National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for action cumulative quads

  1. Cumulative Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CUMULATIVE INDEX I. Articles (i) By Author Abate, Charles J. "Has Dretske Really Refuted Skepticism?", v.4, n.3 (June, 1977), pp. 169- 175. Abugattas, Juan A. "On the Relation Between Morality and the Notion of God". v.7, n.l (November, 1979...), pp. 47-81. Algeo, Donald. "Why Art?", v.7, n.2 (Spring, 1980), pp. 105-129. Austin, James W. "Rorty's Materialism", v.3, n.l (November, 1975), pp. 20-28. Bell, Gary. "A Characterization of Mathematics". v.8, n.2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 96-104. Bell...

  2. Multivariate Cumulates in R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Leeuw, Jan

    2012-01-01

    and Cumulants from Multivariate Distributions. StatisticsTaylor Expan- sion of a Multivariate Function. International79(3):278–305, 1991. MULTIVARIATE CUMULANTS IN R J. Morton

  3. KT McDonald, N Souchlas August 1, 2014 1 Shielding of the Final Focus Quads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    KT McDonald, N Souchlas August 1, 2014 1 Shielding of the Final Focus Quads K.T. McDonald, N. Souchlas August 1, 2014 #12;KT McDonald, N Souchlas August 1, 2014 2 Shielding of the Final Focus Quads (N of the last Final-Focus quad, Use superconducting quads, Must shield against radiation from the target. MARS

  4. Carroll P. Quade Deputy for Test and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll P. Quade Deputy for Test and Evaluation Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research&E) for the Department of Navy. In this position, he acts as the senior advisor on all T&E matters to ASN RDA and the Chief of Navy Operations via the Director, Navy Test and Evaluation and Technology Requirements, OPNAV N

  5. The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

  6. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the...

  7. QUAD RESIDENCE POND ROAD/SENTINEL ROAD LOT CONSTRUCTION August 21, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUAD RESIDENCE POND ROAD/SENTINEL ROAD LOT CONSTRUCTION August 21, 2014 Further to the notice issued on July 25 in regards to changes to the Sentinel and Pond Road parking lots flowing from the Quad and the Pond Road parking lots. Effective September 1, 2014 the remaining southern portion of the Sentinel

  8. Aalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liso, Vincenzo

    ., & Liso, V. (2013). Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell oxide fuel cell system and absorption heat pump Irene Albacete Cachorroa ,Iulia Maria DarabanaAalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel

  9. Direct, Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    during creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public evaluations and input from independent on the natural and human environment from mining in the Peace River Watershed. Environmental Impacts from on Environmental Quality, Executive Office of the President. What are Cumulative Impacts? #12;The report describes

  10. XT Node Architecture Let's Review: Dual Core v. Quad Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DDR2 · 10GB/s peak @ 667MHz · 8GB/s nominal STREAMs Quad Core · Core · 2.1Ghz clock frequency · SSE to L1,L2,L3 · Memory · Dual Channel DDR2 · 12GB/s peak @ 800MHz · 10GB/s nominal STREAMs #12;Cray XT4 Node 9.6 GB/sec 9.6GB/sec 9.6 GB/sec 9.6GB/sec 2 ­ 8 GB 12.8 GB/sec direct connect memory (DDR 800) 6

  11. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  12. Cosmological parameter estimation with QUaD CMB polarization and temperature experiment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memari, Yasin

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we examine the theoretical origin and statistical features of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. We particularly focus on the CMB power spectra and cosmological parameter estimation from QUaD CMB ...

  13. An embedded controller for quad-rotor flying robots running distributed algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian, Brian John

    2009-01-01

    Multiple collaborating quad-rotor flying robots are useful in a broad range of applications, from surveillance with onboard cameras to reconfiguration of wireless networks. For these applications, it is often advantageous ...

  14. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | Department of Energy JuneEnergy

  15. Design and construction of a novel quad tilt-wing UAV E. Cetinsoy, S. Dikyar, C. Hancer, K.T. Oner, E. Sirimoglu, M. Unel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?nel, Mustafa

    Design and construction of a novel quad tilt-wing UAV E. Cetinsoy, S. Dikyar, C. Hancer, K.T. Oner 12 March 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: UAV Quad tilt-wing Aerodynamic design Carbon composite VehIcle). SUAVI is an electric powered quad tilt-wing UAV that is capable of vertical takeoff

  16. FIPS 1402 NonProprietary Security Policy: Persistent Systems Wave Relay Quad Radio Router and Man Portable Unit (Generation 2, Generation 3 Single/Dual, and Generation 4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIPS 1402 NonProprietary Security Policy: Persistent Systems Wave Relay Quad Radio Router and Man Wave Relay Quad Radio Router and Man Portable Unit (Generation 2, Generation 3 Single;FIPS 1402 NonProprietary Security Policy: Persistent Systems Wave Relay Quad Radio Router and Man

  17. FIPS 1402 NonProprietary Security Policy: Persistent Systems Wave Relay Single, Dual, and Quad Radio Document Version 5.2 Persistent Systems Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proprietary Security Policy Persistent Systems Wave Relay Single, Dual, and Quad Radio Board Level 1Proprietary Security Policy: Persistent Systems Wave Relay Single, Dual, and Quad Radio Board Document Version 5 Policy for the Wave Relay Single, Dual, and Quad Radio Board. #12;FIPS 1402 NonProprietary Security

  18. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  19. Estimating Labels from Label Proportions Novi Quadrianto novi.quad@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caetano, Tiberio

    Estimating Labels from Label Proportions Novi Quadrianto novi.quad@gmail.com Alex J. Smola alex proportions, predict the labels of an- other set of observations, also with known label proportions) are available. The mixing proportions can be reliably estimated using random assignment to control and treatment

  20. Architecture-level Thermal Behavioral Models For Quad-Core Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Sheldon X.-D.

    and architecture design of multi-core microprocessor. The estimated temperature at the architecture level can tools for thermal architecture modeling. Ex- isting work on the HotSpot project [8, 12] tried to resolve model- ing approach for fast temperature estimation at the quad- core thermal architecture level

  1. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  2. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A.; Fox, Anthony D.; Furness, Robert W.; Bullman, Rhys; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2010-01-15

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  3. Documentation of cumulative impacts in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, T.A.; Canter, L.W.

    1997-11-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations in the United States require federal agencies to apply an environmental impact assessment (EIA) in decision-making related to their actions. One aspect requires an examination of direct, indirect and cumulative impacts (CIs). Historically, cumulative impact assessment (CIA) has been given limited attention in EIA and resultant environmental impact statements (EISs), not because of its lack of importance, but owing to limitations in methodologies and procedures, including documentation consistency. The objectives of this study were to identify deficiencies in the documentation of CIs and CIA in EISs and to formulate appropriate recommendations (potential solutions) related to such deficiencies. The study involved the systematic review of 33 EISs. The results indicate that improvements have been made in documentation practices since 1990; however, inconsistencies and inadequacies still exist. Therefore, the following recommendations were developed: (1) CIs should be reported in a separate part of the Environmental Consequences section, and they should be addressed for each pertinent environmental resource; (2) a summary of CIs should be included; (3) any CIs considered not significant should be mentioned plus the reason(s) for their non-significance; (4) spatial and temporal boundaries addressed within the CIA process should be defined for pertinent environmental resources; and (5) utilized guidelines and methodologies should be described.

  4. Simulation of the reaction of fragmentation of deuterons into cumulative and twice-cumulative pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvinenko, A G

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the features of the behavior of pion production cross section as a function of the atomic mass of the target nucleus for the reaction of fragmentation of the incident deuterons in the pions produced in the so-called "twice-cumulative" kinematic region. A distinctive feature of the twice-cumulative pions is that for their production the target nucleus must be heavier than hydrogen. The simulation results show that the dependence of the cross sections for pion production in the twice-cumulative region differs from the analogous dependence for the cumulative region. The paper discusses the reasons for such differences. In this work we present simulation results for some models of nuclear structure on small nucleon-nucleon distances.

