National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for action vegetation management

  1. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  2. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase I The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of...

  3. 9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    in the approach to defining management objectives and specifying assumptions behind vegetation change models9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

  4. Transmission Vegetation Management NERC Standard FAC-003-2 Technical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transmission Vegetation Management NERC Standard FAC-003-2 Technical Reference Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  5. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2008 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    's Wilt 489 Using Herbicides with Plastic Mulch 490 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial

  6. EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

  7. Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Joseph L.

    2001-01-11

    The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain ...

  8. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  9. Integrated rotation systems for soilborne disease, weed and fertility management in strawberry/vegetable production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    dahliae infection rate of strawberry plants at the organicsoilborne diseases in strawberry using vegetable rotations.Fertility Management in Strawberry/Vegetable Production M.

  10. Part 5. Cultural Requirements Vegetation Management in Eucalyptus1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part 5. Cultural Requirements Vegetation Management in Eucalyptus1 Clyde L. Elmore2 Weeds are plants that compete for water, nutrients and light, or in Eucalyptus plantations may interfere hazard. Eucalyptus species are grown in California for wood products, ornamental trees along roadways

  11. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On...

  12. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On March...

  13. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01

    to this problem be to use the term "action level" as a replacement term "economic threshold" and the term "inac level" for the critical natural enemy densities (134). terms are more fitting because economic and factors are both important in pest manage dec... component of level model. If the plant has reserves of n sufficient time remaining during the growing replace damaged fruit , then a higher action level be set. The effect of leaf damage as related phenological stage of cotton plant growth is ill...

  14. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (ECASOP) Issued by Office of Project Management, Oversight, and Assessments (PMOA) PM-1 September 21, 2015 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EVMS CORRECTIVE ACTION SOP SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 ii...

  15. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewingValidatingRoadmapVannevarVasudhaVegetation 250

  16. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewingValidatingRoadmapVannevarVasudhaVegetation

  17. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action Alternative in an EA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land...

  18. Managing Insect and Mite Pests in Vegetable Gardens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.

    2008-02-19

    are Green Light? Tomato & Vegetable Spray Read-to-Use (neem oil), Green Light? Neem Concentrate (neem oil), Green Light? Neem II Ready-to-Use (neem oil and pyrethrins), Green Light? Bioganic? series, Bonide? Bio-Neem, and some insecticidal soaps... insect pests. Vegetable Registered Pesticides (PHI) Common Insect Pests Pesticides Registered by Pest asparagus azadirachtin (NA) carbaryl (1) insecticidal soap (0) malathion (1) permethrin (1-3) petroleum oil (0) pyrethrins (0) rotenone (1) aphids...

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Environmenta' Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14 2014 Washington, DC 20585 August 2015 Corrective...

  20. On Managing Temporal Information for Handling Durative Actions in LPG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerevini, Alfonso E.

    On Managing Temporal Information for Handling Durative Actions in LPG Alfonso Gerevini, Alessandro Branze 38, 25123 Brescia, Italy fgerevini,saetti,serinag@ing.unibs.it Abstract. LPG is a recent planner good performance. This paper focuses on how LPG represents and manages temporal information to handle

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  2. Management 4313.583 Organizing for Action (Spring 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management 4313.583 ­ Organizing for Action (Spring 2015) Spears School of Business Oklahoma State University Instructor: Dr. Dennis L. Mott, Professor of Management Contact Information: Office: OSULearn (Online Classroom) Wednesday 10- 11:30 a.m. Course administration Information: EMAIL

  3. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  4. Abscisic Acid-Regulated Growth Modulations and Its Application for Stress and Quality Management of Vegetable Transplants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agehara, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a management tool for producing high quality, more stress tolerant vegetable transplants and for prolonging transplant marketability. This study primarily involves physiological and ...

  5. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  6. Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change as an emergency action for six months the Information Collection Request (ICR) for a new collection (Request...

  7. EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

  8. Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change the Information Collection Request (ICR) for a New Collection for OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance...

  9. Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change the Information Collection Request (ICR) for an Extension without Change of a Currently Approved Collection...

  10. Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change the Information Collection Request (ICR) for an Extension of the ICR for OE Recovery Act Financial...

  11. Process safety management and interim or remedial action plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, M.J.; Henney, D.A.; Heitzman, V.K. [HWS Consulting Group, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Day, D.W. [Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Remedial Actions, including Interim Remedial Activities, often require the use of treatment facilities or stabilization techniques using on-site chemical processes. As such, the 29 CFR 1910.119 Process Safety Management (PSM) of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (PSM Standard) and the USEPA regulations for Risk Management Planning require that these chemicals and their attendant potential hazards be identified. A Hazard and Operation (HAZOP) study, Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis, or equivalent graphic presentation of processes must be completed. These studies form a segment of the Process Hazard Analysis (PHA). HAZOP addresses each system and each element of a system that could deviate from normal operations and thus cause a hazard. A full assessment of each process is produced by looking at the hazards, consequences, causes and personnel protection needed. Many variables must be considered when choosing the appropriate PHA technique including the size of the plant, the number of processes, the types of processes, and the types of chemicals used. A mixture of these techniques may be required to adequately transmit information about the process being evaluated.

  12. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as a primary reference for PMOA PM-1 for development of Corrective Action Requests (CARs) and Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs), as well as the assessment of...

  13. Transcript of See Action and Technical Assistance Program Webinar: Strategic Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) See Action Network and Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Program sponsored this webinar about strategic management in the public sector on November 7, 2012.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andCaffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forMean Big Success: Corporate Energy Management at Frito-Lay.

  15. Management of shallow impoundments to provide emergent and submergent vegetation for waterfowl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polasek, Len Gerard

    1994-01-01

    adjacent to water; and, grasses in upper, drier zones. Seed production of grasses, sedges, and forbs generally reflected vegetation present in each soil-moisture zone. Taxon richness of emergent plants was highest in dewatered zones. Drawdown timing did...

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  17. Office of Personnel Management The Guide to Processing Personnel Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 NewsORMAT NEVADAEnergyA chart BillingDepartment ofFORM

  18. Internal Audit Management of Corrective Action Plans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcess RelevantInternal Audit Management of

  19. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 22, 2015, the Department of Energy established an Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office (EM-LA) responsible for management of the environmental restoration and the legacy waste management programs at LANL. The NA-LA continues with the responsibility for the management of LANL's national security mission and the enduring waste management program (newly generated waste). As a result of this delineation in responsibilities, this corrective action plan was prepared collaboratively between NA-LA and EM-LA Field Offices, with joint responsibility for addressing the Judgement of Needs (JONs) identified in the Accident Investigation Board Accident Investigation Report, Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, February 14, 2014, dated April 2015.

  20. Landscape and farm management effects on Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) diversity and parasitism of pests in organic vegetable production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothwell, Sara G.

    2012-01-01

    or Eucalyptus forest, Salix or marsh riparian vegetation,as occur between Quercus and Salix designations, were thegrasslands marsh Quercus Salix noncrop vegetation perennial

  1. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) grazing on vegetation mosaics grazing patterns and implications for conservation management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Emily Kathryn

    2015-06-29

    Grazing is widely used as a tool in conservation management. Many plant communities of conservation importance are dependent on grazing for their existence, maintenance of species diversity and other valued characteristics. ...

  2. Vegetable Gardening in Containers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25

    space for a productive mini-garden. Problems with soilborne diseases, nematodes or poor soil conditions can be easily overcome by switching to a container garden. Ready access to con- tainers means that pest management is easier. Container vegetable... of selected vegetables which are ideally suited for these mini-gardens are indicated in Table 1. Table 1. Varieties for Container Grown Vegetables Broccoli (2 gallons, 1 plant) Packman, Bonanza, others Carrot (1 gallon, 2-3 plants. Use pots 2 inch deeper...

  3. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  4. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    efficiency actions, develop an energy management plan forE. Worrell (1995). Clean Energy Technologies: A PreliminarySingh, R.P. (1986a). Energy Accounting in Food Canning

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  7. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document. Final report: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    A critical mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the late 1940s into the 1970s. Among these facilities are the 24 former uranium mill sites designed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.) Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designated sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project only; a separate MAP document has been prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project.

  8. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  9. Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

    1983-03-01

    Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

  10. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  11. Expanded public notice: Washington State notice of intent for corrective action management unit, Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document is to serve notice of the intent to operate an Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), adjacent to the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington, as a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 264.552. The ERDF CAMU will serve as a management unit for the majority of waste (primarily soil) excavated during remediation of waste management sites on the Hanford Facility. Only waste that originates from the Hanford Facility can be accepted in this ERDF CAMU. The waste is expected to consist of dangerous waste, radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Mixed waste contains radioactive and dangerous components. The primary features of the ERDF could include the following: one or more trenches, rail and tractor/trailer container handling capability, railroads, an inventory control system, a decontamination building, and operational offices.

  12. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

  13. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Corrective Action Plan for Environmental Management Headquarters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy| DepartmentFuel DepartmentCorrective Action

  15. Is it Economical to Manage Jointly for Wood and Carbon Under the Climate Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects in meeting national and international policy goals on reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) with just $5/tonne CO2e prices, if all three CCX forestry-offset 1 Professor and graduate student, respectively, Natural Resources Management Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

  16. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    1999-11-18

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  17. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  18. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    screw-type compressors, in which a heat exchanger is used inheat exchanger and put into direct contact with the fruits and vegetables, either in shower-type

  20. Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change the

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 News en INFOGRAPHIC:Pictured:Collection Request Title:

  1. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    management assessments. Management assessment results mustbe documented. WMG management must take prompt action tolegal advice to Laboratory management, periodically conducts

  2. Baseline requirements of the proposed action for the Transportation Management Division routing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important to shippers, carriers, and the general public. This is particularly true for shipments of radioactive material. The shippers are primarily concerned with safety, security, efficiency, and equipment requirements. The carriers are concerned with the potential impact that radioactive shipments may have on their operations--particularly if such materials are involved in an accident. The general public has also expressed concerns regarding the safety of transporting radioactive and other hazardous materials through their communities. Because transportation routes are a central concern in hazardous material transport, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward resolution of these issues. In response to these routing needs, several models have been developed over the past fifteen years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HIGHWAY routing model is used to predict routes for truck transportation, the INTERLINE routing model is used to predict both rail and barge routes, and the AIRPORT locator model is used to determine airports with specified criteria near a specific location. As part of the ongoing improvement of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Transportation Management Division`s (EM-261) computer systems and development efforts, a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models was held at ORNL on April 27, 1994. The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the existing capabilities of the models and data bases and to review enhancements of the models and data bases to expand their usefulness. The results of the Baseline Requirements Assessment Section will be discussed in this report. The discussions pertaining to the different models are contained in separate sections.

  3. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  4. Finding of no significant impact for the interim action for cleanup of Pit 9 at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0854, for an interim action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The proposed action would be conducted at Pit 9, Operable Unit 7--10, located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The proposed action consists of construction of retrieval and processing buildings, excavation and retrieval of wastes from Pit 9, selective physical separation and chemical extraction, and stabilization of wastes either through thermal processing or by forming a stabilized concentrate. The proposed action would involve limited waste treatment process testing and full-scale waste treatment processing for cleaning up pre-1970 Transuranic (TRU) wastes in Pit 9. The purpose of this interim action is to expedite the overall cleanup at the RWMC and to reduce the risks associated with potential migration of Pit 9 wastes to the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  5. Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Energy monitoring systems are key tools that play an important role in energy management. Energy monitoring systems

  7. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Corrective Action Individual Permit: Corrective Action Certifications If...

  8. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. The Effect of Topography, Vegetation, and Weather on Cattle Distribution at the San

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of Topography, Vegetation, and Weather on Cattle Distribution at the San Joaquin were implemented to judge the effects of these management techniques on cattle distribution. Animal period. Our study identified topographic, vegetative and environmental forces that affected cattle

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  11. A New Framework for Adaptive Sampling and Analysis During Long-Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsker, Barbara; Albert Valocchi; Barbara Bailey

    2008-01-27

    DOE and other Federal agencies are making a significant investment in the development of field analytical techniques, nonintrusive technologies, and sensor technologies that will have a profound impact on the way environmental monitoring is conducted. Monitoring and performance evaluation networks will likely be base on suites of in situ sensors, with physical sampling playing a much more limited role. Designing and using these types of networks effectively will require development of a new paradigm for sampling and analysis of remedial actions, which is the overall goal of this project.

