance activities. Surveillance activities encompass work planning and control, equipment status control, performance of maintenance, return to service, and closeout documentation. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 DOE 5480.19 Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities 2.3 48 CFR 970.5204-2 Implementation of Environment, Safety, and Health into Work Planning and Execution 2.4 10 CFR 830.120 Quality Assurance 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the

390

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. T...

Bromberger, B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Goldberg, M B; Kaufmann, F; Mor, I; Nolte, R; Schmiedel, M; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D; Wershofen, H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermochemical conversion of biomass: an overview of R and D activities sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch of DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively developing renewable energy sources through research and development programs sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch. The mission of the thermochemical conversion element of the Biomass Energy Systems Program is to develop competitive processes for the conversion of renewable biomass resources into clean fuels and chemical feedstocks which can supplement those produced from conventional sources. A description of thermochemical conversion program areas and an overview of specific thermochemical conversion projects sponsored by the Biomass Energy Systems Branch are presented in this paper.

Schiefelbein, G.F.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Ergun, S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Oxygen scavengers - The chemistry of sulfite under hydrothermal conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control of oxygen corrosion is critical to the reliability of steam generator systems. Mechanical deaeration and chemical oxygen scavenging effectively reduce oxygen levels in boiler feedwater systems. This paper reviews the use of sulfites to reduce oxygen and provide corrosion control throughout the boiler feedwater circuit as well as mechanical and operational oxygen reduction methods. The mechanism of oxygen pitting, electrochemical reactions, and the basis of operation of mechanical deaeration are discussed. Estimating techniques for the amount of steam required and a deaerator troubleshooting guide are included. The chemistry of sulfites is covered in detail. Also included are a functional definition of chemical oxygen scavengers and a general discussion of their various types.

Cotton, I.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Mazzini, Adriano

394

Developing an activity-based costing approach for system development and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the use of the Activity Based Costing (ABC) approach to software estimation. Like other more traditional approaches to software estimation, ABC provides man-day estimates. In addition, it also provides detailed costing information ... Keywords: IS project planning, activity-based costing, effort estimation, organizational learning, software process measurement, time and cost estimation

Ginny Ooi; Christina Soh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A cost-based analysis of intrusion detection system configuration under active or passive response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the joint decisions of IDS configuration and alarm investigation capacity under active and passive responses. In active response, alarm events are blocked immediately, whereas alarm events are allowed to access the information assets ... Keywords: IDS configuration, Information security, Intrusion response, Investigation capacity

Wei T. Yue; Metin akany?ld?r?m

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems  

SciTech Connect

In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

Guo, Jiquan; /SLAC

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 2; Annual simulation results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in a companion paper. This paper presents the application of this method to annual simulations of cooling system performance in five cities.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 1; Model description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation-mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in this paper.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

CURRENT TESTING ACTIVITIES AT THE ACRELAB RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY , E S Spooner2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

undertaken within this facility. Testing of PV systems in the ACRELab facilities has included Solar Home Systems and small PV systems for remote communities in Australia. The results of the development of test performance will also be addressed. Keywords: Qualification and Testing, Reliability, Performance 1

400

Reliability testing of active SDHW components. Part III. Development of a fault detection system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a fault detection system developed for solar domestic hot water systems that will assist the homeowner and repairman in detecting major operational faults with the system. A study by the Florida Solar Energy Center showed that most homeowners were unaware of how well their systems were operating. With this need in mind, we developed a system that will detect and display circulation failures, nighttime circulation, freeze protection failure, and overheating protection failure. Cost of the unit using retail prices for components is less than $55.00 (1985 $), excluding the sensors. Fault detection systems are necessary, since it is difficult for homeowners to know the status of their system. Our device is sufficiently developed for industry to use, although further development of some of the sensors and some cost reduction is necessary.

Farrington, R.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Simultaneous activation of multiple memory systems during learning : insights from electrophysiology and modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel cortico-basal ganglia loops are thought to give rise to a diverse set of limbic, associative and motor functions, but little is known about how these loops operate and how their neural activities evolve during ...

