National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for active hurricane season

  1. Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of ...

  2. Preparing for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparing for Hurricane Season Preparing for Hurricane Season June 1, 2015 - 9:49am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Hurricane season in the Atlantic begins today and will last through November 30. As the lead Federal agency responsible for coordinating the response to major energy disruptions, the Department of Energy works closely with other Federal agencies, State, local and tribal governments, and our

  3. Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) Energy Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season (June 2015) This presentation is from a DOE-NASEO webinar held June 23, 2015, on forecasting energy infrastructure risk for the 2015 hurricane season. A variety of sources predict a below-normal season, with hurricane intensity lower than the 1981-2010 averages. The presentation includes an overview of hurricane season classification, historic impacts, and

  4. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid ...

  5. DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and

  6. Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm Hurricane Season: Restoring Power after a Big Storm June 5, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the ninth named storm, first hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 2011 hurricane season. | Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Hurricane Irene made landfall on the coast of North Carolina as a

  7. Department of Energy Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is taking to prepare for hurricane season in the United States. ... the Gulf of Mexico and refineries along the shore. ... oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve available for ...

  8. Energy Resources for Hurricane Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Season Energy Resources for Hurricane Season This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino This aerial photo of New Orleans from August 29, 2005, shows a flooded neighborhood with a roadway going down into flood waters. Photo courtesy of FEMA/Jocelyn Augustino Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding.

  9. Impact of the 2008 Hurricane Season on the Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season and its impacts on the natural gas industry

  10. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons- August 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In an effort to better understand what actions the energy industry has taken in response to the 2005 and 2008 hurricane seasons, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

  11. Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season May 15, 2013 - 1:16pm Addthis President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. The group met to discuss lessons learned during the response to Hurricane Sandy, as well as the

  12. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 June 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2008 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted above-normal hurricane activity in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 22, 2008. 1 NOAA projects 12 to 16 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 6 to 9 hurricanes, of which 2 to 5 will be intense, during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November

  13. COLLOQUIUM: Past and Future Hurricane Activity | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 30, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Past and Future Hurricane Activity Dr. Gabe Vecchi Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Presentation: File...

  14. Energy SWAT Team Prepares for Hurricane Season | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    gathered in Washington, D.C. for the last in a series of first-responder training sessions, preparing for the rest of the season and other potential energy-sector emergencies. ...

  15. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hardening and Resiliency U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2010 OE/ISER Final Report 8/16/10 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about

  16. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement - June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1

  17. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2012 1 June 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 24, 2012, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience near- normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 9 to 15 named storms will form within the Atlantic

  18. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 June 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2009 Outlook for Hurricane Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted in its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook released on May 21, 2009 that the Atlantic basin will most likely experience near-normal activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects 9 to 14 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6

  19. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2010 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 27, 2010, predicted that the Atlantic basin will likely experience above-normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 14 to 23 named storms will form within the

  20. Microsoft Word - Hurricane Outlook_v3.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2007 1 June 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The 2007 Outlook for Hurricane Impacts on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production Highlights * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts above-normal hurricane activity in the May 22, 2007 version of its Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook. They project 13 to 17 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin, including 7 to 10 hurricanes of which 3 to 5 will be intense. 1 * Above-normal hurricane

  1. Oceanic Control of Northeast Pacific Hurricane Activity at Interannual Timescales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-10-16

    Despite the strong dependence of the Power Dissipation Index (PDI), which is a measure of the intensity of Tropical Cyclone (TC) activity, on tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), the variations in PDI are not completely explained by SST. Here we show, using an analysis of a string of observational data sets, that the variability of the thermocline depth (TD) in the east Pacific exerts a significant degree of control on the variability of PDI in that region. On average, a deep thermocline with a larger reservoir of heat favors TC intensification by reducing SST cooling while a shallow thermocline with a smaller heat reservoir promotes enhanced SST cooling that contributes to TC decay. At interannual time scales, the variability of basin-mean TD accounts for nearly 30% of the variability in the PDI during the TC season. Also, about 20% of the interannual variability in the east Pacific basin-mean TD is due to the El Nio and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a dominant climate signal in this region. This study suggests that a better understanding of the factors governing the interannual variability of the TD conditions in the east Pacific and how they may change over time, may lead to an improved projection of future east Pacific TC activity.

  2. Sandia Energy - Sandia and Los Alamos Teams Gear Up for Hurricane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    how hurricanes and other disasters disrupt critical infrastructure, such as roads, electricity, and water systems. With the onset of hurricane season, NISAC has two jobs:...

  3. Hurricane Earl

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Historical/Selected Significant Energy Disruptions > Hurricane Earl Hurricane Earl Released: September 3, 2010 2:00 p.m. EDT Map Sources: Infrastructure-Energy Information Administration (GasTran System), Ventyx (Energy Velocity); Hurricane path with 67% likelihood cone-National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Uncheck or check an item to hide or show it in the map. Electric Power Plants (>=100 MW) Coal Hydroelectric Natural Gas Nuclear Petroleum Wood Wind Other Electricity

  4. Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hurricane Sandy situation reports detail the storm's impacts and the restoration activities being taken by the energy sector.

  5. Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure - February 2009 | Department of Energy the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy Infrastructure - February 2009 Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy Infrastructure - February 2009 The energy infrastructure and supply disruptions caused by the 2008 hurricanes were similar but not as severe as those caused by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in 2005. Although worst-day outages between both hurricane seasons were comparable, HurricanesKatrina

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: When hurricanes take aim

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When hurricanes take aim By Michael Padilla Photography By Dino Vournas Thursday, September 01, 2016 Sandia, UNM develop bio-inspired liquid membrane that could make clean coal a reality Officials can soon turn to Sandia's guidance for fast, critical evacuation decisions HURRICANE REVIEWERS - Patricia Pacheco (8114) and Lynne Burks (8116) review Sandia's ongoing hurricane project activities. (Photo by Dino Vournas) When a hurricane approaches landfall, local, state, and tribal governments must

  7. VIDEO: "Clear Path II" Helps the Department Prepare for Hurricane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability In preparation for the upcoming hurricane season -- starting June 1 ...

  8. Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons - August 2010 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration Following the June 2012 Derecho Energy ...

  9. Predicting Hurricanes with Supercomputers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Hurricane Emily, formed in the Atlantic Ocean on July 10, 2005, was the strongest hurricane ever to form before August. By checking computer models against the actual path of the storm, researchers can improve hurricane prediction. In 2010, NOAA researchers were awarded 25 million processor-hours on Argonne's BlueGene/P supercomputer for the project. Read more at http://go.usa.gov/OLh

  10. Hurricane Irene Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historical/Selected Significant Energy Disruptions > Hurricane Earl Hurricane Earl Released: September 3, 2010 2:00 p.m. EDT Map Sources: Infrastructure-Energy Information Administration (GasTran System), Ventyx (Energy Velocity); Hurricane path with 67% likelihood cone-National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Uncheck or check an item to hide or show it in the map. Electric Power Plants (>=100 MW) Coal Hydroelectric Natural Gas Nuclear Petroleum Wood Wind Other Electricity

  11. Hurricane Power Committee | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Utah Phone Number: (435) 635-5536 Website: www.cityofhurricane.comcatego Twitter: @HurricaneUtPwr Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Hurricane-Power-...

