National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for active amendment concrete

  1. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  2. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturation–nucleation–depletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun

    2013-07-01

    The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

  4. Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl mass transfer after amendment of contaminated sediment with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy

    2006-07-01

    The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). The authors extend their evaluation of a model based on intraparticle diffusion by including a biomimetic semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and a first-order degradation rate for the aqueous phase. The model predictions are compared with the previously reported experimental PCB concentrations in the bulk water phase and in SPMDs. The simulated scenarios comprise a marine and a freshwater sediment, four PCB congeners, two AC grain sizes, four doses of AC, and comparison with laboratory experiments. The modeling approach distinguishes between two different sediment particles types: a light-density fraction representing carbonaceous particles such as charcoal, coal, coke, cenospheres, or wood, and a heavy-density fraction representing the mineral phase with coatings of organic matter. A third particle type in the numerical model is AC. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed shifts in the PCB distribution during repartitioning after AC amendment but overestimates the overall effect of the treatment in reducing aqueous and SPMD concentrations of PCBs by a factor of 2-6. For the AC application in sediment, competitive sorption of the various solutes apparently requires a reduction by a factor of 16 of the literature values for the AC-water partitioning coefficient measured in pure aqueous systems. With this correction, model results and measurements agree within a factor of 3. After AC amendment is homogeneously mixed into the sediment and then left undisturbed, aqueous PCB concentrations tend toward the same reduction after 5 years. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Activities in Support of Continuing the Service of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status provided. Operating experience related to performance of the concrete structures is presented. Basic components of a program to manage aging of the concrete structures are identified and described: (1) Degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; (2) Assessment and remediation: i.e., component selection, in- service inspection, non-destructive examinations, and remedial actions; and (3) Estimation of performance at present or some future point in time: i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk. Finally, areas are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  6. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah; Yahya, Redzuan; Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  7. Amendment 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Date: 6/30/2016 ISSUED BY: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION Service and Preventive Maintenance Agreement for Standby Power Generators The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth below. The hour and date specified for receipt of offers [XX ] is not extended. [] is extended to OFFERORS ARE ADVISED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT IN THEIR PROPOSAL. FAILURE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF

  8. Amendment 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Date: 7/25/2016 ISSUED BY: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 PROJECT NAME & LOCATION Service and Preventive Maintenance Agreement for Standby Power Generators The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth below. The hour and date specified for receipt of offers [] is not extended. [x] is extended to August 3, 2016. OFFERORS ARE ADVISED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT IN THEIR PROPOSAL. FAILURE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THIS AMENDMENT MAY RESULT IN

  9. Amendment 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Section K, Representations and Certifications is deleted and replaced with Attachment 1 of this Amendment: II. Section L.5 (c) is deleted and replaced with Attachment 2. This change reflects the addition of funds and associated maximum fee for the construction of the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). III. Section M.2 (a) (4) is deleted and replace with Attachment 3. IV

  10. Amendment 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Sections L3(f)(2)(1)-(2) are deleted and replaced as indicated in Attachment 1. II. Section L4(e)(2)(vi) is deleted and replaced as indicated in attachment 1. III

  11. Refractory concretes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  12. Amendment No.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. 11PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement)...

  13. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print Wednesday, 25 September 2013 00:00 The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has...

  14. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter; Fontana, Jack J.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  15. Applications for concrete offshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The report collects and summarizes the various proposals for development offshore which have in common the use of concrete as the main structural material, and where possible, indicates their relative feasibility. A study encompassing such diverse schemes as offshore windmills, concrete LNG carriers, hydrocarbon production platforms and floating airports cannot be completely exhaustive on each subject, so references to sources of further information have been given wherever possible. Details of individual projects and proposals are included for Power plants, Hydrocarbon production platforms, Concrete ships, Storage systems and industrial plants, Subsea systems, Offshore islands, Coastal works and Other concrete structures.

  16. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its manufacture was less environmentally damaging, and how...

  17. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been...

  18. Plutonium Consolidation Amended ROD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision: Storage of Surplus Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended Record of Decision SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511

  19. EO 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) EO 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management (1977, amended 2015) E.O. 11988 (as amended) incorporates changes from E.O. 13690 and directs that, for federally funded projects, federal agencies will use a higher vertical flood elevation and corresponding horizontal floodplain than the 100-year base floodplain used for most other federal actions. EO 11988_as amended by EO 13690_2015.pdf (96.36 KB) More Documents

  20. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  1. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  2. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomasney, H.L.; SenGupta, A.K.; Yachmenev, V.

    1996-12-31

    ELECTROSORB Electrokinetic Extraction Technology, developed by ISOTRON Corp., offers a cost-effective approach to treating contaminated concrete. Heavy metals/radionuclides trapped in concrete can be extracted using this process if they are chemically solubilized; solubilizers used are citric acid alone and a mixture of citric and nitric acids. A DC electric field is applied across the contaminated concrete to electrokinetically transport the solubilized contaminants from the concrete pores to a collector on the concrete surface. The collector is an extraction pad laid on the surface. The pad provides confinement for a planar electrode and solubilizer solution; it is operated under a vacuum to hold the pad against the concrete surface. Operation requires little attendance, reducing the workers` health hazards. The process incorporates a mechanism for recycling the solubilizer solution. A field demonstration of the process took place in Building 21 of DOE`s Mound facility in Miamisburg, OH, over 12 days in June 1996. The thorium species present in this building`s concrete floors included ThO{sub 2} and thorium oxalate. The nitric acid was found to facilitate Th extraction.

  3. Review of Concrete Biodeterioration in Relation to Buried Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Berry, C.

    2012-10-15

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial

  4. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  5. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its

  6. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its

  7. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its

  8. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its

  9. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman concrete was superior to most modern concrete in durability, why its

  10. Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012) Amended Environmental Impact ...

  11. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  12. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  13. Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete Print Wednesday, 25 September 2013 00:00 The material secrets of a concrete Roman breakwater that has spent the last 2000 years submerged in the Mediterranean Sea have been uncovered by an international team of researchers using a variety of techniques, including x-ray microdiffraction, x-ray spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction. Analyses of the ancient samples pinpointed why the best Roman

  14. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  15. Final Rule Technical Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule Technical Amendment Federal Register Announcement: The Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this technical amendment to the regulations for the loan guarantee ...

  16. Cementitious barriers partnership concrete mixture characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Protiere, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage.

  17. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  18. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  19. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  20. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  1. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  2. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  3. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  4. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  5. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  6. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL); Pullockaran, Jose D. (Trenton, NJ); Knox, Lerry (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  7. Implementation of CAA amendments: The federal perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, M.

    1995-12-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a rigorous timetable for EPA to develop and implement an unprecedented number of regulatory and policy initiatives. EPA has made great progress in meeting these mandates; however, much remains to be done if the Act`s health and environmental goals are to be achieved. EPA must issue dozens of additional regulations, guidance documents, and studies and reports over the next several years. The largest group of remaining rulemakings will be those controlling air toxics emissions. Other significant actions will include final rulemakings on emission standards for non-road engines, emissions standards for municipal and medical waste combustion, enhanced emissions monitoring, Federal operating permits, and newsource review simplification. EPA also must accelerate and expand a host of activities to ensure that the Agency and the States are implementing and enforcing the Act effectively. For example, EPA must assess hundreds of SIP revisions, as well as 120 State and local permit programs, and provide technical assistance to States and sources. Ms. Nichols will present EPA`s will present EPA`s plans for implementing these activities over the next several years. She will present a summary of the Agency`s current achievements under the 1990 amendments and EPA`s framework for completing the challenging tasks that lie ahead.