Thorn, Catherine A. (Catherine Ann), 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Active improvement of air-conditioning system energy consumption with adaptive thermal comfort approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MSc research project aims to suggest improvements to building air-conditioning control systems, to reduce energy consumption while maintaining the comfort level of the occupants. (more)

Muhammad Saleh, Muhammad Fadzli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste plan  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-465 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Latray, D.A.

1998-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

The global unified parallel file system (GUPFS) project: FY 2003 activities and results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Cary L. Whitney 1 NERSC Center Division ComputationalScientific Computing (NERSC) Center whose goal is to providefile system for all of the NERSC production computing and

Butler, Gregory F.; Baird, William P.; Lee, Rei C.; Tull, Craig E.; Welcome, Michael L.; Whitney, Cary L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360C [570 to 680F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Program on Technology Innovation: Modeling of Single-Well Closed-Loop Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) include one production well and one injection well to use hydrothermal resources to generate electricity. However, the high initial cost of drilling EGS wells is one of the main factors that hurt its competitiveness with other energy sources. The single-well closed-loop EGS (SWCLEGS) is a new type of geothermal power generation technology that aims to eliminate the need for natural hydrothermal resources with a relatively low drilling cost. The objective of...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

An OVAL-based active vulnerability assessment system for enterprise computer networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many security problems are caused by vulnerabilities hidden in enterprise computer networks. It is very important for system administrators to have knowledge about the security vulnerabilities. However, current vulnerability assessment methods may encounter ... Keywords: Attack path, Network security, Open vulnerability assessment language, Predicate logic, Relational database management system, Security vulnerability

Xiuzhen Chen; Qinghua Zheng; Xiaohong Guan

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: US Geothermal Resources Review and Needs Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to lay the groundwork for an emerging process to assess U.S. geothermal resources that might be suitable for development as Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Interviews of leading geothermists indicate that doing that will be intertwined with updating assessments of U.S. higher-quality hydrothermal resources and reviewing methods for discovering ''hidden'' hydrothermal and EGS resources. The report reviews the history and status of assessment of high-temperature geothermal resources in the United States. Hydrothermal, Enhanced, and Hot Dry Rock resources are addressed. Geopressured geothermal resources are not. There are three main uses of geothermal resource assessments: (1) They inform industry and other interest parties of reasonable estimates of the amounts and likely locations of known and prospective geothermal resources. This provides a basis for private-sector decisions whether or not to enter the geothermal energy business at all, and for where to look for useful resources. (2) They inform government agencies (Federal, State, local) of the same kinds of information. This can inform strategic decisions, such as whether to continue to invest in creating and stimulating a geothermal industry--e.g., through research or financial incentives. And it informs certain agencies, e.g., Department of Interior, about what kinds of tactical operations might be required to support such activities as exploration and leasing. (3) They help the experts who are performing the assessment(s) to clarify their procedures and data, and in turn, provide the other two kinds of users with a more accurate interpretation of what the resulting estimates mean. The process of conducting this assessment brings a spotlight to bear on what has been accomplished in the domain of detecting and understanding reservoirs, in the period since the last major assessment was conducted.

Entingh, Dan; McLarty, Lynn

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solar load ratio method applied to commercial building active solar system sizing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hourly simulation procedure is the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. It is capable of calculating the loads and of simulating various control strategies in detail for both residential and commercial buildings and yet is computationally efficient enough to be used for extensive parametric studies. In addition, to a Building Service Hot Water (BSHW) System and a combined space heating and hot water system using liquid collectors for a commercial building analyzed previously, a space heating system using an air collector is analyzed. A series of runs is made for systems using evacuated tube collectors for comparison to flat-plate collectors, and the effects of additional system design parameters are investigated. Also, the generic collector types are characterized by standard efficiency curves, rather than by detailed collector specifications. (MHR)

Schnurr, N.M.; Hunn, B.D.; Williamson, K.D. III

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

B. Bromberger; D. Bar; M. Brandis; V. Dangendorf; M. B. Goldberg; F. Kaufmann; I. Mor; R. Nolte; M. Schmiedel; K. Tittelmeier; D. Vartsky; H. Wershofen

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

Earthquake Swarm Activity Beneath the Tokaanu-Waihi Geothermal System, Lake Taupo, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hypocenters of 4 earthquake swarms (total of 54 events), recorded with a local network between 1986 April and 1987 January, occur within upper crustal rocks of the deeper Tokaanu-Waihi geothermal reservoir; all the events had a magnitude M{sub L} {le} 3.2. Most foci are aligned along two NW-trending basement fault structures along which young rhyodacitic extrusions can be found. The swarm activity has been interpreted in terms of injections into basement fractures of magma from deeper chambers (dyke injection swarm activity).

