National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for active borrow areas

  1. EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluate the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material.

  2. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  3. A survey of the wetlands and floodplains of the borrow area and wetland/shorebird complex for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.; Yin, S.; Hlohowskyj, I.

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting cleanup operations at the Weldon Spring site, St. Charles, Missouri, that will include development of a 77-ha (191-acre) soil borrow area. Eight wetlands, including riverine and palustrine emergent wetland types and totaling 0.9 ha (2.2 acres), will be eliminated during excavation of the borrow area. A 23-ha (57-acre) wetland/shorebird complex will be created at the Busch Conservation Area. The complex will include 2 ha (5 acres) of palustrine emergent wetland as mitigation for wetland losses in the borrow area.

  4. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  5. borrow_area.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarchW W e e l lJ.b .,

  6. The Market for Borrowing Corporate Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asquith, Paul

    This paper describes the market for borrowing corporate bonds using a comprehensive data set from a major lender. The cost of borrowing corporate bonds is comparable to the cost of borrowing stock, between 10 and 20 basis ...

  7. An Archaeological Survey of Two Borrow Pit Areas: Tract 1 (Gabby's Pit) and Tract 3 (Doorn Bo's Pit) in South East Jefferson County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-28

    Survey using metal detectors and shovel testing and an examination of exposed soil profiles created by heavy equipment during previous sand removal at Tract 1 (Gabby’s Pit). The entire project area is located on a Chenier Ridge that overlooks the Gulf...

  8. Exit Counseling Guide for Direct Loan Borrowers You borrowed Direct Subsidized Loans and/or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Exit Counseling Guide for Direct Loan Borrowers You borrowed Direct Subsidized Loans and/or Direct of Education. The word "loan" refers to one or more Direct Subsidized Loans or Direct Unsubsidized Loans Subsidized Loans) · Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loans (Direct Unsubsidized Loans) · Federal

  9. Evolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of the Fourth Management Plans. This evaluation provides a foundation for change in the approach and contentEvolution and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans FINAL January 2008 Sharon B and Evaluation of the Active Management Area Management Plans Table of Contents Executive Summary i Introduction

  10. Motivation to Move: Physical Activity Affordances in Preschool Play Areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosco, Nilda Graciela

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the association between different types of play area design and level of physical activity of 3-5 year old children. Rationale 1. The majority of USA children are in some type ...

  11. Cost Studies of Borrowing & Subscriptions:Chinese Dissertations Theses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, Vickie; Bolick, Hsi-chu

    2013-03-21

    stream_size 11444 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Borrowing_subscriptions_more_vDoll_hBolick (short).pdf.txt stream_source_info Borrowing_subscriptions_more_vDoll_hBolick (short).pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content...-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Cost Studies: Borrowing & Subscription 3/21/2013 Doll and Bolick 1 Cost Studies of Borrowing & Subscriptions Chinese Dissertations/Theses Hsi?chu Bolick (U of North Carolina) Vickie Doll (U of Kansas) March 21...

  12. UNBC LIBRARY CARD AND BORROWER ACCESS APPLICATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC LIBRARY CARD AND BORROWER ACCESS APPLICATION FORM For Faculty Authorized Users UNBC FACULTY: 20020_________________ Please issue a Faculty Authorized Library card to the following person so that s/he may borrow Library materials and access services in my name for my UNBC academic use. Please extend

  13. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  14. Part 1-To Be Completed By Borrower Borrower Name (Last, First, Initial): Account Number: Social Security Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with your agency and an attorney? 2 Is borrower a full-time employee? 3 Borrower's full-time employment Organizations. The Directory can be found at the following address: http://www.fd.org/odstb_DEF.htm Next click on "Federal Public and Community Defender Directory". This Directory is updated daily. 8 Is your agency listed

  15. Slovene Ultra-Formal Address: Borrowing, Innovation, and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reindl, Donald F.

    2007-01-01

    singular abstraction under Spanish influence (cf. Popinceanu 1963: 84) – although this does not preclude the influence of both languages. Similarly, Swed- ish apparently borrowed its (now defunct) formal pronoun Ni (in the form I, prior to n-prothesis...

  16. The contracting benefits of accounting conservatism to lenders and borrowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jieying, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the ex post and ex ante benefits of conservatism to lenders and borrowers in the debt contracting process. First, I argue that conservatism benefits lenders ex post through a timely signal of default ...

  17. 218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site clean closure soil evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korematsu-Olund, D.M.

    1995-06-12

    This report summarizes the sampling activities undertaken and the analytical results obtained in a soil sampling and analyses study performed for the 218 E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site (218 E-8 Demolition Site). The 218 E-8 Demolition Site is identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment unit that will be closed in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations. The site was used for the thermal treatment of discarded explosive chemical products. No constituents of concern were found in concentrations indicating contamination of the soil by 218 E-8 Demolition Site activities.

  18. Ontario Council of University Libraries Inter-University Borrowing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    institution. Sanctions Queen's University Library will apply sanctions to Queen's patrons who abuse library. Sanctions may include fines, withholding of marks, diplomas, transcripts and suspension of borrowing privileges in all participating libraries and that sanctions may be applied as outlined above

  19. Active I/O Switches in System Area Networks Computer Systems Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Mark

    Active I/O Switches in System Area Networks Ming Hao Computer Systems Laboratory Cornell University, FL 32816 heinrich@cs.ucf.edu Abstract We present an active switch architecture to improve the performance of systems connected via system area networks. Our programmable active switches not only flexibly

  20. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are Fun bookHomelandBorrowing

  1. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are FunBorrowing from Nature to

  2. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are FunBorrowing from Nature

  3. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are FunBorrowing from

  4. Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low-level features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oram, Mike

    ForReview Only Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low Neuroscience #12;ForReview Only 1 Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low, The Netherlands Page 1 of 51 Jounal of Cognitive Neuroscience 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

  5. Efficient Dynamic Contracts: Enabling A Poor borrower To Get Out of Poverty Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    of poverty trap is synonymous to getting loan from the formal sector. The MFI discipline the borrower to saveEfficient Dynamic Contracts: Enabling A Poor borrower To Get Out of Poverty Trap Dyotona Dasgupta, New Delhi 110016, India Keywords: Dynamic Contracts, Progressive Lending, Collateral, Poverty Trap

  6. Home to Home Transfer Learning Activity recognition plays an important role in many areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Home to Home Transfer Learning Abstract Activity recognition plays an important role in many areas such as smart environments by offering unprecedented op- portunities for health monitoring, automation, security for each new physi- cal setting. Our question is "how can we use activities learned in one space, e.g. home

  7. Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene Transistors Fabricated via Transfer-Printing In Device Active-Areas on Large Wafer Xiaogan graphene islands from a graphite and then uses transfer printing to place the islands from the stamp from the printed graphene. The transistors show a hole and electron mobility of 3735 and 795 cm2/V

  8. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  9. Cross Border Trading and Borrowing in the EU ETS A. Denny Ellerman* and Raphael Trotignon**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    multi- national trading system, the European Union's CO2 Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) provides** This paper exploits a little used data resource within the central registry of the European Union's Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) to analyze cross border trading and inter-year borrowing during the first trading

  10. Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013 Maximum eligibility period to receive Direct Subsidized Loans There is a limit on the maximum period of time (measured in academic years) that you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans. In general, you

  11. Wireless ad hoc networks Acknowledgement: Slides borrowed from Richard Y. Yang @ Yale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jie

    are not flexible. ­ Vulnerable to attacks. · Ad hoc networks· Ad hoc networks ­ Flexible, easy to deploy, cheaper · Optimal power assignment /transmission range · Optimal scheduling & multi-hop routing · Node are staticWireless ad hoc networks Acknowledgement: Slides borrowed from Richard Y. Yang @ Yale #12

  12. LENDING TO THE BORROWER FROM HELL: DEBT AND DEFAULT IN THE AGE OF PHILIP II*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stopping all payments to his lenders four times. How could the sovereign borrow much and default often? We). A recent literature focuses on coordination and enforcement of moratoria amongst lenders (Kletzer and Wright 2000; Wright 2002; Kovrijnykh and Szentes 2007).1 Finally, some authors have argued that lender

  13. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Krenzien, Susan

    2012-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). NNSA/NSO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  14. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Farnham, Irene

    2015-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1D, Change 1, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2013a); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). If a participant’s requirement document differs from this QAP, the stricter requirement will take precedence. NNSA/NFO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  15. RESEARCH & RESEARCH INTERESTS Dr. Osisanya has been very active in both experimental and analytical research in the areas of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John M.