  12. UAB's four campus buildings featuring green vegetative roofs have performed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    UAB's four campus buildings featuring green vegetative roofs have performed well through the years vegetative roof on the second floor of the Hill University Center. The roof is the first pilot-scale green Maintenance, Campus Services & Grounds, and Energy Management and student groups including Science

  13. UNDERSTORY LIGHT AND VEGETATION IN TWO FLOODPLAIN FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDERSTORY LIGHT AND VEGETATION IN TWO FLOODPLAIN FORESTS IN COASTAL BRITISH COLUMBIA by Ian J of Resource Management Project No.: 508 Title of Thesis: Understory light and vegetation in two floodplain characteristics on a systematic grid and generated maps of understory light transmission. Both sites have 92% area

  14. Insects in Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, C.L.; Jackman, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    (Blank Pa,ge In OriglDai BuUetinl ' ?L "Z : .. . "."'- ., ? CONTENTS Soil Insects That Attack Vegetables Black Cutworm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5 Variegated Cutworm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 7 Pillbugs and Sowbugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 7 Chewing Insects Corn Earworm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Cabbage Looper ............................. 8 Imported Cabbageworm...

  15. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  16. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes...

  17. Changes in Native Aquatic Vegetation, Associated Fish Assemblages, and Food Habits of Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) Following the Addition of Triploid Grass Carp to Manage Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata) in Lake Conroe, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Patrick Alexander

    2011-10-21

    Nuisance aquatic vegetation (mainly Hydrilla Verticillata ) has become problematic in Lake Conroe, TX. Consequently, triploid grass carp (Ctenopharynogodon idella) were stocked at densities sufficient to completely denude ...

  18. Virginia Tech Climate Action Commitment and Sustainability Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0 Virginia Tech Climate Action Commitment and Sustainability Plan Energy & Sustainability Committee April 22, 2009 #12; 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS VIRGINIA TECH CLIMATE ACTION COMMITMENT Manager, Information Technology James Torgersen Facilities Manager, Athletic Department Tom Tucker

  19. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  20. Vegetable Gardening in Containers. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01

    for a productive mini-garden. Prob lems with soil -borne diseases, nematodes or poor soil condi tions can be easily overcome by switching to a container garden. ? Extension horticu ltur ist, The Texas A&M University System. 3 Crop Selection.... Variety selection is of extreme importance. Most varieties that will do well when planted in a yard garden will also do well in containers. Some varieties of selected vegetables which are ideally suited for these mini gardens are indicated in Table...

  1. management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Management and Budget http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

  2. EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This...

  3. Specialty Vegetables in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longbrake, Thomas D.; Baker, Marvin L.; Cotner, Sam; Parsons, Jerry; Roberts, Roland; Stein, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Jicama (Yam Bean, Mexican Turnip) 7 Kohlrabi 7 Leeks 7 Melons 8 Mushrooms 8 Parsnips 9 Pigeon Peas 9 Rhubarb 9 Rutabaga 9 Salsify 10 Shallots 10 Spaghetti Squash 10 Taro 11 Tomatillo 11 Summary 11 SPECIALTY VEGETABLES IN TEXAS Thomas D...-round and oblong. Fruit range from 8 to 12 pounds. CuUure. This warm weather, vining crop is grown as watermelon. Mushrooms (Enoki, Pleurotus, Shiitake) , Description. The popularity of different species and varieties of mushrooms has increased in the past...

  4. Vegetation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairex Corporation JumpVaron Lighting GroupVegetation

  5. Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  7. Effects of Vegetation Structure and Elevation on Lower Keys Marsh Rabbit Density 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrickson, Angela

    2012-02-14

    LKMR density on lands managed by the United States Navy, Naval Air Station Key West and evaluate how vegetation structure and patch elevation effect LKMR population density. I conducted fecal pellet counts to determine LKMR density, collected...

  8. ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01) (NotAdvanced ABSTRACTSFor-1 ACTION

  9. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture | NationalCorrective Action

  10. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  11. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  12. 8 Management Plan Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    312 8 Management Plan Introduction The management plan integrates the vision for the Lower Mid and populations which form the bulk of the management plan is derived from that input. The scope of the management and inventory are designed and may be used to guide restoration and management actions by many parties under

  13. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to...

  14. FUSION ENERGY Actions Needed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's construction costs through contributions of hardware, personnel, and cash, and DOE is responsible for managing was asked to review DOE's cost and schedule estimates for the U.S. ITER Project. This report examines (1) the reliability of DOE's current cost and schedule estimates, and (3) actions DOE has taken to reduce U.S. ITER

  15. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  16. Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-30

    This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

  17. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of the Next Generation Grid Operating System (Energy Management System) - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the Next...

  18. Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document features a Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) template for creating a Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future campaign handout.

  19. Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document features a Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) template for creating a Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future 2 handout.

  20. 3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-05-12

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

  1. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  2. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  3. Request for Salary Action Requesting action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Request for Salary Action Requesting action: Above "annual entry maximum" Mid-year increase Promotional salary increase exception Counter offer Salary supplement Other Jan. 28 2015 Tracking number Date

  4. Selecting Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    and Vegetables Amanda Scott* E-197 9/08 This publication was sponsored by a grant from the Initiative for Future Agriculture Food Systems, a program of the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, which is an agency of the United States...

  5. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  6. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  7. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  8. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09

    following Hurricanes Opal and Ivan. Multispectral airborne imagery is used to analyze vegetation patterns and recovery. If no vegetation is present, sediment will not be deposited consistently. The clumps of plants collect sand in their wind shadows...

  9. Guam Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  10. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  11. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  14. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  15. Evaluation of Vegetative Roofs' Performance on Energy Consumption in Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, J.; Azarbayjani, M.

    2008-01-01

    policy- making. LEED standards evaluate buildings on a point system that considers site development, material selection, energy efficiency, and indoor environmental quality. Vegetative roofs qualify for up to 3 points in LEED as ?potential... technologies and strategies? under the storm water management and heat island effect categories. A vegetative roof may also accumulate points indirectly under the categories on energy efficiency and water efficient landscaping. (USGBC, 2002) Today...

  16. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, David

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  17. The Effect of Vegetation Density on the Resilience of Coastal Dune Systems Against Wave-Induced Erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Robert Cory

    2013-09-28

    by coastal managers and stakeholders. Dunes with healthy vegetation growth are believed to provide an even higher resilience against wave-induced erosion. However, very little research currently exists on quantifying the effect that plants have on dune...

  18. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2007. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover was observed during the last quarterly inspection in December 2006. This crack was filled with bentonite as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007 and will be monitored during subsequent annual inspections. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showing signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. New DOE Office of Legacy Management signs with updated emergency phone numbers were installed as part of this annual inspection, no issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. A vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas was conducted as part of the annual inspection in May 2007. The vegetation survey indicated that revegetation continues to be successful, although stressed due to the area's prevailing drought conditions. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and to identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action to maintain a viable vegetation cover on the site. It is suggested that future vegetation surveys be conducted once every 2 years or as needed to help monitor the health of the vegetation.

  19. Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de Provence SASSinemSissonville,Skokie,Vegetables Jump

  20. Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 2 Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Supervisor's Vehicle Incident Report (Complete all sections of this form and return within 24 hours of incident to the Office of Risk Management Risk Management March 2012 Risk Management Unsafe Conditions or Actions (describe all contributing

  1. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewingValidatingRoadmapVannevarVasudha

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 1: Individual actions. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-11-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NNSS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-31

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NTS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  5. Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    seconds before and after handling food, and after touching raw meat, changing a diaper, using the restroom, handling a pet or touching anything that could contami- nate your hands. Then dry your hands with a paper towel. Also wash and sanitize all.... Wash the sink with hot, soapy water and then rinse it. Sanitize the sink by pouring a mixture of 1 teaspoon of chlorine bleach in 1 quart of water into the sink. Wash the produce Wash all whole fruits and vegetables before preparing them ? even...

  6. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  7. 2014 Joint Action Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Joint Action Workshop is an annual event for joint action agencies and their members to meet informally and discuss emerging policy, regulatory, and power supply issues, and other topics...

  8. The biopolitics of the vegetative subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelaprat, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    Foucault, Michel. 1982. “The Subject and Power. ” Pp. 208-Foucault, Michel. 2000. “The Subject and Power. ” Pp. 326-production of a vegetative subject through an apparatus of

  9. The biopolitics of the vegetative subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelaprat, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    Michel. 1984. “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History. ” Pp. 76-100Michel. 2006. “On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview ofof life, death and the genealogy of the vegetative

  10. The Gauged Unparticle Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-06-24

    We show that the unparticle action that is made gauge invariant by the inclusion of an open Wilson line factor can be transformed into the integral-differential operator action that avoids the use of the Wilson line factor. The two forms of the action should therefore give the same Feynman diagrams. We also show that it is relatively easy to construct Feynman diagrams using the operator action.

  11. An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Janet Alexis

    2006-04-12

    Predictive vegetation mapping was employed to predict the distribution of vegetation communities and physiognomies in the portion of the Scandinavian mountains in Sweden. This was done to address three main research questions: (1) what environmental...

  12. Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

  13. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (HQ) issues identified in the Accident Investigation Report for the Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) February 5, 2014. The report...

  14. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report for the Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014. The report identified 24 Conclusions and 40 Judgments of Need...

  15. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing FacilityJanuary 20,membership

  16. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing FacilityJanuary 20,membershipRelease Phase II |

  17. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeepDecemberCornstalks

  18. Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

  19. Highly Effective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2013-11-22

    It is conjectured that the world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in an $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ background of type IIB superstring theory, with one unit of flux, can be reinterpreted as the exact effective action (or highly effective action) for U(2), ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory on the Coulomb branch. An analogous conjecture for $U(2)_k \\times U(2)_{-k} $ ABJM theory is also presented. The main evidence supporting these conjectures is that the brane actions have all of the expected symmetries and dualities. Highly effective actions have general coordinate invariance, even though they describe nongravitational theories.

  20. Action Item Review and Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Corporate Board Action Items Action Item Resolution Action Item Strategic Planning Initiative Optimization Study Resolution Presentation by S. Schneider (HLW System...

  1. Annex 2 Risk Management Guidance and Template SPO Project Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Annex 2 ­ Risk Management Guidance and Template SPO Project Management Guidance on Risk Management Introduction Risk is any action or event that affects a project's ability to achieve its on cost, schedule and technical performance. However, with appropriate procedures, risks can be managed

  2. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  3. Strategic Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SEE Action Network and Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Program sponsored this webinar about strategic management in the public sector on November 7, 2012.

  4. Strategic Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) See Action Network and Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Program sponsored this webinar about strategic management in the public sector on November 7, 2012.

  5. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  6. Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Li

    2009-05-15

    flow at Pedernales River upland catchments, and (2) the ecological responses of vegetation to altered flow regimes that result from brush management at the upland riparian zones. The study finds that an average of 3.67% of the monthly water budget...

  7. Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

  8. Protective Actions and Reentry

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines appropriate protective actions and reentry of a site following an emergency. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993: Volume 12, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  10. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, T

    2006-01-01

    emissions from vegetation pyrolysis Comprehensive laboratoryfrom the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation J. P.J. Anal. and Appl. Pyrolysis, 60, 123–130, 2000. Fall, R. :

  11. Final Report Responses of Fishes, Waterbirds, Invertebrates, Vegetation, and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Final Report Responses of Fishes, Waterbirds, Invertebrates, Vegetation, and Water Quality Section Page Number Chapter 1 - Executive Summary ..........................................................5 Emergent Vegetation

  12. Transmission Vegetation Management NERC Standard FAC-003-2 Technical

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrail Canyon Geothermal ProjectTransmarkPrepared

  13. Management of Soilborne Diseases in Strawberry Using Vegetable Rotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbarao, Krishna V

    2007-01-01

    67:1073-1078. 7. California Strawberry Commission. 2001.Crop profile of strawberries in California. Na- tionalspp. recovered from strawberry roots in central coastal

  14. Management of Soilborne Diseases in Strawberry Using Vegetable Rotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbarao, Krishna V

    2007-01-01

    fumigation Total cost with partial plastic mulch Total costwith full-bed plastic mulch Strawberry with fumigationStrawberry with partial plastic mulch Strawberry with full-

  15. Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lan

    1997-01-01

    Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

  16. Vegetation Dynamics in Seasonally Grazed Upland Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L

    This thesis addresses the effects of seasonality of grazing on vegetation dynamics. Background to the thesis is provided by the Hill Sheep and Native Woodland (HSNW) project, a system-scale experiment with the long-term ...