  8. Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The FY10 activities for development of a nuclear concrete materials database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database will be designed and constructed...

  9. Environmental assessment for amendments to 10 CFR Part 835

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This proposed amendment will modify the scope of 10 CFR 835 to explicitly exclude the transportation of radioactive material conducted in conformance with the Department of Transportation regulations, certain activities conducted on foreign soil, add standards for area posting and sealed radioactive source control, and add a removable surface radioactivity value for tritium.

  10. Constructing earth sheltered housing with concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spears, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This manual provides a state - of - the - art review of the design and construction of an earth - sheltered house using cast - in - place concrete, precast concrete, and concrete masonry. Based on a literature survey, theoretical work, and discussions with researchers and engineers in the concrete industry, the text is designed for use by architects, engineers, and homebuilders. The features of concrete construction that are current accepted practice for the concrete products discussed are shown to be applicable with reasonable care to building a safe, dry, and comfortable earth - sheltered house. The main considerations underlying the recommendations were the use of the earth's mass and passive solar effects to minimize energy needs, the structural capacity of the separate concrete products and their construction methods, and drainage principles and waterproofing details. Shelter ranging from those with at least 2 feet of earth cover to those with an uncovered roof of usual construction are included. To be considered an earth - sheltered residential building, at least half of the exterior wall and roof area that is in direct contact with the conditioned living space must be sheltered from the environment by earth berm or earthfill. Siting considerations, the fundamentals of passive solar heating, planning considerations, and structural considerations are discussed. Detailed guidelines are provided on concrete masonry construction, joint details in walls and floors, waterproofing, formwork and form removal, concrete construction practices, concrete masonry, and surface finishes. Numerous illustrations, tables, and a list of 32 references are provided. (Author abstract modified).

  11. H. R. 3467: a Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a surcharge tax on business activities to provide revenues for the trust fund known as the Hazardous Substance Response Superfund. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, October 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Superfund Revenue Act of 1985 (H.R. 3467) amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and provides income for the Superfund trust fund by imposing a surcharge tax on business activities designated in section 4002 and varying with the number of employees. The bill also defines activities according to category of business and the degree of direct and indirect labor. Later sections describe the tax period and procedures for tax payments, exemptions for government entities and charitable organizations, neutrality for import and export goods, and other limitations and requirements involving payments to the trust fund.

  12. INTERIM REPORT ON CONCRETE DEGRADATION MECHANISMS AND ONLINE MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Neal, Kyle; Kosson, David; Adams, Douglas

    2014-09-01

    The existing fleets of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The online monitoring of concrete structure conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, the structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University proposes to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  13. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  14. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to

  15. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  16. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  17. BUILDING MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION USING A CONCRETE FLOOR AND WALL CONTAMINATION PROFILING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, Dr. S.,; Charters, G.; Thacker, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    Certain radioisotopes can penetrate concrete and contaminate the concrete well below the surface. The challenge is to determine the extent and magnitude of the contamination problem in real-time. The concrete profiling technology, TRUPROSM in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the material being sampled. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk. Performing a volumetric concrete or metal characterization safer and faster (without lab intervention) is the objective of this characterization technology. This way of determining contamination can save considerable time and money. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilizes or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the area around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated. The goal is to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release.

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000002 The purpose of Amendment 000002 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Provide clarification on Amendment 000001: (i) Item 14 of Amendment 00001 was

  19. Glenwood Springs Amendments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Glenwood Springs Amendments Citation BLM Colorado River Valley Field Office...

  20. Draft Advice: ERDF ROD Amendment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advice: ERDF ROD Amendment 8/5/14 Author: Pam Larsen BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to move forward with CERCLA cleanup at Hanford in a manner that addresses the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs) for a limited amount of large, heavy hazardous waste debris that is contaminated with radioactive material. The current plan contained in a Record of Decision (ROD) is to dispose of this material in the on-site EDRF landfill. DOE is seeking a CERCLA ARAR waiver to treat this

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11. CONTRACT 10 CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. \5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 361 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* streat. county. Stata and ZIP Coda) ~ 9A AMENDMENT OF

  2. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 COTATI OE AEO AE 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicatble) 127 See Block 16C 110M003568 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00)603 7. ADMINISTERED BY If lotfertan Item ) CODE 100603 Office of River Prooection Office of River Protection Decarzment of Energy .S.Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Prooection B C.Eox 450 PO o 5 Richiandn WA 99352 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR

  3. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete [1]. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete [2] does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure [3]. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  4. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  5. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  6. E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management E.O. 11988 (as amended): Floodplain Management E.O. 11988 (as amended) incorporates changes from E.O. 13690 and directs that, for ...

  7. NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5-12 Amendment NEPA Determination: LM-05-12 Amendment Obtain Access Agreement to Sample Homestake Mining Company Groundwater Monitoring Well HMC-951 Amendment CX(s) Applied: B3.1...

  8. EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to the Record of Decision EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste Under this amendment to its Record of Decision (ROD),...

  9. EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0459: Amended Notice of Intent for a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE announced a broadening of the scope of the previously announced Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: Wind Programmatic EIS and its renaming as the Hawaii Clean Energy PEIS. The PEIS examines the potential environmental impacts of 31 energy efficiency activities and renewable energy

  10. EA-1339: Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) EA-1339: Finding of No Significant Impact (Amended) Waste Disposition Activities at Paducah Site, Paducah, Kentucky The U.S. Department of Energy has completed an environmental assessment addendum (DOE/EA-1339-A), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of 17,600 m3 of waste from the Paducah Site in Paducah, Kentucky. It is anticipated that most of the waste would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United

  11. Application of clearance automatic laser inspection system to clearance measurement of concrete waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Michiya; Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2007-07-01

    Recently, the Clearance Automatic Laser Inspection System (CLALIS) has been developed for the clearance measurement of metal scraps. It utilizes three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning, y-ray measurement and Monte Carlo calculation, and has outstanding detection ability. For the clearance measurement of concrete segments, the effect of background (BG) gamma rays from natural radionuclides in the measurement target, such as K-40 and the radioactive decay products of Th-232 and U-238, should be compensated for to ensure adequate waste management. Since NE102A plastic scintillation detectors are used for y-ray measurement in CLALIS, it is impossible to distinguish between count rates of natural radionuclides and contaminants on the basis of gamma-ray energy information. To apply CLALIS to the clearance measurement of concrete segments, the original activity evaluation method was improved by adding a new compensation procedure. In this procedure, BG count rate due to natural radionuclides is estimated by a Monte Carlo calculation with pre-analyzed data of a representative sample of the measurement target. The activity concentration of natural radionuclides in concrete differs markedly depending on the production location of its components, such as cement and aggregates. In this study, using six mock concrete waste samples, which were composed of cement and fine aggregate from various production locations, the accuracy of BG compensation was experimentally estimated. In addition, the accuracy of calibration for concrete waste was also estimated using a number of mock concrete segments of small and large triangular prisms. By considering the uncertainties of BG compensation and calibration, the detection limit of CLALIS for concrete waste was estimated. As a result, it was revealed that CLALIS could be applied to the clearance measurement of concrete segments when the mass of the measurement target is greater than approximately 1.1 kg and the key radionuclide is Co-60

  12. Microsoft Word - Port Townsend Amendment DRAFT BLACKLINE 1.29...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Contract No. 11PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement)...