  5. Simulation of the reaction of fragmentation of deuterons into cumulative and twice-cumulative pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Litvinenko; E. I. Litvinenko

    2015-05-12

    The paper discusses the features of the behavior of pion production cross section as a function of the atomic mass of the target nucleus for the reaction of fragmentation of the incident deuterons in the pions produced in the so-called "twice-cumulative" kinematic region. A distinctive feature of the twice-cumulative pions is that for their production the target nucleus must be heavier than hydrogen. The simulation results show that the dependence of the cross sections for pion production in the twice-cumulative region differs from the analogous dependence for the cumulative region. The paper discusses the reasons for such differences. In this work we present simulation results for some models of nuclear structure on small nucleon-nucleon distances.

  6. Assessing cumulative impacts within state environmental review frameworks in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Zhao; Becker, Dennis R.; Kilgore, Michael A.

    2009-11-15

    Cumulative impact assessment (CIA) is the process of systematically assessing a proposed action's cumulative environmental effects in the context of past, present, and future actions, regardless of who undertakes such actions. Previous studies have examined CIA efforts at the federal level but little is known about how states assess the cumulative impacts of nonfederal projects. By examining state environmental review statutes, administrative rules, agency-prepared materials, and a national survey of the administrators of state environmental review programs, this study identifies the legal and administrative frameworks for CIA. It examines current CIA practice, discusses the relationship between CIA policy and its implementation, and explores the opportunities for improvement. The results of the study show that twenty-nine state environmental review programs across twenty-six states required the assessment of cumulative environmental impacts. More than half of these programs have adopted specific procedures for implementing their policies. Some programs assessed cumulative impacts using a standard review document, and others have created their own documentations incorporated into applications for state permits or funding. The majority of programs have adopted various scales, baselines, significance criteria, and coordination practices in their CIA processes. Mixed methods were generally used for data collection and analysis; qualitative methods were more prevalent than quantitative methods. The results also suggest that a program with comprehensive and consistent environmental review policies and procedures does not always imply extensive CIA requirements and practices. Finally, this study discusses the potential for improving existing CIA processes and promoting CIA efforts in states without established environmental review programs.

  7. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  8. Orbital-optimized density cumulant functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Alexander Yu. Schaefer, Henry F.

    2013-11-28

    In density cumulant functional theory (DCFT) the electronic energy is evaluated from the one-particle density matrix and two-particle density cumulant, circumventing the computation of the wavefunction. To achieve this, the one-particle density matrix is decomposed exactly into the mean-field (idempotent) and correlation components. While the latter can be entirely derived from the density cumulant, the former must be obtained by choosing a specific set of orbitals. In the original DCFT formulation [W. Kutzelnigg, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 171101 (2006)] the orbitals were determined by diagonalizing the effective Fock operator, which introduces partial orbital relaxation. Here we present a new orbital-optimized formulation of DCFT where the energy is variationally minimized with respect to orbital rotations. This introduces important energy contributions and significantly improves the description of the dynamic correlation. In addition, it greatly simplifies the computation of analytic gradients, for which expressions are also presented. We offer a perturbative analysis of the new orbital stationarity conditions and benchmark their performance for a variety of chemical systems.

  9. COMPl:TI:I1 OR.ZPHICS .\\ND IMAOK PlWCI':SSING 10, %9-296 (197!), Linear Transformation of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiglitz, Kenneth

    of Pictures Represented by Quad Trees' G. M. HUNTERS AND K. STEIGLITZ Departmcrtt of Electrical Engineering for a picture into a quad tree for the same picture after application of a general linear operator of the original picture, m is the number of regions, and p is a resolution parameter. 1. INTRODUCTION

  10. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  11. The Crab glitches: incidence and cumulative effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Graham Smith; C. Jordan

    2003-01-10

    The fourteen glitches observed during 33 years do not show the simple pattern expected from a relaxation oscillator. They may however be regarded as three major events separated by about 12 years, the third being a group of smaller glitches. There is a step increase in slowdown rate at each glitch, whose cumulative effect makes a significant contribution to the second differential nu-ddot. The braking index "n" has previously been evaluated only between glitches: the effect of the glitches is to reduce "n" from 2.51 to 2.45. This extra effect due to the glitches would be explained by an increase in dipole field at the fractional rate of 1.5x10^-5 per annum.

  12. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dallas, E-mail: dallas.johnson@gov.ab.ca; Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-09-15

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  13. New Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the use of wind power forecasting in power systems operations, and a visual impact risk analysis and mitigation system. Addthis Related Articles Model Examines Cumulative Impacts...

  14. Third cumulant of the total transmission of diffuse waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rossum, Mark; de Boer, Johannes; Nieuwenhuizen, Th.M

    1995-01-01

    The probability distibution of the total transmission is studied for waves multiply scattered from a random, static configuration of scatterers. A theoretical study of the second and third cumulants of this distribution ...

  15. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Corrective Action Individual Permit: Corrective Action Certifications If...

  16. Three-particle cumulant Study of Conical Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Pruneau

    2009-01-07

    We discuss the sensitivity of the three-particle azimuthal cumulant method for a search and study of conical emission in central relativistic $A+A $ collisions. Our study is based on a multi-component Monte Carlo model which include flow background, Gaussian mono-jets, jet-flow, and Gaussian conical signals. We find the observation of conical emission is hindered by the presence of flow harmonics of fourth order ($v_4 $) but remains feasible even in the presence of a substantial background. We consider the use of probability cumulants for the suppression of 2$^{nd}$ order flow harmonics. We find that while probability cumulant significantly reduce $v_2^2$ contributions, they also complicate the cumulant of jets, and conical emission. The use of probability cumulants is therefore not particularly advantageous in searches for conical emission. We find the sensitivity of the (density) cumulant method depends inextricably on strengths of $v_2 $, $v_4 $, background and non-Poisson character of particle production. It thus cannot be expressed in a simple form, and without specific assumptions about the values of these parameters.

  17. University at Buffalo Climate Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    ......................................................................................................... 3-26 3.5 Cumulative Reduction in UB's Carbon Footprint.......................................... 3)....................................................................... 1-5 2 UB's Greenhouse Gas Footprint..............................................2-1 2.1 Technical-9 2.4 The Impact of Campus Growth on UB's GHG Footprint.............................. 2-11 3 Actions

  18. Linear Cumulant Control and Its Relationship to Risk-Sensitive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    combination of cost cumulants in the performance index with an infinite series of cost cumulants. The solution descriptions of the cumulants of an integral quadratic cost associated with a linear system with white, these same descriptions are derived directly from the cumulant generating function of the cost

  19. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  20. CUMULATIVE CHORDS, PIECEWISE-QUADRATICS AND PIECEWISE-CUBICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozera, Ryszard

    and Statistics The University of Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009, Perth Australia lyle@maths.uwa.edu.au Ryszard Kozera School of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Perth Australia ryszard@csse.uwa.edu.au Abstract Cumulative chord

  1. A Scientific Basis for the Prediction of Cumulative Watershed Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of California Committee on Cumulative Watershed Effects WILDLAND RESOURCES CENTER Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Report No. 46 June 2001 #12;A CENTER Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of California Bekeley, California 94720

  2. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. GeographicYuccaEH-4.2.1.4-Interim-GENII

  3. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis (06/24/05)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | Department of Energy JuneEnergyPRESIDENT

  4. Cumulative theoretical uncertainties in lithium depletion boundary age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tognelli, Emanuele; Degl'Innocenti, Scilla

    2015-01-01

    We performed a detailed analysis of the main theoretical uncertainties affecting the age at the lithium depletion boundary (LDB). To do that we computed almost 12000 pre-main sequence models with mass in the range [0.06, 0.4] M_sun by varying input physics (nuclear reaction cross-sections, plasma electron screening, outer boundary conditions, equation of state, and radiative opacity), initial chemical elements abundances (total metallicity, helium and deuterium abundances, and heavy elements mixture), and convection efficiency (mixing length parameter, alpha_ML). As a first step, we studied the effect of varying these quantities individually within their extreme values. Then, we analysed the impact of simultaneously perturbing the main input/parameters without an a priori assumption of independence. Such an approach allowed us to build for the first time the cumulative error stripe, which defines the edges of the maximum uncertainty region in the theoretical LDB age. We found that the cumulative error stripe ...