  17. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  18. Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

    2014-04-28

    The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and38. Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre23 5.1 Energy Management Systems and

  20. Comprehensive Emergency Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-01

    To establish policy and to assign and describe roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. The Emergency Management System provides the framework for development, coordination, control, and direction of all emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, response, and recovery actions. Canceled by DOE O 151.1B. Cancels DOE O 151.1.

  1. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primrose, A.; Sproles, W.; Burmeister, M.; Wagner, R.; Law, J.; Greengard, T.

    1998-07-01

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site.

  2. Post-Fire Vegetation Response 49 Barbara A. Holzman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    -Fire Vegetation Response in the Bishop Pine Forest at Point Reyes National Seashore Chinook helicopter dropping

  3. SOUTHWESTERN WOODY RIPARIAN VEGETATION AND SUCCESSION: AN EVOLUTIONARY APPROACH1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in desertification and endangering native riverine ecosystems. Woody Riparian Vegetation Trees and shrubs are major

  4. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  5. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  6. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  7. Bondholders and Securities Class Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, James

    2015-01-01

    2006). 89. See Consolidated Class Action Complaint ¶¶ 42–53,Sept. 30, 2005); Consolidated Class Action Complaint ¶ 1, Inlikely to satisfy various class certification hurdles. See

  8. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  9. Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-12-31

    This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Cancels DOE M 411.1-1B. Canceled by DOE O 450.2.

  10. Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-10-08

    This Manual defines safety management functions, responsibilities, and authorities for DOE senior management with responsibilities for line, support, oversight, and enforcement actions. Canceled by DOE M 411.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  11. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  12. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Volume 14, Nos. 3 and 4, Part 1. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July - December 1995) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  14. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  15. Conditional data watchpoint management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdick, Dean Joseph (Austin, TX); Vaidyanathan, Basu (Austin, TX)

    2010-08-24

    A method, system and computer program product for managing a conditional data watchpoint in a set of instructions being traced is shown in accordance with illustrative embodiments. In one particular embodiment, the method comprises initializing a conditional data watchpoint and determining the watchpoint has been encountered. Upon that determination, examining a current instruction context associated with the encountered watchpoint prior to completion of the current instruction execution, further determining a first action responsive to a positive context examination; otherwise, determining a second action.

  16. Spatiotemporal Monitoring of Urban Vegetation Christopher Small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    and absorbtion of solar radiation, by modulation of evapotranspiration and by sequestration of pollutants by selective reflection and absorption of solar radiation (e.g. Goward et al, 1985; Roth et al, 1989; Gallo et in vegetation abundance influence environmental conditions and energy fluxes by selective reflection

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this paper; nor does any party represent that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This paper has not been

  18. Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    1982­1990 monthly areal evapotranspiration AET was modeled with the Morton approach at the Solar: Evapotranspiration; Vegetation. Introduction In regional water-balance calculations and watershed modeling, one not necessarily deteriorate with the growing aridity of the environ- ment, provided that a time-lag is considered

  19. Energy accounting for eleven vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goering, C.E.; Daugherty, M.J.

    1982-09-01

    Energy inputs and outputs were comparatively analyzed for 11 vegetable oil fuels. Three-year average prices and production quantities were also compared. All nonirrigated oil crops had favorable energy ratios. Soybean, peanut and sunflower oils were the most promising as domestic fuel sources. Rapeseed oil would also be promising if significant domestic production can be established.

  20. University of Dundee Carbon Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Carbon Management Strategy 2.1 Our low carbon vision 6 2.2 Context and drivers for Carbon Management 6 2 and sources of funding 18 6 Actions to Embed Carbon Management in Your Organisation 19 6.1 Corporate Strategy Appendix A: Carbon Management Matrix - Embedding 23 Appendix B: Energy Prices 24 #12;3 FOREWORD FROM

  1. Carbon Management Plan 1. Executive summary 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Carbon Management Plan June 2011 #12;2 #12;3 CONTENTS 1. Executive summary 5 2. Introduction 15 3. Background and context 16 4. Carbon management strategy 18 5. Carbon emissions baseline and projections 22 6. Past actions and achievements 30 7. Carbon Management Plan implementation 33 8. Carbon Management Plan

  2. Conjugate flow action functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Venturi

    2013-10-15

    We present a new general method to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations of the theory relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow of the theory, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gateaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  3. CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION AREA OF CONCERN 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP York 11973 REGISTERED TO ISO 14001 #12;AOC 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP AND SUMP OUTFALL .................................................................................9 2.6.1 Final Radiological Status Survey Design

  4. Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2009-01-01

    Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

  5. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth Yi Y. Liu,1 optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellitebased passive microwave instruments were merged longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38

  6. Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

  7. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  8. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1 and Jennifer M. Jacobs, M.ASCE2 Abstract: A five parameter, daily vegetated roof water balance model (VR-WBM) was developed, calibrated, and validated by using experimental vegetated roof data from the Seacoast, New

  9. Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

  10. Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    Climate and coastal dune vegetation: disturbance, recovery, and succession Thomas E. Miller Æ Elise. Foredune, interdune, and backdune habitats common to most coastal dunes have very different vegetation deterministic trajectories. Keywords Dune habitats Á Succession Á Disturbance Á Coastal vegetation Á Hurricane Á

  11. Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts over the United and vegetation on 30 h convective precipitation forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting model over, the complete removal of vegetation produced substantially less precipitation, while conversion to forest led

  12. Network Management Network Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giaccone, Paolo

    Network Management Pag. 1 Network Management Network management and QoS provisioning - 1Andrea of this license visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc- /3 0/ Network management and QoS provisioning ­ Chapter 9, Network Management, of the book Jim Kurose, Keith Ross, Computer Networking, A Top Down

  13. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids in the Deschutes River. The Management Plan consists of five elements described in the Council's program: 1

  14. ?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  15. Climate Action Plan 2009 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Climate Action Plan September 2009 Sustainability Council This plan outlines methods by which. This document is publicly available at http://sustainability.uark.edu. #12;2 University of Arkansas Climate....................................................................................................................................7 Climate Action Plan Committee

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  18. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  19. Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-12

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  20. Environmental Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  1. Electrical Demand Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below...

  2. 5) Management 5) Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    5) Management c) Control #12;5) Management c) Control Prioritizing control ­ From Hiebert in Luken & Thieret (1997) · Types of information utilized Ecological impacts #12;5) Management c) Control impacts Economic impacts #12;5) Management c) Control Prioritizing control ­ From Hiebert in Luken

  3. Network Management Network Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giaccone, Paolo

    Network Management Pag. 1 Network Management Andrea Bianco Telecommunication Network Group Network management and QoS provisioning - 1Andrea Bianco ­ TNG group - Politecnico di Torino Telecommunication management and QoS provisioning - 2Andrea Bianco ­ TNG group - Politecnico di Torino Stanford, California

  4. Securities Class Actions and Bankrupt Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, James J.

    2014-01-01

    the utility of securities class actions. Certainly, contextthe merit of securities class actions. UCLA | SCHOOL OF LAWof James J. Park, Securities Class Actions and Bankrupt

  5. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  6. Nuclear waste management. Semiannual progress report, April 1983-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, J.L.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1984-01-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: waste stabilization; waste isolation; low-level waste management; remedial action; and supporting studies. 58 figures, 39 tables.

  7. Checklist for Managing a General Program Evaluation Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This checklist for managing a general program evaluation study provides action items covering the following topics:  initial planning; evaluation design and procurement; implementation of study;...

  8. Floodplain Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the capacity of the stream channel is 1091 reduced by natural obstructions (ice or debris dams, sediment, and vegetation) and human-made 1092 obstructions (structures and...

  9. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  10. Vegetable Adaptability in the Wichita Valley. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, B. S. (Barzalli Stewart)

    1942-01-01

    2 Rlarch 12 Rlarch 12 3Ialrch 12 Rfarch 24 March 24 April 5 April 5 April 5 April 5 April 5 April 5 April 5 Reasonably safe date of planting* Beets Onions Chard Kale Kohl-rabi Mustard English peas Radish ,Spinach Turnip.... Table 2 contains information concerning the limiting temperature fac- tors of certain spring-planted vegetables in reference to harvest periods. Here again it should be remembered that all dates in Table 2, both for planting and harvest, are averages...

  11. Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    paper towel. Also wash all utensils, countertops and cutting boards with hot, soapy water. Then sanitize them with a mixture of 1 teaspoon chlorine bleach in 1 quart of water. Do this before and after preparing food. It is especially important... to wash and sanitize cutting boards and utensils that have been in contact with raw meat before using them with fresh produce. Wash all whole fruits and vegetables before preparing them?even if the skin or rind will not be eaten. This prevents...

  12. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, Alissa J.

    2015-01-14

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): • CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment • CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well • CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility • CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater • CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits • CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2014 (October 2013–September 2014). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0101 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. The results of the inspections, a summary of maintenance activities, and an evaluation of monitoring data are presented in this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, 111, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches (in.) in a 24-hour period and at CAU 111 if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.0 in. in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units, including covers, fences, signs, gates, and locks. In addition to visual inspections, soil moisture monitoring, vegetation evaluations, and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. At CAU 111, soil moisture monitoring, vegetation evaluations, subsidence surveys, direct radiation monitoring, air monitoring, radon flux monitoring, and groundwater monitoring are conducted. The results of the vegetation surveys and an analysis of the soil moisture monitoring data at CAU 110 are presented in this report. Results of additional monitoring at CAU 111 are documented annually in the Nevada National Security Site Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites and in the Nevada National Security Site Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, which will be prepared in approximately June 2015. All required inspections, maintenance, and monitoring were conducted in accordance with the post-closure requirements of the permit. It is recommended to continue inspections and monitoring as scheduled.

  13. Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    savanna gradient in southern Venezuela, For. Ecol. Manage. ,La Sabana region of Venezuela. An overview of the lowlandthe Grand Sabana area of Venezuela [Dezzeo et al. , 2004] as

  14. Accident management for severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J.; Leonard, M.; Disalvo, R.; Sheron, B.

    1988-01-01

    The management of severe accidents in light water reactors is receiving much attention in several countries. The reduction of risk by measures and/or actions that would affect the behavior of a severe accident is discussed. The research program that is being conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on both in-vessel accident management and containment and release accident management. The key issues and approaches taken in this program are summarized. 6 refs.

  15. High-latitude vegetation dynamics: 850 years of vegetation development on Mt Hekla, Iceland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutler, Nick

    2008-01-01

    on Mt Hekla in south-central Iceland. The chronosequence approach was used to infer 850 years of vegetation development from a suite of 14 lava flows (five of which had been disturbed by the deposition of volcanic tephra). The thesis is organised around...

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  18. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    www.mdpi.comjournalremotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R....

  19. Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperatureprecipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern...

  20. NRM 2061/ENV 2005 Environmental Documentaries: Knowledge to Action Environmental Studies Department and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    NRM 2061/ENV 2005 Environmental Documentaries: Knowledge to Action Environmental Studies Department environmental issues such as old-growth forests, endangered species, indigenous land rights, nuclear energy processes, natural resource management practices, and social and political systems. Students will view

  1. Critical Legal Consciousness in Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Scott L

    2007-01-01

    www.ufcw.org/take_action/walmart_workers_campaign_info/Editorial, Global Retailing: WalMart’s Waterloo, Guardian (Buffer Zones Would Prevent Walmart, Others, Park La Brea

  2. JAS - a Java action semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, D.F.; Watt, D.A.

    Brown,D.F. Watt,D.A. Proceedings of 2nd International Workshop on Action Semantics pp 43-56 Dept of Computer Science, University of Aarhus

  3. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  4. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  5. Managing Applicants Reference Guide Quick easy steps of Viewing Applications and Changing Workflow States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Change* Within a search only the hiring managers assigned to that requisition, or EAD Users and HR Users may change workflow states. Hiring managers actionsManaging Applicants Reference Guide Quick easy steps of Viewing Applications

  6. Collaborative adaptive management in practice : case studies from Arizona and New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jenna (Jenna Leidy)

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative adaptive management (CAM) is a natural resource management approach in which a diverse group of stakeholders iteratively plan, implement, monitor, evaluate and adjust management actions to reduce uncertainty ...