  13. EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    70: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption EIS-0470: EPA Amended Notice of Adoption Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts The Environmental Protection Agency's Notice ...

  14. Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Amendment to Funding Opportunity...

  15. EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Amended Record of Decision EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington DOE has decided to...

  16. EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision (April 2002) EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision (April 2002) Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program Amended Record of Decision: The U.S. Department of Energy's National...

  17. Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application to Amend ...

  18. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PP-371 Amended Northern Pass Transmission FRN More Documents & Publications Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, ...

  19. First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Programmatic Agreement among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Texas ...

  20. Microsoft Word - DSI Amendment 01-08-09 _after Implementation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    06PB-11744 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. and PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF WHATCOM COUNTY, WASHINGTON This AMENDMENT to the BLOCK...

  1. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Amendment 5 23 12.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0PB-12175 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. This AMENDMENT to the Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) is executed by the UNITED STATES OF...

  2. Microsoft Word - Draft Amendment to CFAC block power sales agreement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. 06PB-11745 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and COLUMBIA FALLS ALUMINUM COMPANY, LLC and FLATHEAD ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC This AMENDMENT to...

  3. Microsoft Word - Draft Amendment to CFAC block power sales agreement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amendment No. 1 Contract No. 06PB-11745 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and COLUMBIA FALLS ALUMINUM COMPANY, LLC and FLATHEAD ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC...

  4. EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0217: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina This Record of ...

  5. ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO ... ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR ...

  6. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  7. DE-SOL-0003641 Amendment 002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02/2013 000002 5 1 13. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTS/ORDERS. IT MODIFIES THE CONTRACT/ORDER NO. AS DESCRIBED IN ITEM 14. 12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA (If required) is not extended. is extended, Items 8 and 15, and returning Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation or as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The

  8. DE-SOL-0003641 Amendment 003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3641 Amendment 003 Page 2 of 4 The purpose of this amendment is to revise the solicitation and to provide the attached "DE-SOL- 0003641 Questions and Responses 1-9-13." Accordingly the solicitation is amended as follows: 1. The solicitation is hereby revised as follows: a. Clause M.3 Basis for Contract Award is deleted in its entirety and replaced with the following. Changes are delineated in bold yellow highlighted text. "M.3 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD The Government intends to

  9. Fatal and nonfatal risk associated with recycle of D&D-generated concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boren, J.K.; Ayers, K.W.; Parker, F.L.

    1997-02-01

    As decontamination and decommissioning activities proceed within the U.S. Department of Energy Complex, vast volumes of uncontaminated and contaminated concrete will be generated. The current practice of decontaminating and landfilling the concrete is an expensive and potentially wasteful practice. Research is being conducted at Vanderbilt University to assess the economic, social, legal, and political ramifications of alternate methods of dealing with waste concrete. An important aspect of this research work is the assessment of risk associated with the various alternatives. A deterministic risk assessment model has been developed which quantifies radiological as well as non-radiological risks associated with concrete disposal and recycle activities. The risk model accounts for fatal as well as non-fatal risks to both workers and the public. Preliminary results indicate that recycling of concrete presents potentially lower risks than the current practice. Radiological considerations are shown to be of minor importance in comparison to other sources of risk, with conventional transportation fatalities and injuries dominating. Onsite activities can also be a major contributor to non-fatal risk.

  10. NEPA Determination: LM-08-12 Amendment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grazing Agreement Amendment, Acid Pond, Spook, WyomingCX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 09/12/2012Location(s): Spook, WYOffices(s): Legacy Management

  11. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO AMEI DMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as sel forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not...

  12. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPLIES TO ' ... OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not...

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO,. .MENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS J The above numbered solicitation is amended as set forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers : j is extended. 0 is...

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Amarillo TX 79 1 20 - 0030 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., streel, county, Siele end ZIP Code) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. (xl - BABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES ...

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONlMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* slffHIl. county. Stale and ZIP Codo) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O....

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* treot. county. State and ZIP Codo) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. i - OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O....

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, Stato and ZIP Codo) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC....

  18. Concrete shaver. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) for many of its nuclear facilities throughout the United States. These facilities must be dismantled and the demolition waste sized into manageable pieces for handling and disposal. The facilities undergoing D and D are typically chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. To facilitate this work, DOE requires a tool capable of removing the surface of radiologically contaminated concrete floors. Operating requirements for the tool include simple and economical operation, the capability of operating in ambient temperatures from 3 C to 40 C (37 F to 104 F), and the ability to be easily decontaminated. The tool also must be safe for workers. The Marcrist Industries Limited concrete shaver is an electrically driven, self-propelled concrete and coating removal system. This technology consists of a 25-cm (10-in.)-wide diamond impregnated shaving drum powered by an electric motor and contains a vacuum port for dust extraction. The concrete shaver is ideal for use on open, flat, floor areas. The shaver may also be used on slightly curved surfaces. This shaver is self-propelled and produces a smooth, even surface with little vibration. The concrete shaver is an attractive alternative to traditional pneumatic scabbling tools, which were considered the baseline in this demonstration. The use of this tool reduces worker fatigue (compared to the baseline) due to lower vibration. The shaver is more than five times faster than the five-piston pneumatic scabbler at removing contamination from concrete. Because of this increased productivity, the shaver is 50% less costly to operate than baseline technologies. The DOE has successfully demonstrated the concrete shaver for decontaminating floors for free-release surveys prior to demolition work.

  19. INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A

    2007-08-30

    The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

  20. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  1. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Cai, Guowei; Agarwal, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  2. H. R. 4804: A bill to amend titles I, II, IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, and to add a new title X, to encourage the remining and reclamation of abandoned mined lands by active mining operations, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, June 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Surface coal mining operations can be effective in the reclamation of abandoned mined lands and are being encouraged by the amendments to the existing Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The new section X - Remining spells out the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to enter into agreements with mining companies to use excess spoil from an active surface mine to reclaim an abandoned site, to develop a bond guarantee program whereby the operators may be compensated with reclamation bond credits for up to 80% of the reclamation costs incurred, and to make funds available on a matching basis to states or tribes to collect certain geologic and hydrologic data for watersheds or regions adversely affected by past coal mining abuses for the use of regulatory authorities to assist applicants for surface mining permits within such areas.

  3. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfarb, V.; Gannon, R.

    1995-10-01

    Textron Defense Systems (TDS) is developing an electro-hydraulic device that has the potential for faster, safer, and less expensive scabbling of contaminated concrete surfaces. In the device, shock waves and cavitating bubbles are produced in water by the electric pulses, and the direct and reflected shock waves impinging on the concrete surface result in the crushing and cracking of the concrete. Pulse energy, frequency, and traverse speed control the depth of the scabbling action. Performance thus far has demonstrated the capability of a prototype unit to process a swath 24 inches wide, up to 3/4 inch deep at a linear velocity of up to 6 feet per hour, i.e., at a scabbling rate of 12 sq. ft. per hour.