  5. Finite Volume Cumulant Expansion in QCD-Colorless Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ladrem; M. A. A. Ahmed; Z. Al-Full; S. Cherif

    2015-09-03

    Due to the finite size effects, the localisation of the phase transition in finite systems and the determination of its order, become an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the finite volume transition point $T_{0}(V)$ of the QCD deconfinement phase transition to a Colorless QGP, we have developed a new approach using the finite size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the $L_{mn}$-method. The first six cumulants $C_{1,2,3,4,5,6}$ with the corresponding under-normalized ratios(skewness $\\Sigma$, kurtosis $\\kappa$ ,pentosis $\\Pi_{\\pm}$ and hexosis $\\mathcal{H}_{1,2,3}$) and three unnormalized combinations of them ($\\mathcal{O}={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa } }{\\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{U} ={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{-2} \\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{N} = \\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa }$) are calculated and studied as functions of $(T,V)$. A new approach, unifying in a clear and consistent way the definitions of cumulant ratios, is proposed. A numerical FSS analysis of the obtained results has allowed us to locate accurately the finite volume transition point. The extracted transition temperature value $T_{0}(V)$ agrees with that expected $T_{0}^{N}(V)$ from the order parameter and the thermal susceptibility $\\chi _{T}\\left( T,V\\right)$, according to the standard procedure of localization to within about $2\\%$. In addition to this, a very good correlation factor is obtained proving the validity of our cumulants method. The agreement of our results with those obtained by means of other models is remarkable.

  6. Finite Volume Cumulant Expansion in QCD-Colorless Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladrem, M; Al-Full, Z; Cherif, S

    2015-01-01

    Due to the finite size effects, the localisation of the phase transition in finite systems and the determination of its order, become an extremely difficult task, even in the simplest known cases. In order to identify and locate the finite volume transition point $T_{0}(V)$ of the QCD deconfinement phase transition to a Colorless QGP, we have developed a new approach using the finite size cumulant expansion of the order parameter and the $L_{mn}$-method. The first six cumulants $C_{1,2,3,4,5,6}$ with the corresponding under-normalized ratios(skewness $\\Sigma$, kurtosis $\\kappa$ ,pentosis $\\Pi_{\\pm}$ and hexosis $\\mathcal{H}_{1,2,3}$) and three unnormalized combinations of them ($\\mathcal{O}={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa } }{\\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{U} ={\\mathcal{\\sigma }^{-2} \\mathbf{\\Sigma }^{-1} }$, $\\mathcal{N} = \\mathcal{\\sigma }^{2} \\mathcal{\\kappa }$) are calculated and studied as functions of $(T,V)$. A new approach, unifying in a clear and consistent way the definitions of cumulant...

  7. Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the degree to which the cumulative risk index predicted school readiness in a Head Start population. In general, the reviewed studies indicated the cumulative risk model was efficacious in predicting adverse developmental...

  8. Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China; accepted 9 March 2004 Abstract This paper examines the assessment of cumulative environmental impacts of sources of environmental impacts, notably industrial expansion, port development, shipping, waste disposal

  9. Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ramesh

    2009-05-15

    reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue...

  10. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2009-12-17

    Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

  11. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Patent quality and value in discrete and cumulative innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Patent quality and value in discrete and cumulative innovation Justus,version2-16Nov2010 #12;2 Patent Quality and Value in Discrete and Cumulative Innovation Cerna Working the relationship between patent quality and patent value in discrete and cumulative innovation. Using factor

  12. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  13. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

  14. Power plant cumulative environmental impact report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of studies conducted by the Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) to determine the cumulative impact of power plants on Maryland's environment. Included in this report are: (1) current and projected power demands and consumption in Maryland; (2) current and planned power generation; (3) air impacts; (4) aquatic effects; (5) radiological effects; (6) social and economic considerations; (7) noise impacts; (8) groundwater effects; (9) solid waste management concerns; (10) transmission line impacts; and (11) descriptions of cooling towers in Maryland. Also contained is the 1982 Ten Year Plan of Maryland Electric Utilities.

  15. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX GEOGRAPHIC AND SITE INDEX 1AABW Africa SW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX GEOGRAPHIC AND SITE INDEX 1AABW · Africa SW A AABW. See Antarctic Bottom Water AAIW. See Antarctic Intermediate Water Abaco event, geology, 101B27:428­430; 29:1­19 organogenic dolomites, 175B15:1­17 pore water, 175A20:547­553 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX

  17. Long-Run Growth in Open Economies: Export-Led Cumulative Causation or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Long-Run Growth in Open Economies: Export-Led Cumulative Causation or a Balance. On the one hand, models of export-led cumulative causation (ELCC) stress the possibility that some countries competitiveness, rising exports, and rapid output growth (although, in this view, other countries may be doomed

  18. Calculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation with absorbing boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    of a bimo- lecular chemical reaction, i.e., state-to-state differential and integral cross sections. HoweverCalculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation is suggested for the calculation of the microcanonical cumulative reaction probability uia flux autocorrelation

  19. ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01) (NotAdvanced ABSTRACTSFor-1 ACTION

  20. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture | NationalCorrective Action

  1. Fact #843: October 20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction Fact 843:...

  2. Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors hydropower facilities. This support is manifested in national and international energy and development policies designed to incentivize growth in the small hydropower sector while curtailing large dam

  3. HALF INDEPENDENCE AND HALF CUMULANTS By Arup Bose,, Rajat Subhra Hazra and Koushik Saha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    HALF INDEPENDENCE AND HALF CUMULANTS By Arup Bose,, Rajat Subhra Hazra and Koushik Saha Indian described in Banica, Curran and Speicher (2010)[2] and Bose, Hazra and Saha (2010)[7]. In Section 2, we

  4. Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on...

  5. Examination Schools Room Layout During Trinity Term use the Merton Street entrance and wait in the quad marquee until your examination is called. Outside of Trinity Term enter via the High Street entrance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    South SchoolEast School SI Student Information Desk wc wc wc PLEASE NOTE: THERE IS NO CAR PARKING until your examination is called. Outside of Trinity Term please go directly to the Exam Hall. Reception Exam Office EXAM HALL wc Exam Office Reception wc QUAD MARQUEE WAITING AREA Entrance ­ via car park

  6. Efficient evaluation of high-order moments and cumulants in tensor network states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin West; Artur Garcia-Saez; Tzu-Chieh Wei

    2015-04-01

    We present a numerical scheme for efficiently extracting the higher-order moments and cumulants of various operators on spin systems represented as tensor product states, for both finite and infinite systems, and present several applications for such quantities. For example, the second cumulant of the energy of a state, $\\langle \\Delta H^2 \\rangle$, gives a straightforward method to check the convergence of numerical ground-state approximation algorithms. Additionally, we discuss the use of moments and cumulants in the study of phase transitions. Of particular interest is the application of our method to calculate the so-called Binder's cumulant, which we use to detect critical points and study the critical exponent of the correlation length with only small finite numerical calculations. We apply these methods to study the behavior of a family of one-dimensional models (the transverse Ising model, the spin-1 Ising model, and the spin-1 Ising model in a crystal field), as well as the two-dimensional Ising model on a square lattice. Our results show that in one dimension, cumulant-based methods can produce precise estimates of the critical points at a low computational cost, and show promise for two-dimensional systems as well.

  7. Request for Salary Action Requesting action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Request for Salary Action Requesting action: Above "annual entry maximum" Mid-year increase Promotional salary increase exception Counter offer Salary supplement Other Jan. 28 2015 Tracking number Date

  8. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  9. Tables of the cumulative distribution function are provided. THE UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lionheart, Bill

    MATH39032 2 hours Tables of the cumulative distribution function are provided. THE UNIVERSITY questions A1. An asset pays a dividend of £2 at the end of each of the next 2 years. The current asset price that a zero value forward contract on this asset with delivery date in 3 years and delivery price of £135

  10. Assessing the cumulative environmental impact of hydropower construction on river systems based on energy network model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Assessing the cumulative environmental impact of hydropower construction on river systems based 2014 Keywords: Hydropower construction Sustainable energy development Environmental impact assessment Energy network model a b s t r a c t Hydropower is the major renewable energy source for many nations

  11. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 117 Cumulative Watershed Effects: Caspar Creek and Beyond1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts are influenced by multiple activities, so almost all impacts must be evaluated as cumulative impacts rather than as individual impacts. Existing definitions suggest that to be significant, an impact and managing cumulative watershed impacts have not yet proved successful for averting these impacts, so

  12. Cumulative Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Edinburgh University Press, 1988. McGrane, Bernard. Beyond Anthropology: Society and the Other. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989. Michclfelder, Diane and Palmer, Richard. Dialogue and Deconstruction: The Gadamer-Derrida Encounter. Albany: SUNY...: Edinburgh University Press, 1988. McGrane, Bernard. Beyond Anthropology: Society and the Other. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989. Michclfelder, Diane and Palmer, Richard. Dialogue and Deconstruction: The Gadamer-Derrida Encounter. Albany: SUNY...