  7. WATER ACTION D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    WATER ACTION PLAN D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 #12;2 UC Santa Cruz Water Action Plan DECEMBER 2013 Physical Context ..............................7 Water Supply...................................10 Campus Water Use..........................15 Watershed Management ...............20 Education and Outreach

  8. Leaving the corporate fold: examining spin-off actions and performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semadeni, Matthew Briggs

    2004-09-30

    This research examines the exit of a subsidiary from its corporate parent through spin-off, the actions taken by the firm management post spin-off, and the performance implications of those actions, all from the spin-off's perspective. While spin...

  9. RENEWABLE ENERGY ACTION TEAM Milestones to Permit California Renewable Portfolio Standard Energy Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RENEWABLE ENERGY ACTION TEAM Milestones to Permit California Renewable Portfolio Standard Energy renewable energy resources. In November 2008, the CEC, DFG, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM the Renewable Energy Action Team (REAT) to address permitting issues associated with specific renewable energy

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV Operations Office

    1999-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

  11. BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

  12. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  13. BASF Corporate Energy Management Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, T.

    2014-01-01

    North America 6 ESL-IE-14-05-30 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 7Management Commitment Assess Performance & Set Goals Implement Action Plan Create Action Plan Recognize... Optimization (EM) 2009 Compressed Air Optimization (EM) 2009 Energy Efficiency Program (EM) Recognition: American Chemistry Council Responsible Care® Energy Efficiency Awards 2009 Corporate Energy Efficiency Improvement Goal 2010 Geismar Ethylene Oxide Plant...

  14. Influence of C4 vegetation on 13 CO2 discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Influence of C4 vegetation on 13 CO2 discrimination and isoforcing in the upper Midwest, United vegetation on the 13 CO2 photosynthetic discrimination and atmospheric isotopic forcing in the upper Midwest discrimination within this heterogeneous landscape? (3) To what extent does land use change (i.e., a change in C4

  15. RESEARCH ARTICLE Topography-mediated controls on local vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Topography-mediated controls on local vegetation phenology estimated from MODIS patterns of phenology in humid temperate forest as a function of topography. Moderate-resolution imaging spectro- radiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices are used to derive local patterns of topography

  16. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krause

    2010-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 562 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of CAAs for the 13 CASs within CAU 562. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 27, 2009, through May 12, 2010, as set forth in the CAU 562 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. A data quality assessment (DQA) performed on the CAU 562 data demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at 10 of the 13 CASs in CAU 562, and thus corrective action is required. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 562 is shown in Table ES-1. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 13 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 562. • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-26-11, 02-44-02, 02-59-01, 02-60-02, 02-60-03, 02-60-04, 02-60-05, 23-60-01, 23-99-06, and 25-60-04. The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposures to contaminated media to acceptable levels. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is recommended for the remaining 10 CASs in CAU 562. • A Corrective Action Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection that contains a detailed description of the proposed actions that will be taken to implement the selected corrective actions.

  18. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This document summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period of January-June 1996. The report includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violations sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to the enforcement actions.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

  1. CHANGES IN RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: Floods and Riparian Vegetation on the San Juan River, Southeastern Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHANGES IN RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: Floods and Riparian Vegetation (Surveyed Water Surface Elevation) 113 m3/s (Calculated Water Surface Elevation) 4,200 m3 /s (1911 Flood) 1,980 m3 /s (Peak Flood of Gaging Record) 900 m3/s 1911 Slackwater Deposits Driftwood Other Historic

  2. Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index for corn and soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index Information about vegetation water content (VWC) has widespread utility in agriculture, forestry. D 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vegetation water content; Landsat; NDWI 1

  3. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustin, Lauren Nicole

    2009-05-15

    It is commonly known that coastal vegetation dissipates energy and aids in shoreline protection by damping incoming waves and depositing sediment in vegetated regions. However, this critical role of vegetation to dampen wave forces is not fully...

  4. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

  5. The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    processes can contribute to reaching ecosystem goals. We draw primarily on information developed31 The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range Thomas A. Spies twelve major ecological themes (regional environment, ecosystem types and patterns, vegetation

  6. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  7. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  8. 2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    2010 Climate Action Plan Energy and Environmental Stewardship Initiative: Prepared by: The Office.........................................................................................................................17 4A. Curriculum, Education, and Research environmental stewardship and reduces our own carbon footprint on campus. Through the U's Office

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Changes in management modify agro-diversity in sainfoin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Changes in management modify agro-diversity in sainfoin swards in the Eastern of management changes currently occurring in many regions. We sampled 39 sainfoin swards in the Eastern Pyrenees to assess changes in vegetation structure with sward management and evaluated how those changes might

  10. UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary Issue Date: April 21, 2011 #12;UCSF Sustainability Action Plan Executive Summary April 21, 2011 Page 1 Table of Contents An Introduction to the Sustainability Action Plan

  11. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  12. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  13. EIS-0111: Remedial Actions at the Former Vanadium Corporation of America Uranium Mill Site, Durango, La Plata County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several scenarios for management and control of the residual radioactive wastes at the inactive Durango, Colorado, uranium processing site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and three alternatives involving off-site management and decontamination of the Durango site.

  14. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  15. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  16. Comparison of RCRA SWMU corrective action and CERCLA remedial action. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupe, S.C.

    1991-09-30

    With the passage of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and the addition of expanded authorities to require corrective action for release of hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, the Solid Waste Disposal Act (hereafter referred to as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or RCRA) will dramatically influence the Superfund program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Not only will the RCRA corrective action program help prevent current RCRA sites from becoming Superfund sites, but it also offers EPA and the states an important alternative to address superfund sites that already exist. EPA recognized this and, hoping to conserve Superfund resources, developed a policy to defer listing of sites from the National Priority List if those sites can be addressed under RCRA's corrective action authorities. Private industry and federal agencies with problem sites that could qualify under either program need to compare the advantages and disadvantages of each program. EPA's deferral policy continues to evolve and appears to be ripe for expansion.

  17. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and...

  18. DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

  19. Energy Agency Coordinators for Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agency coordinators serve as primary Federal agency points of contact for Energy Action Month. Contact them if you have questions about implementing an Energy Action Month campaign.

  20. Florida state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Florida. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  2. Sediment patterns near a model patch of reedy emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follett, Elizabeth M.

    This laboratory study describes the sediment patterns formed in a sand bed around circular patches of rigid vertical cylinders, representing a patch of reedy emergent vegetation. The patch diameter was much smaller than ...

  3. Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Trenton W.

    2013-03-06

    and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial...

  4. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daehyun

    2010-10-12

    of submergence and, hence, waterlogging of marsh soils and plants, which has retarded ecological succession. At the mid-scale, spatial patterns of vegetation and environmental factors were examined across tidal creeks. Sites closer to tidal creeks, compared...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and...

  6. Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation at Four Kgra's in the Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  7. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, USA Abstract A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and...

  8. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli,chem-phys.org/acp/6/81/ Eucalyptus J. P. Greenberg et al. :from vegetation pyrolysis Eucalyptus wood µ gC emission/gC/

  9. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  10. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  11. An ecological and range vegetation analysis of the upland sites of the southern extension of the oak-hickory forest region in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaleb, John Earl

    1954-01-01

    a c r e s p er animal unit y e a r ................... 99 Table Page 1 AN ECOLOGICAL AND RANGE VEGETATION ANALYSIS OF THE UPLAND SITES OF THE SOUTHERN EXTENSION OF THE OAK- HICKORY FOREST REGION IN TEXAS INTRODUCTION The oak -h ick o ry fo... the nature o f the vegetational changes which are o c cu rr in g is n e c e s sa ry fo r p roper management o f these a reas as range lands. 4 OBJECTIVES The ob je c t iv es set forth in this study are th ree - fo ld : 1. To make an e co lo g...

  12. International Bibliography of Vegetation Maps 2nd Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku?chler, A. W. (August William)

    1980-01-01

    . Parana-Uruguay c. Patagonia d. Mountain e. Marsh IV. Bushlands 8. a. Humid mountains b. Arid mountains c. Intermontanc valley d. Patagonia e. Inner coastal desert V. Deserts 9. a. Peruvian-Chilean b. Lomas c. Venezuelan sand-dunes d. Salt.... Bunch grasses, annual grasses and herbs, and shrubs 1. Tola heath puna 2. Paramo grassland: grasses 3. Tundra: low shrubs, mosses VI. Desert A. Coastal desert of Peru and Chile B. Fog vegetation of Peru Coast (lomas vegetation). Predominantly...

  13. Residential water use and landscape vegetation dynamics in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mini, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Archibald, S. O. (1998). Demand side management policies forArchibald, S. , 1998, Demand side management policies for

  14. Game Action Based Power Management for Multiplayer Online Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Mun Choon

    applications on mobile phones. One of the key challenges is battery lifetime. For example, a mobile phone. However, the lack of similar growth in battery technology limits the usability of these devices for MOGs interactive applications on mobile phones is usually much lower when compared to running

  15. Ocean and Plume Science Management Uncertainties, Questions and Potential Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in large woody debris (LWD) inputs and LWD density in the estuary, plume and near ocean influenced salmonid

  16. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

  17. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Truck Fire |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing FacilityJanuary 20,membershipRelease Phase II

  18. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing FacilityJanuary 20,membershipRelease Phase

  19. SEE Action Series: Strategic Energy Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -Rob Roberts About UsWYOMING ROCKYSECRETARY OFK-1Department

  20. NOTICE OF OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ACTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment of Energy009At26-2009 has prepared a draft,10/2012

  1. NOTICE OF OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ACTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment of Energy009At26-2009 has prepared a

  2. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorth Dakota:HillE-FormsWebOpen

  3. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard Operating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EV Everywhere| Department of

  4. NOTICE OF OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ACTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department of EnergyNEW1for AcquisitionNORTHEAST HOME

  5. Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Wireless Energy Efficiency Keys Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings forTitleJulyAmy Hollander: I'd

  6. Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings forTitleJulyAmyDepartment of Energy

  7. Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED1,400 JobsDepartment5Decontamination and Demolition

  8. NNSA Contract Reform in Action: Supply Chain Management Center | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Basic NERSCKeyNuclearBudgetComputersProgram

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

  10. Facility Operations and Maintenance Facilities Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Facility Operations and Maintenance Facilities Management D101 Facilities Management R -575/affirmative action institution. 354 3 373 4 373A,B,C,D 4 Alm8/31/12 #12;Facility Operations and Maintenance, B 5 1409 5 1403 5 1403 A, B 4 1408 3 1408 A,B,C 3 1610 3 #12;Facility Operations and Maintenance

  11. DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED WASTE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS, OPTIONS AND STRATEGIES Prepared for BC of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Fisheries and Oceans Fraser River Action Plan November, 1996 Prepared by P. E Nutrients in Wastes 22 4.2.5 Waste Treatment 23 5.0 STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT 24 5.1 LAND USE MANAGEMENT 24 5

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190, Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended January 2007). Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the following four corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge • 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall • 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System • 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 190 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from March 21 through June 26, 2007. All CAI activities were conducted as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 190 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs.