  4. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  5. Innovative technology summary report: Concrete grinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The Flex concrete grinder is a lightweight, hand-held concrete and coating removal system used for decontaminating or stripping concrete surfaces. The US Department of Energy has successfully demonstrated it for decontaminating walls and floors for free release surveys prior to demolition work. The grinder is an electric-powered tool with a vacuum port for dust extraction and a diamond grinding wheel. The grinder is suitable for flat or slightly curved surfaces and results in a smooth surface, which makes release surveys more reliable. The grinder is lightweight and produces very little vibration, thus reducing worker fatigue. The grinder is more efficient than traditional baseline, tools at removing contamination from concrete surfaces (more than four times faster than hand-held pneumatic scabbling and scaling tools). Grinder consumables (i.e., replacement diamond grinding wheel) are more expensive than the replacement carbide parts for the scaler and scabbler. However, operating costs are outweighed by the lower purchase price of the grinder (50% of the price of the baseline scaler and 8% of the price of the baseline scabbler). Overall, the concrete grinder is an attractive alternative to traditional scabbling and scaling pneumatic tools. To this end, in July 1998, the outer rod room exposed walls of the Safe Storage Enclosure (SSE), an area measuring approximately 150 m{sup 2}, may be decontaminated with the hand-held grinder. This concrete grinder technology was demonstrated for the first time at the DOE`s Hanford Site. Decontamination of a sample room walls was performed at the C Reactor to free release the walls prior to demolition. The demonstration was conducted by onsite D and D workers, who were instructed by the vendor prior to and during the demonstration.

  6. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  7. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-03-03

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970`s, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in{sup 2} mix and a 4.5 kip/in{sup 2} mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in{sup 2}. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  8. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  9. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  10. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during

  11. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  12. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  13. Nuclear waste package fabricated from concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1987-03-01

    After the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1983, the Department of Energy must design, site, build and operate permanent geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The Department of Energy has recently selected three sites, one being the Hanford Site in the state of Washington. At this particular site, the repository will be located in basalt at a depth of approximately 3000 feet deep. The main concern of this site, is contamination of the groundwater by release of radionuclides from the waste package. The waste package basically has three components: the containment barrier (metal or concrete container, in this study concrete will be considered), the waste form, and other materials (such as packing material, emplacement hole liners, etc.). The containment barriers are the primary waste container structural materials and are intended to provide containment of the nuclear waste up to a thousand years after emplacement. After the containment barriers are breached by groundwater, the packing material (expanding sodium bentonite clay) is expected to provide the primary control of release of radionuclide into the immediate repository environment. The loading conditions on the concrete container (from emplacement to approximately 1000 years), will be twofold; (1) internal heat of the high-level waste which could be up to 400/sup 0/C; (2) external hydrostatic pressure up to 1300 psi after the seepage of groundwater has occurred in the emplacement tunnel. A suggested container is a hollow plain concrete cylinder with both ends capped. 7 refs.

  14. FFTF Final Safety Analysis Report Amendment 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAUTEL, W.A.

    2003-03-01

    This is the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 82 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set assigned to you. This page change amendment incorporates changes previously approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. This amendment provides updates to the FSAR to facilitate FFTF shutdown and deactivation. Among the changes are the following: Chapter 11 is updated to describe upgrades to the Solid Waste Cask. Additional fuel handling accidents are added to Chapter 15. Appendix G is revised to clearly identify systems and their safety functions. Appendix H is revised to remove the discussion of material that has been removed from the Interim Storage Area. Appendix I is revised to provide a general description of liquid metal removal from FFTF. Other changes include minor technical updates from the FSAR annual review and editorial and procedure references.

  15. Thermal Removal of Tritium from Concrete and Soil to Reduce Groundwater Impacts - 13197

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

    2013-07-01

    of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on-site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management. (authors)

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I PAGlE 01 PAGES 1 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO. NO. I' PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 04 94 See Block 16C No PR 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00516 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE I u.s. Department of Energy ORNL Site Office P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state and ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 0 AK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 0

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID <!;ODE 1 PAGE 1 OF 3 I PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE IS. P1ROJECT NO. (If applicable) M528 See Block 16C REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration I Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county,

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 1PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 25 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ . NO . 5 PROJECT NO. (If applicab/e) See Bl ock 1 6C 1 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 105007 NNSA / Pantex Site Office 05007 NNSA/Pantex Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Nt SA/ Pantex S it e Offi ce NNSA/Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030 P . O . Box 30030

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1. CONTRACT ID <!;ODE 1 PAGE 1 OF 3 I PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE IS. P1ROJECT NO. (If applicable) M528 See Block 16C REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration I Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF S<DLlCITATIONNO. I

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Page 1 of 4 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. M0538 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Sandia Corporation P. O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 8 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Non-M&O Contracting Operations NA-APM-12 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000001 PAGE 3 OF 8 AMENDMENT 000001 The purpose of Amendment 000001 to solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Standard Form (SF) 33 to change proposal due date and number of pages noted in Section

  2. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 PAGE OF PAGES 2 of 3 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ United States Department of Energy NNSA Construction & Specialty Acquisition NA-APM-123 Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 388 P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov SCHEDULE DE-SOL-0008449 000003 PAGE 3 OF 3 AMENDMENT 000003 The purpose of Amendment 000003 to Solicitation DE-SOL-0008449 is to: 1) Revise Attachment L-4 Past Performance Questionnaire (PPQ), for clarification.

  3. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    . CONTRACT 10 CODE PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) M058 See Block 16 C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road, Building 1410, TA-3 Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION

  4. Microsoft Word - Northern Pass Amended Application - FINAL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY NORTHERN PASS TRANSMISSION LLC DOCKET NO. PP-371 AMENDED APPLICATION JULY 1, 2013 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. LIST OF EXHIBITS iii LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS iv INTRODUCTION 1 OVERVIEW OF AMENDMENTS TO APPLICATION 1 SECTION 1 - INFORMATION REGARDING THE APPLICANT 1.1 Legal Name of the Applicant 6 1.2 Legal Names of All Partners 6 1.3 Communications and Correspondence 7 1.4 Foreign Ownership

  5. Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe

    2009-04-15

    The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    EHS is being developed for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals. EHS involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface; high impulse pressure results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. Objective of Phase I was to prove the technical feasibility of EH for controlled scabbling and decontamination of concrete. Phase I is complete.

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT /1. CONTRACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CODE 041152224 FACILITY CODE 12212005 11. THIi ITt:M ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOL CITATIONS OThe above numbered solicitation IS amended as set forth In Item 14. The hour...

  8. Microsoft Word - Posted DSI Amendment of Alcoa Block Power Sales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No. 1 Contract No. 06PB-11744 DRAFT AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and ALCOA INC. This AMENDMENT to the BLOCK POWER SALES AGREEMENT is executed by the...

  9. An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

    2014-07-01

    The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

  10. Salado mass concrete: Mixture development and preliminary characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.; Neeley, B.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1994-06-01

    A salt-saturated concrete proportioned with Class H oilwell cement, Class F fly ash, and a shrinkage compensating component was developed to meet performance requirements for mass placement as seal components at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Target properties of the concrete included 8-in. slump 3 hr after mixing, no aggregate segregation, heat rise of < 25{degrees}F 4 hr after mixing, compressive strength of 4,500 psi at 180 days, minimal volume change, and probable geochemical stability for repository conditions. Thermal and mechanical properties of promising candidate concrete mixtures were measured. Modulus of elasticity and creep behavior were similar to those of ordinary portland cement mass concretes. Thermal expansion for the salt-saturated concrete developed here was typical of ordinary concrete with similar silicate aggregates. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and specific heat approximated values measured for other mass concretes and were similar to values of the host salt rock.