    1 RESEARCH & RESEARCH INTERESTS Dr. Osisanya has been very active in both experimental and analytical research in the areas of wellbore stability in shale formations, drilling fluid formulations technology, and environmental studies. MAJOR RESEARCH GRANTS & ACCOMPLISHMENTS 1. Bureau of Ocean Energy

  16. The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1 of the art of synthetic uranium chemistry should provide form to its future in catalysis, drawn from for uranium will be created in part by the quest of researchers to understand the properties and potential

  17. Number of honeybee colonies in areas with high and low beekeeping activity in Southern Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Robert

    of surrounding secondary forest. The number of colonies was determined by genotyping drones caught on drone congregation areas and assigning the drone genotypes to mother queens each heading a colony. We used three sets

  18. Title: Training Effects on Emergency Management Activation Response Subject Area: Social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    a significantly higher proportion of emergency response activation. Supporting Summary: As the frequency scenarios) of the variation in response by our emergency management participants. Long-term training courses with higher levels of training engaged a significantly higher proportion of emergency response activation

  19. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  20. Multivariate Activation and Connectivity Patterns Discriminate Speech Intelligibility in Wernicke's, Broca's, and Geschwind's Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitin, Daniel

    Multivariate Activation and Connectivity Patterns Discriminate Speech Intelligibility in Wernicke. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging with a novel whole-brain multivariate pattern relies on differential multivariate response and connectivity patterns in Wernicke's, Broca

  1. OPS 9.3 Control Area Activities 8/24/98 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t787 (02-94)| Department3 Control Area

  2. Financial Fact Sheet for Subsidized / Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan Borrowers As a student loan borrower, you are making a large investment in your education. With this in mind, it is important that you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Financial Fact Sheet for Subsidized / Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan Borrowers As a student loan to be enrolled half time. Subsidized vs. Unsubsidized: A Federal Direct Loan may be either subsidized or unsubsidized. The primary difference between the Subsidized Federal Direct Loan and Unsubsidized Federal Direct

  3. Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    1 of 3 Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First- Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013 Maximum eligibility period to receive Direct Subsidized Loans There is a limit on the maximum period of time (measured in academic years) that you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans

  4. The Third Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackermann, M; Atwood, W; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Gonzalez, J; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R; Bloom, E; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T; Bregeon, J; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G; Cameron, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P; Casandjian, J; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Abrusco, R; D'Ammando, F; Angelis, A; Desiante, R; Digel, S; Venere, L; Drell, P; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S; Ferrara, E; Finke, J; Focke, W; Franckowiak, A; Fuhrmann, L; Furniss, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I; Grove, J; Guiriec, S; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A; Horan, D; J'ohannesson, G; Johnson, A; Johnson, W; Kataoka, J; Kuss, M; Mura, G; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Leto, C; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M; McEnery, J; Michelson, P; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A; Monzani, M; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Ojha, R; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Paggi, A; Paneque, D; Perkins, J; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T; Rain`o, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Romani, R; Salvetti, D; Schaal, M; Schinzel, F; Schulz, A; Sgr`o, C; Siskind, E; Sokolovsky, K; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stawarz, L; Suson, D; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, Y; Thayer, J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D; Torresi, E; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vianello, G; Winer, B; Wood, K; Zimmer, S

    2015-01-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected with a test statistic (TS) greater than 25, using the first 4 years of data. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>10{\\deg}), which is a 71% increase over the second catalog that was based on 2 years of data. There are 28 duplicate associations (two counterparts to the same gamma-ray source), thus 1563 of the 2192 high-latitude gamma-ray sources of the 3FGL catalog are AGNs. A very large majority of these AGNs (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. Based on their spectral properties, these sources are evenly split between FSRQs and BL~Lacs. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs, but some new subclasses (e.g., ...

  5. Pedestrian Areas in Los Angeles: Influence of design features and market area on pedestrian activity. A case study of three commercial strips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto, Manuel Antonio

    2012-01-01

    David and Ragan, Leslie (1991) Pedestrian and Street LifeOther Considerations for Pedestrian Malls. Washington D.C. ,is a compactly developed pedestrian area characterized by

  6. The influence of sex-role orientation on membership, activity participation rates, and perceived masculinity-femininity of activities at select fitness and health clubs in the Burlington, Vermont area / cby Susan Kay Bulmer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulmer, Susan Kay

    1986-01-01

    THE INFLUENCE OF SEX-ROLE ORIENTATION ON MEMBERSHIP, ACTIVITY PARTICIPATIDN RATES, AND PERCEIVED MASCULINITY-FEMININITY DF ACTIVITIES AT SELECT FITNESS AND HEALTH CLUBS IN THE BURLINGTON, VERMONT AREA A Thesis by SUSAN KAY BULMER Submitted... PARTICIPATION RATES, AND PERCEIVED MASCULINITY-FEMININITY OF ACTIVITIES AT SELECT FITNESS . AND HEALTH CLUBS IN THE BURLINGTDN, VERMONT AREA A Thesis by SUSAN KAY BULMER Approved as to style and content by: J nna M. Westphal ( air of Committee) James H...

  7. Comparison of the MODIS Active Fire Product and Burned Area Product in Detecting Fire Affected Pixels in the Ecosystems of Belize 2003 - 2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van, Warmerdam

    2010-11-24

    The MODIS Active Fire Product (AFP) and the Burned Area Product (BAP) were used to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of fire affected pixels in the ecosystems of Belize from 2003-2009. There was an overall ...

  8. Hydraulic Isolation of Waste Disposal Areas at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cater, F.; Cange, J.B.; Lambert, R.K. [Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spurling, R. [B and W Technical Services Y-12 LLC, National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Julius, J.F.K.; Skinner, R. [United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the location of several large waste disposal areas that received waste from more than 50 years of operation, production, and research activities at ORNL and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Southern Regional Burial Ground for wastes from more than 50 other facilities. The major burial grounds in the valley are Solid Waste Storage Areas (SWSAs) 4, 5, and 6, where wastes were buried in more than 850 unlined trenches and more than 1500 unlined auger holes. The area includes 3 seepage pits and 3 gravel-filled trenches used by ORNL for the disposal of liquid low level wastes. The burial grounds contained several hundred thousand cubic yards of waste, and the combined inventory of the burial grounds and liquid disposal sites was well over 1 million curies. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions for the Melton Valley Watershed at ORNL selected hydraulic isolation of major waste sources as the primary mechanism for remediation of the watershed. Isolation was to be accomplished mainly through the construction of multi-layer caps over the burial grounds, seepage pits, and trenches. Groundwater diversion and collection systems were installed along the up-gradient and down-gradient edges, respectively, of selected caps to enhance the performance of the isolation system. The waste areas were covered with both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type and isolation multi-layer caps. A total of 13 multi-layer caps covering 58.7 hectares (ha) (plan view) were constructed in Melton Valley between 2003 and 2006. The project encountered considerable challenges, not the least of which was its scale, involving simultaneous construction activities at widely scattered sites across the 430-ha watershed. Detailed planning and coordination enabled year-round fieldwork, an essential requirement necessary to retain a skilled, experienced workforce and meet the contract milestone for completion. Other factors key to the success of the project involved the use of an on-site borrow area and construction of a dedicated haul road for transfer of materials from the borrow area to the capping sites. In summary: Remedy effectiveness data obtained during 2007 for the Melton Valley ROD actions collectively indicate that the remedy is generally operating and functioning as planned. Contaminant releases of the principal contaminants of concern in Melton Valley have decreased significantly during and since remediation of the contaminant source areas. Hydrologic isolation systems at the burial grounds functioned as intended as demonstrated by attainment of groundwater level goals in most areas. (authors)

  9. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  10. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Chen, Chien-Jen; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan ; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li; Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ? We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ? LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ? Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  11. “I used to be as fit as a linnet” - Beliefs, attitudes, and environmental supportiveness for physical activity in former mining areas in the North-East of England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy

    2014-12-02

    ). Whilst there is good evidence that the popula industrialised areas show lower levels of activChanging social and physical environments Focus groupshttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.12.002 0277-9536/© 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevie... of occupational physical activity as well as the progressive development of environments that are not fit to support population activity levels. Partic- ularly important was the loss of recreational facilities, public green spaces and sports facilities that were...

  12. PATH TO SUCCESSA ROAD MAP TO SMART STUDENT BORROWING DON'T BE SURPRISED. BE PREPARED. College is an exciting, educational experience but also a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    PATH TO SUCCESSA ROAD MAP TO SMART STUDENT BORROWING DON'T BE SURPRISED. BE PREPARED. College on their loan. The national average is 13.7%. · Don't wait until after your taxes are filed -- file your FAFSA before the priority date of March 1 and update tax information later. · Take advantage of the FREE

  13. Library Rules and Information The Library is open to members of the College for the borrowing of books and other items,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    Library Rules and Information · The Library is open to members of the College for the borrowing colleges, are not permitted to use the Library except by prior appointment with the Librarian. Please make on the shelves at the entrance to the Library. · No reader may smoke, eat or drink in the Library. Any food

  14. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  15. Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

    2011-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

  16. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-15

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO{sub 2} supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H{sub 2} adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area while the suitability of this activation process was proved via SEM, TGA, EA, XRF, and PSD. Being compared with the crystal structures of IRMOF-16 and HCC-1 via XRD and FT-IR analysis, the crystal structure of HCC-2 having an identical chemical structure except the introduction of four hydroxyl functional side groups on the backbone of its organic ligand showed no noticeable change. Specifically, HCC-2 was established as a cubic structure with each axis of about 21.5 A. Moreover, H{sub 2} adsorption isotherms for these HCCs were attained to ultimately examine that hydroxyl functionalities inside their pores have any influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCC-2 having higher number of hydroxyl groups than that of HCC-1 was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of HCC-2 was a cubic-shaped structure with each axis of 21.5 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -OH functionalities on HCCs had negative influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This might be due to impurities rigidly attached to their functional side groups.