  15. Sustainability Action Plan Campus Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    -making and Sustainability Resources 5. Buildings and Renovations 6. Grounds, Food and Urban Agriculture 7. Waste Management ..................................................................................... 5.7 Waste

  16. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  17. Dynamics of the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation: preliminary results of revegetation experiments of maritime tundra with Elymus mollis on Adak Island, Alaska. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundsen, C C; McCord, R A

    1982-08-01

    The vegetation of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska is maritime tundra (Amundsen, 1977). While maritime tundra is not characterized by the presence of permafrost, the soil temperatures remain low (5 to 7/sup 0/C) year-round (Williams, 1980). The low soil temperature, a high level of soil moisture, and a low level of incident solar radiation are thought to delay the development of the vegetation. Natural revegetation of natural or man made open areas is relatively slow. Disturbed areas from World War II military activity are not completely revegetated after almost 40 years. Because of the windy and wet climate of the region, exposed soil is unstable and subject to extensive freeze-thaw action and erosion. Insults to the vegetation, both marine and aeolian, are common. Successful reproduction by seed is uncommon among species of this flora. The primary means of reproduction appears to be by vegetative propagules which are usually fragments of the shoot and rhizome. While the transport of the fragments by wind and water aids in the dispersal of the propagules, the same action often removes these fragments from open areas. This later activity further delays the revegetation of open and disturbed areas. Elymus mollis Trin. is the most successful major native species found to date as it fragments due to wind and water action and transplants easily. Transplanting experiments with sprigs of Elymus mollis Trin. have been conducted on Adak Island, Alaska since 1977. Preliminary results indicate that Elymus mollis may be transplanted for revegetation with a survival rate of at least 90 percent. Experiments were set up in 1979 to determine appropriate planting density, sprig rhizome length, and best time of year for transplanting. Preliminary results for these experiments are reported here.

  18. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

  19. -Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water/energy exchange -301 Journal of Vegetation Science 13: 301-314, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    - Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water/energy exchange environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation

  20. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  1. Action Required An extra layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Action Required An extra layer of protection m A Securian Company State of Florida Group Term Life by Minnesota Life Insurance Company, at rates negotiated exclusively for employees of the State of Florida's right for you and your family, it's important to think about the amount of money your family would need

  2. Driving Energy Performance with Energy Management Teams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younghein, M.; Tunnessen, W.

    2006-01-01

    , annual strategy meetings can allow teams to develop action plans for the following year that are presented to senior management far in advance. TEAMING TO OVERCOME COMMON CHALLENGES TO EFFECTIVE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: Examples from... with Energy Management Teams Meredith Younghein ENERGY STAR Industrial Communications Mgr. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC ABSTRACT Companies today face an uncertain energy future. Businesses face escalating energy prices which...

  3. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Coalgate, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

  4. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  5. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael

    2011-01-18

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  6. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells.

  7. 5.0 Management Plan 5.1 Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Blackfoot Subbasin Management Plan consists of a comprehensive set of conservation objectives and strategic218 5.0 Management Plan 5.1 Background The Management Plan is the heart of the Blackfoot Subbasin) strategic actions, 4) research, monitoring and evaluation and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act

  8. 7 Management Plan 7.1 Vision for the Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    227 7 Management Plan 7.1 Vision for the Subbasin The vision of the Wenatchee subbasin plan, address problems, reach consensus and implement actions to improve coordinated natural resource management management plan using watershed specific information ultimately leading towards compliance with the federal

  9. Action

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nuclear Securityhr INITIATED| NationalRegister

  10. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

  11. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1B: Citations with abstracts, sections 10 through 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  13. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1A: Citations with abstracts, sections 1 through 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  14. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip H. Henna

    2008-08-18

    Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Caffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre forU.S. DOE-OIT (2003a). Energy Management Program Benefits.actions, develop an energy management plan for business; and

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    actions, develop an energy management plan for business; andFigure 8-1. Main elements of a strategic energy managementCaffal, C. (1995). Energy Management in Industry. Centre for

  17. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  18. Action Sheet 36 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kips, R E; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2012-02-24

    Pursuant to the Arrangement between the European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to continue cooperation on research, development, testing, and evaluation of technology, equipment, and procedures in order to improve nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for international safeguards, dated 1 September 2008, the IRMM and LLNL established cooperation in a program on the Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles under IRMM-LLNL Action Sheet 36. The work under this action sheet had 2 objectives: (1) Achieve a better understanding of the loss of fluorine in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} particles after exposure to certain environmental conditions; and (2) Provide feedback to the EC-JRC on sample reproducibility and characteristics.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  20. Take the Energy Action Challenge

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will work in pairs or small groups to apply knowledge of energy-wise habits to evaluate energy use in their homes and schools and make recommendations for improved efficiency. They will use an energy audit tool to collect data on their home and school energy habits and present an action plan to their class. Further communication at the school and district level is encouraged.

  1. EM International Program Action Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement |toDepartmentContributesAdvisoryProgram Action

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  3. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P. T.; Webb, J. R.; Knox, N. P.; Goins, L. F.; Harrell, R. E.; Mallory, P. K.; Cravens, C. D.

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  5. Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan · Produce a PhD proposal in Criminal Justice. Completed · Redesign the graduate of senior faculty with strong records of obtaining external funding should become a top priority." · "The

  6. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

  7. ACTION ITEMS STRENGTHENING THE PHYSICS ENTERPRISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    1 ACTION ITEMS STRENGTHENING THE PHYSICS ENTERPRISE IN UNIVERSITIES AND NATIONAL LABORATORIES MAY 6 that make demeaning or snide comments, you will find the rewards are great. "Judy Franz, APS #12;3 EXECUTIVE: ACTION ITEMS ..........................................................................5 Physics

  8. Emergence and perceptual guidance of prehensile action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Successful coordination of prehensile action depends upon the selection and control of appropriate reach and grasp movements. This thesis explores how prehensile actions are shaped and regulated by perceptual information. ...

  9. SEAB Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy. Climate Action Plan...

  10. Building Emergency Action Plan Facility Name: _____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Building Emergency Action Plan (Template) Facility Name: _____________________ Date Prepared .....................................................................................................................................................3 2. Building Description..................................................................................................................................3 3. Building Emergency Personnel

  11. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  12. Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  13. Energy Management in Microgrids: Algorithms and System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Distributed Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Quantum Chaos via the Quantum Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kröger

    2002-12-16

    We discuss the concept of the quantum action with the purpose to characterize and quantitatively compute quantum chaos. As an example we consider in quantum mechanics a 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling - which is classically a chaotic system. We compare Poincar\\'e sections obtained from the quantum action with those from the classical action.

  15. PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN REMOTE SENSING OF VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    make food from light energy, carbon dioxide and water in a series of chemical reactions. Some energy is then used to join hydrogen and carbon dioxide together to form a new molecule of sugarPHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN REMOTE SENSING OF VEGETATION ER = EI - (EA + ET) #12;What

  16. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR THE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR THE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING INDUSTRY Pollution Abatement North Vancouver, B.C. Prepared by: PBK Engineering Ltd. Vancouver, B.C. September 1996 Plan through its Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. Environment Canada is not responsible

  17. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  18. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  19. An Introduction to Wavelet Analysis with Applications to Vegetation Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    . example: time series of vegetation areas over land (50 # --90 # N) (based on monthly SAT data from Climate change from one place to the next on a given scale, where here `scale' is either - an interval (span t of center of interval: A(#, t) # #(t - # 2 , t + # 2 ) = 1 # Z t+ # 2 t- # 2 x(u) du - # # b - a is called

  20. An Introduction to Wavelet Analysis with Applications to Vegetation Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    · example: time series of vegetation areas over land (50 ­90 N) (based on monthly SAT data from Climate change from one place to the next on a given scale, where here `scale' is either - an interval (span;Basics of Wavelet Analysis: II · reparameterize using width and time t of center of interval: A(, t) (t

  1. Fire Feedbacks with Vegetation and Alternative Stable States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    landscape composition and that (ii) hurricane disturbances can mediate the frequency of fire that leads frequency. Our results indicate that gradual changes in global climate that influence disturbance frequency.Beckage@uvm.edu Positive feedbacks between vegetation and fire disturbance may lead to nonlinear ecosystem responses

  2. The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation Finn Danielsen,1 * Mikael K. Sørensen,2 The scale of the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was almost unprecedented. In areas with the maximum tsunami intensity, little could have prevented catastrophic coast- al destruction. Further away, however

  3. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing Vegetation indicators #12;Indicators of a changing climate J. Magnuson Source: IPCC 2007 Potter, et al

  4. HISTORICAL VEGETATION AND DRAINAGE PATTERNS OF WESTERN SANTA CLARA VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    describing landscape ecology in Lower Peninsula, West Valley, and Guadalupe Watershed Management Areas San

  5. Fire Effects and Fuel Management in Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire Effects and Fuel Management in Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Ricardo Vélez2 1 Presented, California. 2 Doctor Ingeniero de Montes, ICONA - Forest Fire Section, Madrid Spain. Abstract: Forest fuels of woody shrub vegetation. The Forest Service prepared in 1978 a fuel management plan and a program

  6. Environmental compliance assessment findings for Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmon, C.F.; Levine, M.B.

    1990-03-02

    This report presents the results of an environmental assessment conducted at Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) in St. Charles County, Missouri, in accordance with the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Environmental Compliance Assessment Checklists. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate the compliance of the site with applicable federal and Missouri environment regulations. Assessments activities included the following: review of site records, reports ,and files; inspection of the WSSRAP storage building, other selected buildings, and the adjacent grounds; and interviews with project personnel. This assessment was conducted on August 28-30, 1989. The assessment covered five management areas as set forth in the Checklist: Hazardous Waste Management, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Management; Air Emissions; Wastewater Discharges and Petroleum Management. No samples were collected. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Emerging Technologies for Industrial Demand-Side Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, J. E.; Kasprowicz, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Demand-side management (DSM) is a set of actions taken by an electric utility to influence the electricity usage by a customer. Typical DSM activities include rebates for higher efficiency appliances and discounted electric rates for electric...

  8. Establishment of Management Decisions on Office of Inspector General Reports

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17

    To establish the responsibilities and requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) action required to make management decisions on Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit and public inspection reports. Cancels DOE 2320.2B

  9. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste removed from FFTF or resulting from removal will be discussed under the Waste Management alternatives. 5.2.1.1 FFTF Decommissioning Alternative 1: No Action This section...

  10. Vegetable oils: Precombustion characteristics and performance as diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagby, M.O.

    1986-03-01

    Vegetable oils show technical promise as alternative fuels for diesel engines and have good potential as emergency fuels. Realistically, vegetable oils cause a number of problems when used in direct-injection diesel engines, generally attributable to inefficient combustion. At least partially responsible for poor combustion of neat vegetable oils are their high viscosity and non-volatility. To improve combustion several somewhat empirical approaches involving both chemical and physical modifications have been investigated by endurance tests in a variety of engines. Using the EMA 200 h engine screening test, several fuels show technical promise. These include methyl, ethyl, and butyl esters; high-oleic oils:diesel blend (1:3); diesel:soybean oil:butanol:cetane improver (33:33:33:1); and microemulsion fuels (diesel:soybean oil:190 proff ethanol:butanol, 50:25:5:20) and (soybean oil:methanol:2-octanol:cetane improver, 53:13:33:1). Using a pressure vessel, fuel injection system, and high speed motion picture camera, fuel injection characteristics of vegetable oils, e.g., soybean, sunflower, cottonseed, and peanut, have been observed in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at 480/sup 0/C and 4.1MPa. Their injection and atomization characteristics are markedly different from those of petroleum derived diesel fuels. Heating the vegetable oils to lower their viscosities increased spray penetration rate, reduced spray cone angles, and resulted in spray characteristics resembling those of diesel fuel. Significant chemical changes occurred following injection. Samples collected at about 400 microseconds after the injection event consisted of appreciable quantities of C/sub 4/-C/sub 16/ hydrocarbons, and free carboxyl groups were present.

  11. A New Action for Heavy Lattice Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14

    I describe a unified formalism for lattice fermions, in which the relativistic action of Wilson and the nonrelativistic and static actions appear as special cases. It is valid at all values of $m_q a$, including $m_q a \\approx 1$. In the limit $m_q a \\ll 1 $, the formulation reduces to the light quark action of Wilson. In the limit $m_q a \\gg 1 $, the formulation reduces to the nonrelativistic action of Thacker and Lepage, and to the static action of Eichten.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 130 are located within Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Unit 130 is comprised of the following CASs: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective action investigations and provides data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 130 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implemented any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation-derived wastes. From August 4 through September 30, 2008, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 130, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, confirm that no residual contamination is present, and properly dispose of wastes. Constituents detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to identify COCs for CAU 130. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicates that no further action is necessary because no COCs were identified at any CAU 130 CAS. Debris removal from these CASs was considered a best management practice because no contamination was detected. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at all CAU 130 CASs. • A Notice of Completion to DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 130. • Corrective Action Unit 130 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  13. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions...