  13. 2014 Joint Action Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Joint Action Workshop is an annual event for joint action agencies and their members to meet informally and discuss emerging policy, regulatory, and power supply issues, and other topics...

  14. The Gauged Unparticle Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-06-24

    We show that the unparticle action that is made gauge invariant by the inclusion of an open Wilson line factor can be transformed into the integral-differential operator action that avoids the use of the Wilson line factor. The two forms of the action should therefore give the same Feynman diagrams. We also show that it is relatively easy to construct Feynman diagrams using the operator action.

  15. A quadratic cumulative production model for the material balance of an abnormally pressured gas reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Felix Eduardo

    2005-02-17

    -1 A QUADRATIC CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION MODEL FOR THE MATERIAL BALANCE OF AN ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by FELIX E. GONZALEZ ROMERO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... OF AN ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by FELIX E. GONZALEZ ROMERO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  16. Particle sizing by dynamic light scattering: non-linear cumulant analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alastair G. Mailer; Paul S. Clegg; Peter N. Pusey

    2015-04-24

    We revisit the method of cumulants for analysing dynamic light scattering data in particle sizing applications. Here the data, in the form of the time correlation function of scattered light, is written as a series involving the first few cumulants (or moments) of the distribution of particle diffusion constants. Frisken (2001 Applied Optics 40, 4087) has pointed out that, despite greater computational complexity, a non-linear, iterative, analysis of the data has advantages over the linear least-squares analysis used originally. In order to explore further the potential and limitations of cumulant methods we analyse, by both linear and non-linear methods, computer-generated data with realistic `noise', where the parameters of the distribution can be set explicitly. We find that, with modern computers, non-linear analysis is straightforward and robust. The mean and variance of the distribution of diffusion constants can be obtained quite accurately for distributions of width (standard deviation/mean) up to about 0.6, but there appears to be little prospect of obtaining meaningful higher moments.

  17. A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE M87 JET. I. SUPERLUMINAL KNOT EJECTIONS FROM HST-1 AS TRAILS OF QUAD RELATIVISTIC MHD SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Masanori [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Garofalo, David; Meier, David L., E-mail: nakamura@stsci.ed, E-mail: david.a.garofalo@jpl.nasa.go, E-mail: david.l.meier@jpl.nasa.go [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This is the first in a series of papers that introduces a new paradigm for understanding the jet in M87: a collimated relativistic flow in which strong magnetic fields play a dominant dynamical role. Here, we focus on the flow downstream of HST-1-an essentially stationary flaring feature that ejects trails of superluminal components. We propose that these components are quad relativistic magnetohydrodynamic shock fronts (forward/reverse fast and slow modes) in a narrow jet with a helically twisted magnetic structure. And we demonstrate the properties of such shocks with simple one-dimensional numerical simulations. Quasi-periodic ejections of similar component trails may be responsible for the M87 jet substructures observed further downstream on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} pc scales. This new paradigm requires the assimilation of some new concepts into the astrophysical jet community, particularly the behavior of slow/fast-mode waves/shocks and of current-driven helical kink instabilities. However, the prospects of these ideas applying to a large number of other jet systems may make this worth the effort.

  18. A magnetohydrodynamic model of the M87 jet. II. Self-consistent quad-shock jet model for optical relativistic motions and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Masanori

    2014-04-20

    We describe a new paradigm for understanding both relativistic motions and particle acceleration in the M87 jet: a magnetically dominated relativistic flow that naturally produces four relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks (forward/reverse fast and slow modes). We apply this model to a set of optical super- and subluminal motions discovered by Biretta and coworkers with the Hubble Space Telescope during 1994-1998. The model concept consists of ejection of a single relativistic Poynting jet, which possesses a coherent helical (poloidal + toroidal) magnetic component, at the remarkably flaring point HST-1. We are able to reproduce quantitatively proper motions of components seen in the optical observations of HST-1 with the same model we used previously to describe similar features in radio very long baseline interferometry observations in 2005-2006. This indicates that the quad relativistic MHD shock model can be applied generally to recurring pairs of super/subluminal knots ejected from the upstream edge of the HST-1 complex as observed from radio to optical wavelengths, with forward/reverse fast-mode MHD shocks then responsible for observed moving features. Moreover, we identify such intrinsic properties as the shock compression ratio, degree of magnetization, and magnetic obliquity and show that they are suitable to mediate diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic particles via the first-order Fermi process. We suggest that relativistic MHD shocks in Poynting-flux-dominated helical jets may play a role in explaining observed emission and proper motions in many active galactic nuclei.

  19. Highly Effective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2013-11-22

    It is conjectured that the world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in an $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ background of type IIB superstring theory, with one unit of flux, can be reinterpreted as the exact effective action (or highly effective action) for U(2), ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory on the Coulomb branch. An analogous conjecture for $U(2)_k \\times U(2)_{-k} $ ABJM theory is also presented. The main evidence supporting these conjectures is that the brane actions have all of the expected symmetries and dualities. Highly effective actions have general coordinate invariance, even though they describe nongravitational theories.

  20. Action Item Review and Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Corporate Board Action Items Action Item Resolution Action Item Strategic Planning Initiative Optimization Study Resolution Presentation by S. Schneider (HLW System...

  1. Discrete-Time, Bi-Cumulant Minimax and Nash Games Ronald W. Diersing, Michael K. Sain, and Chang-Hee Won

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Discrete-Time, Bi-Cumulant Minimax and Nash Games Ronald W. Diersing, Michael K. Sain, and Chang player, Nash and minimax cumulant games will be formulated and developed for a nonlinear system with non, a cumulant based, discrete time, Nash game will be developed. At first we will consider a nonlinear system

  2. Protective Actions and Reentry

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines appropriate protective actions and reentry of a site following an emergency. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  3. Susceptibilities, the Specific Heat and a Cumulant in Two-Flavour QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frithjof Karsch; Edwin Laermann

    1994-06-13

    We study the quark mass dependence of various response functions, which contribute to chiral susceptibilities and the specific heat in the staggered fermion formulation of two-flavour QCD. This yields information about the critical exponents $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $\\delta$. In the case of the chiral susceptibility, obtained as derivative of the chiral order parameter with respect to the quark mass, we calculate all contributions. This allows to construct a cumulant of the order parameter, which is a scaling function and yields a direct determination of the critical exponent $\\delta$. All our results are consistent with a second order phase transition.

  4. Susceptibilities, the specific heat and a cumulant in two-flavour QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Frithjof Karsch; Edwin Laermann

    1994-01-01

    Abstract We study the quark mass dependence of various response functions, which contribute to chiral susceptibilities and the specific heat in the staggered fermion formulation of two-flavour QCD. This yields information about the critical exponents \\alpha, \\beta and \\delta. In the case of the chiral susceptibility, obtained as derivative of the chiral order parameter with respect to the quark mass, we calculate all contributions. This allows to construct a cumulant of the order parameter, which is a scaling function and yields a direct determination of the critical exponent \\delta. All our results are consistent with a second order phase transition.

  5. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  6. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  7. Notices ACTION: Notice.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    867 Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 215 Friday, November 6, 2015 Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of an application 91163-EUP-R from Texas...

  8. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1983-07-01

    The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

  10. Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulvihill, Peter R. . E-mail: prm@yorku.ca; Ali, S. Harris . E-mail: hali@yorku.ca

    2007-05-15

    This article explores environmental impacts and risks that can accumulate in rural and ex-urban areas and regions and their relation to urban and global development forces. Two Southern Ontario cases are examined: an area level water disaster and cumulative change at the regional level. The role of disaster incubation analysis and advanced environmental assessment tools are discussed in terms of their potential to contribute to more enlightened and effective assessment and planning processes. It is concluded that conventional approaches to EA and planning are characteristically deficient in addressing the full range of impacts and risks, and particularly those originating from pathogens, dispersed and insidious sources. Rigorous application of disaster incubation analysis and more advanced forms of EA has considerable potential to influence a different pattern of planning and decision making.