  17. Western Area Power Administration's Control and Administration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Borrowing Authority, OAS-RA-12-01

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize » Air SealingDepartmentWest CoastWest

  18. Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

    1997-12-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

  19. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  20. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    which started in 1998. The geothermal system in the area islow temperature geothermal system, that should, due to itsprobably related to geothermal systems associated with other

  1. Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area by passing the exhaust air through a filter and/or adsorbent, such as an activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    I. Policy Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories); 5154.1 (Ventilation Requirements for Laboratory-Type Hood Operations require use of fume hoods to control exposure to hazardous or odorous chemicals. IV. Definitions Activated

  2. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  3. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2003 - 2003...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 - 2002...

  5. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date 1998 - 2002...

  6. Ground Magnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Colwell, Et Al., 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 2011 - 2011...

  7. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1996 - 1996...

  8. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Truckhaven Area Exploration...

  9. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Italy (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area, Iceland (Ranalli & Rybach, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  11. Operations Management oversees all activities directly related to making a product or providing a service. This functional area is responsible for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    are produced forecast future demand for goods and services manage logistics and supply chains (the movement of materials, equipment, energy, information, and human skills into goods and services that satisfy customer dynamic sectors such as energy, transportation, financial services, and manufacturing. This is an area

  12. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGashome /Areas Research Areas

  13. GEOMORPHOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF PLAUSIBLE WATER ACTIVITY AND EVAPORITIC DEPOSITION IN INTERDUNE AREAS OF THE GYPSUM-RICH OLYMPIA UNDAE DUNE FIELD. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    OF THE GYPSUM-RICH OLYMPIA UNDAE DUNE FIELD. A. Szynkiewicz1 , R.C. Ewing2 , K.E. Fishbaugh3 , M.C. Bourke4 , D, P.O. Box 1086, Holloman Air Force Base, NM 88330. Introduction: The Olympia Undae Dune Field. Although the dune sand is likely to be mainly com- posed of pyroxene-bearing sand, in some areas the gypsum

  14. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  15. Surface activity of the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera:Formicidae), in polygyne infested areas of Brazos Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, James Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    the sticks are noted. Four habitat types that are common throughout the landscape matrix of Texas and other regions of the southern U.S. were examined for surface scouting activity: cattle pasture, fallow field, forested edge (post oak forest), and pond edge...

  16. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  17. Annual Report on Environmental Monitoring Activities for FY 1995 (Baseline Year) at Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes baseline contaminant release conditions for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sampling approach and data analysis methods used to establish baseline conditions were presented in ``Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (EMP).`` As outlined in the EMP, the purpose of the baseline monitoring year at WAG 6 was to determine the annual contaminant releases from the site during fiscal year 1995 (FY95) against which any potential changes in releases over time could be compared. The baseline year data set provides a comprehensive understanding of release conditions from all major waste units in the WAG through each major contaminant transport pathway. Due to a mandate to reduce all monitoring work, WAG 6 monitoring was scaled back and reporting efforts on the baseline year results are being minimized. This report presents the quantified baseline year contaminant flux conditions for the site and briefly summarizes other findings. All baseline data cited in this report will reside in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information system (OREIS) database, and will be available for use in future years as the need arises to identify potential release changes.

  18. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike; Matthews, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

  19. State Environmental Policy Act environmental checklist forms for the 218-E-8 Borrow Pit Demolition Site Closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The 218-E-8 Demolition Site was the site of a single demolition event in November of 1984. This demolition event was a form of thermal treatment for spent or abandoned chemical waste. Because the 218-E-8 Demolition Site will no longer be used for this thermal activity, the site will be closed. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy closure requirements of WAC 173-303-680. This closure plan presents a description of the 218-E-8 Demolition Site, the history of the waste treated, and the approach that will be followed to close the 218-E-8 Demolition Site. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. Only dangerous constituents derived from 218-E-8 Demolition Site operations will be addressed in this closure plan in accordance with WAC 173-303-610(2)(b)(i).

  20. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  1. Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At...

  2. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Gardner, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

  3. Recommended Underground Test Area Activity Reference Documents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Rainier MesaShoshone Mountain Rev 0, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOENV-1031, December 2004. (838783) o Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units...

  4. Geographic Information System At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Chena Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date 2005 - 2007 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

  5. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The...

  6. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sladek, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Stillwater Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Stillwater Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Farhar, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  11. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  12. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  13. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Sammel, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Lienau, 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Callender, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  16. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Grant, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  18. Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aeromagnetic Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  20. Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Getman, 2014) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  1. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Smith, 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  2. Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Boreholes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Parr & Percival, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory...

  3. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  4. Public participation in a DOE national program: The mixed waste focus area`s approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The authors describe the Mixed Waste Focus Area`s approach to involving interested Tribal and public members in the mixed waste technology development process. Evidence is provided to support the thesis that the Focus Area`s systems engineering process, which provides visible and documented requirements and decision criteria, facilitates effective Tribal and public participation. Also described is a status of Tribal and public involvement at three levels of Focus Area activities.

  5. Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid Electric Trolleys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the evaluation done by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity on the Knoxville Area Transit's use of propane hybrid electric trolleys.

  6. Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, G.L.; Kilburn, J.E.; Conrad, J.E.; Leszcykowski, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-127), California Desert Conservation Area, Inyo County, California. The Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area has an identified volcanic cinder resource and few areas with mineral resource potential. Hydrothermal deposits of lead-zinc-silver occur in veins and small replacement bodies along and near the Lemoigne thrust fault on the eastern side of the wilderness study area. Two workings, the Big Four mine with 35,000 tons of inferred subeconomic lead-zinc-silver resources and a moderate potential for additional resources, and the Apple 1 claim with low potential for lead-zinc-silver resources, are surrounded by the study area but are specifically excluded from it. A low resource potential for lead-zinc-silver is assigned to other exposures along the Lemoigne thrust, although metallic minerals were not detected at these places. The Green Quartz prospect, located near the northern tip of the study area, has low resource potential for copper in quartz pegmatities in quartz monzonite of the Hunter Mountain batholith. Nonmetallic mineral resources consist of volcanic cinders and quartz sand. An estimated 900,000 tons of inferred cinder reserves are present at Cal Trans borrow pit MS 242, on the southern margin of the study area. The Panamint Valley dune field, encompassing 480 acres in the north-central part of the study area, has only low resource potential for silica because of impurities. Other sources of silica and outside the study area are of both higher purity and closer to possible markets. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activities Activities (7) Aeromagnetic Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Direct-Current Resistivity At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Direct-Current Resistivity...

  8. 200 North Aggregate Area source AAMS report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the 200 North Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past practice investigations.

  9. Selectivity and development of the visual word form area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Li-Wei

    2013-01-01

    An area of left occipitotemporal cortex commonly referred to as the visual word form area (VWFA), has consistently been shown to activate during the processing of written language. However, the exact nature of the region's ...

  10. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  11. Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kennedy-Bowdoin, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis, Et Al., 2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  13. Ground Gravity Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Faulder, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell, Et Al., 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  15. Ground Gravity Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  18. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Leslie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Leslie, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal Inc., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground...

  20. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Broyles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Broyles, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  1. Geodetic Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Newman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date 1995 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "We investigate the effects of...

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S. Geothermal Inc., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  6. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At...

  7. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water...

  8. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At...

  9. Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling...

  10. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas...

  11. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At...

  12. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At...

  13. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At...

  14. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  15. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  16. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test...

  17. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At...

  18. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Stone, Et Al., 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Dahal, Et Al., 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  20. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Witcher, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At...

  1. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Elston, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  2. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  3. Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic...

  4. Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic...

  5. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling...

  6. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  7. Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  8. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  9. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling...

  10. Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging...

  11. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  14. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

  15. Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova & Malin, 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  16. Micro-Earthquake At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zandt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zandt, Et Al., 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake...

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Hisatoshi Ito, Kazuhiro Tanaka (1995) Insights On The...

  18. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis examining known geothermal sites in New Mexico Notes...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the...

  20. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Conservation, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  1. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging...

  2. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature...

  3. Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  4. Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brown & DuTeaux, 1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  8. Refraction Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Refraction Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Lamb, Et Al., 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction...

  9. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles...

  10. Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log At Valles...

  11. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain...

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground...

  13. Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  14. Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  15. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Blue...

  16. Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reflection Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection...

  17. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue...

  18. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  19. Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential...

  20. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  1. Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Mapping At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At...

  2. Petrography Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Petrography Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Petrography...

  3. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  4. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data...

  5. Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At...

  6. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose & Pearl, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At...

  7. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static...

  8. Electrical Resistivity At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electrical Resistivity At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (KELLER, Et Al., 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electrical...

  9. Analytical Modeling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Brook...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Analytical Modeling Activity Date 1978 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Assessing the accessible energy in known...

  10. Cuttings Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuttings Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings...

  11. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At...

  12. Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Clemons, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  13. Geothermal Literature Review At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  15. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  16. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Beowawe Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Garg, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  17. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  18. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)...

  19. Direct-Current Resistivity At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Garg...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Garg, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  20. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  1. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  2. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  3. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  4. Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  5. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal...

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient...

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral...

  9. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Ross, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Dipole-Dipole...