  14. Bushland Management For Water Yield: Prospects for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Freeman, Lansingh S.; Blackburn, Wilbert H.; Jordan, Wayne R.

    1987-01-01

    [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BRUSHLAND MANAGEMENT FOR WATER YIELD: PROSPECTS FOR TEXAS Bruce A. McCarl Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald C. Griffin Associate Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald A. Kaiser Assistant Professor... management. The main categories of these actions are a) continue current policy-no new initiatives; b) subsidize brush management through low-interest loans; c) cost share with those managing brush; d) refine property rights to resultant water so...

  15. Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

  16. Effects of Added Vegetation on Sand Bar Stability and Stream Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey Tsaros

    Vegetation was added to a fully developed sandy point bar in the meander of a constructed stream. Significant changes in the flow structure and bed topography were observed. As expected, the addition of vegetative resistance ...

  17. The influence of vegetation on frost dynamics, infiltration rate and surface stability in Icelandic Andisolic rangelands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orradottir, Berglind

    2002-01-01

    . When snow cover was present soil temperature fluctuations were negligible. Incidence of frost heaving of wooden pegs in sparsely vegetated plant community was 3x greater than that observed in well-vegetated communities. Heaving of willow seedlings...

  18. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    offer free services to identify and evaluate energy-savingopportunities, recommend energy efficiency actions,develop an energy management plan for business; and

  20. Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, 42 USC 7901 (hereinafter referred to as the Act''). Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial actions at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing sites. The Act, amended in January 1983, by Public Law 97-415, also authorizes DOE to perform remedial actions at vicinity properties in Edgemont, South Dakota. Cleanup of the Edgemont processing site is the responsibility of the Tennessee Valley Authority. This document describes the plan, organization, system, and methodologies used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated vicinity properties in accordance with the Act. The plan describes the objectives of the UMTRA Project, defines participants' roles and responsibilities, outlines the technical approach for accomplishing the objectives, and describes the planning and managerial controls to be used in integrating and performing the Project mission. 21 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    This document describes the three near-term energy strategies selected by the CNMI Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. The three energy strategies selected by the task force are (1) designing a demand-side management program focusing on utility, residential and commercial sectors, (2) developing an outreach and education plan focused on energy conservation in government agencies and businesses, including workplace rules, and (3) exploring waste-to-energy options. The task force also discussed several other medium- and long-term energy strategies that could be explored at a future date.

  2. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  3. Journal of Vegetation Science 24 (2013) 384394 Disentangling the role of edaphic variability, flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fine, Paul V.A.

    2013-01-01

    flooded white-sand vegetation at mesoscales in the Amazon Basin. Introduction In the Amazon, the two most

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-12-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

  5. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Montana Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    1 Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from NMRI as a metric for estimating vegetation water content (VWC) and evaluate the normalization procedure Reflection Index (NMRI). It is a measure of vegetation water content (VWC) estimated from data archived

  6. Vegetation and temperature condition indices from NOAA AVHRR data for drought monitoring over India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Vegetation and temperature condition indices from NOAA AVHRR data for drought monitoring over India. The present study shows the application of vegetation and temperature condition indices for drought monitoring and converting brightness temperature into the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and Temperature Condition Index

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to provide a summary of the completed closure activities, to document waste disposal, and to present information confirming that the remediation goals were met. The closure alternatives consisted of closure in place with administrative controls for one CAS, and no further action with implementation of best management practices (BMPs) for the remaining five CASs.

  8. 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    This report presents the 2009 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended February 2008) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 447 that were conducted at the PSA during fiscal year 2009.

  9. University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan December 20, 2013 #12;i Table of Contents of the Water Action Plan Water Action Plan Committee Regional Scope of the Water Action Plan HISTORICAL PROGRESS IN WATER REDUCTION.......................................................... 5 Campus Irrigation

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

  11. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  12. Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  13. A comparison of the RCRA Corrective Action and CERCLA Remedial Action Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traceski, Thomas T.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of the RCRA corrective action and the CERCLA remedial action processes. On the even-numbered pages a discussion of the RCRA corrective action process is presented and on the odd-numbered pages a comparative discussion of the CERCLA remedial action process can be found. Because the two programs have a difference structure, there is not always a direct correlation between the two throughout the document. This document serves as an informative reference for Departmental and contractor personnel responsible for oversight or implementation of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA remedial action activities at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  14. Impacts of Aquatic Vegetation Management on the Ecology of Small Impoundments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Trevor J.

    2010-01-16

    can absorb nutrients directly from the water column, which suppresses the growth of phytoplankton. Conversely, in a nutrient rich system, water clarity tends to be low as a result of a high biomass of planktonic algae. The planktonic algal bloom... algae all three forms of algae: planktonic, filamentous, and microalgae at levels of 0.2 to 0.4 ppm copper (Hallingse and Phlips 1996). Chelated copper formulations like Cutrine-Plus stay in solution longer than copper sulfate and result in better...

  15. Understory vegetation and site factors: implications for a managed Wisconsin landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    .D. Brosofskea,* , J. Chena , T.R. Crowb a School of Forestry and Wood Products, Michigan Technological is therefore valuable for assessing the effectiveness of this approach. The goal of this stud

  16. MANAGING VEGETABLE GARDEN SOIL FERTILITY IN VERMONT Vern Grubinger, Extension Professor, University of Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    it, elemental sulfur can be added. It requires more lime, or sulfur, to change the pH of `heavier sand). A soil test is needed to determine whether or not lime or sulfur is needed to adjust a soil's p, and hairy vetch can also add N to the soil because the nodules on their roots work with bacteria to capture

  17. Frequently Asked Questions About Southwesterns Vegetation Management Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServicesAmesFour LosAct Freedom ofFrequently Asked

  18. Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, Paul; Diamond, Rick

    2009-04-01

    General Services Administration (GSA) has been a pioneer in using Smart Building technologies but it has yet to achieve the full benefits of an integrated, enterprise-wide Smart Building strategy. In July 2008, GSA developed an initial briefing memorandum that identified five actions for a Smart Buildings feasibility study: (1) Identify and cluster the major building systems under consideration for a Smart Buildings initiative; (2) Identify GSA priorities for these clusters; (3) Plan for future adoption of Smart Building strategies by identifying compatible hardware; (4) Develop a framework for implementing and testing Smart Building strategies and converged networks; and (5) Document relevant GSA and industry initiatives in this arena. Based on this briefing memorandum, PBS and FAS retained consultants from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Noblis, and the Building Intelligence Group to evaluate the potential for Smart Buildings within GSA, and to develop this report. The project has included extensive interviews with GSA staff (See Appendix A), a review of existing GSA standards and documents, and an examination of relevant GSA and industry initiatives. Based on interviews with GSA staff and a review of GSA standards and documents, the project team focused on four goals for evaluating how Smart Building technology can benefit GSA: (1) Achieve Energy Efficiency Mandates--Use Smart Building technology as a tool to meet EISA 2007 and EO 13423 goals for energy efficiency. (2) Enhance Property Management--Deploy enterprise tools for improved Operations and Maintenance (O&M) performance and verification. (3) Implement Network as the Fourth Utility--Utilize a converged broadband network to support Smart Building systems and provide GSA clients with connectivity for voice, data and video. (4) Enhance Safety and Security--Harmonize Physical Access Control Systems (PACS) with Smart Building Systems.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Strand

    2006-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

  20. Class Action Lawyers: Fools for Clients?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Cir. 1976). 23. See Note, Class Actions-Susman v. Lincolntakes over a case from the class representative is act- ingan active and indepen- dent class representative throughout

  1. Utilities Working with Industry: Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This action plan outlines joint ITP and utility activities that will help reach a national goal of reducing energy by 25 percent over then next 10 years.

  2. Calls to Action -- Linking Science to Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraker, Harrison

    2008-01-01

    the National Academy of Design, July 2008. Opposite: FlowAction Linking Science to Design Harrison Fraker Two recentthe fields of science and design. Entitled “Energy, Security

  3. Handbook for preparation of Individual Procurement Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The Procurement and Assistance Data System (PADS) provides a mechanism for collecting, assembling, organizing, and presenting acquisition and assistance data for the Department of Energy (DOE). This handbook and associated documents establish a uniform system to report acquisition/assistance data to PADS for the collection, processing, and dissemination of official statistical data on the Department`s acquisition and assistance actions. The data provides, based on information available at the time of request, a basis for any recurring and special reports to the senior procurement executive, Congress, General Accounting Office (GAO), Federal executive agencies, Office of management and Budget (OMB), and the general public. It provides information for measuring and assessing the extent to which small business firms and small disadvantages business enterprises are sharing in DOE placement, and for other acquisition and assistance policy and management control purposes. The Handbook for the Preparation of the Individual Procurement Action Report (IPAR) has been designed in two sections; Procurement and Financial Assistance to support the individual forms.

  4. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  5. Lecturer, Management Lally School of Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Lecturer, Management Lally School of Management Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The enterprise management and organization area of The Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute degree equivalent in management, strategy, organization behavior, or an appropriate related field

  6. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  7. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  8. Position Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-23

    The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2005-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 552 is comprised of the one Corrective Action Site which is 12-23-05, Ponds. One additional CAS, 12-06-04, Muckpile (G-Tunnel Muckpile), was removed from this CAU when it was determined that the muckpile is an active site. A modification to the FFACO to remove CAS 12-06-04 was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on December 16, 2004. The G-Tunnel ponds were first identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. document entitled, ''Nevada Test Site Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Facilities and Waste Sites'' (REECo, 1991). Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting the corrective action alternatives for the site. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of appropriate media. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation of the corrective actions and site closure activities implemented at CAU 367. A corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions was completed at each of the three crater CASs (10-45-01, 10-45-02, and 10-45-03); corrective actions were not required at CAS 10-09-03. In addition, a limited soil removal corrective action was conducted at the location of a potential source material release. Based on completion of these correction actions, no additional corrective action is required at CAU 367, and site closure is considered complete. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 2010 through March 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of non-test or other releases (e.g., migration in washes and potential source material). Based on the proximity of the Uncle, Ess, and Sedan craters, the impact of the Sedan test on the fallout deposited from the two earlier tests, and aerial radiological surveys, the CAU 367 investigation was designed to study the releases from the three crater CASs as one combined release (primary release). Corrective Action Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit, consists of two mud pits identified at CAU 367. The mud pits are considered non-test releases or other releases and were investigated independent of the three crater CASs. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 367 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. For the primary release, radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface or shallow subsurface soil outside the default contamination boundary. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within each of the three craters (Sedan, Ess, and Uncle) due to prompt injection of radionuclides from the tests. Based on the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each crater CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. With regard to other releases, no contaminants of concern were identified at the mud pits or any of the other release locations, with one exception. Potential source material in the form of lead was found at one location. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at this location, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 367. • Corrective Action Unit 367 should be promoted from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  11. 1995 Department of Energy Records Management Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Group (RMG) provides a forum for DOE and its contractor personnel to review and discuss subjects, issues, and concerns of common interest. This forum will include the exchange of information, and interpretation of requirements, and a dialog to aid in cost-effective management of the DOE Records Management program. Issues addressed by the RMG may result in recommendations for DOE-wide initiatives. Proposed DOE-wide initiatives shall be, provided in writing by the RMG Steering Committee to the DOE Records Management Committee and to DOE`s Office of ERM Policy, Records, and Reports Management for appropriate action. The membership of the RMG is composed of personnel engaged in Records Management from DOE Headquarters, Field sites, contractors, and other organizations, as appropriate. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Robotic actions in the human brain Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Antonia

    Robotic actions in the human brain 1 Robotic movement., Stadler, W. & Prinz, W. (in press / 2011). Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network. Human Brain Mapping. #12;Robotic

  13. Graduate Honor System Actions 1999-2000 Case Dept. Charge GHS Action Sanction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    Graduate Honor System Actions 1999-2000 Case Dept. Charge GHS Action Sanction F1999-01 ECp the Past Four Academic Years Case Outcomes Number of Students Sanctioned Sanction 1996-97 1997-98 1998

  14. Environmental Activism as Collective Action Key words: Environmental activism, environmental behavior, collective action,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark

    Environmental Activism as Collective Action Key words: Environmental activism, environmental behavior, collective action, environmentalism, collective interest model. Mark Lubell Department The literature on environmental activism has failed to produce a model of individual decision- making explicitly

  15. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  16. ExxonMobil Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto, F.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, ExxonMobil has undertaken voluntary actions to improve efficiency in our operations and in customer use of our products. Our Global Energy Management System (GEMS) is an important initiative that is having a positive impact at each...