  11. Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Maryland U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), Maryland State Historic Preservation Office, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) md_amendment.pdf (432.88 KB) More Documents & Publications First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri

  12. On-Going International Research Program on Irradiated Concrete Conducted by DOE, EPRI and Japan Research Institutions. Roadmap, Achievements and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Pape, Yann; Rosseel, Thomas M.

    2015-10-01

    The Joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Program (Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program–Material Pathway–Concrete and Long-Term Operation (LTO) Program) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research studies aim at understanding the most prominent degradation modes and their effects on the long-term operation of concrete structures to nuclear power generation. Based on the results of the Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), (NUREG/CR-7153, ORNL/TM-2011/545), irradiated concrete and alkali-silica reaction (ASR)-affected concrete structures are the two prioritized topics of on-going research. This report focuses specifically on the topic of irradiated concrete and summarizes the main accomplishments obtained by this joint program, but also provides an overview of current relevant activities domestically and internationally. Possible paths forward are also suggested to help near-future orientation of this program.

  13. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  14. EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    83: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition Program EIS-0283-AmROD-2003a.pdf (50.43 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0229: Supplement Analysis (September 2007) EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact

  15. Microsoft Word - CADROD amendment FINAL 091511

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION/RECORD OF DECISION AMENDMENT FOR ROCKY FLATS PLANT (USDOE) CENTRAL OPERABLE UNIT JEFFERSON AND BOULDER COUNTIES, COLORADO This page intentionally left blank Page 1 of 26 Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ...................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Site

  16. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A

    2015-01-01

    Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet in the United States as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtime, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of both known and new forms of degradation. A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. The size and complexity of nuclear power plant containment structures and the heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. This paper examines the benefits of using time-frequency analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). By using wavelet packet decomposition, the original ultrasound signals are decomposed into various frequency bands that facilitates highly selective analysis of the signal’s frequency content and can be visualized using the familiar SAFT image reconstruction algorithm.

  18. EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0222: Amended Record of Decision Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan In amending the 1999 ROD, DOE seeks to clarify two points: that when considering land-use proposals, DOE will use regulatory processes in addition to the implementing procedures in Chapter 6 of the HCP-EIS to ensure consistency with CLUP land-use designations, and that DOE will continue to apply the process under HCP-EIS Chapter 6 to modify or amend the CLUP, as needed. DOE/EIS-0222, Amended

  19. Clear Air Act Amendments Overview and update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, W.C.; Frazier, R.S.

    1995-06-01

    The new Clean Air Act is rapidly establishing itself as the leading industry affecting environmental legislation of today and perhaps of all time. Numerous developments are occurring daily that can and will impact industry over the next few years. This paper summarizes the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act and attempts to bring the reader {open_quotes}up to date{close_quotes}. The paper ends with some management suggestions as to what industry should be doing today.

  20. Rapid method to determine 89Sr/90Sr in large concrete samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; Sudowe, Ralf; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2016-03-24

    Here, a new rapid method has been developed that provides high quality low-level measurements of 89,90Sr in concrete samples with an MDA (Minimum Detectable Activity) of <1 mBq g-1. The new method is fast, meets new decommissioning regulatory limits and is robust even if refractory particles are present. The method utilizes a rapid fusion to ensure total dissolution of samples and rapid preconcentration and separation of 89,90Sr from 5-10 g concrete samples. When, the 89Sr/90Sr ratio is high, Sr can be isolated from up to 5g concrete samples, total 89/90Sr measured, and then 90Sr determined via 90Y separated after amore » period of ingrowth. Another approach allows the immediate determination of 90Sr in 10 g concrete aliquots without waiting for 90Y ingrowth, in instances where the shorter lived 89Sr is unlikely to be encountered.« less

  1. ESTIMATES FOR RELEASE OF RADIONUCLIDES FROM POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE HADDAM NECK NUCLEAR PLANT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.

    2004-09-15

    Decommissioning of the Haddam Neck Nuclear Power Plant operated by Connecticut Yankee is in progress. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the Containment Building and Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) Building. Consideration is being given to leaving some subsurface concrete from the Containment, Spent Fuel and certain other buildings in place following NRC license termination. Characterization data of most of these structures show small amounts of residual contamination. The In-Core Sump area of the Containment Building has shown elevated levels of tritium, Co-60, Fe-55, and Eu-152 and lesser quantities of other radionuclides due to neutron activation of the concrete in this area. This analysis is provided to determine levels of residual contamination that will not cause releases to the groundwater in excess of the acceptable dose limits. The objective is to calculate a conservative relationship between the radionuclide concentration of subsurface concrete and the maximum groundwater concentration (pCi/L) for the concrete that may remain following license termination at Connecticut Yankee.

  2. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akka?, Ay?e; Ba?yi?it, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes added Silica fume have been investigated.

  3. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A novel technique for the production of cool ...

  4. Roman Seawater Concrete Holds the Secret to Cutting Carbon Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "one of the most durable construction materials on the planet," says UC Berkeley's Marie Jackson, a leading member of the team. Says Monteiro, "It's not that modern concrete...

  5. Evolution of an interfacial crack on the concrete-embankment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Evolution of an interfacial crack on the concrete-embankment boundary Authors: Glascoe, L ; Antoun, T ; Kanarska, Y ; Lomove, I ; Hall, R ; Woodson, S ; Smith, J Publication ...

  6. Performance of Damaged Soil-Concrete Wraparound Dam Sections...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predicting seismic or shock loading damage of the soil-concrete interface where an ... erosion process, and deposition within interface cracks; and (2) to investigate the ...

  7. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production Shao, Yixin 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental Processes Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental...

  8. Concrete growth problems and remedial measures at TVA projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Most concrete structures are designed and detailed to provide for a volume decrease without excessive cracking. Occasionally, however, a concrete structure exhibits a long-term increase in volume termed concrete growth. Concrete growth may result from a variety of reactions, such as the hydration of unstable oxides included in the concrete mix, or the oxidation of minerals or from an outside attack of sulfates. The most important reaction creating concrete growth is that between minor alkali hydroxides from cement and the concrete aggregates. Two distinctly different harmful reactions have been recognized: the alkali-silicate and alkali-carbonate reactions. Concrete deteriorating from an alkali-aggregate reaction, regardless of the type, develops an obvious network of cracks called pattern or map cracking. These alkali-aggregate reactions and their accompanying concrete growth have presented numerous problems at TVA's Fontana Dam, Chickamauga Dam and lock, and Hiwassee Dam. Much has been learned about alkali-aggregate reaction since 1940. Most harmful reactions can now be prevented in proposed structures by interpreting the results of standard test methods. It is not possible, however, in existing structures to determine how far the growth phenomenon has progressed, how long the effects will have to be dealt with, or what the future effects will be. A program of close surveillance and monitoring is maintained at these projects, and problems are dealt with as they arise.

  9. Development of ultrasonic methods for the nondestructive inspection of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, T.N.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1983-08-01

    Nondestructive inspection of Portland cement and refractory concrete is conducted to determine strength, thickness, presence of voids or foreign matter, presence of cracks, amount of degradation due to chemical attack, and other properties without the necessity of coring the structure (which is usually accomplished by destructively removing a sample). This paper reviews the state of the art of acoustic nondestructive testing methods for Portland cement and refractory concrete. Most nondestructive work on concrete has concentrated on measuring acoustic velocity by through transmission methods. Development of a reliable pitch-catch or pulse-echo system would provide a method of measuring thickness with access from only one side of the concrete.