  10. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At...

  11. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue...

  12. Geothermometry At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Pearl...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Pearl, Et Al., 1976)...

  13. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mariner & Willey, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner & Willey,...

  14. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Goles & Lambert, 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic...

  16. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  17. Remote sensing survey of the Coso geothermal area, Inyo county...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif., is an area of granitic rock exposure and fracture-controlled explosion breccias and perlitic domes. Fumarolic and hot springs activity...

  18. Chemical Logging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Los Alamos...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chemical Logging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  19. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Ordovician shale quartzite MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest...

  20. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  1. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  2. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  3. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  4. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  5. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  6. Underwriting Area-based Yield Insurance to Crowd-in Credit Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Michael; Galarza, Francisco; Boucher, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    crowd-in credit supply from lenders reluctant to carry toofor both borrowers and lenders). We close by arguing thatOn the supply side, lenders are reluctant to increase their

  7. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have years. · Mauna Loa, in Hawaii, is the world's largest active volcano. · The Cascade Range--home to more

  8. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  9. Student Activities Student Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Solar Energy? Activity B How do Atmospheres Produce their Effect Upon Surface Temperatures? Activity C and populations found in developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Figure 4.3 illustrates the actual and projected growths in global population. 0Topic ,Real World Problem: Culprits of Climate Warming and Cooling

  10. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentataboutScalablePhysicist: Christian Bauer 101000 Area

  11. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses -1300 Area

  12. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4B Drawings 4B618-10 and700 Area

  13. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  14. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  15. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial Disposal Areas Material

  16. Theories of Motivation -- Borrowing the Best 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terpstra, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews five approaches to motivation-Maslow's Need Hierarchy Theory, Herzberg's Dual-Factor Theory, Locke's Goal-Setting Theory, Expectancy/Valence Theory, and Reinforcement Theory. On the basis of the review, some general...

  17. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Collingwood CFB Borden 0 10 20 Kilometers Area = 521,900 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population

  18. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  19. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  20. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  1. Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-06-23

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

  2. An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton area,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempstead BiomassAmes,Operations at

  3. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosisWestern United States |

  4. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  6. Addendum to the composite analysis for the E-Area Vaults and Saltstone Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-03-13

    This report documents the composite analysis performed on the two active SRS low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility.

  7. Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 The 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Monroe Urbanized Area Developed for The Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and The Louisiana Department... of Transportation and Development Developed by In association with Neel-Schaffer, Inc. **DRAFT** Adopted Date Here This document was prepared in cooperation with: The Monroe Urbanized Area MPO Technical Advisory Committee and The Louisiana...

  8. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  9. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  10. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    .7 4.1 5.8 27.9 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 4,070,800 22.8% 51% 22% 6% 21% 61% 13% 12% 2% 8% 4% 7.1 3.3 7datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY AREA City of Orillia Durham Region City

  11. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eklund, B.

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  12. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  13. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kienholz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kienholz, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or...

  14. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  15. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  16. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples...

  17. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie & Truesdell, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling...

  18. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Sampling At...

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient...

  20. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  1. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  2. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or...

  3. Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling...

  4. Numerical Modeling At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A numerical reservoir model was created to...

  5. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  6. Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

    1994-06-01

    This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

  7. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    % 7% 6.5 5.5 6.5 68.5 30,100 10% 5% 51% 34% 73% 17% 1% * 3% 7% 7.0 7.2 10.0 * ANCASTER AREA CITYdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 85 ANCASTER AREA CITY OF HAMILTON Mohawk Rd. Main St. Carluke Rd. Governors Rd. Garner

  8. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    ,213,000 38% 13% 35% 14% 60% 14% 16% 1% 7% 2% 5.7 4.1 6.6 30.0 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 3,168,200 23.5% 51% 22datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 GREATER TORONTO HAMILTON AREA Durham Region Peel Region City of Hamilton City

  9. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  10. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Reimer; P. F. Michelson; R. A. Cameron; S. W. Digel; D. J. Thompson; K. S. Wood

    2006-11-21

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  11. Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    367 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 APPENDIX 4 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Fish- eries District to August 31, 1924. U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, Afognak, AK (5 September 1924). 8 p. 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Dis- trict

  12. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  13. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  14. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  15. Area Health Education Center of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington Washington State University Extension's Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington works with university and community allies to promote health for underserved and at-risk populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions

  16. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  17. Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    32 Exam- ples Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power 5xp1 0.93 0.98 0.86 0.82 0 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.07 0.99 duke2 1.01 1.01 0.99 1.13 0.97 e64 1.00 0.51 0.83 1.16 0.50 ex5 0.99 0.89 0.99 0.92 0.96 1.05 0.90 Table 2: Area, delay and power statistics for power script (normalized

  18. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  19. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  20. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO...

  1. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    21] ZigBee Alliance. "ZigBee Smart Energy V2.0”, 2011 [22]Secure remote access to Smart Energy Home area Networks”,Density HEMS SEP Smart Energy Profile HV Home Energy

  2. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  3. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  4. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  5. Multi-area network analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Liang

    2005-02-17

    -1 MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2004 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering MULTI-AREA NETWORK ANALYSIS A Dissertation by LIANG ZHAO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  6. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Research Areas Research Areas Properties of Materials under Extreme Conditions and Hydrodynamics During open solicitations research...

  7. Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a decades-old waste disposal site at the historic Technical Area 21. Pre-demolition activities are beginning, federal project manager with the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office. "We requirements and shipped offsite to an approved waste disposal facility. MDA B was used from 1944 to 1948

  8. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  9. Growth of macroscopic-area single crystal polyacene thin films on arbitrary substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Headrick, Randall L.

    University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA 3) Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca New York, 14853 an alternative approach borrowed from recent research on the crystallization of synthetic spheres from Figure 2). The (001) surface has the lowest free energy, and as a result, when a thin film of anthracene

  10. University of Virginia Housing Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    University of Virginia Housing Areas Copeley Hill Faulkner Copeley III & IV Piedmont Hereford Gardens Lile-Maupin House 2372 Tuttle - Dunnington House 2373 Shannon House 2374 Gibbons House 2375 IvyGardensWay Tree House Drive Grady Avenue University Court Farrish Circle W estview Road Engineer'sWay Gildersleve

  11. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  12. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-05-28

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-?-carotene (?-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute ?-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of ?-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of ?-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of ?-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å.

  13. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  14. CX-012588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Obtain Samples for Potential D-Area Borrow Sources (Revision 1: Develop Borrow Pit 6 and Haul Roads) CX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 41835 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study for the groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties, the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, located adjacent to one another in St. Charles County, Missouri. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE and CE are evaluating conditions and potential responses at the chemical plant area and at the ordnance works area, respectively, to address groundwater and surface water contamination. This work plan provides a comprehensive evaluation of areas that are relevant to the (GWOUs) of both the chemical plant and the ordnance works area. Following areas or media are addressed in this work plan: groundwater beneath the chemical plant area (including designated vicinity properties described in Section 5 of the RI for the chemical plant area [DOE 1992d]) and beneath the ordnance works area; surface water and sediment at selected springs, including Burgermeister Spring. The organization of this work plan is as follows: Chapter 1 discusses the objectives for conducting the evaluation, including a summary of relevant site information and overall environmental compliance activities to be undertaken; Chapter 2 presents a history and a description of the site and areas addressed within the GWOUs, along with currently available data; Chapter 3 presents a preliminary evaluation of areas included in the GWOUs, which is based on information given in Section 2, and discusses data requirements; Chapter 4 presents rationale for data collection or characterization activities to be carried out in the remedial investigation (RI) phase, along with brief summaries of supporting documents ancillary to this work plan; Chapter 5 discusses the activities planned for GWOUs under each of the 14 tasks for an remedial (RI/FS); Chapter 6 presents proposed schedules for RI/FS for the GWOUS; and Chapter 7 explains the project management structure.

  16. Shallow water areas (defined as areas with less than 6 feet of water) are important components of the shoreline ecosystem providing food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dredge to create deep water access to large creeks and rivers. After the initial impacts from-boatable areas. In this way activities in a confined area (e.g. shallow water) can affect both birds and deep of deep water shoreline. As populations on the coastal plain of Virginia grow, more and more development

  17. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  18. Nevada Test Site, 2006 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson

    2007-06-30

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2006 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2006; Warren and Grossman, 2007; National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2006 totaled 98.6 millimeters (mm) (3.9 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 80.7 mm (3.2 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 remains at the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005. The vegetated final cover at U-3ax/bl continues to remove moisture by evapotranspiration. There was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated. Water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received three times natural precipitation. All 2006 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  19. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

  20. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  1. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  2. Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Areas Using A Neuronet Approach Abstract A method is proposed for predicting the distribution of temperatures in geothermal areas using the neuronet approach and, in particular,...

  3. LED Outdoor Area Lighting Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outdoor Area Lighting LED technology is rapidly becoming competitive with high-intensity discharge light sources for outdoor area lighting. This document reviews the major design...

  4. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for outdoor areas. Outdoor Area Lighting (June 2008) More Documents & Publications Philadelphia International Airport Apron Lighting: LED System Performance in a Trial...