  11. Appraising the sustainability of project alternatives: An increasing role for cumulative effects assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senner, Robert

    2011-09-15

    Evaluating and comparing development alternatives with regard to sustainability is an important goal for comprehensive project appraisal. In the United States, this component has been largely missing from standard environmental impact assessment practice. Cumulative effects assessment provides a way to appraise the sustainability of project alternatives in terms of their probable contributions to long-term trends affecting the condition of valued environmental components. Sustainability metrics and predictors are being developed as criteria for rating systems and evaluation processes that are applied to community planning, building design, and transportation infrastructure. Increasing interest in adaptive management is also providing cost-effective solutions to optimizing safety and function throughout the long-term operation of a facility or infrastructure. Recent federal legislation is making it easier to integrate sustainability features into development alternatives through early, community-based planning.

  12. Alchemy to reason: Effective use of Cumulative Effects Assessment in resource management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegmann, George, E-mail: george.hegmann@stantec.com [Principal, Environmental Management, Stantec Consulting Ltd., 805 - 8th Avenue SW Suite 300, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 1H7 (Canada); Yarranton, G.A., E-mail: yarran@shaw.ca [121 Artists View Way, Calgary, Alberta, T3Z 3N1 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Cumulative Effects Assessment (CEA) is a tool that can be useful in making decisions about natural resource management and allocation. The decisions to be made include those (i) necessary to construct planning and regulatory frameworks to control development activity so that societal goals will be achieved and (ii) whether or not to approve individual development projects, with or without conditions. The evolution of CEA into a more successful tool cannot occur independently of the evolution of decision making processes. Currently progress is painfully slow on both fronts. This paper explores some opportunities to accelerate improvements in decision making in natural resource management and in the utility of CEA as a tool to assist in making such decisions. The focus of the paper is on how to define the public interest by determining what is acceptable.

  13. Detecting spatial patterns with the cumulant function. Part II: An application to El Nino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernacchia, Alberto; Vrac, Mathieu; Yiou, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    The spatial coherence of a measured variable (e.g. temperature or pressure) is often studied to determine the regions where this variable varies the most or to find teleconnections, i.e. correlations between specific regions. While usual methods to find spatial patterns, such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA), are constrained by linear symmetries, the dependence of variables such as temperature or pressure at different locations is generally nonlinear. In particular, large deviations from the sample mean are expected to be strongly affected by such nonlinearities. Here we apply a newly developed nonlinear technique (Maxima of Cumulant Function, MCF) for the detection of typical spatial patterns that largely deviate from the mean. In order to test the technique and to introduce the methodology, we focus on the El Nino/Southern Oscillation and its spatial patterns. We find nonsymmetric temperature patterns corresponding to El Nino and La Nina, and we compare the results of MCF with other techniques, such a...

  14. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  15. Bondholders and Securities Class Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, James

    2015-01-01

    2006). 89. See Consolidated Class Action Complaint ¶¶ 42–53,Sept. 30, 2005); Consolidated Class Action Complaint ¶ 1, Inlikely to satisfy various class certification hurdles. See

  16. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  17. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  18. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  19. ACADEMIC RENEWAL GUIDELINES Academic Renewal is a university policy administered to recalculate the cumulative ASU grade point average of an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    ACADEMIC RENEWAL GUIDELINES Academic Renewal is a university policy administered to recalculate undergraduate degree and has not previously received an academic renewal; 2. has a cumulative ASU gpa below 2 requirements for resident credit hours and gpa must be fulfilled after the academic renewal. Graduation

  20. Social Learning and Cumulative Mutual Improvement in a Networked Group Thomas N. Wisdom (tnwisdom@indiana.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Robert

    -solving game task to study imitation and innovation in groups of participants. Guesses were composed of the problem space and achieved lower performance overall. When scores were visible, higher performance within groups as a result of selective imitation and cross-participant cumulative mutual innovations

  1. Conjugate flow action functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Venturi

    2013-10-15

    We present a new general method to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations of the theory relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow of the theory, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gateaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  2. CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION AREA OF CONCERN 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP York 11973 REGISTERED TO ISO 14001 #12;AOC 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP AND SUMP OUTFALL .................................................................................9 2.6.1 Final Radiological Status Survey Design

  3. A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

  4. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 446, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 183-200 THE CONCEPT OF CUMULATIVE DUCTILITY STRENGTH SPECTRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -200 THE CONCEPT OF CUMULATIVE DUCTILITY STRENGTH SPECTRA AND ITS USE WITHIN PERFORMANCE-BASED SEISMIC DESIGN of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, U.S.A. ABSTRACT A seismic design procedure that does not take, is a useful tool for performance- based seismic design. Particularly, constant cumulative ductility strength

  5. Stochastic model for indirect estimation of instantaneous and cumulative loads in wind turbines: a systematic approach for off-shore wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Stochastic model for indirect estimation of instantaneous and cumulative loads in wind turbines present our recent findings for estimating instantaneous and cumulative loads in singles wind turbines at single wind turbines, driven by wind speed measurements. Through a standard fatigue analysis of data

  6. A quantitative approach to the characterization of cumulative and average solvent exposure in paint manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.P.; Schwartz, B.S.; Powell, S.; Nelson, T.; Keller, L.; Sides, S.; Agnew, J.; Bolla, K.; Bleecker, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous reports have attributed a range of neurobehavioral effects to low-level, occupational solvent exposure. These studies have generally been limited in their exposure assessments and have specifically lacked good estimates of exposure intensity. In the present study, the authors describe the development of two exposure variables that quantitatively integrate industrial hygiene sampling data with estimates of exposure duration--a cumulative exposure (CE) estimate and a lifetime weighted average exposure (LWAE) estimate. Detailed occupational histories were obtained from 187 workers at two paint manufacturing plants. Historic industrial hygiene sampling data for total hydrocarbons (a composite variable of the major neurotoxic solvents present) were grouped according to 20 uniform, temporally stable exposure zones, which had been defined during plant walk-through surveys. Sampling at the time of the study was used to characterize the few zones for which historic data were limited or unavailable. For each participant, the geometric mean total hydrocarbon level for each exposure zone worked in was multiplied by the duration of employment in that zone; the resulting products were summed over the working lifetime to create the CE variable. The CE variable was divided by the total duration of employment in solvent-exposed jobs to create the LWAE variable. The explanatory value of each participant's LWAE estimate in the regression of simple visual reaction time (a neurobehavioral test previously shown to be affected by chronic solvent exposure) on exposure was compared with that of several other exposure variables, including exposure duration and an exposure variable based on an ordinal ranking of the exposure zones.

  7. Climate Action Plan 2009 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Climate Action Plan September 2009 Sustainability Council This plan outlines methods by which. This document is publicly available at http://sustainability.uark.edu. #12;2 University of Arkansas Climate....................................................................................................................................7 Climate Action Plan Committee

  8. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    estimated 3.2 quads of primary energy, which is equivalentof total cumulative primary energy savings and 55 to 66of total cumulative primary energy savings and 34 to 45

  9. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  10. Securities Class Actions and Bankrupt Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, James J.

    2014-01-01

    the utility of securities class actions. Certainly, contextthe merit of securities class actions. UCLA | SCHOOL OF LAWof James J. Park, Securities Class Actions and Bankrupt

  11. Guam Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  12. Measurement of flow harmonics with multi-particle cumulants in Pb+Pb collisions at ?sNN = 2.76  TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-11-26

    ATLAS measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy in lead–lead collisions at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV are shown using a dataset of approximately 7 ?b–1 collected at the LHC in 2010. The measurements are performed for charged particles with transverse momenta 0.5 T n, of the charged-particle azimuthal angle distribution for n = 2–4. The Fourier coefficients are evaluated using multi-particle cumulants calculated with the generating function method. Results on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity and centrality dependence of the vn coefficients aremore »presented. The elliptic flow, v2, is obtained from the two-, four-, six- and eight-particle cumulants while higher-order coefficients, v3 and v4, are determined with two- and four-particle cumulants. Flow harmonics vn measured with four-particle cumulants are significantly reduced compared to the measurement involving two-particle cumulants. A comparison to vn measurements obtained using different analysis methods and previously reported by the LHC experiments is also shown. Results of measurements of flow fluctuations evaluated with multi-particle cumulants are shown as a function of transverse momentum and the collision centrality. As a result, models of the initial spatial geometry and its fluctuations fail to describe the flow fluctuations measurements.« less

  13. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigni, Marco T; Francis, Matthew W; Gauld, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  14. Critical Legal Consciousness in Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Scott L

    2007-01-01

    www.ufcw.org/take_action/walmart_workers_campaign_info/Editorial, Global Retailing: WalMart’s Waterloo, Guardian (Buffer Zones Would Prevent Walmart, Others, Park La Brea

  15. JAS - a Java action semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, D.F.; Watt, D.A.

    Brown,D.F. Watt,D.A. Proceedings of 2nd International Workshop on Action Semantics pp 43-56 Dept of Computer Science, University of Aarhus

  16. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  17. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This cumulative report covers the project from initiation through the second quarter of 2013.