  10. CONCRETE SUPPORT DESIGN FOR MISCELLANEOUS ESF UTILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Misiak

    1999-06-21

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to design concrete supports for the miscellaneous utility equipment used at the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Two utility systems are analyzed: (1) the surface collection tanks of the Waste Water System, and (2) the chemical tracer mixing and storage tanks of the Non-Potable Water System. This analysis satisfies design recommended in the Title III Evaluation Reports for the Subsurface Fire Water System and Subsurface Portion of the Non-Potable Water System (CRWMS M&O 1998a) and Waste Water Systems (CRWMS M&O 1998b).

  11. EERE Success Story-Concrete Company Moving to Natural Gas with...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Concrete Company Moving to Natural Gas with Clean Cities EERE Success Story-Concrete Company Moving to Natural Gas with Clean Cities March 10, 2015 - 10:25am Addthis Concrete ...

  12. Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 The Federal Advisory Committee Act became law in 1972 and is the legal foundation defining how federal advisory committees operate. The law has special emphasis on open meetings, chartering, public involvement, and reporting. This version is from the House website, complete with all Amendments and annotations. Federal Advisory Committee Act (79.63 KB) More Documents &

  13. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Colorado First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado First amendment to the programmatic agreement between DOE, the Colorado Governor's Energy Office, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Office regarding EECBG, SEP and WAP undertakings. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Colorado (1.78 MB) More Documents & Publications Programmatic Agreement for Colorado Vermont State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement NEW JERSEY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION

  14. First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Missouri First Amendment to Programmatic Agreement for Missouri U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Missouri Department of Natural Resources Division of Energy (DE), Missouri State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs mo_amendment.pdf (976.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Programmatic Agreement for Colorado Amendment to

  15. EIS-0387: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amended Record of Decision EIS-0387: Amended Record of Decision Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex The National Nuclear Security Administration, a separately organized agency within the Department of Energy, is issuing this Amended Record of Decision for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex issued on March 4, 2011. A Supplement Analysis was issued on May 2, 2016. For more information, see:

  16. EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer

  17. EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0310: Amended Record of Decision Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) (66 FR 7877, January 26, 2001) for its Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the

  18. DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE Amends Record of Decision for Plutonium Consolidation DOE amended the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Specifically, DOE decided to take the actions necessary to transfer approximately 2,511 additional 3013-compliant packages containing surplus non-pit weapons-usable plutonium metals and oxides to the Savannah River Site

  19. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D.; Giltrud, M.E.; Luk, V.K.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  20. Multiscale Concrete Modeling of Aging Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammi, Yousseff; Gullett, Philipp; Horstemeyer, Mark F.

    2015-07-31

    In this work a numerical finite element framework is implemented to enable the integration of coupled multiscale and multiphysics transport processes. A User Element subroutine (UEL) in Abaqus is used to simultaneously solve stress equilibrium, heat conduction, and multiple diffusion equations for 2D and 3D linear and quadratic elements. Transport processes in concrete structures and their degradation mechanisms are presented along with the discretization of the governing equations. The multiphysics modeling framework is theoretically extended to the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) by introducing the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and based on the XFEM user element implementation of Giner et al. [2009]. A damage model that takes into account the damage contribution from the different degradation mechanisms is theoretically developed. The total contribution of damage is forwarded to a Multi-Stage Fatigue (MSF) model to enable the assessment of the fatigue life and the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in a nuclear power plant. Finally, two examples are presented to illustrate the developed multiphysics user element implementation and the XFEM implementation of Giner et al. [2009].

  1. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  2. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  3. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  4. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  5. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  6. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  7. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  8. Letter, proposed amendment to power sales agreement with Columbia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13, 2009 In reply refer to: PT-5 To regional customers, stakeholders and other interested parties: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to amend its 2007 Block Power...

  9. EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement. This document corrects an error in that notice. DOEEIS-0287, Department of Energy, Amended Record of Decision: Idaho...

  10. EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0431: Amended Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated ...

  11. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 6217 Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section 6217 Webpage...

  12. EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand ... (residual radioactive material) at the Moab milling site and vicinity properties in Utah. ...

  13. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure? ...

  14. NUSAR: N Reactor Updated Safety Analysis Report, Amendment 21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G L

    1989-12-01

    The enclosed pages are Amendment 21 of the N Reactor Updated Safety Analysis Report (NUSAR). NUSAR, formerly UNI-M-90, was revised by 18 amendments that were issued by UNC Nuclear Industries, the contractor previously responsible for N Reactor operations. As of June 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) acquired the operations and engineering contract for N Reactor and other facilities at Hanford. The document number for NUSAR then became WHC-SP-0297. The first revision was issued by WHC as Amendment 19, prepared originally by UNC. Summaries of each of the amendments are included in NUSAR Section 1.1.

  15. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12082008) DOE is ...

  17. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PP-398 Minnesota Power - Great Northern Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 222 - Nov. 18, 2014 Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. ...

  18. Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 2, 2010 SUBJECT: FINAL RULE ON AMENDING ELIGIBILITY PROVISIONS TO MULTI-FAMILY BUILDINGS FOR THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM PURPOSE: To issue guidance on implementing...

  19. Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for the Weatherization Assistance Program U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

  20. Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater Citation Vermont...

  1. Part I: Amendment of Solicitiation / Modification of Contract (SF30)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (x) x DE-AC36-08GO28308 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted ; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted ,

  2. 36CFRPart800_as_amended2004_web.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 CFR PART 800 -- PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES (incorporating amendments effective August 5, 2004) Subpart A -- Purposes and Participants Sec. 800.1 Purposes. 800.2 ...

  3. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ``Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs.

  4. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  5. Code System to Calculate Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-05-26

    Version 00 This version is designated USINTC and was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as watermore » and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.« less

  6. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO, 3, EFFECTIVE DATE 4, REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ, NO, I' PROJECT NO, (If applicable) 176 See Block 16C 10SC007515 Item 10 6 ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7, ADMINISTERED BY (If olher loon lIem 6) CODE L00518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Depart:nent of Energy U.S. Departmer.t of Energy 2.0. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge T~ 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. _ , county, sttJIe IJ1Id ZIP COde) (x) 9A, AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO, t-- OAK RIDGE

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 326 See Block 16C 11SC007443 Item 6 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, COllllty, Stato and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. r-- o AK RIDGE

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 CODE \ PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. \5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 330 See Block 16C 11SC007443 Item 11 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE \00518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, COWlIy, Ststo and ZIP Corio) (X) 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* sIntfIl, county. SIms and ZIP Codo) OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 OAK RIDGE TN 37830-6218 11. CONTRACT 10 CODE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 12SC000484 Item 4 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. t-- 9B. DATED

  10. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT 10 CODE 1 PAGE OF PAGES 1 1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. /5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 340 See Block 16C 12SC000849 Item 6 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroet, coooty, Stote /JIId ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT

  11. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    [0 CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIF[CATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQU[SITJONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. r' PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 357 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., slmot, county, Sloto and ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. o

  12. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT 10 CODE / PAGE OF PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 I 2 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 358 See Block 16C 12SC002265 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stme/, county, S/olo ond ZIP Code) ~ 9A. AMENDMENT OF

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . CONTRACT ID CODEPAEOPGS 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFI CATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 046 See Block 16C 12EM000343 6 ISSUED BY CODE 00603 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If otherthan Item 6) CODE 100603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Depar7nent of Energy UJ.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richiand WA 99352 Richiand WA 99352 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    , 1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 . REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15 PROJECT NO. (ff applicable) 0250 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (ff other than Item 6) coDE jo5003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Off ice NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Off ice 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos NM 87544 Los Alamos NM 87544 8.