  17. USDA Orange County Invasive Plant Management (OCIM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    (Treatments) No Action Passive Restoration Intermediate Restoration Active Restoration Exotic plant management type of CSS and 22% grasslands. 16 Control 53 Passive 37 Intermediate 25 Active · 21% had the goal of increasing California Gnatcatcher habitat. · 39% of the restorations were in house and 44% were contracted

  18. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises five corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 374 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at CASs 18-23-01 and 20-45-03, and a corrective action of removing potential source material (PSM) was conducted at CAS 20-45-03. The other CASs require no further action; however, best management practices of removing PSM and drums at CAS 18-22-06, and removing drums at CAS 18-22-08 were performed. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 4 through October 6, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigating the primary release of radionuclides and investigating other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 374 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were found to be present in the surface soil that was sampled. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present in subsurface media within the craters and ejecta fields (default contamination boundaries) at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that PSM in the form of lead-acid batteries at Schooner exceeds the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing PSM, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 374. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 374. • Corrective Action Unit 374 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  20. UC SAN DIEGO DROUGHT ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UC SAN DIEGO DROUGHT ACTION PLAN 2014 #12;Water at UC San Diego Background Report and Action Strategy for Drought The UC San Diego Campus The UC San Diego La Jolla campus (including Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the UC San Diego Medical Center ­ La Jolla) totals approximately 1,152 acres

  1. A Brief Look At Affirmative Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Nancy Jo

    2007-12-06

    .........................................................................................13 Limitations of This Study ..........................................................................................14 History of Affirmative Action ...................................................................................15 Two Sides... of pertinent information due to the closed nature of the system being studied and the limited amount of information on this specific topic by anthropologists and the anthropological community. 14 History of Affirmative Action In its tumultuous 46-year...

  2. Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions 2014-2015 Concern Recommendation Action Follow-up 1. The department name is Chemical and Biological Engineering. An analysis of student Biological Engineering programs. 4. The second semester of the senior capstone sequence in Chemical

  3. General Laws for the Action of Diastases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V: Action of amylase on starch 68 §33. Method. H. Brown and Glendinning's research 68 §34. Law for the progress of the hydrolysis of starch by amylase 65 §35. Effect of the amount of starch. Difference between malt amylase and pancreatic juice amylase 68 §36. Theory of the law of action of amylase 72 §37

  4. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  5. Bishop's University Energy Efficiency Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    global energy consumption by 14% relative to 2002-2003. By 2010 Action 6: Cost evaluation of investments% reduction in energy consumption (GJ / m²) for higher education buildings from 2002-2003 until 2010- 2011 ways to save energy March 2008 Action 3: Snapshot of current energy consumption. Send energy

  6. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009 SANDY DEJOHN PHYSICAL FACILITIES DEPARTMENT #12;~ i ~ TABLE the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, I believe strongly in working to achieve its helped shape and develop the information contained in this Climate Action Plan: (Names listed

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  8. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 365 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with a use restriction (UR). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18, 2011, through August 2, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 365 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in supporting the DQO decisions. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present to the southwest of the Baneberry crater. It was also assumed that radionuclide levels present within the crater and fissure exceed the FAL. Corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of establishing a UR and posting warning signs for the crater, fissure, and the area located to the southwest of the crater where soil concentrations exceeded the FAL. These URs were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions beyond what are described in this document are necessary for CAU 365. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 365. (3) Corrective Action Unit 365 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  10. Constrained marine resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Jason Hastings

    2007-01-01

    areas as a risk management tool A. Introduction . . . . .1. Effort management without Technologicalwith Technological Progress Under Effort Management F.

  11. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Faust, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography of 657 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fourth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic documents of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been references in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; and (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author, or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. Appendix A lists 264 bibliographic references to literature identified during this reporting period but not abstracted due to time constraints. Title and publication description indexes are given for this appendix. Appendix B defines frequently used acronyms, and Appendix C lists the recipients of this report according to their corporate affiliation.

  13. Residential water use and landscape vegetation dynamics in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mini, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Reidy, K. (2008). Residential Water Demand Management:Estimation of residential water demand: a state-of-the-art2009, Determinants of residential water demand in Germany,

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01

    This publication contains 1035 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. These citations constitute the thirteenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types. There are 13 major sections of the publication, including: (1) DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (6) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (7) DOE Site-Specific Remedial Actions; (8) Contaminated Site Restoration; (9) Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater; (10) Environmental Data Measurements, Management, and Evaluation; (11) Remedial Action Assessment and Decision-Making; (12) Technology Development and Evaluation; and (13) Environmental and Waste Management Issues. Bibliographic references are arranged in nine subject categories by geographic location and then alphabetically by first author, corporate affiliation, or publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  15. Uncertainties and severe-accident management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Severe-accident management can be defined as the use of existing and or alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. Together with risk management (e.g., changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-indepth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments have been completed, which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities, and can be categorized as (a) dominant sequences with respect to core-melt frequency, (b) dominant sequences with respect to various risk measures, (c) dominant threats that challenge safety functions, and (d) dominant threats with respect to failure of safety systems. Severe-accident management strategies can be generically classified as (a) use of alternative resources, (b) use of alternative equipment, and (c) use of alternative actions. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These include (a) uncertainty in key phenomena, (b) uncertainty in operator behavior, (c) uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and (d) uncertainty in information availability (i.e., instrumentation). This paper focuses on phenomenological uncertainties associated with severe-accident management strategies.

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2010-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 560 comprises seven corrective action sites (CASs): •03-51-01, Leach Pit •06-04-02, Septic Tank •06-05-03, Leach Pit •06-05-04, Leach Bed •06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System •06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond •06-59-05, Control Point Septic System The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 560 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 7, 2008, through February 24, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. •If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 560 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: •No contamination exceeding the FALs was identified at CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04. •The soil at the base of the leach pit chamber at CAS 06-05-03 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 5 to 20 feet (ft) below ground surface. The contamination is confined laterally to the walls of the leach pit chamber and leach rock. The contamination present at CAS 06-05-03 within the leach pit was not feasible to remove. •The surface and subsurface soils within and surrounding the septic system at CAS 06-05-04 contained PCB concentrations above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg. The lateral and vertical extent of COCs was determined for this CAS. Contaminated soils were removed up to within 18 ft of the building. The remaining contamination is confined to subsurface soils adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162 and was not feasible to remove. •The solid materials within the septic tank and soils immediately surrounding the inlet end of the tank at CAS 06-59-03 contained benzo(a)pyrene above the FAL of 0.21 mg/kg. The soils, tank contents, and tank were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. •The solids contained within the septic tank and inlet pipe at CAS 06-59-05 contained the following contaminants above their respective FALs: PCBs, arsenic, lead, benzo(a)pyrene, and pesticides. The tank and inlet pipe contents were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following corrective action recommendations: •No further action for CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04, as no contaminants of potential concern were present that exceed FALs. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-03 under a corrective action with a use restriction (UR) for remaining PCB- and arsenic-impacted potential source material (PSM). The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-04 under a corrective action with a UR for remaining PCBs in soil adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •No further action for CAS 06-59-0

  17. Managing Insects and Mite Pests of Texas Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronholm, Gregory B.; Knutson, Allen E.; Parker, Roy D.; Pendleton, Bonnie

    2007-06-20

    ...............................................28 Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Sorghum Greg Cronholm, Allen Knutson, Roy Parker and Bonnie Pendleton* N INTEGRATED APPROACH TO managing insect and mite pests can help Texas sorghum growers and crop protection specialists: * Extension... in cultural practices or crop varieties, or when insecticides are used for other insect pests. Methods of preventing insect pest infestations Managing insect and mite pests of sor- ghum involves actions that prevent pests from increasing to high enough...

  18. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 366 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended).

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-04-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); 03-05-01, Leachfield; 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); 06-05-01, Leachfield; 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and 23-05-02, Leachfield. Corrective Action Sites 06-05-01, 06-23-01, and 23-05-02 were identified in the 1991 Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo) inventory (1991). The remaining sites were identified during review of various historical documents. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating and selecting a corrective action alternative for each CAS. The CAI will include field inspections, radiological and geological surveys, and sample collection. Data will also be obtained to support investigation-derived waste (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal sits, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)) to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal sits would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  1. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  2. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium Processing Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contain measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect groundwater quality. Remedial action at the Naturita site must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Colorado. The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to either the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast, or a licensed non-DOE disposal facility capable of handling RRM. At either disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed Dry Flats disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This report discusses environmental impacts associated with the proposed remedial action.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  4. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we derive an action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth potentials. Exact conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles. Being suitable for discretization, the presented action allows construction of variational integrators. Numerical implementation is left for a future study.

  5. On QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof

    1998-01-01

    We discuss recent advances in the calculation of thermodynamic observables using improved actions. In particular, we discuss the calculation of the equation of state of the SU(3) gauge theory, the critical temperature in units of the string tension, the surface tension and the latent heat at the deconfinement transition. We also present first results from a calculation of the equation of state for four-flavour QCD using an O(a^2) improved staggered fermion action and discuss possible further improvements of the staggered fermion action.

  6. WHOLE-FARM APPLE ARTHROPOD MANAGEMENT USING REDUCED-RISK TACTICS AND IPM SAMPLING AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    WHOLE-FARM APPLE ARTHROPOD MANAGEMENT USING REDUCED-RISK TACTICS AND IPM SAMPLING AND MONITORING management programs in apples, using provisional action thresholds for specific major pests based on previous-farm approaches for managing the arthropod pests of apple orchards that rely on RR and OP-replacement insecticides

  7. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-25

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

  8. Relationships between climate, vegetation, and energy exchange across a montane gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak?fraction of energy used to evaporate water (equation (1)) EFwater supplies, predicting change in precipitation, vegetation, energy

  9. Some dry season plants recommended as edible vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiga, AKPOVUGHAYE Dr.

    2009-01-01

    vegetables cultivated in Nigeria are: cabbage, lettuce,Community in Kogi State, Nigeria, there are inadequateGovernment Area, Kogi State, Nigeria. Each of the fresh

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  11. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  12. Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Climate Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    divided into three categories: (i) Demand Side Management a. behavior change (as it applies to energy management, and sustainable development. VCU will further establish key performance indicators for raising

  13. Virginia Commonwealth University Climate Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    categories: (i) Demand Side Management a. behavior change (as it applies to energy, water, waste, recycling to the interdependence of humans and the environment, environmental management, and sustainable development. VCU

  14. DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENT REPORT PREPARED FOR: Civil & Environmental Engineering College of Engineering University of Washington Seattle, Washington of Engineering strategic goals, this report provides Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) with detailed

  15. DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT REPORT PREPARED FOR: Civil & Environmental Engineering College of Engineering University of Washington Seattle, Washington in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). The purpose of the report is to facilitate the department

  16. QER- Comment of Berkshire Environmental Action Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, Please find attached comments from the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, Inc. (BEAT) regarding the proposed natural gas pipeline expansion. Thank you for considering our comments.

  17. Science Maps in Action Dr. Katy Brner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    Science Maps in Action Dr. Katy Börner Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, Director Information Visualization Laboratory, Director School of Library and Information Science Indiana University Computational Scientometrics: Studying Science by Scientific Means Börner, Katy, Chen, Chaomei, and Boyack

  18. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  19. Palouse Subbasin Management Plan 3. Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palouse Subbasin Management Plan 3. Management Plan FINAL DRAFT ~ May 2004 Project Lead: Palouse-Rock Lake Conservation District Trevor Cook, Project Manager PO Box 438 St. John WA 99171 (509) 648;Palouse Subbasin Plan: MANAGEMENT PLAN Management Plan: Page 3 - 1 3. Management Plan 3.1 Background

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2005-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: ''Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.'' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: ''Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?'' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.'' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site boundaries. The migration pattern can be derived from the Decision II samples, since the analytical results of those samples will show how far the contamination has travelled in the time period since activities at the site ended. Most of the data necessary to resolve the decisions will be generated from the analysis of environmental samples collected during the CAI for CAU 552. The general purpose of the investigation is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COCs. (2) Determine the vertical and lateral extent of identified COCs. (3) Ensure sufficient data is collected to support the selection of a corrective action compliant with all NDEP, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA)'', and DOE requirements. In addition, data will be obtained to support (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  1. The Question of Conation in Action Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, Robert

    The Question of Conation in Action Theory Robert Good Rider College In some recent and most interesting articles, Myles Brand argues that intending has an exclusively conative feature. 1 This conative feature is said by Brand to be non... of a conative component of intending is best understood in light of the recent history of Causal theories of action. Basciaily, a Causal theory is one which holds that intentional ac­ tion is caused by a preceding mental event of a partic­ ular kind...