Hochstein, M.P.; Sherburn, S.; Tikku, J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburg, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

Williams, J.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reactive Separations via a Hydrothermally Stable Hydrogen Selective Membrane. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this SBIR Phase I program, we have successfully completed the fabrication of SiC-based hydrogen selective membranes suitable for use as a membrane reactor for steam-methane reforming applications. Hydrothermal stability was performed for selected membrane to demonstrate their stability for appx. 50 hours under the proposed reforming condition. In addition, several mechanistic study was conducted to elucidate the SiC membrane formation mechanism. This understanding will facilitate membrane optimization work to be proposed for the Phase II study. The reaction study was postponed to the Phase II study.

Ciora, R. J.; Liu, P. KT.

2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparative report: performance of active-solar space-cooling systems, 1981 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. There is comprehensive data on four absorption chiller cooling systems and one Rankine cooling system. Three of these systems, including the Rankine system, demonstrated that solar cooling can be operated efficiently and provide energy savings. Good designs and operating procedures are discussed. Problems which reduce savings are identified. There is also a comparison of solar cooling by absorption, Rankine, and photovoltaic processes. Parameters and performance indices presented include overall system delivered loads, solar fraction of the load, coefficient of performance, energy collected and stored, and various subsystem efficiencies. The comparison of these factors has allowed evaluation of the relative performance of various systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data are provided include: energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; energy savings in terms of dollars; overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; hourly building cooling loads; actual and long-term weather conditions; collector performance; collector area to tons of chiller cooling capacity; chiller performance; normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and cooling solar fractions, design and measured.

Wetzel, P.; Pakkala, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Performance of active solar space-cooling systems: 1980 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the solar absorption cooling process as represented by the NSDN system is presented. There is comprehensive data on eight solar cooling systems in the NSDN. Among these eight systems solar cooling by an absorption chiller is not a cost effective method to use solar heat. This statement is substantiated by careful analysis of each subsystem and equipment component. Good designs and operating procedures are identified. The problems which reduce cost effectiveness are pointed out. There are specific suggestions for improvements. Finally, there is a comparison of solar cooling by absorption chilling and using photovoltaic cells.

Blum, D.; Frock, S.; Logee, T.; Missal, D.; Wetzel, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Business activity monitoring system design framework integrated with process-based performance measurement model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, strong interests in the real-time performance management are increasing to gain competitive advantages in the rapidly changing business environment. For better business performance or continuous process improvement of an enterprise, real-time ... Keywords: business activity monitoring (BAM), business performance, business process management (BPM), key performance indicator (KPI)

Kwan Hee Han; Sang Hyun Choi; Jin Gu Kang; Geon Lee

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Lessons learned from reactive transport modeling of a low-activity waste glass disposal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of reactive chemical transport calculations were conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal ... Keywords: chemical transport, low-level waste, numerical model, unsaturated flow, vadose zone

Diana H. Bacon; B. Peter McGrail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

DVB-H Systems: Quality-Based Active Handoff Assisted by UMTS Return Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Video Broadcasting for Handheld terminals (DVB-H) is a new standard developed by DVB Project consortium to enable the delivery of broadcast transmissions to mobile terminals (such as, cellular telephone, PDA, pocket PC, etc.). Being the DVB-H ... Keywords: Active handoff, DVB-H, Power saving, UMTS return channel

Giuseppe Araniti; Antonio Iera; Antonella Molinaro

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

STARSPOTS, SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT, AND ACTIVE LATITUDES IN THE HAT-P-11 EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the analysis of four months of Kepler photometry of the K4V star HAT-P-11, including 26 transits of its 'super-Neptune' planet. The transit data exhibit numerous anomalies which we interpret as passages of the planet over dark starspots. These spot-crossing anomalies preferentially occur at two specific phases of the transit. These phases can be understood as the intersection points between the transit chord and the active latitudes of the host star, where starspots are most abundant. Based on the measured characteristics of spot-crossing anomalies and previous observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find two solutions for the stellar obliquity {psi} and active latitude l: either {psi} = 106{sup +15}{sub -11} and l = 19.7{sup +1.5}{sub -2.2}, or {psi} = 97{sup +8}{sub -4} and l = 67{sup +2}{sub -4} (all in degrees). If the active latitude changes with time analogous to the 'butterfly diagram' of the Sun's activity cycle, future observations should reveal changes in the preferred phases of spot-crossing anomalies.

Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Aalborg Universitet An active damper for stabilizing power-electronics-based AC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impedance profile seen from the point of common coupling of the converters, such that the potential for connecting renewable energy systems and at the load side as electric drives [1], [2]. The mutual interactions

Chen, Zhe

426

Photovoltaic power converter system with a controller configured to actively compensate load harmonics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photovoltaic power converter system including a controller configured to reduce load harmonics is provided. The system comprises a photovoltaic array and an inverter electrically coupled to the array to generate an output current for energizing a load connected to the inverter and to a mains grid supply voltage. The system further comprises a controller including a first circuit coupled to receive a load current to measure a harmonic current in the load current. The controller includes a second circuit to generate a fundamental reference drawn by the load. The controller further includes a third circuit for combining the measured harmonic current and the fundamental reference to generate a command output signal for generating the output current for energizing the load connected to the inverter. The photovoltaic system may be configured to compensate harmonic currents that may be drawn by the load.

de Rooij, Michael Andrew (Clifton Park, NY); Steigerwald, Robert Louis (Burnt Hills, NY); Delgado, Eladio Clemente (Burnt Hills, NY)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

427

Measurement and modeling of computer reliability as affected by system activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a practical approach to the study of the failure behavior of computer systems. Particular attention is devoted to the analysis of permanent failures. A number of important techniques, which may have general applicability in both ...

R. K. Iyer; D. J. Rossetti; M. C. Hsueh

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Bull. Disas. Prey. Res. Inst., Kyoto Univ., Vol. 45, Part 2, 3 No. 389, February, 1996 27 Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern Continuation By Masaaki KIMURA (Manuscript investigations have revealed that the present central rift system of the Okinawa Trough which is an active Okinawa Trough can be distinguished. The crustal thinning and thus eastward drifting of the Ryukyu Arc may

Takada, Shoji

429

The global unified parallel file system (GUPFS) project: FY 2003 activities and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Unified Parallel File System (GUPFS) project is a multiple-phase project at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center whose goal is to provide a scalable, high-performance, high-bandwidth, shared file system for all of the NERSC production computing and support systems. The primary purpose of the GUPFS project is to make the scientific users more productive as they conduct advanced scientific research at NERSC by simplifying the scientists' data management tasks and maximizing storage and data availability. This is to be accomplished through the use of a shared file system providing a unified file namespace, operating on consolidated shared storage that is accessible by all the NERSC production computing and support systems. In order to successfully deploy a scalable high-performance shared file system with consolidated disk storage, three major emerging technologies must be brought together: (1) shared/cluster file systems software, (2) cost-effective, high-performance storage area network (SAN) fabrics, and (3) high-performance storage devices. Although they are evolving rapidly, these emerging technologies individually are not targeted towards the needs of scientific high-performance computing (HPC). The GUPFS project is in the process of assessing these emerging technologies to determine the best combination of solutions for a center-wide shared file system, to encourage the development of these technologies in directions needed for HPC, particularly at NERSC, and to then put them into service. With the development of an evaluation methodology and benchmark suites, and with the updating of the GUPFS testbed system, the project did a substantial number of investigations and evaluations during FY 2003. The investigations and evaluations involved many vendors and products. From our evaluation of these products, we have found that most vendors and many of the products are more focused on the commercial market. Most vendors lack the understanding of, or do not have the resources to pay enough attention to, the needs of high-performance computing environments such as NERSC.