  5. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  6. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  7. Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

  8. An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An active seismic reconnaissance survey of the Mount Princeton area, Chaffee County, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: An active...

  9. tight environment high radiation area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle Optical Diagnostics 01-13-2006 1 #12 electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle One set of optics per viewport 11 #12; to infinity Length: 1-meter Hawkeye flexible borescope 5 #12;cm scale borescope retroreflected illumination 6

  10. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-05-22

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

  11. Active Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freuder, Eugene C.

    A progress report on the work described in Vision Flashes 33 and 43 on recognition of real objects. Emphasis is on the "active" use of knowledge in directing the flow of visual processing.

  12. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  13. Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

  14. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy EquipmentSvendborgTecsisArea Jump to:

  15. Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special PagesGeotermica JumpAreas Jump

  16. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  17. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report: December 2008 to December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.G. Finucane, J.P. Harrie

    2010-10-26

    This report documents the final status of buildings after the completion of D4 activities at the 100 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site from December 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009.

  18. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  19. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; William Cable; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2014-12-04

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  20. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  1. Essays on entrepreneurship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taveras, Carmen Aída

    2010-01-01

    It is often argued that borrowing constraints are crucial to the understanding of entrepreneurial activity in the United States. However, portfolio data and calibration exercises raise doubts about the importance of borrowing ...

  2. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  3. VHF profiler observations of winds and waves in the troposphere during the Darwin Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    VHF profiler observations of winds and waves in the troposphere during the Darwin Area Wave radar (wind profiler) was used to study tropospheric winds during the Darwin Area Wave Experiment (DAWEX heights occurring when convective activity was strongest. Mean winds observed between October and December

  4. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  5. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  6. Composite analysis E-area vaults and saltstone disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the Composite Analysis (CA) performed on the two active Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults (EAV) Disposal Facility. The analysis calculated potential releases to the environment from all sources of residual radioactive material expected to remain in the General Separations Area (GSA). The GSA is the central part of SRS and contains all of the waste disposal facilities, chemical separations facilities and associated high-level waste storage facilities as well as numerous other sources of radioactive material. The analysis considered 114 potential sources of radioactive material containing 115 radionuclides. The results of the CA clearly indicate that continued disposal of low-level waste in the saltstone and EAV facilities, consistent with their respective radiological performance assessments, will have no adverse impact on future members of the public.

  7. Identifying Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  8. 300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-10-13

    This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures.

  9. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Govi, Aldo R. (Greensburg, PA)

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  10. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  11. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Nevada Test Site 2005 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson, Cathy A. Wills

    2006-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2005 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2005; Grossman, 2005; Bechtel Nevada, 2006). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2005 totaled 219.1 millimeters (mm) (8.63 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 201.4 mm (7.93 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 has percolated to the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that precipitation from the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005 infiltrated past the deepest sensors at 188 centimeters (6.2 feet) and remains in the pit cover. Precipitation did not infiltrate to the deepest sensor on the vegetated final cover at U-3ax/bl. Water drained from all Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received three times natural precipitation, but there was no drainage from the lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Biota monitoring data show that tritium is the primary radionuclide accessible to plants and animals. Other human-produced radionuclides in the tissues of plant and animal samples from both RWMSs were not found at concentrations higher than in biota samples collected at control locations. This suggests that sampled animals did not intrude into the waste and that waste did not move to where it is accessible to plants or animals.

  13. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  14. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  15. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  16. Hemispheric sunspot unit area: comparison with hemispheric sunspot number and sunspot area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K. J.; Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L., E-mail: lkj@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, CAS, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-03-01

    The monthly mean northern and southern hemispheric sunspot numbers (SNs) and sunspot areas (SAs) in the time interval of 1945 January to 2012 December are utilized to construct the monthly northern and southern hemispheric sunspot unit areas (SUAs), which are defined as the ratio of hemispheric SA to SN. Hemispheric SUAs are usually found to rise at the beginning and to fall at the ending time of a solar cycle more rapidly, forming a more irregular cycle profile than hemispheric SNs and SAs, although it also presents Schwabe-cycle-like hemispheric SNs and SAs. Sunspot activity (SN, SA, and SUA) is found asynchronously and is asymmetrically distributed in the northern and southern hemispheres, and hemispheric SNs, SAs, and SUAs are not in phase in the two hemispheres. The similarity of hemispheric SNs and SAs is found to be much more obvious than that of hemispheric SUAs and SNs (or SAs), and also for their north-south asymmetry. A notable feature is found for the behavior of the SUA around the minimum time of cycle 24: the SUA rapidly decreases from the cycle maximum value to the cycle minimum value of sunspot cycles 19-24 within just 22 months.

  17. Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

  18. MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management Rita OLIVEIRA MONTEIRO Cover photo of a mpa (coast and underwater) MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OBJECTIVES FOR TODAY: · definitions · historical · habitat degradation · invasive species · harmful algal blooms · marine epidemics · mass mortalities

  19. Center symmetry and area laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2014-07-15

    SU($N_c$) gauge theories containing matter fields may be invariant under transformations of some subgroup of the $\\mathbb{Z}_{N_c}$ center; the maximum such subgroup is $\\mathbb{Z}_{p}$, with $p$ depending on $N_c$ and the representations of the various matter fields in the theory. Confining SU($N_c$) gauge theories in either 3+1 or 2+1 space-time dimensions and with matter fields in any representation have string tensions for representation $R$ given by $\\sigma_R =\\sigma_f \\, \\, \\frac{p_R (p-p_R) \\, \\, g\\left (p_R (p-p_R) \\right )}{(p-1) \\, \\, g(p -1 )} $ with $p_R={n_R \\, \\rm mod}(p)$, where $\\sigma_f $ is the string tension for the fundamental representation, $g$ is a positive finite function and $n_R$ is the n-ality of $R$. This implies that a necessary condition for a theory in this class to have an area law is invariance of the theory under a nontrivial subgroup of the center. Significantly, these results depend on $p$ regardless of the value of $N_c$.

  20. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  1. Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

  2. New Academic Subject Area Information Sheet To be completed for new Academic Subject Areas only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    New Academic Subject Area Information Sheet To be completed for new Academic Subject Areas only New Academic Subject Area:____________________ (Maximum 4 Letters eg: INFO; except for ELFSC: Maximum of 6

  3. Part-of-Speech tagging Dividing area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Part-of-Speech tagging Dividing area -Grids by 1 degree lat & lng Evaluation area weight Date Area (lat, lng) snow 9/1/2012 38~39, -78~-77 sunset 13/1/2012 47~48,-123~-122 Grammy 12/2/2012 34

  4. Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake Charles Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-08-04

    CONSTRAINED AND UNCONSTRAINED PLAN PROJECTS . C-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page v Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 Table of Tables Table 2-1 Stakeholders Present... ......................................................................................................... 3-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page iii Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 LAKE CHARLES URBANIZED AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODEL .............................................................. 3-2 SOCIOECONOMIC...

  5. SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SWOPE PARK INDUSTRIAL AREA Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Swope Park Industrial Area is located in the south-central portion safe ingress/egress during flooding. The Swope Park Industrial Area has limited access, one

  6. Novel materials for Li-ion batteries is one of the principle thrust areas of current research in energy storage. One of the major limiting factors in a Li-ion battery's performance is the low specific capacities of the active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in energy storage. One of the major limiting factors in a Li-ion battery's performance is the low specific capacities of the active materials in the electrodes. Anode materials based on silicon have generated much interest of late. Both cubic and amorphous silicon can reversibly alloy with lithium and have a theoretical

  7. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-07-31

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  8. Physisorption and Chemisorption Methods for Evaluating the Total Surface Area and Active Surface Area of Two Types of Carbon Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TSA is a gross indicator of soot reactivity and does not always correlate well with the real reactivity. This research shows that a more relevant reactivity index is soot ASA.

  9. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  10. Nevada Test Site 2009 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-06-23

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2009 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NTS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Radon flux from waste covers is well below regulatory limits. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 87.6 millimeters (mm) (3.45 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2009 is 43 percent below the average of 152.4 mm (6.00 in.), and the 62.7 mm (2.47 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2009 is 49 percent below the average of 122.5 mm (4.82 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 30 cm (1 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2009, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated, but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not indicate that there has been biota intrusion into the waste. All 2009 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  11. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related manufacturer. A component produced by one manufacturer certainly varies dimensionally from a similar product produced by a different manufacturer. The internal envelope dimensions are dependent on the selection of the individual components. The external envelope dimensions, as well as, key interface dimensions are established within this calculation and are to be treated as bounding dimensions.