  12. OVERVIEW OF RESPONSE TO HURRICANE SANDY-NOR'EASTER AND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OVERVIEW OF RESPONSE TO HURRICANE SANDY-NOR'EASTER AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 26, 2013 I. Introduction Following the severe and widespread impact of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed the preparation, response, recovery, and restoration activities performed within its organization and by the Energy Sector. Understanding the wide range of challenges encountered by owners

  13. Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improvement (February 2013) | Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Following the severe and widespread impact of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed the preparation, response, recovery, and restoration activities performed within its organization and by the Energy Sector. Understanding the

  14. Hurricane Sandy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hurricane Sandy Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast...

  15. Predicting Hurricanes with Supercomputers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting Hurricanes with Supercomputers Share Description Hurricane Emily, formed in the Atlantic Ocean on July 10, 2005, was the strongest hurricane ever to form before August. By checking computer models against the actual path of the storm, researchers can improve hurricane prediction. In 2010, NOAA researchers were awarded 25 million processor-hours on Argonne's BlueGene/P supercomputer for the project. Duration 0:28 Topic Programs Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling,

  16. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures

  17. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Bradley G; Suszcynsky, David M; Hamlin, Timothy E; Jeffery, C A; Wiens, Kyle C; Orville, R E

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  18. Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina PRICE GOUGING PRICE GOUGING

  19. Hurricane Sandy Contingency Operation -- Increase in Micro-Purchase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Sandy Contingency Operation -- Increase in Micro-Purchase and Simplified Acquisition Thresholds for Specific States and Counties Hurricane Sandy Contingency Operation -- ...

  20. President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply September 26, 2005 - 10:47am Addthis Washington, DC On Monday,...

  1. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #39

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-09

    There are 49,300 customers without power in Florida as of 7:00 AM EST 11/9 due to Hurricane Wilma, down from a peak of about 3.6 million customers. Currently, less than 1 percent of the customers are without power in the state. This is the last report we will due on outages due to Hurricane Wilma.

  2. JLab Prepares for 2015 Hurricane Season | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    readyvirginia http:www.vaemergency.govreadyvirginiastayinformedhurricanes Review the information posted to the Jefferson Lab Emergency Management webpage:...

  3. Hurricane Sandy Situation Report #3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Sandy Situation Report #3 Hurricane Sandy Situation Report #3 OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE) SITUATION REPORT #3 FOR HURRICANE SANDY (165.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) September 3, 2010 Situation Report Situation Reports: Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic Storm 2012

  4. Report Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report "Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure" is now available for download.

  5. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  6. Final Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #46

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-26

    According to Entergy New Orleans, electricity has been restored to the vast majority of residents and businesses in the city, except in a few isolated areas that sustained severe devastation from Hurricane Katrina.

  7. Is Your Plant Prepared for a Hurricane?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-07-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program BestPractices fact sheet lists resources for manufacturers and steps they can take to prepare for the devastating winds and floods caused by hurricanes.

  8. Preparing for Hurricane Irene: Follow Local Direction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hurricane Irene is heading towards the East Coast, and while the extent of its impact is not yet known, those who may be effected (even inland areas), should get prepared and follow the direction...

  9. Federal Power Act section 202(c)- Hurricane Rita, September 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 28, 2005, in response to “the massive devastation caused Hurricane Rita, which further exacerbated the dire condition caused by Hurricane Katrina”, a 202(c) emergency order was issued...

  10. Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports December 3, 2012 - 4:07pm Addthis On November 7, a Noreaster began to impact the...

  11. Hurricane Rita Situation Report #1, September 21, 2005 (noon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-21

    Highlights and electricity information are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Rita on outages.

  12. August 29, 2005: Hurricane Katrina | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9, 2005: Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005: Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005: Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005 Katrina, now a Category 4 hurricane, makes landfall at 6:10 a.m. in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, just south of Buras, with winds of 140 mph. Katrina is very large with hurricane force winds extending 125 miles from the center. Continuing northward, Katrina passes just to the east of New Orleans and makes a second landfall near the Louisiana/Mississippi border at 10:00 a.m., with

  13. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #40

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-14

    On 11/12 Florida Power & Light (FPL) announced that crews had essentially completed Hurricane Wilma restoration efforts to all 3.2 million customers in South Florida who had been without power. Electricity restoration efforts are now essentially complete in Florida.

  14. President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply September 26, 2005 - 10:47am Addthis Washington, DC On Monday, President Bush came to the headquarters of the Department of Energy (DOE) to get a briefing on the Nation's energy infrastructure from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Interior Secretary Gale Norton. The briefing, which took place in the DOE Emergency Operations Center, focused on the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and

  15. Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy November 5, 2012 - 6:30pm Addthis Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy remains a high priority. | Photo by

  16. Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response to Hurricane Katrina Department of Energy Response to Hurricane Katrina September 2, 2005 - 9:47am Addthis FACT SHEET Secretary Bodman is leading the most comprehensive response effort to a natural disaster in the history of the Department of Energy (DOE). Even before Hurricane Katrina came ashore, the Department began its work to restore the many significant portions of our nation's energy infrastructure affected by the storm. DOE will continue to work to help bring life-saving and

  17. Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (April 2013) | Department of Energy Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure (April 2013) Two major hurricanes, Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012, have impacted the Northeastern United States over the past 2 years, devastating coastal communities and causing widespread impacts to the region's energy infrastructure, supply, and markets. Although Sandy was weaker than Irene at landfall, Sandy brought

  18. DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects on Gulf Coast | Department of Energy Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast July 19, 2006 - 3:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the Office of Science has provided an additional 400,000 supercomputing processor-hours to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to simulate Gulf Coast hurricanes. The

  19. Atlantic Hurricane Surge Response to Geoengineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, John; Grinsted, Aslak; Guo, Xiaoran; Yu, Xiaoyong; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Rinke, Annette; Cui, Xuefeng; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Lenton , Andrew; Watanabe, Shingo; Ji, Duoying

    2015-09-29

    Devastating Atlantic hurricanes are relatively rare events. However their intensity and frequency in a warming world may rapidly increase by a factor of 2-7 for each degree of increase in mean global temperature. Geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosol injection cools the tropics relative to the polar regions, including the hurricane main development region in the Atlantic, suggesting that geoengineering may be an effective method of controlling hurricanes. We examine this hypothesis using 8 Earth System Model simulations of climate under the GeoMIP G3 and G4 schemes that use stratospheric aerosols to reduce the radiative forcing under the RCP4.5 scenario. Global mean temperature increases are greatly ameliorated by geoengineering, and tropical temperature increases are at most half of those in RCP4.5, but sulphate injection would have to double between 2020 and 2070 to balance RCP 4.5 to nearly 10 Tg SO2 yr-1, with consequent implications for damage to stratospheric ozone. We project changes in storm frequencies using a temperature-dependent Generalized Extreme Value statistical model calibrated by historical storm surges from 1923 and observed temperatures. The numbers of storm surge events as big as the one that caused the 2005 Katrina hurricane are reduced by about 50% compared with no geoengineering, but this is only marginally statistically significant. However, when sea level rise differences at 2070 between RCP4.5 and geoengineering are factored in to coastal flood risk, we find that expected flood levels are reduced by about 40 cm for 5 year events and perhaps halved for 50 year surges.