  18. Navistar eStar Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative; Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Navistar will build and deploy all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country. This cumulative report covers the period through the third quarter of 2013.

  19. BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

  20. Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

    1983-08-01

    Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This document summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period of January-June 1996. The report includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violations sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to the enforcement actions.

  2. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  3. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  4. 2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    2010 Climate Action Plan Energy and Environmental Stewardship Initiative: Prepared by: The Office.........................................................................................................................17 4A. Curriculum, Education, and Research environmental stewardship and reduces our own carbon footprint on campus. Through the U's Office

  5. UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    UCSF Sustainability Action Plan: Executive Summary Issue Date: April 21, 2011 #12;UCSF Sustainability Action Plan Executive Summary April 21, 2011 Page 1 Table of Contents An Introduction to the Sustainability Action Plan

  6. Analysis of the cumulative neutrino flux from Fermi-LAT blazar populations using 3 years of IceCube data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glüsenkamp, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse neutrino flux up to PeV energies raises the question of which populations of astrophysical sources contribute to this diffuse signal. One extragalactic candidate source population to produce high-energy neutrinos are Blazars. We present results from a likelihood analysis searching for cumulative neutrino emission from Blazar populations selected with the 2nd Fermi-LAT AGN catalog (2LAC) using an IceCube data set that has been optimized for the detection of individual sources. In contrast to previous searches with IceCube, the investigated populations contain up to hundreds of sources, the biggest one being the entire Blazar sample measured by the Fermi-LAT. No significant neutrino signal was found from any of these populations. Some implications of this non-observation for the origin of the observed PeV diffuse signal will be discussed.

  7. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and...

  8. DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

  9. Energy Agency Coordinators for Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agency coordinators serve as primary Federal agency points of contact for Energy Action Month. Contact them if you have questions about implementing an Energy Action Month campaign.

  10. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase I The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of...

  11. Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

    2005-02-10

    The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

  12. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  13. Strategic Sourcing Dashboard Fiscal Year 2015 Program Summary: Our FY 15 savings was $9.5 million, with our cumulative program savings up to $38.4 million.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Strategic Sourcing Dashboard Fiscal Year 2015 Program Summary: Our FY 15 savings was $9.5 million, with our cumulative program savings up to $38.4 million. Significant Accomplishments/Activities/Risks for this Reporting Period (FY 15): We added new Strategic Sourcing savings of $1.2M annually with 19 different

  14. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  15. FUSION ENERGY Actions Needed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's construction costs through contributions of hardware, personnel, and cash, and DOE is responsible for managing was asked to review DOE's cost and schedule estimates for the U.S. ITER Project. This report examines (1) the reliability of DOE's current cost and schedule estimates, and (3) actions DOE has taken to reduce U.S. ITER

  16. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  17. Action Required An extra layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Action Required An extra layer of protection m A Securian Company State of Florida Group Term Life by Minnesota Life Insurance Company, at rates negotiated exclusively for employees of the State of Florida's right for you and your family, it's important to think about the amount of money your family would need

  18. Action

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nuclear Securityhr INITIATED| NationalRegister

  19. Chapter 26 Cumulative Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Public Works near Battleground, WA 109 Under Construction Road, Bridge, Bicycle and Pedestrian Improvements: improve various roads, bridges, and bicycle and...

  20. Action Sheet 36 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kips, R E; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2012-02-24

    Pursuant to the Arrangement between the European Commission DG Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) to continue cooperation on research, development, testing, and evaluation of technology, equipment, and procedures in order to improve nuclear material control, accountancy, verification, physical protection, and advanced containment and surveillance technologies for international safeguards, dated 1 September 2008, the IRMM and LLNL established cooperation in a program on the Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles under IRMM-LLNL Action Sheet 36. The work under this action sheet had 2 objectives: (1) Achieve a better understanding of the loss of fluorine in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} particles after exposure to certain environmental conditions; and (2) Provide feedback to the EC-JRC on sample reproducibility and characteristics.

  1. Take the Energy Action Challenge

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will work in pairs or small groups to apply knowledge of energy-wise habits to evaluate energy use in their homes and schools and make recommendations for improved efficiency. They will use an energy audit tool to collect data on their home and school energy habits and present an action plan to their class. Further communication at the school and district level is encouraged.

  2. EM International Program Action Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatement |toDepartmentContributesAdvisoryProgram Action

  3. Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Criminal Justice and Criminology Action Plan Memorandum of Understanding Status of Action Items from Prior Action Plan · Produce a PhD proposal in Criminal Justice. Completed · Redesign the graduate of senior faculty with strong records of obtaining external funding should become a top priority." · "The

  4. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  5. ACTION ITEMS STRENGTHENING THE PHYSICS ENTERPRISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    1 ACTION ITEMS STRENGTHENING THE PHYSICS ENTERPRISE IN UNIVERSITIES AND NATIONAL LABORATORIES MAY 6 that make demeaning or snide comments, you will find the rewards are great. "Judy Franz, APS #12;3 EXECUTIVE: ACTION ITEMS ..........................................................................5 Physics

  6. Emergence and perceptual guidance of prehensile action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Successful coordination of prehensile action depends upon the selection and control of appropriate reach and grasp movements. This thesis explores how prehensile actions are shaped and regulated by perceptual information. ...

  7. SEAB Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A presentation on the Climate Action Plan presented by Dr. Jonathan Pershing, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of Energy. Climate Action Plan...

  8. Measurement of higher cumulants of net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7-200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; H. Al-Ta'ani; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; Y. Aramaki; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; D. Black; D. S. Blau; J. S. Bok; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; P. Castera; C. -H. Chen; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; M. Connors; P. Constantin; N. Cronin; N. Crossette; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; K. Dehmelt; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; J. Hanks; E. P. Hartouni; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; S. Hayashi; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; Y. Imazu; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; A. Isinhue; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; P. K. Khandai; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; J. Klatsky; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; L. Kochenda; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; T. Maruyama; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; J. Midori; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; A. Milov; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; A. K. Mohanty; S. Mohapatra; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; M. Moskowitz; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; T. Nagae; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; C. Nattrass; A. Nederlof; P. K. Netrakanti; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; T. Niida; R. Nouicer; N. Novitzky; A. Nukariya; A. S. Nyanin; H. Obayashi; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; B. H. Park; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; L. Patel; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; D. V. Perepelitsa; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; K. Reygers; D. Reynolds; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; N. Riveli; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; P. Ruži?ka; M. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; K. Sakashita; H. Sako; V. Samsonov; M. Sano; S. Sano; M. Sarsour; S. Sato; T. Sato; S. Sawada; K. Sedgwick

    2015-06-25

    We report the measurement of cumulants ($C_n, n=1\\ldots4$) of the net-charge distributions measured within pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|energy. These quantities are important to understand the quantum-chromodynamics phase diagram and possible existence of a critical end point. The measured values are very well described by expectation from negative binomial distributions. We do not observe any nonmonotonic behavior in the ratios of the cumulants as a function of collision energy. The measured values of $C_1/C_2 = \\mu/\\sigma^2$ and $C_3/C_1 = S\\sigma^3/\\mu$ can be directly compared to lattice quantum-chromodynamics calculations and thus allow extraction of both the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential at each center-of-mass energy.

  9. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  10. Building Emergency Action Plan Facility Name: _____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Building Emergency Action Plan (Template) Facility Name: _____________________ Date Prepared .....................................................................................................................................................3 2. Building Description..................................................................................................................................3 3. Building Emergency Personnel

  11. Quantum Chaos via the Quantum Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kröger

    2002-12-16

    We discuss the concept of the quantum action with the purpose to characterize and quantitatively compute quantum chaos. As an example we consider in quantum mechanics a 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling - which is classically a chaotic system. We compare Poincar\\'e sections obtained from the quantum action with those from the classical action.