  12. Nevada Test Site 2007 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-06-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2007 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a; 2008; Warren and Grossman, 2008). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are at background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. A single gamma spectroscopy measurement for cesium was slightly above the minimum detectable concentration, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Radon flux from waste covers is well below regulatory limits. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 136.8 millimeters (mm) (5.39 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2007 is 13 percent below the average of 158.1 mm (6.22 in.), and the 123.8 mm (4.87 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2007 is 6 percent below the average of 130.7 mm (5.15 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05U continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward movement percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005. The vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS effectively removes moisture from the cover by evapotranspiration. During 2007, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not suggest that there has been intrusion into the waste. All 2007 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  13. Special Analysis: Disposal Plan for Pit 38 at Technical Area 54, Area G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [URS Coporation

    2012-06-26

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research; environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on- and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data, and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, disposal operations have been confined to MDA G and are scheduled to continue in that region until MDA G undergoes final closure at the end of 2013. Given its impending closure, efforts have been made to utilize the remaining disposal capacity within MDA G to the greatest extent possible. One approach for doing this has been to dispose of low-activity waste from cleanup operations at LANL in the headspace of selected disposal pits. Waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the material placed in the headspace of pits 15, 37, and 38 have been developed (LANL, 2010) and the impacts of placing waste in the headspace of these units has been evaluated (LANL, 2012a). The efforts to maximize disposal efficiency have taken on renewed importance because of the disposal demands placed on MDA G by the large volumes of waste that are being generated at LANL by cleanup efforts. For example, large quantities of waste were recently generated by the retrieval of waste formerly disposed of at TA-21, MDA B. A portion of this material has been disposed of in the headspace of pit 38 in compliance with the WAC developed for that disposal strategy; a large amount of waste has also been sent to off-site facilities for disposal. Nevertheless, large quantities of MDA B waste remain that require disposal. An extension of pit 38 was proposed to provide the disposal capacity that will be needed to dispose of institutional waste and MDA B waste through 2013. A special analysis was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the pit extension (LANL, 2012b). The analysis concluded that the disposal unit could be extended with modest increases in the exposures projected for the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis, as long as limits were placed on the radionuclide concentrations in the waste that is placed in the headspace of the pit. Based, in part, on the results of the special analysis, the extension of pit 38 was approved and excavation of the additional disposal capacity was started in May 2012. The special analysis presented here uses performance modeling to identify a disposal plan for the placement of waste in pit 38. The modeling uses a refined design of the disposal unit and updated radionuclide inventories to identify a disposal configuration that promotes efficie

  14. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

  15. Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2008-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

  16. Nevada National Security Site 2013 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D. B.

    2014-08-19

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) within the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2013 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2013; 2014a; 2014b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are close to detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 105.8 millimeters (mm) (4.17 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2013 is 30% below the average of 150.3 mm (5.92 in.), and the 117.5 mm (4.63 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2013 is 5% below the average of 123.6 mm (4.86 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2013, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3-times natural precipitation. All 2013 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  17. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, David B.

    2013-09-10

    Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  18. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  19. Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 - Requirements Flow Down and Focus Area 4 - Graded Approach to Quality Assurance Graded Approach Model and Expectation Page 1 of 18 Office of Environmental Management And Energy...

  20. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear facilities. DOE-STD-1150-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard Type: Invoked Technical Standards Status: Current Approved Date: Dec 02, 2013...

  1. 300 Area Process Trenches Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-08-13

    This document is a proposed groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches to comply with RCRA final status, corrective action groundwater monitoring.

  2. Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    radiation-dominated HED dynamo, and radiation-dominated reconnection. Nonlinear Optics of Plasmas and Laser-Plasma Interactions Specific areas of interest include, but are...

  3. Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72-2011, Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Diane Johnson This SSQA FAQS identifies the minimum technical competency requirements for DOE...

  4. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area, Nevada- Structural Controls, Hydrothermal Alteration and Deep Fluid Sources Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMagne...

  5. DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  6. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures over a long-range spatial scale has always been a challenge for the artificial self-assembly approach. Illustration revealing how the arrangement of molecular building...

  7. Payday Borrowing: Credit and Networks among the Economic Insecure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Anthony Steven

    2013-01-01

    Carter. 2012. “Payday Lenders Seek U.S. Oversight vs.2008. “Campaign ’08: Payday Lenders Back Measures to Unwind2008. “Payday advance lenders targeted; Baldwin Park’s mayor

  8. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are Fun bookHomeland

  9. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimeticBooks Are Fun

  10. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic(cousinDataTalksHealth &

  11. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic(cousinDataTalksHealth

  12. Small Water System Management Program: 100 K Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunacek, G.S. Jr. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-29

    Purposes of this document are: to provide an overview of the service and potable water system presently in service at the Hanford Site`s 100 K Area; to provide future system forecasts based on anticipated DOE activities and programs; to delineate performance, design, and operations criteria; and to describe planned improvements. The objective of the small water system management program is to assure the water system is properly and reliably managed and operated, and continues to exist as a functional and viable entity in accordance with WAC 246-290-410.

  13. Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports and Activities ChemicalReportsAreas

  14. Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-NicholasReports and Activities ChemicalReportsAreas

  15. Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-06-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  16. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Area 5 Waste Management Division, Nevada National Security Site, Final CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management; The Delphi Groupe, Inc.; J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2012-01-31

    The report is the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report for the 92-Acrew Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for the period of January 20, 2011, to January 31, 2012 The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location, waste types and regulatory requirements: (1) Pit 3 Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU); (2) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111; (3) CAU 207; (4) Low-level waste disposal units; (5) Asbestiform low-level waste disposal units; and (6) One transuranic (TRU) waste trench.

  17. Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization 2010-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;Faculty & Staff Areas of Engineering 3304 Patrick F. Taylor Hall Baton Rouge, LA 70803 225/578-5706 225/578-8388 Fax mlavall@lsu.edu www.eng.lsu.edu COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 Table of Contents College of Engineering Administration

  18. College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 College of Science CLINICAL SCIENCE AREA MANUAL DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY VIRIGINIA TECH AY2015 Training 24 B. Clinical Science Area Committee 25 C. Graduate Student Representatives 25 D. Advisor 26 E for Continuation on to the Preliminary Examination 49 F. Plan of Study: Doctoral Degree 51 G. The Preliminary

  19. Bumblebee vibration activated foraging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Dan Kuan-Nien

    2009-01-01

    SAN DIEGO Bumblebee vibration activated foraging: A ThesisOF THE THESIS Bumblebee vibration activated foraging by Danproduce brief bursts of vibration (foraging activation

  20. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. (Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. (Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  1. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  2. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Medical Hot Springs Geothermal Area Idaho Batholith Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Cascades Melozi Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal...

  3. Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-07-01

    Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line work) of Swadley and Hoover (1990) and re-label these with map unit designations like those in northern Frenchman Flat (Huckins-Gang et al, 1995a,b,c; Snyder et al, 1995a,b,c,d).

  4. Tanks Focus Area annual report FY2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation effort with tanks containing hazardous and radioactive waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials. With some 90 million gallons of waste in the form of solid, sludge, liquid, and gas stored in 287 tanks across the DOE complex, containing approximately 650 million curies, radioactive waste storage tank remediation is the nation's highest cleanup priority. Differing waste types and unique technical issues require specialized science and technology to achieve tank cleanup in an environmentally acceptable manner. Some of the waste has been stored for over 50 years in tanks that have exceeded their design lives. The challenge is to characterize and maintain these contents in a safe condition and continue to remediate and close each tank to minimize the risks of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. In 1994, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) created a group of integrated, multiorganizational teams focusing on specific areas of the EM cleanup mission. These teams have evolved into five focus areas managed within EM's Office of Science and Technology (OST): Tanks Focus Area (TFA); Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area; Nuclear Materials Focus Area; Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area; and Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area.

  5. Area products for black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Area products for multi-horizon black holes often have intriguing properties, and are often independent of the mass of the black hole (depending only on various charges, angular momenta, and moduli). Such products are often formulated in terms of the areas of inner (Cauchy) horizons and event horizons, and often include the effects of unphysical "virtual'" horizons. For the Schwarzschild-de Sitter [Kottler] black hole in (3+1) dimensions it is shown by explicit exact calculation that the product of event horizon area and cosmological horizon area is not mass independent. (Including the effect of the third "virtual" horizon does not improve the situation.) Similarly, in the Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-de Sitter black hole in (3+1) dimensions the product of inner (Cauchy) horizon area and event horizon area is calculated (perturbatively), and is shown to be not mass independent. That is, the mass-independence of the product of physical horizon areas is not generic. In the generic situation, whenever the quasi-local...

  6. 2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  7. Radionuclide concentrations in honey bees from Area G at TA-54 during 1997. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haarmann, T.K.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1998-07-01

    Honey bees were collected from two colonies located at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Area G, Technical Area 54, and from one control (background) colony located near Jamez Springs, NM. Samples were analyzed for the following: cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu), tritium ({sup 3}H), total uranium, and gross gamma activity. Area G sample results from both colonies were higher than the upper (95%) level background concentration for {sup 238}Pu and {sup 3}H.

  8. Deployment of phytoremediation at the 317/319 area at Argonne National Laboratory - East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negri, M. C.; Hinchman, R. R.; Quinn, J.; Wozniak, J.

    2000-02-10

    The 317 and 319 Areas are located on the extreme southern end of the ANL-E site, immediately adjacent to the DuPage County Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. The 317 Area is an active hazardous and radioactive waste processing and storage area. In the late 1950s, liquid waste was placed in the unit known as the French Drain. Since that time, this waste has migrated into underlying soil and groundwater. The principal environmental concern in the 317 Area is the presence of several VOCs in the soil and groundwater and low levels of tritium in the groundwater beneath and down gradient of the site. The 319 Area Landfill and French Drain are located immediately adjacent to the 317 Area. The principal environmental concern in the 319 Area is the presence of radioactive materials in the waste mound, in the leachate in the mound, and in the shallow groundwater immediately down gradient of the landfill. Several interim actions have already been implemented in this area, to reduce the VOC and tritium releases from these areas, as the result of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from December 1994 through September 1996.