  20. Solar-Powered Charging Systems to Help Hurricane Recovery Efforts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), is providing solar electric charging stations to help residents of Kiln, Miss., recover from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. ...

  1. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Resilient Communities October 29, 2013 - ... Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. ... an integrated resilience program that leverages our ...

  2. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary of Revised Tornado, Hurricane and Extreme Straight Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites BY: John D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer PDF icon Summary of Revised ...

  3. Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Irene | Department of Energy Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene August 26, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30 am EDT near Cape Lookout, North Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (Category 1). This NOAA GOES-13 satellite image captures Irene’s landfall moment. | Image courtesy of NOAA Hurricane Irene made landfall at approximately 7:30

  4. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    N E T SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT ... (1) natural hazard phenomenon (earthquake, wind, flooding and precipitation) and ...

  5. NREL: Technology Deployment - FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effort FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort May 8, 2013 Natural Disasters, By the Numbers There have been 144 weather/climate disasters since 1980 in which overall damages reached or exceeded $1 billion. In 2005, the estimated economic loss due to Hurricane Katrina was about $187 billion. In 2012, the estimated total loss due to Hurricane Sandy was $71 billion in New York and New Jersey alone. By the time Hurricane Sandy pounded the East Coast on October 29, 2012, it had

  6. President Obama Visits DOE to Discuss Preparations for Hurricane...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The President discussed that in the wake of major disasters like Hurricane Sandy extended power outages can have major impacts on communities and recovery efforts, and that beyond ...

  7. Comparing the Impacts of Northeast Hurricanes on Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More Documents & Publications Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 1 - January 2013 Hurricane Sandy Situation Report 3 A Review of Power Outages and Restoration ...

  8. Tropical Storm Frances/ Hurricane Ivan Situation Report, September 10, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none, none

    2004-09-10

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan in the Florida area. Sections on electric information and oil and gas information are provided.

  9. Tropical Storm Frances and Hurricane Ivan Situation Report, September 9, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-09

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, are provided.

  10. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #35, September 14, 2005 (2:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-14

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  11. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #28, September 8, 2005 (4:00 PM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-08

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  12. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #3, August 27, 2005 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-27

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  13. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #41, September 22, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-22

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  14. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #36, September 15, 2005 (2:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  15. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #8, August 29, 2005 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-29

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  16. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #6, August 28, 2005 (7:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-28

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  17. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #37, September 16, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-16

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  18. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #7, August 29, 2005 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-29

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  19. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #26, September 7, 2005 (5:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-07

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  20. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #5, August 28, 2005 (10:30 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-08-28

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  1. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #31, September 10, 2005 (11:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-10

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  2. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #34, September 13, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-13

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  3. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #33, September 12, 2005 (3:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-12

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  4. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #40, September 21, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-21

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  5. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #42, September 23, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-23

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  6. Hurricane Ophelia Situation Report #1, September 14, 2005 (2:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-14

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Ophelia on power grids.

  7. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #24, September 6, 2005 (6:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-06

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  8. Hurricane Ophelia Situation Report #2, September 15, 2005 (10:30 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Ophelia on power grids.

  9. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #32, September 11, 2005 (11:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-11

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  10. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #38, September 19, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-19

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  11. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #39, September 20, 2005 (3:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-20

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  12. Hurricane Katrina Situation Report #29, September 9, 2005 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-09

    Highlights are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on power grids.

  13. EIA - Daily Report 9/16/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets 16, 4:00 pm Hurricane Katrina in Perspective (see figures below) While the peak crude oil production loss from Hurricane Katrina was similar to Hurricane Ivan last year and even less than Hurricane Dennis earlier this year, the pace of restoration is expected to be much more similar to Hurricane Ivan than any of the other recent hurricanes. For example, while the peak daily loss in crude oil production during Hurricane Dennis was slightly more than suffered

  14. EIA - Daily Report 9/19/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets Monday, September 19, 5:00 pm Hurricane Katrina in Perspective (see figures below). While the peak crude oil production loss from Hurricane Katrina was similar to 2004's Hurricane Ivan and even less than Hurricane Dennis earlier this year, the pace of restoration is expected to be much more similar to Hurricane Ivan than any of the other recent hurricanes. For example, while the peak daily loss in crude oil production during Hurricane Dennis was slightly more than

  15. Microsoft Word - HurricaneComp0508-022609.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Spot gasoline and diesel prices briefly spiked as Hurricane ... The islanded grid was reconnected to the Entergy system ... 2005 Waterford 3 LA Entergy 1,075 Shut Down 82905 91605 ...

  16. Federal Power Act section 202(c)- Hurricane Ike, September 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 14, 2008, in response to Hurricane Ike, a 202(c) emergency order was issued authorizing CenterPoint Energy to temporarily connect electricity lines to restore power to Entergy Gulf...

  17. Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane Katrina September 2, 2005 - 9:46am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman released the ...

  18. Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An exceptional waste management project at a Texas Strategic Petroleum Reserve site following Hurricane Ike in 2008 has won a DOE Environmental Sustainability (EStar) Award for Waste/Pollution Prevention.

  19. Department of Energy's Hurricane Response Chronology, as Referred to by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Bodman at Today's Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Hearing | Department of Energy Hurricane Response Chronology, as Referred to by Secretary Bodman at Today's Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Hearing Department of Energy's Hurricane Response Chronology, as Referred to by Secretary Bodman at Today's Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Hearing October 27, 2005 - 12:34pm Addthis Week 1: August 21 - 27, 2005 Katrina strikes south Florida 8/25 and

  20. Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy November 9, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative What are the key

  1. JLab Guest Lecturer Discusses Hurricane Hunting - By Remote Control! On

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 14 | Jefferson Lab JLab Guest Lecturer Discusses Hurricane Hunting - By Remote Control! On April 14 JLab Guest Lecturer Discusses Hurricane Hunting - By Remote Control! On April 14 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., March 2, 2009 - Learn how the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration are using an unmanned aircraft system to gain information never before gathered about tropical storm systems and how this data is helping them better understand

  2. Tropical Storm Frances/ Hurricane Ivan Situation Report, September 10, 2014 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-10

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, county outage data, and a table for restoration targets/status are provided.

  3. Tropical Storm Frances and Hurricane Ivan Situation Report, September 9, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-09

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, and county outage data are provided.

  4. Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado ...

  5. Hunting Hurricanes...and Data to Help Build Better Offshore Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hunting Hurricanes...and Data to Help Build Better Offshore Wind Turbines Hunting Hurricanes...and Data to Help Build Better Offshore Wind Turbines June 2, 2014 - 12:21pm Addthis ...

  6. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Summary of Revised Tornado, Hurricane and Extreme Straight Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites BY: John D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer

  7. Hurricane/ Tropical Storm Ophelia Situation Report #3, September 16, 2005 (9:30 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-16

    Highlights and electricity information are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Rita on outages.

  8. Microsoft Word - HurricaneComp0508-022609.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy Infrastructure Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy February 2009 OE/ISER Report 2/26/09 p. ii For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman (patricia.hoffman@hq.doe.gov), Acting Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant

  9. Hurricane Rita Situation Report #2, September 22, 2005 (1:00 pm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-22

    Highlights and electricity, oil and gas, and outage information are provided reflecting the current status of the impacts of Hurricane Rita on outages.