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 OF30 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 192 See Block 16 C G. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos, NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRACT ID CODE j PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2 AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (II applicable) 220 See Block 16C 6 ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7 ADMINISTERED BY (lfolherthan Item 6) CODE 105003 NNSA/Los Alamos Sile Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office u.s. Department of Energy u.s. Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos Los Alamos NM 87544 NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO . 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 0232 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Al amos Si t e Office U. S . Dep a rtme nt of Ene r gy Los Alamo s Sit e Off i ce 3747 We st Jemez Road Los Al a mos NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No. , street, county, State and ZIP Code) L A OS ALAMOS NAT I ONAL SECURI TY, ttn : STEVE K. SHOOK P.O . BOX 1663 , M S P222 L OS ALAMOS NM 875450001 CODE 175252894 LLC FACILITY CODE 11 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 4.

  18. Management of the aging of critical safety-related concrete structures in light-water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. ); Arndt, E.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant safety-related structures for continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued-service determinations. Objectives, accomplishments, and planned activities under each of these tasks are presented. Major program accomplishments include development of a materials property data base for structural materials as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, a review and assessment of inservice inspection techniques for concrete materials and structures has been complete, and work on development of a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future condition assessment of concrete structures is well under way. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 2. Evaluation of concretes for LMFBR applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  20. Preparing for the clean air act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, B.; Bensinger, D. Midwest Research Inst., Cary, NC )

    1993-09-09

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state air quality control agencies are in the midst of developing regulations and programs to meet the ambitious goals of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. The CAAA--which call for stricter air quality standards, a greater number of pollutants and sources to be regulated, new operating permits, and more stringent enforcement of air quality violations--are expected to have a significant impact on virtually every facility in the country. An important deadline in the implementation of the CAAA is November 1993. That is when individual states must submit their proposed operating permit programs to the EPA, as mandated by Title 5 of the Amendments. The EPA then has one year after receiving a state program to accept or reject it. Once a state's program is accepted, all major sources of air pollution in that state have one year to apply for an operating air permit. Although the initial deadlines for business and industry are up to two years away, sufficient information is now available to take the first steps toward compliance with the new air quality regulations. Even while the details of the new rules are being hammered out, plant engineering can and should begin laying the groundwork for their own permit applications. Time and effort spent preparing now for the provisions of the CAAA will pay off in the long run.

  1. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  2. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  3. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  4. Prestressed-concrete pressure vessels and their applicability to advanced-energy-system concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J

    1983-01-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are, in essence, spaced steel structures since their strength is derived from a multitude of steel elements made up of deformed reinforcing bars and prestressing tendons which are present in sufficient quantities to carry tension loads imposed on the vessel. Other major components of a PCPV include the concrete, liner and cooling system, and insulation. PCPVs exhibit a number of advantages which make them ideally suited for application to advanced energy concepts: fabricability in virtually any size and shape using available technology, improved safety, reduced capital costs, and a history of proven performance. PCPVs have many applications to both nuclear- and non-nuclear-based energy systems concepts. Several of these concepts will be discussed as well as the research and development activities conducted at ORNL in support of PCPV development.

  5. Structural aging program to assess the adequacy of critical concrete components in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Oland, C.B.; Arndt, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). The Program has evolved from preliminary studies conducted to evaluate the long-term environmental challenges to light-water reactor safety-related concrete civil structures. An important conclusion of these studies was that a damage methodology, which can provide a quantitative measure of a concrete structure's durability with respect to potential future requirements, needs to be developed. Under the SAG Program, this issue is being addressed through: establishment of a structural materials information center, evaluation of structural component assessment and repair technologies, and development of a quantitative methodology for structural aging determinations. Progress to date of each of these activities is presented as well as future plans. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Code System for Analysis of 3-D Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-11-22

    Version 00 NONSAP-C is a finite element program for determining the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures. Long-term, or creep, behavior of concrete structures can also be analyzed. Nonlinear constitutive relations for concrete under short-term loads are incorporated in two time-independent models, a variable-modulus approach with orthotropic behavior induced in the concrete due to the development of different tangent moduli in different directions and an elastic-plastic model in which the concrete ismore » assumed to be a continuous, isotropic, and linearly elastic-plastic strain-hardening-fracture material. A viscoelastic constitutive model for long-term thermal creep of concrete is included. Three-dimensional finite elements available in NONSAP-C include a truss element, a multinode tendon element for prestressed and post tensioned concrete structures, an elastic-plastic membrane element to represent the behavior of cavity liners, and a general isoparametric element with a variable number of nodes for analysis of solids and thick shells.« less

  7. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  8. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Damage in Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Remec, Igor; Giorla, Alain B; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has resulted in a renewed focus on long-term aging of materials at nuclear power plants (NPPs) including concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete (Graves et al., (2014)). Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete (Hilsdorf et al., (1978)) does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure (Kontani et al., (2011)). To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, the Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are working to better understand radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines recent progress toward: 1) assessing the radiation environment in concrete biological shields and defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield for extended operation, and estimating adsorbed dose, 2) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, 3) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete and its components under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish conservative bounds and inform damage models, 4) developing improved models to enhance the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete and 5) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge including developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in data obtained from various concretes and from accelerated irradiation experiments.

  9. Microsoft Word - Port Townsend Amendment DRAFT 5.2.12.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1PB-12330 AMENDMENT executed by the BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION and PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION This AMENDMENT to the Firm Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) is executed by...

  10. EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Amended Notice of Intent EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent Surplus ... (SPD Supplemental EIS, DOEEIS-0283-S2) and to conduct additional public scoping. ...

  11. WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamil...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions to Multifamily Buildings for the Weatherization Assistance Program WPN 10-15: Final Rule on Amending Eligibility Provisions...

  12. Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap tracks the eight goals published in the American Concrete Institute Strategic Development Council's Vision 2030: A Vision for the U.S. Concrete Industry. Roadmap 2030 highlights existing state-of-the-art technologies and emerging scientific advances that promise high potential for innovation, and predicts future technological needs. It defines enabling research opportunities and proposes areas where governmental-industrial-academic partnerships can accelerate the pace of development. Roadmap 2030 is a living document designed to continually address technical, institutional, and market changes.

  13. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-12-26

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  14. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radchenko, P. A. Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  15. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  16. Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E.

    2009-07-01

    The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Geopolymer concretes: a green construction technology rising from the ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allouche, E.

    2009-07-01

    Researchers at Louisiana Tech University have embarked on a multi-year research initiative to develop applications for inorganic polymer concrete, or geopolymer concrete, in the area of civil construction, and to bring solve of these applications to market. One objective was to produce a spray-on coating for use in the harsh environment of wastewater conveyance and treatment facilities. Another project is to establish relationships between fly ash composition and particle size distribution and the mechanical attributes and workability of the resulting geopolymer concrete. A third project is to develop a 'smart' geopolymer concrete whose response to a given electric current can be correlated to the stress level to which the structure is subjected. 1 fig., 6 photos.

  18. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  19. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  20. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  1. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  2. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced ...