  9. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

  10. Sacramento Area Voltage Support Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    transmission projects in the general area, would not generate significant amounts of air pollution emissions. ES.7 IMPACTS The Proposed Action would consist of 31.6 miles of...

  11. Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    selected in Biomedical, Civil and Environmental, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering are thoseIndustrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering

  12. Chinese immigrant entrepreneurs in New England area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Joe Xiongwei

    2008-01-01

    More and more Chinese immigrants came to the U.S. to start a whole new life. Some of them became entrepreneurs. This study focused on Chinese new immigrant entrepreneurs in New England area, and analyzed what factors have ...

  13. Redefining Housing Market Areas in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muir, Christopher Iain

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to address some of the limitations inherent in the methods currently used for identification of Housing Market Areas (HMAs) in Scotland. Firstly the conventionally defined geography of HMAs for the four ...

  14. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  15. Regulating new construction in historic areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellers-Garcia, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    This study is an examination of how the restrictiveness of different design regulations impacts the process of new construction in historic areas. The North End, South End, and Back Bay neighborhoods of Boston were identified ...

  16. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

  17. Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Family Care La Mesa Village Housing Area Child Care Development Center 2 La Mesa Way Bldg. 439 831 Recommendation 1 The Monterey Taxi Cab Company will provide Taxi Service from Herrmann Hall to your residence

  18. Pressure and Phase Equilibria in Interacting Active Brownian Spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solon, Alexandre P.

    We derive a microscopic expression for the mechanical pressure P in a system of spherical active Brownian particles at density ?. Our exact result relates P, defined as the force per unit area on a bounding wall, to bulk ...

  19. The Active Wave-front Sampling based 3D endoscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Hemanth

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of Active Wave-front Sampling (AWS) for real time quantified 3D endoscopy. AWS is a technique by which phase information from an aperture area of a lens is obtained by sampling ...

  20. Using mammographic density to predict breast cancer risk: dense area or percent dense area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Jennifer; Ding, Jane; Warren, Ruth M L; Duffy, Stephen; Hopper, John L

    2010-11-18

    and dense area were strongly associated with breast cancer risk; however, inclusion of dense area in a PDA-adjusted model improved the pre- diction of breast cancer risk, but not vice versa. This suggests that, in terms of a single parameter, dense area... dense area alone. Conclusions: As a single parameter, dense area provides more information than PDA on breast cancer risk. Introduction A number of prospective, nested case control studies have shown that, for women of the same age, those with greater...

  1. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 22% 21% 11% 1% 19% 51% 18% 12% 2.9 1.9 2.2 2.2 7.1 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF KING 9

  2. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,800 20.6% 43% 18% 26% 13% 67% 14% 5% 3% 8% 3% 5.7 3.4 3.9 51.8 329,100 28% 9% 45% 18% 69% 19% 4% 2% 5% 1

  3. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 26% 24% 26% 15% 3% 30% 51% 13% 3% 3.2 1.7 2.2 1.9 6.8 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF BROCK

  4. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,000 72% 13% 15% 15% 33% 20% 23% 9% 4% 30% 51% 12% 3% 2.8 1.6 2.0 1.8 6.5 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWN

  5. Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Area and Volume Problems 1. Given the formula for the area of a square, derive the formula for the area of a rectangle of dimensions a and b. 2. Given the formula for the area of a rectangle, derive the formula for the area of a parallelogram of base b and height h. 3. Use calculus to derive the formula

  6. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  7. Summary of biomonitoring activities of the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories and biomonitoring activities in National Parks and Protected Forests of Côte d'Ivoire and Liberia Foundation has implemented biomonitoring programs in protected areas in Côte d'Ivoire, Liberia and Guinea Park. Inventories were conducted in the Taï area between Liberia and Côte d'Ivoire to study

  8. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  9. Closure Report for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of the 92-Acre Area, which includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that the closure objectives were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). Closure activities began in January 2011 and were completed in January 2012. Closure activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2010). The following closure activities were performed: (1) Construct an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the boreholes, trenches, and pits in the 92-Acre Area; (2) Install use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; and (3) Establish vegetation on the covers. UR documentation is included as Appendix C of this report. The post-closure plan is presented in detail in Revision 1 of the CADD/CAP for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111, and the requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this document. When the next request for modification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit NEV HW0101 is submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), the requirements for post-closure monitoring of the 92-Acre Area will be included. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from NDEP to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 111; and (2) The transfer of CAU 111 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  10. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Secondary Energy Infobook, 19 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12.

  11. Effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity of activated alumina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Gerald Leland

    1950-01-01

    and constant feed com- position: to dxc Iko f(xc) ko' f'(xc)j a s L 8f fraction reactant converted k ~ forward reaction rate constant k a L s k'~ reverse reaction rate constant ko' a L s Wc weight of catalyst nt mole of feed ner unit time a ~ area per... unit mass of catalyst L active spots per unit area s ~ number of equidistant~ active spots ad)acent to each spot, needed by and available for reaction (assumed constant in this case) Let [ko f(xc) k ' f'(x )] 15(xc) Separating variables...

  12. Technical planning activity: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  13. Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

    2007-02-05

    We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

  14. A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marique, Anne-Francoise Reiter, Sigrid

    2012-02-15

    Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by reducing distances to travel through a good mix between activities at the local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of transport used in only of little impact in the studied suburban neighborhoods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work can significant energy savings.

  15. Bioavailable organic carbon in wetland soils across a broad climogeographic area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew Dwight

    2002-01-01

    drained areas in northern Alaska for comparison of biological properties and to determine the effects of drying on estimation of microbial biomass and activity. Air-dried soils were moistened and incubated 48 h, during which time CO? evolution was measured...

  16. Transformational, Large Area Fabrication of Nanostructured Materials Using Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will address critical additional steps over large areas of as-synthesized nanostructured materials, such as annealing, phase transformation, or activation of dopants, dramatically reducing the processing costs of the solid-state lighting and photovoltaic materials.

  17. Entanglement area law from specific heat capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Marcus Cramer

    2015-08-20

    We study the scaling of entanglement in low-energy states of quantum many-body models on lattices of arbitrary dimensions. We allow for unbounded Hamiltonians such that systems with bosonic degrees of freedom are included. We show that if at low enough temperatures the specific heat capacity of the model decays exponentially with inverse temperature, the entanglement in every low-energy state satisfies an area law (with a logarithmic correction). This behaviour of the heat capacity is typically observed in gapped systems. Assuming merely that the low-temperature specific heat decays polynomially with temperature, we find a subvolume scaling of entanglement. Our results give experimentally verifiable conditions for area laws, show that they are a generic property of low-energy states of matter, and, to the best of our knowledge, constitute the first proof of an area law for unbounded Hamiltonians beyond those that are integrable.

  18. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  19. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  20. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

  1. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  2. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  3. Property:DevelopmentArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOfficesCollaboratorsDevelopmentArea Jump to:

  4. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  5. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  6. Dynamics of Active Database Rules: Models and Refinements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaniolo, Carlo

    application areas. In this paper, we introduce a durable change seman- tics for active database rules seman- tics) or as a separate transaction (decoupled seman- tics) [?]. Most systems adopt the coupled seman- tics, inasmuch as this is more effective at enforcing integrity constraints via active rules

  7. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Lake Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And...

  8. Versatile secondary beam for the meson area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, T.

    1982-03-01

    A new secondary beam design is outlined for the Meson M6 Beamline that combines versatility with economy. The beamline described will transport charged particles of either sign to 800 GeV/c and bring the beam to a focus in one of three potential experimental areas. The plan makes maximal use of existing civil construction.

  9. Quiet, Nonconsumptive Recreation Reduces Protected Area Effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    in community composition from native to nonnative species. Demand for recreation and nature-based tourism use the world's protected areas for the recreation, education, and tourism opportu- nities public access (IUCN Categories Ib-VI; IUCN 1994), and key reserve networks, including national park sys

  10. Business Continuity Planning Administrative Support Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    of facilities or utilities · Deliberate acts of disruption Business continuity planning process is an ongoingBusiness Continuity Planning for Administrative Support Areas 1 #12;What is Business Continuity Planning? Planning for an adverse, major or catastrophic event that would cause a disruption to our mission

  11. AREA OVERVIEW----Agent & Data Mining Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    AREA OVERVIEW---- Agent & Data Mining Interaction (ADMI) Longbing Cao Faculty of Information in a Multiple Agent Environment", EWSL91, 1991 Agent-based data mining & knowledge discovery by Davies, W., 1994 Research topics Agent driven data mining Data mining driven agents & multi- agent systems Mutual issues

  12. Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Orc Notation Structured Wide-Area Programming Jayadev Misra Department of Computer Science University of Texas at Austin http://orc.csres.utexas.edu April 12, 2010 Rennes, France #12;Orc Notation hierarchical structure. #12;Orc Notation Orc · Goal: Internet scripting language. · Next: Component integration

  13. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  14. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  15. Understanding ecological variation across species: area-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Ian

    and mass- based assimilation rate or nitrogen (N) content can equally be Table 1 The two main arguments put: Photosynthesis is naturally an area-based process. When it is expressed on a mass basis, the dominant axis and associated traits) and biochemistry (e.g. nitrogen (N)) affect leaf carbon exchange processes

  16. 100-B area technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    This document supports the environmental remediation effort of the 100-B Area by providing remediation planners with key data that characterize the 100-B and 100-C Reactor sites. It provides operational histories of the 100-B and 100-C Reactors and each of their associated liquid and solid waste sites.