  10. ARM - Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reason for the Seasons Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Reason for the Seasons Objective The objective of this activity is to understand the reasons for the seasons and to study the motion of the earth. Materials Each student or group of students will need the

  11. 2015 Open Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Open Season which will run from Monday, November 9, 2015 through Monday, December 14, 2015.  During the annual Open Season period employees can enroll, change, or cancel an existing enrollment in...

  12. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  13. In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety November 6, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Natural gas jitneys like this are Atlantic City's main form of public transportation. These vehicles were used to evacuate vulnerable residents during Hurricane Sandy. This vehicle is fueling up at a natural gas station built, owned, and operated by Clean Energy Fuels, who kept the station running

  14. Impacts to the ethylene supply chain from a hurricane disruption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Downes, Paula Sue; Heinen, Russell; Welk, Margaret Ellen

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of chemical supply chains is an inherently complex task, given the dependence of these supply chains on multiple infrastructure systems (e.g., the petroleum sector, transportation, etc.). This effort requires data and information at various levels of resolution, ranging from network-level distribution systems to individual chemical reactions. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has integrated its existing simulation and infrastructure analysis capabilities with chemical data models to analyze the chemical supply chains of several nationally critical chemical commodities. This paper describes how Sandia models the ethylene supply chain; that is, the supply chain for the most widely used raw material for plastics production including a description of the types of data and modeling capabilities that are required to represent the ethylene supply chain. The paper concludes with a description of Sandia's use the model to project how the supply chain would be affected by and adapt to a disruptive scenario hurricane.

  15. Baseline Design of a Hurricane-Resilient Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Schreck, S.; Maples, B.; Anderson, M.; Finucane, Z.; Raina, A.

    2014-10-01

    Under U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored research FOA 415, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory led a team of research groups to produce a complete design of a large wind turbine system to be deployable in the western Gulf of Mexico region. As such, the turbine and its support structure would be subjected to hurricane-loading conditions. Among the goals of this research was the exploration of advanced and innovative configurations that would help decrease the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of the design, and the expansion of the basic IEC design load cases (DLCs) to include hurricane environmental conditions. The wind turbine chosen was a three-bladed, downwind, direct-drive, 10-MW rated machine. The rotor blade was optimized based on an IEC load suite analysis. The drivetrain and nacelle components were scaled up from a smaller sized turbine using industry best practices. The tubular steel tower was sized using ultimate load values derived from the rotor optimization analysis. The substructure is an innovative battered and raked jacket structure. The innovative turbine has also been modeled within an aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool, and future papers will discuss results of the dynamic response analysis for select DLCs. Although multiple design iterations could not be performed because of limited resources in this study, and are left to future research, the obtained data will offer a good indication of the expected LCOE for large offshore wind turbines to be deployed in subtropical U.S. waters, and the impact design innovations can have on this value.

  16. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2014-04-01

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbine response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.

  17. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability is Closely Monitoring Hurricane Irene (2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is closely monitoring Hurricane Irene as it travels up the U.S. coast and is publishing Situation Reports.

  18. Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    just launched a web page with information about Hurricane Earl from an energy perspective. ... The web page also features links to additional related information and will be updated as ...

  19. Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005, was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Grid Resilience Capabilities- Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Risk Predictions for the 2015 Hurricane Season DOE-NASEO Webinar on Forecasting Energy Infrastructure Risk for the 2015 Hurricane Season June 23, 2015 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability US Department of Energy What is a normal Hurricane Season ?  NOAA classifies 13 of the 20 seasons since 1995 as above normal, with eight being very active (i.e., hyperactive defined by ACE > 165% of median). - Only three seasons since 1995 were below normal (1997, 2009, and 2013). - The

  1. OPEN SEASON CHECK LIST

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FSAFEDS brochure https:www.fsafeds.comGEMFSAFEDSFormsOPM- FSA-OVTF-10-031.pdf Talk to an FSAFEDS representative Open Season benefits fair Contact your agency HR staff...

  2. Four seasons of giving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Four seasons of giving We value a culture of giving and appreciate our employees' on-going volunteerism throughout Northern New...

  3. Hurricane Sandy Contingency Operation-- Increase in Micro-Purchase and Simplified Acquisition Thresholds for Specific States and Counties

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Senior Procurement Executive (SPE) has increased the micro-purchase and simplified acquisition thresholds for Hurricane Sandy Contingency Operation.

  4. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 1 June 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 6, 2006 Release Special Focus: Hurricane Season June 1 marked the start of the hurricane season, which lasts through the end of November. The Atlantic hurricane season of 2005 was the most active season since accurate record-keeping began in 1944. In fact, last year's 27 named Atlantic storms included 15 hurricanes, 7 of which were classified as Category 3 or greater. The paths of 5 of these major hurricanes passed through the Gulf of Mexico,

  5. Moist multi-scale models for the hurricane embryo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Xing, Yulong; Mohammadian, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Determining the finite-amplitude preconditioned states in the hurricane embryo, which lead to tropical cyclogenesis, is a central issue in contemporary meteorology. In the embryo there is competition between different preconditioning mechanisms involving hydrodynamics and moist thermodynamics, which can lead to cyclogenesis. Here systematic asymptotic methods from applied mathematics are utilized to develop new simplified moist multi-scale models starting from the moist anelastic equations. Three interesting multi-scale models emerge in the analysis. The balanced mesoscale vortex (BMV) dynamics and the microscale balanced hot tower (BHT) dynamics involve simplified balanced equations without gravity waves for vertical vorticity amplification due to moist heat sources and incorporate nonlinear advective fluxes across scales. The BMV model is the central one for tropical cyclogenesis in the embryo. The moist mesoscale wave (MMW) dynamics involves simplified equations for mesoscale moisture fluctuations, as well as linear hydrostatic waves driven by heat sources from moisture and eddy flux divergences. A simplified cloud physics model for deep convection is introduced here and used to study moist axisymmetric plumes in the BHT model. A simple application in periodic geometry involving the effects of mesoscale vertical shear and moist microscale hot towers on vortex amplification is developed here to illustrate features of the coupled multi-scale models. These results illustrate the use of these models in isolating key mechanisms in the embryo in a simplified content.

  6. Hurricanes in an Aquaplanet World: Implications of the Impacts of External Forcing and Model Horizontal Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Wehner, Michael F.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-02

    High-resolution climate models have been shown to improve the statistics of tropical storms and hurricanes compared to low-resolution models. The impact of increasing horizontal resolution in the tropical storm simulation is investigated exclusively using a series of Atmospheric Global Climate Model (AGCM) runs with idealized aquaplanet steady-state boundary conditions and a fixed operational storm-tracking algorithm. The results show that increasing horizontal resolution helps to detect more hurricanes, simulate stronger extreme rainfall, and emulate better storm structures in the models. However, increasing model resolution does not necessarily produce stronger hurricanes in terms of maximum wind speed, minimum sea level pressure, and mean precipitation, as the increased number of storms simulated by high-resolution models is mainly associated with weaker storms. The spatial scale at which the analyses are conducted appears to have more important control on these meteorological statistics compared to horizontal resolution of the model grid. When the simulations are analyzed on common low-resolution grids, the statistics of the hurricanes, particularly the hurricane counts, show reduced sensitivity to the horizontal grid resolution and signs of scale invariant.