  3. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  4. Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 Bond Amendment, Security Clearances - January 1, 2008 January 1, 2008 In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: "SEC. 3002. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS SEC. 1072. SECURITY CLEARANCES; LIMITATIONS. (a) In General.-Title III of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (50 U.S.C. 435b)

  5. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  6. Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment for New Reactors Standard Contract Amendment for New Reactors The following document is a contract amendment to a standard contract between the United States of America, represented by the U.S. Department of Energy, and a corporation organized and existing under the laws of a given state to dispose of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF)and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (HRW). (446.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Standard Contract for Disposal of SNF and/or HRW Locations of Spent

  7. Federal Register Notice, Amending 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Ssubustance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Register Notice, Amending 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Ssubustance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites

  8. EIS-0220: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Materials: Savannah River Site Waste Management In this amended ROD, DOE is announcing that it ... a small portion of a second type of nuclear materials analyzed in the IMNM EIS. ...

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT \\1. CONTRACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, State and ZIP Code) J1 SA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. P.O. BOX 117 9B. ...

  10. Section L Attachment I - Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I Summary and Fee Sheet Amendment 000002 Nevada National Security Site Management and Operating (M&O) Contract PROPOSED 2017 Mgt Team Costs 2018 Mgt Team Costs Subtotal 0 FEE CLIN ...

  11. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, as amended...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, as amended The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (Public Law 101-601; 25 U.S.C. 3001-3013) describes ...

  12. EPA-- Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Qualitys Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

  13. Savannah River Site Settlement Agreement Amendment, June 15,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Amendment to Settlement Agreement 87-27-SW State South Carolina Agreement Type Settlement Agreement Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish course of action due to DOE's ...

  14. DOE Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Supply Test Procedure; Docket No. EERE-2014-BT-TP-0043 RIN 1904-AD36 DOE Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to Amend the External Power Supply Test Procedure; Docket No. ...

  15. Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance (EPA, 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Amended Environmental Impact Statement Filing System Guidance for Implementing 40 CFR 1506.9 and 1506.10 of the Council on Environmental Quality’s Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act

  16. OT SPECIFIED I OTHER AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATI ON/MODIFICATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODIFIC ATION OF CO NTRACTIORD ER NO A DE-AC05 - 060R 23 100 l OB DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 12 21 2005 11 . THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITA TI ONS L the above numbered...

  17. Amendment: Energy and Emissions Benefit Table (December 30, 2008)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This amendment replaces the Energy Benefits and Emissions Table on page 52 of Solicitation DE-FOA-0000005 and page 44 of Solicitation Number DE-FOA-0000008 with the following data request form.

  18. Microsoft Word- DE-FOA-0000013 Amendment 000003.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This amendment extends the application due date for State Applicants from May 11, 2009 to June 25, 2009 for Recovery Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG) formula grants.

  19. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and

  20. EIS-0287: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Revised by State The U.S. Department of Energy is amending its initial ROD published December 19, 2005, pursuant to the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, issued in October 2002. Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Revised by State, DOE/EIS-0287 (January 2010) 75 FR 137 (2.25 MB) More Documents & Publications

  1. ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS | Department of Energy AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS ADR Lunchtime Program: AMENDMENTS TO THE REHABILITATION ACT - RECENT TRENDS AND HOW ADR PRINCIPLES MAY HELP TO NAVIGATE THE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION INTERACTIVE PROCESS The Rehabilitation Act requires federal agencies to provide

  2. Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Advisory Committee Act with Amendments of 1997 The Federal Advisory Committee Act became law in 1972 and is the legal foundation defining how federal advisory committees operate. The law has special emphasis on open meetings, chartering, public involvement, and reporting. This version is from the House web site, complete with all Amendments and annotations. 5 USC TITLE 5 - APPENDIX 01/02/01 TITLE 5 - GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES TITLE 5 - APPENDIX Item Federal Advisory Committee

  3. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 252014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste...

  4. Code requirements for concrete repository and processing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hookham, C.J. [Black & Veatch, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Palaniswamy, R. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The design and construction of facilities and structures for the processing and safe long-term storage of low- and high-level radioactive wastes will likely employ structural concrete. This concrete will be used for many purposes including structural support, shielding, and environmental protection. At the present time, there are no design costs, standards or guidelines for repositories, waste containers, or processing facilities. Recently, the design and construction guidelines contained in American Concrete Institute (ACI), Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures (ACI 349), have been cited for low-level waste (LLW) repositories. Conceptual design of various high-level (HLW) repository surface structures have also cited the ACI 349 Code. However, the present Code was developed for nuclear power generating facilities and its application to radioactive waste repositories was not intended. For low and medium level radioactive wastes, concrete has a greater role and use in processing facilities, engineered barriers, and repository structures. Because of varied uses and performance/safety requirements this review of the current ACI 349 Code document was required to accommodate these special classes of structures.

  5. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  6. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong; Brannon, Rebecca Moss

    2009-08-01

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material

  7. Electrochemical Aging of Thermal-Sprayed Zinc Anodes on Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Cryer, C.B.; McGill, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used in impressed current cathodic protection systems for some of Oregon's coastal reinforced concrete bridges. Electrochemical aging of zinc anodes results in physical and chemical changes at the zinc-concrete interface. Concrete surfaces heated prior to thermal-spraying had initial adhesion strengths 80 pct higher than unheated surfaces. For electrochemical aging greater than 200 kC/m{sup 2} (5.2 A h/ft{sup 2}), there was no difference in adhesion strengths for zinc on preheated and unheated concrete. Adhesion strengths decreased monotonically after about 400 to 600 kC/m{sup 2} (10.4 to 15.6 A-h/ft{sup 2}) as a result of the reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. A zone adjacent to the metallic zinc (and originally part of the zinc coating) was primarily zincite (ZnO), with minor constituents of wulfingite (Zn(OH){sub 2}), simonkolleite (Zn{sub 5}(OH) {sub 8}C{sub l2}{sup .}H{sub 2}O), and hydrated zinc hydroxide sulfates (Zn{sub 4}SO{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}{sup .}xH{sub 2}O). This zone is the locus for cohesive fracture when the zinc coating separates from the concrete during adhesion tests. Zinc ions substitute for calcium in the cement paste adjacent to the coating as the result of secondary mineralization. The initial estimate of the coating service life based on adhesion strength measurements in accelerated impressed current cathodic protection tests is about 27 years.

  8. Tierra Concrete Homes Honored with Energy Star Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tierra Concrete Homes Honored with Energy Star Award For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Homes Barba Golden, Colo., August 8, 2001 - Tierra Concrete Homes, Inc. of Pueblo, Colo., has been recognized as a leader in energy-efficient home building by Energy Star, a national program that develops energy-saving partnerships with the home building industry. The first-ever "Most Energy-Efficient Homes of the New Millennium" award was presented to

  9. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-15

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  10. Quick setting water-compatible furfuryl alcohol polymer concretes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1982-11-30

    A novel quick setting polymer concrete composite comprising a furfuryl alcohol monomer, an aggregate containing a maximum of 8% by weight water, and about 1-10% trichlorotoluene initiator and about 20-80% powdered metal salt promoter, such as zinc chloride, based on the weight of said monomer, to initiate and promote polymerization of said monomer in the presence of said aggregate, within 1 hour after mixing at a temperature of -20.degree. C. to 40.degree. C., to produce a polymer concrete having a 1 hour compressive strength greater than 2000 psi.