  12. Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology JumpPrueba 1VenturePzero JumpQnovo Jump

  13. A New Action for Heavy Lattice Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14

    I describe a unified formalism for lattice fermions, in which the relativistic action of Wilson and the nonrelativistic and static actions appear as special cases. It is valid at all values of $m_q a$, including $m_q a \\approx 1$. In the limit $m_q a \\ll 1 $, the formulation reduces to the light quark action of Wilson. In the limit $m_q a \\gg 1 $, the formulation reduces to the nonrelativistic action of Thacker and Lepage, and to the static action of Eichten.

  14. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions...

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-12-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

  16. Fact #843: October 20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #843: Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction

  17. University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan December 20, 2013 #12;i Table of Contents of the Water Action Plan Water Action Plan Committee Regional Scope of the Water Action Plan HISTORICAL PROGRESS IN WATER REDUCTION.......................................................... 5 Campus Irrigation

  18. Pathways Toward Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    toward greater sustainability. We are providing actionable information on the life cycle environmental impacts of biomass production and use. 2 3 Quad Chart Overview * Project...

  19. A comparison of the RCRA Corrective Action and CERCLA Remedial Action Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traceski, Thomas T.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of the RCRA corrective action and the CERCLA remedial action processes. On the even-numbered pages a discussion of the RCRA corrective action process is presented and on the odd-numbered pages a comparative discussion of the CERCLA remedial action process can be found. Because the two programs have a difference structure, there is not always a direct correlation between the two throughout the document. This document serves as an informative reference for Departmental and contractor personnel responsible for oversight or implementation of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA remedial action activities at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  20. Class Action Lawyers: Fools for Clients?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Cir. 1976). 23. See Note, Class Actions-Susman v. Lincolntakes over a case from the class representative is act- ingan active and indepen- dent class representative throughout

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  2. Utilities Working with Industry: Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This action plan outlines joint ITP and utility activities that will help reach a national goal of reducing energy by 25 percent over then next 10 years.

  3. Calls to Action -- Linking Science to Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraker, Harrison

    2008-01-01

    the National Academy of Design, July 2008. Opposite: FlowAction Linking Science to Design Harrison Fraker Two recentthe fields of science and design. Entitled “Energy, Security

  4. Robotic actions in the human brain Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Antonia

    Robotic actions in the human brain 1 Robotic movement., Stadler, W. & Prinz, W. (in press / 2011). Robotic movement preferentially engages the action observation network. Human Brain Mapping. #12;Robotic

  5. Graduate Honor System Actions 1999-2000 Case Dept. Charge GHS Action Sanction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butt, Ali R.

    Graduate Honor System Actions 1999-2000 Case Dept. Charge GHS Action Sanction F1999-01 ECp the Past Four Academic Years Case Outcomes Number of Students Sanctioned Sanction 1996-97 1997-98 1998

  6. Environmental Activism as Collective Action Key words: Environmental activism, environmental behavior, collective action,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark

    Environmental Activism as Collective Action Key words: Environmental activism, environmental behavior, collective action, environmentalism, collective interest model. Mark Lubell Department The literature on environmental activism has failed to produce a model of individual decision- making explicitly

  7. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  8. UC SAN DIEGO DROUGHT ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UC SAN DIEGO DROUGHT ACTION PLAN 2014 #12;Water at UC San Diego Background Report and Action Strategy for Drought The UC San Diego Campus The UC San Diego La Jolla campus (including Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the UC San Diego Medical Center ­ La Jolla) totals approximately 1,152 acres

  9. A Brief Look At Affirmative Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Nancy Jo

    2007-12-06

    .........................................................................................13 Limitations of This Study ..........................................................................................14 History of Affirmative Action ...................................................................................15 Two Sides... of pertinent information due to the closed nature of the system being studied and the limited amount of information on this specific topic by anthropologists and the anthropological community. 14 History of Affirmative Action In its tumultuous 46-year...

  10. Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Chemical and Biological Engineering Summary of Actions 2014-2015 Concern Recommendation Action Follow-up 1. The department name is Chemical and Biological Engineering. An analysis of student Biological Engineering programs. 4. The second semester of the senior capstone sequence in Chemical

  11. General Laws for the Action of Diastases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V: Action of amylase on starch 68 §33. Method. H. Brown and Glendinning's research 68 §34. Law for the progress of the hydrolysis of starch by amylase 65 §35. Effect of the amount of starch. Difference between malt amylase and pancreatic juice amylase 68 §36. Theory of the law of action of amylase 72 §37

  12. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  13. Bishop's University Energy Efficiency Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    global energy consumption by 14% relative to 2002-2003. By 2010 Action 6: Cost evaluation of investments% reduction in energy consumption (GJ / m²) for higher education buildings from 2002-2003 until 2010- 2011 ways to save energy March 2008 Action 3: Snapshot of current energy consumption. Send energy

  14. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009 SANDY DEJOHN PHYSICAL FACILITIES DEPARTMENT #12;~ i ~ TABLE the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, I believe strongly in working to achieve its helped shape and develop the information contained in this Climate Action Plan: (Names listed

  15. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  16. Freeze-out radii extracted from three-pion cumulants in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2015-06-25

    In high-energy collisions, the spatio-temporal size of the particle production region can be measured using the Bose-Einstein correlations of identical bosons at low relative momentum. The source radii are typically extracted using two-pion correlations, and characterize the system at the last stage of interaction, called kinetic freeze-out. In low-multiplicity collisions, unlike in high-multiplicity collisions, two-pion correlations are substantially altered by background correlations, e.g. mini-jets. Such correlations can be suppressed using three-pion cumulant correlations. We present the first measurements of the size of the system at freeze-out extracted from three-pion cumulant correlations in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE. At similar multiplicity, the invariant radii extracted in p-Pb collisions are found to be 5-15% larger than those in pp, while those in Pb-Pb are 35-55% larger than those in p-Pb. Our measurements disfavor models which incorporate substantially stronger collective expansion in p-Pb as compared to pp collisions at similar multiplicity.

  17. Measurement of flow harmonics with multi-particle cumulants in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-12-22

    ATLAS measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy in lead-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV are shown using a dataset of approximately 7 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$ collected at the LHC in 2010. The measurements are performed for charged particles with transverse momenta $0.5flow, $v_2$, is obtained from the two-, four-, six- and eight-particle cumulants while higher-order coefficients, $v_3$ and $v_4$, are determined with two- and four-particle cumulants. Flow harmonics $v_n$ measured with four-particle cumulants are significantly reduced compared to the measurement involving two-particle cumulants. A comparison to $v_n$ measurements obtained using different analysis methods and previously reported by the LHC experiments is also shown. Results of measurements of flow fluctuations evaluated with multi-particle cumulants are shown as a function of transverse momentum and the collision centrality. Models of the initial spatial geometry and its fluctuations fail to describe the flow fluctuations measurements.

  18. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we derive an action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth potentials. Exact conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles. Being suitable for discretization, the presented action allows construction of variational integrators. Numerical implementation is left for a future study.

  19. On QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof

    1998-01-01

    We discuss recent advances in the calculation of thermodynamic observables using improved actions. In particular, we discuss the calculation of the equation of state of the SU(3) gauge theory, the critical temperature in units of the string tension, the surface tension and the latent heat at the deconfinement transition. We also present first results from a calculation of the equation of state for four-flavour QCD using an O(a^2) improved staggered fermion action and discuss possible further improvements of the staggered fermion action.

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Volume 14, No. 2, Part 1: Individual actions. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1995) and includes copies of Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  1. DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENT REPORT PREPARED FOR: Civil & Environmental Engineering College of Engineering University of Washington Seattle, Washington of Engineering strategic goals, this report provides Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) with detailed

  2. DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVERSITY ACTION PLAN CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT REPORT PREPARED FOR: Civil & Environmental Engineering College of Engineering University of Washington Seattle, Washington in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). The purpose of the report is to facilitate the department

  3. QER- Comment of Berkshire Environmental Action Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, Please find attached comments from the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, Inc. (BEAT) regarding the proposed natural gas pipeline expansion. Thank you for considering our comments.