  7. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department’s Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Next up in our Smart Grid Week series -- improving electric grid technologies to adequately prepare for emergencies with power outages.

  8. Statement by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on Hurricane Katrina |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on Hurricane Katrina Statement by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on Hurricane Katrina August 29, 2005 - 2:45pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "First of all, on behalf of myself and the entire Department of Energy family, I wish to extend our thoughts and prayers to those people affected by this terrible storm. As with any natural disaster, the first priority is human

  9. New Orleans Schools Recover from Hurricane Katrina with Assistance from DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and NREL | Department of Energy Orleans Schools Recover from Hurricane Katrina with Assistance from DOE and NREL New Orleans Schools Recover from Hurricane Katrina with Assistance from DOE and NREL June 17, 2014 - 11:42am Addthis The solar installation at Warren Easton Senior High School was the first of four installations placed on local schools as part of Solar Schools Initiative program. At 28 kW of thin-film, it is the largest installation in the city of New Orleans. | Photo by Garrett

  10. Omar Hurricane, 2009 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Omar Hurricane, 2009 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's Omar Hurricane, 2009 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page National Security and

  11. Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select

  12. EIA - Special Report 8/29/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the U.S. Oil Market Hurricane Katrina's Impact on the U.S. Oil Market As of 3:00 pm, Monday, August 29 --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by about 1.4 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The MMS also reported that 8.3 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in. The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) stopped making shipments to onshore facilities as of Saturday, and was

  13. F A C T S H E E T Tornado and Hurricane Fire Safety A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tornado and Hurricane Fire Safety A wide range of natural disasters occurs within the United States every year. Natural disasters can have a devastating effect on you and your home. The Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration encourages you to use the following safety tips to help protect yourself, your family and your home from the potential threat of fire during or after a tornado or hurricane. You can greatly reduce your chances of becoming a fire casualty by being able

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    new report published by the Colorado State University (CSU) Department of Atmospheric Science predicts a significantly more active hurricane season for 2008 than the average...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    new report published by the Colorado State University (CSU) Department of Atmospheric Science predicts a significantly more active hurricane season for 2008 than the average...

  16. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebdon, F.J.

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  17. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call ...

  18. New Energy Department Team Established to Help Local Authorities Get Gas Stations Impacted by Hurricane Sandy Back Online

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the government-wide effort to assist the response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy, the Energy Department has established a team to assist local authorities in their efforts to get help get gas stations back online.

  19. New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2014 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  2. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  3. A Woman of All Seasons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Woman of All Seasons Pittsburgh, Pa. - Lilas Soukup, a 35-year employee at NETL, has been recognized by the Pittsburgh Federal Executive Board (FEB) as the 2013 Woman of the Year....

  4. The season of giving begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The season of giving begins Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit The season of giving begins Lab employees encouraged to donate to area communities. September 1, 2016 Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Los Alamos employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Director, Community Partnerships Office Kathy Keith Email Editor Whitney

  5. Four Seasons Windpower, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seasons Windpower, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Four Seasons Windpower, LLC Address: 1697 Wilbur Road Place: Medina, Ohio Zip: 44256 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product:...

  6. Microsoft Word - 2011_sp_02.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration June 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2011 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 19, 2011, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience above-normal tropical weather activity during this year's hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA

  7. Microsoft Word - January HighlightsFinal.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Supplement: 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico Highlights  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, released on May 24, 2012, predicts that the Atlantic basin likely will experience near- normal tropical weather activity during the upcoming hurricane season (June 1 - November 30). 1 NOAA projects that 9 to 15 named storms will form within the Atlantic Basin over the next 6 months, including 4 to 8

  8. EIA - Daily Report 9/12/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets 2, 5:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 12, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 860,636 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 57.38 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.784 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 37.84 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas

  9. EIA - Daily Report 9/13/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets Tuesday, September 13, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 12, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 846,720 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 56.45 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which had been1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.720 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 37.20 percent of daily Gulf of

  10. EIA - Daily Report 9/14/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets Wednesday, September 14, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 14, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 843,725 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 56.25 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which had been 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.518 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 35.18 percent of daily Gulf

  11. EIA - Daily Report 9/15/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets Thursday, September 15, 3:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 15, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 842,091 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 56.14 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which had been 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.411 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 34.11 percent of daily Gulf of

  12. EIA - Daily Report 9/7/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets 7, 3:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 7, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 861,000 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 57.37 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 4.0360 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 40.36 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas

  13. EIA - Special Report 8/30/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 30, 3:00 pm --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time August 30, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 1.4 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to about 95 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production. The MMS also reported that 8.8 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 88 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas production. The Louisiana

  14. EIA - Special Report 8/31/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wednesday, August 31, 4:00 pm --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time August 31, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 1.371 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to about 91.45 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 8.345 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 83.46 percent of daily

  15. EIA - Special Report 9/1/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thursday, September 1, 3:00 pm --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time September 1, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 1.356 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 90.43 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 7.866 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 78.66 percent of daily

  16. EIA - Special Report 9/2/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets Friday, September 2, 4:00 pm --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time September 2, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 1.328 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 88.53 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 7.248 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent

  17. EIA - Special Report 9/6/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets September 6, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time September 6, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 870,000 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 58.02 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 4.160 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 41.6 percent of daily Gulf of

  18. EIA - Special Report 9/8/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets 8, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 September 7, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 901,726 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 60.12 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 4.020 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 40.20 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas

  19. EIA - Special Report 9/9/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets 9, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), 11:30 September 9, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by 898,161 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 59.88 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 3.829 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 38.29 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas production

  20. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  1. NOVA Making Stuff Season 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leombruni, Lisa; Paulsen, Christine Andrews

    2014-12-12

    Over the course of four weeks in fall 2013, 11.7 million Americans tuned in to PBS to follow host David Pogue as he led them in search of engineering and scientific breakthroughs poised to change our world. Levitating trains, quantum computers, robotic bees, and bomb-detecting plants—these were just a few of the cutting-edge innovations brought into the living rooms of families across the country in NOVA’s four-part series, Making Stuff: Faster, Wilder, Colder, and Safer. Each of the four one-hour programs gave viewers a behind-the-scenes look at novel technologies poised to change our world—showing them how basic research and scientific discovery can hold the keys to transforming how we live. Making Stuff Season 2 (MS2) combined true entertainment with educational value, creating a popular and engaging series that brought accessible science into the homes of millions. NOVA’s goal to engage the public with such technological innovation and basic research extended beyond the broadcast series, including a variety of online, educational, and promotional activities: original online science reporting, web-only short-form videos, a new online quiz-game, social media engagement and promotion, an educational outreach “toolkit” for science educators to create their own “makerspaces,” an online community of practice, a series of nationwide Innovation Cafés, educator professional development, a suite of teacher resources, an “Idealab,” participation in national conferences, and specialized station relation and marketing. A summative evaluation of the MS2 project indicates that overall, these activities helped make a significant impact on the viewers, users, and participants that NOVA reached. The final evaluation conducted by Concord Evaluation Group (CEG) confidently concluded that the broadcast, website, and outreach activities were successful at achieving the project’s intended impacts. CEG reported that the MS2 series and website content were

  2. Hurricane | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    several key sectors located in the projected storm track. This provided situational awareness and advanced warning of potential infrastructure impacts for DHS and Federal...