  2. Improved lattice fermion action for heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yong-Gwi; Jüttner, Andreas; Kaneko, Takashi; Marinkovic, Marina; Noaki, Jun-Ichi; Tsang, Justus Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We develop an improved lattice action for heavy quarks based on Brillouin-type fermions, that have excellent energy-momentum dispersion relation. The leading discretization errors of $O(a)$ and $O(a^2)$ are eliminated at tree-level. We carry out a scaling study of this improved Brillouin fermion action on quenched lattices by calculating the charmonium energy-momentum dispersion relation and hyperfine splitting. We present a comparison to standard Wilson fermions and domain-wall fermions.

  3. Improved lattice fermion action for heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Gwi Cho; Shoji Hashimoto; Andreas Jüttner; Takashi Kaneko; Marina Marinkovic; Jun-Ichi Noaki; Justus Tobias Tsang

    2015-05-28

    We develop an improved lattice action for heavy quarks based on Brillouin-type fermions, that have excellent energy-momentum dispersion relation. The leading discretization errors of $O(a)$ and $O(a^2)$ are eliminated at tree-level. We carry out a scaling study of this improved Brillouin fermion action on quenched lattices by calculating the charmonium energy-momentum dispersion relation and hyperfine splitting. We present a comparison to standard Wilson fermions and domain-wall fermions.

  4. Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-05-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles and Debris) Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Laura

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 511, Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris). The CAU is comprised of nine corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, and 19 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 511 is comprised of nine CASs: (1) 03-08-02, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (2) 03-99-11, Waste Dump (Piles); (3) 03-99-12, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (4) 04-99-04, Contaminated Trench/Berm; (5) 06-16-01, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris); (6) 06-17-02, Scattered Ordnance/Automatic Weapons Range; (7) 07-08-01, Contaminated Mound; (8) 18-99-10, Ammunition Dump; and (9) 19-19-03, Waste Dump (Piles & Debris). The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 511 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) and closure activities were performed from January 2005 through August 2005, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 511: Waste Dumps (Piles & Debris)'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004) and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 511 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify the COCs for each CAS. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 511 revealed the following: (1) Two CASs contained COCs. The extent of the contamination was determined at each site, and the contaminant was removed during the CAI. (2) Debris located at the CASs was removed during the CAI as a best management practice. (3) Materials presenting a potentially explosive hazard at two of the CASs were disposed of appropriately by explosive ordnance disposal/unexploded ordnance personnel. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the nine CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective action for CAU 511. (2) No Corrective Action Plan. (3) A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 511. (4) Corrective Action Unit 511 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''.

  6. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  7. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  8. Material Stabilization Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-09-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

  9. Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

    2006-01-01

    • Provides periodic energy consumption reports Demand-Side Energy Management • Compares actual energy cost against defined dynamic targets • Alerts responsible personnel when corrective action is needed • Provides a list of recommended actions... stream_source_info ESL-IE-06-05-24.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 17485 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-06-05-24.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Real-Time Demand Side Energy...

  10. Managing the Management: CORBAbased Instrumentation of Management Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Managing the Management: CORBA­based Instrumentation of Management Systems A. Keller Munich Network Management Team Department of Computer Science, TU MË? unchen Arcisstr. 21, D­80333 Munich, Germany akeller@ieee.org Proceedings of the Sixth IFIP/IEEE International Symposium on Integrated Network Management (IM'99), Boston

  11. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics and neurological implications action' hypothesis examines the role that regulating mitochondrial function and bioenergetics play

  12. Energy Action Month October 2014 Campaign Materials | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Month October 2014 Campaign Materials Energy Action Month October 2014 Campaign Materials Campaign materials for "Transition to a Clean Energy Reality," the theme for Energy Action...

  13. State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 This 2003...

  14. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  15. Water Action Plan 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Water Action Plan 2013 #12;2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE #12;WATER ACTION PLAN TABLE...........................................11 WATER USE.......................................................................13 MAIN..........................................14 RECYCLED WATER...........................................................14 STORMWATER

  16. United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

  17. Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 -...

  18. North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy Security and the Environment North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy Security and the...

  19. Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota: Solar in Action (Brochure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

  20. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  1. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report (August 2012) 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report (August 2012) On June...

  2. Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy November 6, 2014 -...

  3. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 Report to...

  4. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances in Clean Energy and DOE Support of Scientific Research Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features...

  5. Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from...

  6. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine...

  7. Overview of the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network Johanna Zetterberg Coordinator, SEE Action Network US Department of Energy Achieving the Potential * EE remains one...

  8. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  9. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  10. Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 This paper discusses three main objectives in the CHP...

  11. Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the...

  12. One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role June 25, 2014 -...

  13. National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is required to develop the National Action Plan on Demand Response (National Action Plan) as outlined in section 529 of the Energy...

  14. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  15. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  16. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  17. Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  18. Single-cylinder diesel engine study of four vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobus, M.J.; Geyer, S.M.; Lestz, S.S.; Risby, T.M.; Taylor, W.D.

    1983-10-01

    A single-cylinder, 0.36l, D.I. Diesel engine was operated on Diesel fuel, sunflowerseed oil, cottonseed oil, soybean oil, and peanut oil. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed comparison of performance and emissions data and to characterize the biological activity of the particulate soluble organic fraction for each fuel using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test. In addition, exhaust gas aldehyde samples were collected using the DNPH method. These samples were analyzed gravimetrically and separated into components from formaldehyde to heptaldehyde with a gas chromatograph. Results comparing the vegetable oils to Diesel fuel generally show slight improvements in thermal efficiency and indicated specific energy consumption; equal or higher gas-phase emissions; lower indicated specific revertant emissions; and significantly higher aldehyde emissions, including an increased percentage of formaldehyde.

  19. Operating and Maintaining Energy Smart Schools Action Plan Template - All Action Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-07-01

    EnergySmart Schools action plan templates for benchmarking, lighting, HVAC, water heating, building envelope, transformer, plug loads, kitchen equipment, swimming pool, building automation system, other.

  20. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  1. Tactical Action Plan: Powering the Energy Frontier (An Appendix to the Strategic Roadmap 2024)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The Tactical Action Plan identifies and describes the Western-wide tasks and activities, existing and new, needed to fully achieve the goals in Strategic Roadmap 2024. Each activity in the TAP chart is briefly described in this document and also linked to the Critical Pathway it supports. As the TAP is a list of specific strategies and actions susceptible to changing environments and needs, the TAP will be updated more frequently as Western progresses towards its goals. The TAP is organized into seven Strategic Target Areas that serve as Western’s priorities and areas of focus for the next two to three years. These Target Areas are: Power and Transmission Related Services; Energy Infrastructure; Partnership and Innovation; Asset Management; Safety and Security; Communication; and Human Capital Management and Organization Structure. Target Areas are also used to create the agency’s annual performance targets, which measure progress and implementation of the TAP, and the status of which will be reported regularly.

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  3. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  4. New Jersey state information handbook: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-31

    Under the implied authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, radiological surveys and research work has been conducted to determine radiological conditions at former MED/AEC sites. As of this time, 31 sites in 13 states have been identified that require or may require remedial action. This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of New Jersey. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations. The loose-leaf format used in these volumes will allow the material to be updated periodically as the Remedial Action Program progresses.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 543 is located in Area 6 and Area 15 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Seven corrective action sites (CASs) comprise CAU 543 and are listed below: (1) 06-07-01, Decon Pad; (2) 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; (3) 15-04-01, Septic Tank; (4) 15-05-01, Leachfield; (5) 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; (6) 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and (7) 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. Corrective Action Site 06-07-01, Decon Pad, is located in Area 6 and consists of the Area 6 Decontamination Facility and its components that are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the EPA Farm. The EPA Farm was a fully-functional dairy associated with animal experiments conducted at the on-site laboratory. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, video-mole surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs within CAU 543 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The seven CASs in CAU 543 primarily consist of sanitary and process waste collection, storage, and distribution systems (e.g., storage tanks, sumps, and piping). Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

  6. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  7. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  8. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  9. What is a healthy A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    cup fat free milk + 1 tbsp vegetable oil 1 egg 2 egg whites 1 tbsp butter 3/4 tbsp liquid vegetable oil Additional Resources: www.mypyramid.gov www.fda.gov www.nyapplecountry.org www.eatturkey.com www. These fluctuations can lead to medical emergencies. Avoid fasting and eating irregular meals to help maintain a more

  10. Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    . Introduction Vegetated salt marshes are a common feature along tectonically quiescent coastal mar- gins9 Flow, Sedimentation, and Biomass Production on a Vegetated Salt Marsh in South Carolina: Toward, sedimentation, and plant community evolution on a salt marsh populated by Spartina alterniflora is deve- loped

  11. Blank page retained for pagination PROPERTIES OF FISH AND VEGETABLE OIL MIXTURES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;PROPERTIES OF FISH AND VEGETABLE OIL MIXTURES of various fish oils for the most diverse commercial operations, their substitution where possible for the more valuable vegetable oils, and the lack of intimate and complete knowledge of their physical

  12. Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattox, April Marie

    2013-07-30

    the root zone of plants. Water moving beyond the root zone is referred to as deep drainage, and has potential to become aquifer recharge. A vegetation manipulation project was designed to understand the effects of woody vegetation removal on soil water...

  13. Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988 and microwave sensors are expected to provide complementary vegetation information. Here we compared NDVI from-annual variations. However, the long term changes reflected by them are divergent. Microwave based VOD shows

  14. SPECIAL ISSUE Multi-spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    vegetation near shallow subsurface CO2 releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research to the CO2 sink­source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain sequestration for reducing greenhouse gas emissions is accompanied by a need for methods to detect CO2

  15. Why do some small islands lack vegetation? Evidence from long-term introduction experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Lloyd W.

    , and only two naturally vegetated islands lost all vegetation. Experimental introductions of two species Á and hurricanes appeared to have reduced the establishment success and possibly long-term survival of the introductions, although some populations survived four major hurricanes. Turnover rates of both introduced

  16. A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 ORNL/CDIAC-124 NDP-073/CDIAC-124 NDP-073 A DATABASE OF HERBACEOUS VEGETATION RESPONSES TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 Contributed by Michael H. Jones Peter S. Curtis Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology The Ohio State

  17. Numerical study of turbulence and wave damping induced by vegetation canopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    accurate predictions of vegetation-induced wave energy dissipation. Wave propagation through a finite patch binder that resists coastal erosion. Vegetation can also dissipate wave energy (Augustin et al., 2009, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan d Department of Marine Engineering Technology, Texas A & M University

  18. Air motion within and above forest vegetation in non-ideal conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    Air motion within and above forest vegetation in non-ideal conditions Xuhui Lee* School of Forestry state of knowledge about air ¯ow under ideal conditions (neutral to slightly unstable conditions knowledge of air motion in forest vegetation is a necessary step towards a better understanding of a number

  19. Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation Elise S Barrier Island . Coastal ecology . Dune zone . Disturbance . Dune vegetation . Storm response Introduction), with varied results. Restoration strategies can be difficult to implement successfully in coastal dune systems

  20. Long-term effects of Lupinus lepidus on vegetation dynamics at Mount R. del Moral1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    (Jumpponen et al. 1998; Jones and del Moral 2005), slack dunes (Berendse et al. 1998), coastal dunes (Olff et-1 Long-term effects of Lupinus lepidus on vegetation dynamics at Mount St. Helens R. del Moral1 surfaces at Mount St. Helen. We compared vegetation structure in 30 Lupinus colonies in three age classes