Butler, Gregory F.; Baird William P.; Lee, Rei C.; Tull, Craig E.; Welcome, Michael L.; Whitney Cary L.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports  

SciTech Connect

This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

Jones, C.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water. This model is consistent with data from seeping mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan, where water of the Azerbaijan SSR, (in Russian), Azerbaijan Acad. of Sci., Baku, Azerbaijan. Kerrick, D. M., M. A. McKibben, T volcano, Azerbaijan, Mar. Pet. Geol., in press. Melard, G. (1984), Algorithm AS 197: A fast algorithm

Mazzini, Adriano

435

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Nash-Cournot Equilibria in Hydrothermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

belonging to company ; fixed cost of power plant belonging to company ; set of thermal plants connected that the proposed model considers thermal and hydro power plants (as it is the case of the interconnected Chilean of duration each, company (which has thermal and hydro power plants) has the following benefit as a function

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

436

Thermopolis hydrothermal system, with an analysis of Hot Springs State Park. Preliminary report No. 20  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopolis is the site of Hot Springs State Park, where numerous hot springs produce nearly 3000 gallons per minute (gpm) of 130/sup 0/F (54/sup 0/C) water. The University of Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group has studied a 1700-square-mile area centered roughly on the State Park. Available literature, bottom-hole temperatures from over 400 oil well logs, 62 oil field drill stem tests, the Wyoming State Engineer's water well files, 60 formation water analyses, thermal logs of 19 holes, and field investigations of geology and hydrology form the basis of this report. Analysis of thermal data reveals that temperatures of up to 161/sup 0/F (72/sup 0/C) occur along the crest of the Thermopolis Anticline within 500 feet of the surface. The hydrology and heat flow of these geothermal anomalies was studied.

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.; King, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thermopolis hydrothermal system with an analysis of Hot Springs State Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermopolis is the site of Hot Springs State Park, where numerous hot springs produce nearly 3000 gallons per minute (gpm) of 130/sup 0/F (54/sup 0/C) water. The University of Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group has studied a 1700-square-mile area centered roughly on the State Park. Available literature, bottom-hole temperatures from over 400 oil well logs, 62 oil field drill stem tests, the Wyoming State Engineer's water well files, 60 formation water analyses, thermal logs of 19 holes, and field investigations of geology and hydrology form the basis of this report.

Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.; King, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) reactive fluid flow and transport in fractured rocks as well as porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reservoir engineering studies of small low-temperature hydrothermal systems in Iceland  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy provides more than one third of the energy consumed in Iceland. Its primary use is for space heating and most of the 28 public hitaveitur (district heating services) in Iceland utilize small low-temperature geothermal fields that have a natural heat output of only a few 100 kW{sub t} to a few MW{sub t}. All of these small reservoirs respond to production by declining pressure and some by declining temperature. During the 1980's the emphasis in geothermal research in Iceland shifted from exploration to reservoir engineering. The reservoir engineering work carried out concurrent with the exploitation of these small fields includes: testing of individual wells, field wide tests, monitoring the response of reservoirs to long-term production and simple modeling.

Axelsson, Gudni

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hydrothermal factors in porosity evolution and caprock formation at the Geysers steam field, California--insight from the Geysers Coring Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)/geothermal industry-sponsored Geysers Coring Project (GCP) has yielded 236.8 m of continuous core apparently spanning the transition between the uppermost Geysers steam reservoir and its caprock. Both zones in the corehole are developed in superficially similar, fractured, complexly veined and locally sericitized, Franciscan (late Mesozoic) graywacke-argillite sequences. However, whereas the reservoir rocks host two major fluid conduits (potential steam entries), the caprock is only sparingly permeable. This discrepancy appears to reflect principally vein texture and mineralogy. Two types of veins are common in the core--randomly-oriented, Franciscan metamorphic quartz-calcite veins; and high-angle, late Cenozoic veins deposited by The Geysers hydrothermal system. The older veins locally contain hydrothermal carbonate-dissolution vugs, which, although concentrated at the larger fluid conduit, are scattered throughout the core. The younger veins, commonly with intercrystalline vugs, consist dominantly of euhedral quartz, calcite, K-feldspar, wairakite, and pyrite--those in the reservoir rock also contain minor epidote and illite. The corresponding caprock veins are devoid of epidote but contain abundant, late-stage, mixed-layer illite/smecite (5-18% smectite interlayers) with minor chlorite/smectite (40-45% smectite interlayers). We suggest that clots of these two expandable clays in the caprock clog otherwise permeable veins and carbonate-dissolution networks at strategic sites to produce or enhance the seal on the underlying steam reservoir. Illite/smectite geothermometry indicates that the SB-15-D caprock clays were precipitated in the approximate temperature range 180-218 C, and those in the reservoir at about 218-238 C. These temperatures, along with occurrence of the clays on commonly etched calcite, K-feldspar, or wairakite, suggest that the clays were precipitated from mildly acidic steam condensate under conditions similar to those now prevailing.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "active hydrothermal system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recent Developments in Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics Applied to Hydrothermal Reservoir Mapping and Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in research and development of four of UURI's projects are reviewed in this paper. First, the development of chemical tracers has evolved to a field test in the Dixie Valley geothermal system in Nevada. Second, the measurement of in situ stress continues to demonstrate changes with location in the orientation of stress within active geothermal systems. Third, we continue to develop hydrologic models of geothermal systems based upon fluid inclusion measurements. Fourth, we are developing equipment that will allow testing of borehole to borehole and borehole to surface electrical resistivity techniques for locating fluid-filled fractures.