  3. Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Nominal Prices (dollars per gallon) WTI Crude Oil (Spot) a 1.38 1.11 1.24 1.08 1.06 1.07 -21.4 -4.5 -13.7 Brent Crude Oil Price (Spot) 1.47 1.20 1.33 1.08 1.08 1.08 -26.1 -10.2 -18.8 U.S. Refiner Average Crude Oil Cost 1.37 1.14 1.25 1.00 1.03 1.02 -26.6 -8.8 -18.5 Wholesale Gasoline Price b 2.01 1.84 1.93 1.58 1.46 1.52 -21.6 -20.6 -21.1 Wholesale Diesel Fuel Price b 1.89 1.61 1.75 1.41 1.43 1.42 -25.4 -11.4 -18.8 Regular Gasoline Retail Price c 2.67 2.60

  4. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M; Freer, Eva B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Fernandez, Steven J; Chinthavali, Supriya; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  5. Microsoft Word - S08364_SeasonalVariation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site February 2012 LMS/RVT/S08364 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation, Riverton, Wyoming February 2012 Doc. No. S08364 Page 1 Evaluation of Groundwater Constituents and Seasonal Variation at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site Executive Summary Historical groundwater monitoring at the Riverton site included collecting

  6. Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Leveraging Seasonal Opportunities for Marketing Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (2.92 MB) More Documents & Publications Hit the Road: Applying Lessons from National Campaigns to a Local Context (201) Strengthening the Front

  7. Microsoft Word - Heating Oil Season.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4-2015 Heating Oil Season Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Trigger Mechanism (Cents per Gallon, Except Where Noted) Week Residential Heating Oil Price Average Brent Spot Price ...

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Seasonal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the seasonal variation of land cover which is dominated by the agricultural land use, primarily winter wheat production. http:gi.ssec.wisc.eduairsknutesonindex.html...

  9. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems

  10. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 252014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    released on Tuesday, April 4, 2007, in a report by Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray titled Extended Range Forecast of Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity and U.S....

  12. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season.

  13. Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Four Seasons Solar Power Technology Co Ltd Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China...

  14. Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover ... Title: Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land ...

  15. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial ...

  16. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L.; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A.; Qian, Song S.; Stoy, Paul C.; Thornton, Peter E; Bowden, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Reynolds, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  17. EIA Report 12/27/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Markets This will be the last of our reports summarizing Hurricane impacts. The statistics used in the report can still be found on our site in these specific locations. As of Tuesday, December 27, 5:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 12/22/2005 412,687 26.2% 1,962 19.4% 12/19/2005 414,495 26.3% 2,014 19.9% 12/16/2005 426,282 27.0% 2,228 22.1% 12/15/2005 426,282 27.0% 3,228 22.1% 12/12/2005 441,394 28.0% 2,312

  18. Shoreline, grain-size, and total-carbon distribution changes before and after Hurricane Alicia, Galveston Island, Texas, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothammer, C.M.; Morrison, L.R.; Warkentin, S.L.

    1985-02-01

    Shoreline, grain-size, and sediment total-carbon changes were monitored, on a monthly basis, on three Galveston Island beaches, from January through December 1983. The study area included: (1) East Beach, obstructed by groins and a seawall; (2) Galveston Island State Park, obstructed by fences artificially stabilizing the dunes; and (3) West Beach, an unobstructed beach. Beach profiles revealed the effects of beach obstruction, such as erosion and undercutting at East Beach, and truncation of the dunes at Galveston Island State Park. Approximately 20 m of expansional cutback occurred on the beaches after Hurricane Alicia hit on August 18, 1983. Contour maps of grain-size and total-carbon distributions reflect the movement of beach sand by either onshore-offshore transport during low-energy periods, or longshore, edge-wave transport during high-energy periods. Statistical analyses revealed a small variation in grain size throughout the year. There were well-defined times of either no correlation or strong correlation between total carbon vs. mean grain size, skewness vs. mean grain size, kurtosis vs. mean grain size, skewness vs. mean grain size, kurtosis vs. mean grain size, total carbon vs. percent sand, total carbon vs. skewness, and skewness vs. kurtosis. Strong correlation was found in response to high-energy events, whereas no correlation was found in response to low-energy events. Galveston Island is undergoing net erosion and appears to be in a metastable state, still capable of responding to oceanographic conditions. The economic effects of Hurricane Alicia include considerable loss of the shoreline and destruction of property. Beach nourishment appears to be the only economically feasible solution to counteract the extensive erosion.

  19. Role of Low Frequency Sea Surface Temperature Modes with a Changing Climate in Modulating Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRow, Timothy

    2014-08-03

    The SSTs used in our study come from the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) (Gent et al 2011) and from the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis (CanESM2) (Chylek et al20ll) climate models from the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) (Taylor et al2012). We've examined the tropical cyclones using both the historical simulation that employs volcanic and aerosol forcing as well as the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5). In addition, we've compared the present day North Atlantic tropical cyclone metrics from a previous study (LaRow, 2013) to these climate change experiments. The experimental setup is shown in Table 1. We considered the CMIP5 experiment number '3.2 historical' (Taylor et al,201l), which provides simulations of the recent past (1850-2005). The second set of CMIP5 SSTs is the RCp4.5 experiment where the radiative forcing stabilizes at 45W m-2 after 2100 (experiment number 4.1 in Taylor etal2}ll).

  20. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970

  1. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, D.S.; Sunderland, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Massachusetts has recently started a two year effort to identify and design a significant Central Solar Heating Plant with Seasonal Storage (CSHPSS) in Massachusetts. The work is closely associated with the U.S. participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on CSHPSS. The University is working closely with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist in identifying State facilities as potential sites and to explore and secure State support which will be essential for product development after the design phase. Currently, the primary site is the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus with particular interest in several large buildings which are funded for construction over the next 4-5 years. Seasonal thermal energy storage will utilize one of several geological formations.

  2. Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons - August 2010 Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane ...

  3. Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season Reduce Waste and Save Energy this Holiday Season December 5, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis Wrap your gifts with recycled paper to reduce ...

  4. Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season Fall: Energy Saving Changes with the Season ... reduce standby heat losses by 25%-45% and save you around 4%-9% in water heating costs. ...

  5. February most likely month for flu season to peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February most likely month for flu season to peak February most likely month for flu season to peak The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather, presidential elections, and sporting events. December 20, 2015 The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather,

  6. Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and recommends specific activities to help DOE move forward with its government colleagues and industry partners to increase the resilience of the nation's energy infrastructure. ...

  7. EIA - Daily Report 9/20/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Markets 0, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbl/d) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcf/d) % of Total Federal GOM 9/20/2005 877,275 56.2% 3,482 33.5% 9/19/2005 837,648 53.6% 3,375 32.5% 9/16/2005 840,921 53.8% 3,384 32.5% 9/15/2005 842,091 53.9% 3,411 32.8% 9/14/2005 843,725 54.0% 3,518 33.8% 9/13/2005 846,720 54.2% 3,720 35.8% 9/12/2005 860,636 55.1% 3,784 36.4% source: Minerals Management Service graph of shut-in oil & natural gas production comparison of hurricanes

  8. Nebraska Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    N E B R A S K A Nebraska "Preparing for the Upcoming Heating Season" E N E R G Y O F F I C E State Heating Oil and Propane Conference October 8, 2014 Profile of Nebraska Population - 1,868,516 Occupied Housing Units - 733,570 Occupied Housing by Fuel Used for Home Heating in 2012 Natural Gas 63% Fuel Oil and Kerosene 0.50% Electricity 26% Propane 8% Wood 1.60% All Other Fuels 0.09% Coal or Coke 0.01% Solar Energy 0.04% No Fuel Used 0.20% http://www.neo.ne.gov/statshtml/75.html History

  9. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corrective Measures Analysis > Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures Released: June 4, 2010 Download Full Report (PDF) This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly. Research finds that a significant portion of data collected on EIA’s primary monthly natural gas

  10. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program ...