  17. Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decreases the roads' level of service, while at the same time increasing both fuel consump- tion5Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas Pu Wang1,2 , Timothy Hunter4 , Alexandre M. Bayen4 patterns in urban road usage. We find that the major usage of each road segment can be traced to its own

  18. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  19. West Central North East Area of Tucson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    a, b) in urbanized areas. The Tucson Hummingbird Project (THP) is a citizen-science, reconciliation for migrating ones. Citizen Science and OutreachCitizen Science and Outreach The latter was achieved with citizen scientists via large-scale outreach to the local community. Projects such as the THP can

  20. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  1. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the RCBRA Fall 2005 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Queen

    2006-05-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a brief description of the sampling approaches, a description of the samples collected, and the results for the Fall 2005 sampling event. This report presents the methods and results of the work to support the 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment.

  2. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  3. High-surface-area hydrated lime for SO2 control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moran, D.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Minerals Engineering Section)

    1993-03-01

    Since 1986, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), has been developing a process to produce high-surface-area hydrated lime (HSAHL) with more activity for adsorbing SO2 than commercially available hydrated lime. HSAHL prepared by the ISGS method as considerably higher surface area and porosity, and smaller mean particle diameter and crystallite size than commercial hydrated lime. The process has been optimized in a batch, bench-scale reactor and has been scaled-up to a 20--100 lb/hr process optimization unit (POU). Experiments have been conducted to optimize the ISGS hydration process and identify key parameters influencing hydrate properties for SO2 capture (surface area, porosity, particle size, and crystallite size). The known how is available to tailor properties of hydrated limes for specific SO2 removal applications. Pilot-scale tests conducted with the HSAHL under conditions typical of burning high-sulfur coals have achieved up to 90% SO2 capture in various DSI systems. The removal results are enough to bring most high-sulfur coals into compliance with acid rain legislation goals for the year 2000. The focus of the POU program is to generate critical engineering data necessary for the private sector to scale-up the process to a commercial level and provide estimates of the optimal cost of construction and operation of a commercial plant. ISGS is currently participating in a clean coal technology program (CCT-1) by providing 50 tons of HSAHL for a demonstration test at Illinois Power's Hennepin station in January 1993.

  4. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-11-16

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

  5. Release of Norepinephrine in the Preoptic Area Activates Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisiologia e Biofisica (R.E.S., M.O.P.), Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Departamento de Morfologia, Estomatologia e Fisiologia (R-904, Departamento de Fisiologia (M.P.B., B.K., C.R.F.), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, 14049

  6. Total Activity Estimation - Quarry Area. QY-500-501-1.06.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr -.:2yL:iU i.1 '7,

  7. Federal Solar Activities and Policies: Update on Strategic Areas of Focus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication3-EDepartmentExerciseCarbon4 LDRDFebruaryFacilitiesMarch 6, 2012.Solar

  8. Colorado - C.R.S. 24-65.1, Planning Areas and Activities of State

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa:Colmar,Energy Information 24-4-105(2)(a) -65.1

  9. DOE-STD-1042-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Control Area Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY6.1viiiDepartment of4-93 March 19937-930-932-93

  10. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  11. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

  12. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  13. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  14. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Xu; Zhen-Ming Xu

    2015-10-22

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  15. The Needles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe Needles Geothermal Area (Redirected from

  16. Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky, Minnesota:Truckhaven Geothermal Area

  17. Pulse Areas in Multi-Soliton Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Groves; B. D. Clader; J. H. Eberly

    2008-11-12

    The prospect of self-consistent propagation of more than two pulses contemporaneously through multi-resonant media raises open questions: whether soliton solutions exist, and whether a useful generalization of two-level pulse Area can be found. We answer these questions positively for the case of four pulses interacting in combined V and Lambda fashion with an idealized pair of atomic D-lines.

  18. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  19. Functional Area Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRADS provided on this page are provided as examples of functional area Objectives and Criteria used to evaluate how requirements are meet. They are only examples and should not be utilized as is. In accordance with DOE Standard 3006-2010, CRADs should be developed by team members to reflect the specifics of the proposed review (i.e., breadth and depth) as defined in the approved Plan of Action.

  20. Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts:Ohio:WebsiteInformationHawthorne Geothermal Area

  1. Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplication

  2. Little Melozitna Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove,Little Melozitna Geothermal Area

  3. Redfield Campus Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield Campus Geothermal Area (Redirected from

  4. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur A. Evans; Eric Lauga

    2013-02-10

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape, and the resulting fluid motion, result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area...

  6. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Marcel Bergeron Washignton River...

  7. Clean Cities: Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) Coalition The Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other...

  8. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study...

  9. The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connick, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    CCOMWP). April 8, 1993. Sacramento Area Water Plan ForumProcess (Draft). Sacramento, California. Emphasis inWorking Paper 2006-06 The Sacramento Area Water Forum: A

  10. Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500 Jobs Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support...

  11. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

  12. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calnin has worked with the Clean Cities initiative since 2007, having supported the Detroit Area coalition as well as the Greater Lansing Area coalition. With a background that...

  13. Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective, June 2003 Economic Potential of CHP in Detroit Edison Service Area: The Customer Perspective,...

  14. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities Coalition The Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and...

  15. Plutonium contamination in soils in open space and residential areas near Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litaor, M.I.

    1999-02-01

    Spatial analysis of the {sup 240}Pu:{sup 239}Pu isotopic ratio of 42 soil samples collected around Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado, was conducted to assess the effect of Rocky Flats Plant activity on the soil environment. Two probability maps that quantified the uncertainty of the spatial distribution of plutonium isotopic ratios were constructed using the sequential Gaussian simulation technique (sGs). Assuming a plutonium isotopic ratio range of 0.152 {+-} 0.003 to 0.169 {+-} 0.009 is characteristic to global fallout in Colorado, and a mean value of 0.155 is representative for the Rocky Flats Plant area, the main findings of the current work were (1) the areas northwest and southwest of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium ratio {ge}0.155, this were minimally impacted by the plant activity; (2) he study area east of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium isotopic ratio {le}0.155, which is a definitive indicator of Rocky Flats Plant-derived plutonium; and (3) inventory calculations across the study area exhibited large standard error of estimates. These errors were originated from the high variability in plutonium activity over a small sampling scale and the uncertainty in the global fallout isotopic ratio. Using the mean simulated estimates of plutonium isotopic ratio, coupled with plutonium activity measured at 11 soil pits and additional plutonium information published elsewhere, the plutonium loading on the open space and residential areas amounted to 111.2 GBq, with a standard error of estimate of 50.8 GBq.

  16. Area della Ricerca CNR Area della Ricerca del Cnr di Pisa Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, ITALY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Area della Ricerca CNR Area della Ricerca del Cnr di Pisa Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, ITALY'aula 27 dell'Area della Ricerca del CNR di Pisa. Tutti gli interessati sono invitati a partecipare Antonio

  17. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  18. Zxodes scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae) Deer Tick Mesoscale Populations in Natural Areas: Effects of Deer, Area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Zxodes scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae) Deer Tick Mesoscale Populations in Natural Areas: Effects al. 1990al) and macroscales (eastern United States [Daniels et al. 19931).We examined the mesoscale

  19. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  20. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  1. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  2. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  3. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

  4. 2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

  5. Expanding the Area of Gravitational Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    2002-11-12

    I describe how gravitational entropy is intimately connected with the concept of gravitational heat, expressed as the difference between the total and free energies of a given gravitational system. From this perspective one can compute these thermodyanmic quantities in settings that go considerably beyond Bekenstein's original insight that the area of a black hole event horizon can be identified with thermodynamic entropy. The settings include the outsides of cosmological horizons and spacetimes with NUT charge. However the interpretation of gravitational entropy in these broader contexts remains to be understood.

  6. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  7. Outdoor Area Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas of the countryofPROGRAM |TechnologyDepartment ofOurAThis

  8. Hot Pot Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat Basin Geothermal Area Jump to:

  10. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal Area

  11. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplicationDixie Valley

  12. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)DisplacementTudorOpenApplicationDixie

  13. Mori Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation MontanaOhio:Hill, California: EnergyMori Geothermal Area

  14. Krafla Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrderInformationKizildereTexas:Solar IncKrafla Geothermal Area

  15. Ngawha Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: Energy Resources JumpNgawha Geothermal Area Jump to:

  16. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

  17. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,Obsidian

  18. Surrond Area Resturants | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing You theLessons Learned |8,Super BowlEXC-14-0002Surrond Area

  19. Property:GeothermalArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc d bGeothermalArea Jump to: navigation,

  20. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex Fuels EnergyToolFort Bliss Geothermal Area