Moore, Joseph N.; Nielson, Dennis L.; Wright, Phillip M.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

M2 priority screening system for near-term activities: Project documentation. Final report December 11, 1992--May 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From May through August, 1993, the M-2 Group within M Division at LANL conducted with the support of the LANL Integration and Coordination Office (ICO) and Applied Decision Analysis, Inc. (ADA), whose purpose was to develop a system for setting priorities among activities. This phase of the project concentrated on prioritizing near-tenn activities (i.e., activities that must be conducted in the next six months) necessary for setting up this new group. Potential future project phases will concentrate on developing a tool for setting priorities and developing annual budgets for the group`s operations. The priority screening system designed to address the near-term problem was developed, applied in a series of meeting with the group managers, and used as an aid in the assignment of tasks to group members. The model was intended and used as a practical tool for documenting and explaining decisions about near-term priorities, and not as a substitute for M-2 management judgment and decision-making processes.

NONE

1993-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system being investigated was actually less expensive to install than other less-efficient options, most of which were unable to deliver the required ventilation while maintaining the desired space humidity levels.

Fischer, J

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comparative report: performance of active solar space cooling systems, 1982 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. Five solar cooling systems were monitored in 1982; four of these have absorption chillers and one has a Rankine engine. Of the four absorption chillers, two are directly solar fired and two are boiler fired using solar energy as the preheat to the boiler. The composite data for the five sites covers the period from September 1981 through December 1982. There are 36 site months of data covered in the report. These are all commercial systems with buildings ranging in size from 5000 to 84,000 square feet. There are three evacuated-tube, one flat-plate, and one linear concentrating collector systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data is provided include: Energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; Overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; Hourly building cooling loads; Actual and long-term weather conditions; Collector performance; Chiller performance; Normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and Cooling solar fractions, design and measured. Conclusions and lessons learned from the comparative analysis are presented.

Logee, T.; Kendall, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Improved security for commercial container transports using an innovative active RFID system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The huge number of containers daily involved in the global transportation system opens important logistic and security issues. The matter of improving the management of goods in the harbor and the serious vulnerability problem of containers are relevant ... Keywords: Electronic seals, RFID technology, Secure supply chain, Secure transport, Wireless communications

Francesco Rizzo; Marcello Barboni; Lorenzo Faggion; Graziano Azzalin; Marco Sironi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+Introduction on Low Thermal Energy Stirling Engine Photos from the last friendship get-together #12;-Nano System Engineering Title of his talk: I am a Gaijin: From Dream to Expectation to Reality Dr. Emanuel Leleito International Student Advisor, School of Engineering Title of his talk: Japan Life: Looking Back

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

447

Investigation of the effects of long-duration exposure on active optical system components (S0050)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of long duration space exposure on the relevant performance parameters of lasers, radiation detectors, and selected optical components, was determined. The results and implications of the measurements indicating real or suspected degradation mechanisms were evaluated and guidelines, based on these results, for selection and use of components for space electro-optical systems are established.

Blue, M.D.; Gallagher, J.J.; Shackelford, R.G.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z