  11. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor’s Seasonal Fluctuations, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 7, 2012.

  12. BPA revises policy for managing seasonal power oversupply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    policy-for-managing-seasonal-power-oversupply Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  13. A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Race, Caitlin; Steinbach, Michael; Ganguly, Auroop R; Semazzi, Fred; Kumar, Vipin

    2010-01-01

    The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

  14. Energy Resources for Tornado Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tornado Season Energy Resources for Tornado Season The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 The aftermath of a tornado in Greensburg, Kansas. | Photo courtesy of Federal Emergency Mgmt. Agency, NREL 16290 Find helpful resources for incorporating energy into disaster planning, response, and rebuilding. Sustainable Transportation Alternative Fueling Station Locator U.S. Department of Energy Find alternative fueling stations

  15. Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the

  16. Political Activity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activity Political Activity Policy Flash 2011-2, issued October 5, 2010, provided information on the prohibition on using Government property and facilities to conduct political activities. Recently, there was an alleged misuse of the Department of Energy (DOE) e-mail system to conduct political activities by a DOE contractor. This Policy Flash serves as a reminder on political activities in the workplace during this election season. Government property and facilities are not authorized for

  17. Hurricane Response and Restoration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Despite all of ISER’s efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system.

  18. Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company

    1993-04-01

    This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

  19. Slowed demand ushers in summer season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This article is the June 1996 market summary in uranium market. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the U3O8 spot market and three long-term deals for U3O8. There were four deals for UF6 conversion, and the spot market for uranium separation services had no transactions. This was little change from the previous month`s activities, and this slowness was reflected in the price trends of little or no increase.

  20. Diagnosis of extratropical variability in seasonal integrations of the ECMWF model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferranti, L.; Molteni, F.; Brankovic, C.; Palmer, T.N. )

    1994-06-01

    Properties of the general circulation simulated by the ECMWF model are discussed using a set of seasonal integrations at T63 resolution. For each season, over the period of 5 years, 1986-1990, three integrations initiated on consecutive days were run with prescribed observed sea surface temperature (SST). This paper presents a series of diagnostics of extratropical variability in the model, with particular emphasis on the northern winter. Time-filtered maps of variability indicate that in this season there is insufficient storm track activity penetrating into the Eurasian continent. Related to this the maximum of lower-frequency variability for northern spring are more realistic. Blocking is defined objectively in terms of the geostrophic wind at 500 mb. Consistent with the low-frequency transience, in the Euro-Atlantic sector the position of maximum blocking in the model is displaced eastward. The composite structure of blocks over the Pacific is realistic, though their frequency is severely underestimated at all times of year. Shortcomings in the simulated wintertime general circulation were also revealed by studying the projection of 5-day mean fields onto empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the observed flow. The largest differences were apparent for statistics of EOFs of the zonal mean flow. Analysis of weather regime activity, defined from the EOFs, suggested that regimes with positive PNA index were overpopulated, while the negative PNA regimes were underpopulated. A further comparison between observed and modeled low-frequency variance revealed that underestimation of low-frequency variability occurs along the same axes that explain most of the spatial structure of the error in the mean field, suggesting a common dynamical origin for these two aspects of the systematic error. 17 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  2. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore » to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  3. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  4. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Firestone, Mary

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal

  5. Successional trajectories of rhizosphere bacterial communities over consecutive seasons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shengjing; Nuccio, Erin; Herman, Donald J.; Rijkers, Ruud; Estera, Katerina; Li, Jiabao; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; He, Zhili; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Brodie, Eoin L.; et al

    2015-08-04

    It is well known that rhizosphere microbiomes differ from those of surrounding soil, and yet we know little about how these root-associated microbial communities change through the growing season and between seasons. We analyzed the response of soil bacteria to roots of the common annual grass Avena fatua over two growing seasons using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Over the two periods of growth, the rhizosphere bacterial communities followed consistent successional patterns as plants grew, although the starting communities were distinct. Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative tomore » background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities. Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxa that increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere soil displayed phylogenetic clustering, suggesting some conservation and an evolutionary basis for the response of complex soil bacterial communities to the presence of plant roots. The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence. We document the successional patterns of rhizosphere bacterial communities associated with a “wild” annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. Most studies documenting rhizosphere microbiomes address “domesticated” plants growing in soils to which they are introduced. Rhizosphere bacterial communities exhibited a pattern of temporal succession that was consistent and repeatable

  6. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  7. A resilience assessment framework for infrastructure and economic systems : quantitative and qualitative resilience analysis of petrochemical supply chains to a hurricane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vugrin, Eric D.; Warren, Drake E.

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the nation has recognized that critical infrastructure protection should consider not only the prevention of disruptive events, but also the processes that infrastructure systems undergo to maintain functionality following disruptions. This more comprehensive approach has been termed critical infrastructure resilience (CIR). Given the occurrence of a particular disruptive event, the resilience of a system to that event is the system's ability to efficiently reduce both the magnitude and duration of the deviation from targeted system performance levels. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed a comprehensive resilience assessment framework for evaluating the resilience of infrastructure and economic systems. The framework includes a quantitative methodology that measures resilience costs that result from a disruption to infrastructure function. The framework also includes a qualitative analysis methodology that assesses system characteristics that affect resilience in order to provide insight and direction for potential improvements to resilience. This paper describes the resilience assessment framework. This paper further demonstrates the utility of the assessment framework through application to a hypothetical scenario involving the disruption of a petrochemical supply chain by a hurricane.

  8. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  9. New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory By Raphael Rosen September 15, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton (Photo by Elle Starkman) The new colloquium committee. From left to right: Mike Mardenfeld, David Mikkelsen, Committee Administrator Carol Ann Austin, Brent Stratton Just as

  10. South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm ...

  11. Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

  12. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  13. Response of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations to seasonally unpredictable perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, M.J.; Stewart, A.J.

    1990-07-01

    Many questions remain unresolved about the linkages between life history attributes of fishes and the tactics that these organisms employ in response to environmental uncertainty. Such questions include (1). If a perturbation affects the entire ecosystem, what are the consequences for a given population of fish (2) What tactics can a fish employ to increase its chances of leaving offspring (3) Do fish respond differently to such perturbations depending on the season (4) How do these changes relate to the overall resilience of the population The research reported here was designed to address such questions. Mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis) populations in thirteen experimental ponds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were sampled ten times between June 1988, and July 1989 in response to a series of chemical disturbances. During each sampling period the population size and total biomass of Gambusia in each pond was estimated using photographs and a length weight regression. Size-frequency histograms were used to examine seasonal and dose-related changes in population structure. Lipid content and reproductive allotment were measured for a series of fish from each pond on all dates to explore the energy allocation patterns at the individual. 106 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. DOE Project Management Risk Committee (PMRC) SOP | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season May 30, 2007 - 1:25pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today outlined a number of steps that the Department is taking to strengthen its hurricane response system in the United States. Since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, DOE has made operational and administrative improvements, including coordination between federal, state and local leaders, deployment of trained staff, and

  15. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  16. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in

  17. Seasonal Variability in Clouds and Radiation at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, Jim H.

    2005-07-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates three climate observation stations in the tropical western Pacific region. Two of these sites, located on Manus island in Papua New Guinea and on the island republic of Nauru, have been operating for over five years. This data set provides an opportunity to examine variability in tropical cloudiness on a wide range of time scales. The focus of this study is on the annual cycle. The most obvious manifestation of the annual cycle in this region is the oscillation of monsoon convection between Asia and Australia. The impact of the annual cycle on Manus and Nauru is more subtle; however, analysis of radiation and cloud observations from the Manus and Nauru ARM sites reveals links to the annual monsoon cycle. One such link relates to the proximity of Manus to the Maritime Continent, the collection of islands separating the Pacific and Indian oceans. Convection over the large islands in the maritime continent exhibits a distinct annual cycle. Outflow from large-island convection is shown to modulate the cirrus population over Manus. During neutral or cool ENSO periods, convection over Nauru is relatively suppressed. During such periods, Nauru is shown to exhibit an annual cycle in local convective activity. During the inactive season, cirrus are often found near the tropopause over Nauru. These clouds are not formed directly by the outflow from convection. The seasonality and source of these clouds is also examined. Identifying the source of cirrus observed at Manus and Nauru is important because of the potential dependence of cirrus properties on the source of convection.

  18. Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Derivation of Seasonal Cloud Properties at ARM-NSA from Multispectral MODIS Data D. A. ... over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. ...

  19. State of Maine residential heating oil survey 2001-02 season summary [SHOPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, Betsy

    2002-05-22

    This, as the title implies, is a summary report of the price trends for heating oil, propane and kerosene heating fuels for the heating season.

  20. Seasonality in the Natural Gas Balancing Item: Historical Trends and Corrective Measures

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    This special report examines an underlying cause of the seasonal pattern in the balancing item published in the Natural Gas Monthly.

  1. Copper smelters and atmospheric visibility in the southwest, seasonal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nochumson, D.H.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    Seasonal results from a study which evaluated the effects of sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) emitted from 11 copper smelters on atmospheric visibility in 14 national parks and wilderness areas are presented. In addition two alternative strategies for controlling SO/sub x/ are compared. They are supplementary control systems (SCS) and continuous emission controls (CEC). The objective of each strategy is not to improve visibility but is to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). SCS is a strategy that has been used by almost all of the 11 copper smelters. It reduces SO/sub x/ emissions during adverse meteorological conditions through production curtailment. SCS has not been successful at eliminating NAAQS violations. The emissions used for the SCS control alternative are based upon actual copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions and operating conditions during 1979. The year 1979 was selected because it is fairly representative of production levels, though highly variable, from 1965 to 1978 and copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions during the latter half of the 1970s. In more recent years, the copper industry has been economically depressed and copper smelter production and SO/sub x/ emissions have been lower. The southwestern states are implementing the CEC strategy to control SO/sub x/ emissions from copper smelters as part of their state implementation plans. For production levels typical of 1979, the CEC regulations would require about a two-thirds reduction in SO/sub x/ emissions from that allowed under SCS. The study estimates the effect of this reduction upon the improvement of visibility in southwestern national parks and wilderness areas.

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    analysis includes an expectation that the current weak La Nia conditions will transition to neutral or perhaps weak El Nio conditions by this years hurricane season. The...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    impacts. In September of 2008, disruptions caused by Hurricanes Gustav and Ike led to cumulative seasonal production outages of 65 million barrels of crude oil. In...

  4. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  5. Program listing for heat-pump seasonal-performance model (SPM). [CNHSPM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    The computer program CNHSPM is listed which predicts heat pump seasonal energy consumption (including defrost, cyclic degradation, and supplementary heat) using steady state rating point performance and binned weather data. (LEW)

  6. Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season U.S. natural gas inventories are expected to be at record levels to start the winter heating season. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the amount of natural gas stored underground should total almost 4 trillion cubic feet by the beginning of November, reflecting record high natural gas production. Inventories could go even higher if heating demand is not strong during October

  7. Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season Appliance Upgrades to Consider for Next Tax Season April 15, 2013 - 2:28pm Addthis Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Solar energy systems are among the renewable and efficiency purchases that are eligible for tax credits. | Photo courtesy of Industrial Solar Technology Corp. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations

  8. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

  9. Active-R filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  10. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  11. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWarm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Warm-Season Data Assimilation and ISS Test 1993.06.01 - 1993.06.30 Lead Scientist : Dave Parsons Data Availability Complete output from a 10-day simulation using a high resolution mesoscale model is available at 1-hr intervals. Verification of June 1993 IOP Assimilation Dataset and its use in Driving a

  13. EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide EnergySavers.gov: A New Season, a New URL for the Consumer's Guide April 3, 2009 - 5:47pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL If you're a regular visitor to EERE's Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, you may have noticed some changes this week. The site has moved to EnergySavers.gov and is now called "Energy Savers." The same in-depth information is still

  14. Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating season Despite the jump in natural gas use to meet heating demand during the recent winter storm that walloped the East Coast, total U.S. natural gas inventories remain near 3 trillion cubic feet. That's about 20 percent higher than at this time last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that by the end of the winter heating season at the close of March, it expects natural gas inventories

  15. Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Money and Energy All Year! | Department of Energy an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the

  16. Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason

  17. 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings November 27, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Giving energy-efficient gifts is an easy way to save money and energy year-round. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/nano Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental

  18. The magic school bus TV project. Final technical performance report, July 1, 1992--July 31, 1995. Season III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    For Season III, our goal has been to produce 13 new episodes that can optimally benefit from our research and experience in developing this unique series. With a total of 39 episodes, MSB`s third season will move the production from a weekly to a daily series, airing Monday to Friday and Sundays on PBS. As we delivered the 13 Season II episodes to PBS during fall of 1995, we also completed 13 more scripts for Season III production. During the remaining portion of Season III, these 13 scripts are being animated and prepared for delivery to PBS for an October 7th, 1996 launch date. Based on staggered phases of production used since the project`s inception, the development of science topics and show scripting for Season IV occurs at the same time that Season III shows are in animation and post-production. Thus, topics for Season IV shows are being selected, and science research and scripting have also begun during this time period. Both the National Science Foundation and PBS have made a commitment to Season IV, and a proposal has been submitted to Microsoft for consideration.

  19. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  20. Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Entering the 2000-2001 Heating Season

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

  1. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  2. Network Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics Network Activity Network Activity PDSF Network Uplinks to NERSC (dual 10 Gbps) NERSC Uplink to ESnet Last edited: 2011-03-31 22:20:59...

  3. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This

  4. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  5. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  6. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  7. Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Guadalupe; Meneses, Montserrat; Ballinas, Lourdes; Castells, Francesc

    2009-07-15

    Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

  8. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA genemore » sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.« less

  9. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  10. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a