  4. Science Maps in Action Dr. Katy Brner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    Science Maps in Action Dr. Katy Börner Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, Director Information Visualization Laboratory, Director School of Library and Information Science Indiana University Computational Scientometrics: Studying Science by Scientific Means Börner, Katy, Chen, Chaomei, and Boyack

  5. The Question of Conation in Action Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, Robert

    The Question of Conation in Action Theory Robert Good Rider College In some recent and most interesting articles, Myles Brand argues that intending has an exclusively conative feature. 1 This conative feature is said by Brand to be non... of a conative component of intending is best understood in light of the recent history of Causal theories of action. Basciaily, a Causal theory is one which holds that intentional ac­ tion is caused by a preceding mental event of a partic­ ular kind...

  6. Improved lattice fermion action for heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yong-Gwi; Jüttner, Andreas; Kaneko, Takashi; Marinkovic, Marina; Noaki, Jun-Ichi; Tsang, Justus Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We develop an improved lattice action for heavy quarks based on Brillouin-type fermions, that have excellent energy-momentum dispersion relation. The leading discretization errors of $O(a)$ and $O(a^2)$ are eliminated at tree-level. We carry out a scaling study of this improved Brillouin fermion action on quenched lattices by calculating the charmonium energy-momentum dispersion relation and hyperfine splitting. We present a comparison to standard Wilson fermions and domain-wall fermions.

  7. Improved lattice fermion action for heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Gwi Cho; Shoji Hashimoto; Andreas Jüttner; Takashi Kaneko; Marina Marinkovic; Jun-Ichi Noaki; Justus Tobias Tsang

    2015-05-28

    We develop an improved lattice action for heavy quarks based on Brillouin-type fermions, that have excellent energy-momentum dispersion relation. The leading discretization errors of $O(a)$ and $O(a^2)$ are eliminated at tree-level. We carry out a scaling study of this improved Brillouin fermion action on quenched lattices by calculating the charmonium energy-momentum dispersion relation and hyperfine splitting. We present a comparison to standard Wilson fermions and domain-wall fermions.

  8. Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-05-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

  9. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved; Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993: Volume 12, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  12. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)

  13. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics and neurological implications action' hypothesis examines the role that regulating mitochondrial function and bioenergetics play

  14. Energy Action Month October 2014 Campaign Materials | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Month October 2014 Campaign Materials Energy Action Month October 2014 Campaign Materials Campaign materials for "Transition to a Clean Energy Reality," the theme for Energy Action...

  15. State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 This 2003...

  16. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  17. Water Action Plan 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Water Action Plan 2013 #12;2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE #12;WATER ACTION PLAN TABLE...........................................11 WATER USE.......................................................................13 MAIN..........................................14 RECYCLED WATER...........................................................14 STORMWATER

  18. United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

  19. Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 -...

  20. North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy Security and the Environment North American Energy Ministers Take Further Action on Energy Security and the...

  1. Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota: Solar in Action (Brochure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

  2. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  3. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report (August 2012) 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report (August 2012) On June...

  4. Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy November 6, 2014 -...

  5. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 Report to...

  6. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances in Clean Energy and DOE Support of Scientific Research Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features...

  7. Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from...

  8. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine...

  9. Overview of the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network Johanna Zetterberg Coordinator, SEE Action Network US Department of Energy Achieving the Potential * EE remains one...

  10. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  11. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  12. Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 Consensus Action Items from CHP Roadmap Process, June 2001 This paper discusses three main objectives in the CHP...

  13. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes...

  14. Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the...

  15. One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role June 25, 2014 -...

  16. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On...

  17. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On March...

  18. National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is required to develop the National Action Plan on Demand Response (National Action Plan) as outlined in section 529 of the Energy...

  19. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  20. Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Denver, Colorado: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  1. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  2. Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Houston, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  3. Operating and Maintaining Energy Smart Schools Action Plan Template - All Action Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-07-01

    EnergySmart Schools action plan templates for benchmarking, lighting, HVAC, water heating, building envelope, transformer, plug loads, kitchen equipment, swimming pool, building automation system, other.

  4. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  5. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  6. EMERGENCY ACTION University of California Riverside Main Campus Emergency Action Plan (EAP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    If possible to do so without endangering yourself, shut down all operations that could produce hazards if leftEMERGENCY ACTION PLAN (EAP) University of California Riverside Main Campus Emergency Action Plan emergencies that arise within the workplace as required by the California Code of Regulations (CCR) Title 8

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  8. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  9. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  10. Wilson Line Integrals in the Unparticle Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-05-25

    We consider the unparticle action that is made gauge invariant by inclusion of an open Wilson line factor. In deriving vertexes from such an action it has been customary to use a form of differentiating the Wilson line originally proposed by Mandelstam. Using a simple example, we show that the Mandelstam derivative is mathematically inconsistent. We show that there are two ways to define differentiation of the Wilson line. The mathematically consistent method is to differentiate the explicit dependence of the line on the endpoint. The other method is a functional derivative and corresponds in a limiting case to the Mandelstam derivative. We also show that the only path that can be used in the Wilson line integral that leaves the unparticle action both Poincare and scale invariant is the straight line.

  11. Tachyon Dynamics and the Effective Action Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2002-09-20

    Recently effective actions have been extensively used to describe tachyon condensation in string theory. While the various effective actions which have appeared in the literature have very similar properties for static configurations, they differ for time-dependent tachyons. In this paper we discuss general properties of non-linear effective Lagrangians which are first order in derivatives. In particular we show that some observed properties, such as asymptotically vanishing pressure, are rather generic features, although the quantative features differ. On the other hand we argue that certain features of marginal tachyon profiles are beyond the reach of any first order Lagrangian description. We also point out that an effective action, proposed earlier, captures the dynamics of tachyons well.

  12. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN 2.0 University of Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN 2.0 University of Pennsylvania #12;Published October 21, 2014 #12;TABLE 28 34 38 45 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN 2.0 #12;#12;5Penn Climate Action Plan 2.0 I am pleased to present the University of Pennsylvania's Climate Action Plan 2.0, our roadmap for environmental sustainability. Drawing

  13. Scalable Action Respecting Embedding Michael Biggs and Ali Ghodsi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowling, Michael

    starting seed. Hence, this optimization is coupled with Action-Guided Isomap for seeding. In practice first introduce an action-guided vari- ant of Isomap. Although it alone does not produce action formulation of the ARE optimization. The optimization is not convex, but the Action-Guided Isomap provides

  14. Action and Inaction Levels in Pest Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Winfield

    1984-01-01

    to this problem be to use the term "action level" as a replacement term "economic threshold" and the term "inac level" for the critical natural enemy densities (134). terms are more fitting because economic and factors are both important in pest manage dec... component of level model. If the plant has reserves of n sufficient time remaining during the growing replace damaged fruit , then a higher action level be set. The effect of leaf damage as related phenological stage of cotton plant growth is ill...

  15. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primrose, A.; Sproles, W.; Burmeister, M.; Wagner, R.; Law, J.; Greengard, T.

    1998-07-01

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site.

  16. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  17. Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-30

    This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

  18. Action Principle for the Generalized Harmonic Formulation of General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. David Brown

    2011-09-07

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona--Casas and Palenzuela (BBP). The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the BBP action is discussed in detail.

  19. Quenched hadron spectroscopy with improved staggered quark action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Thomas A. DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; James Hetrick; Craig McNeile; K. Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint

    1997-12-11

    We investigate light hadron spectroscopy with an improved quenched staggered quark action. We compare the results obtained with an improved gauge plus an improved quark action, an improved gauge plus standard quark action, and the standard gauge plus standard quark action. Most of the improvement in the spectroscopy results is due to the improved gauge sector. However, the improved quark action substantially reduces violations of Lorentz invariance, as evidenced by the meson dispersion relations.

  20. FIRE Project Action Plan in Response to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FIRE Project Action Plan in Response to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report (PAC1) FIRE Mission: Finding F1-1: PAC-1 felt that the FIRE mission statement, "Attain, explore, understand states the scientific direction and objectives of the FIRE program, but that the mission statement does

  1. Request for Curriculum Action Curriculum Deadlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Request for Curriculum Action Curriculum Deadlines: November 1 Deadline for submitting changes ONLY) Undergraduate Curriculum Graduate Curriculum Department or Program Chair or Program Coordinator Signature Date Curriculum Change(s) Create new* major/program/minor/emphasis/option/certificate Create new

  2. Engineering in Action Engineering Challenge Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    G-84 ESB Casey's ATA 2:30 p.m. Engineering and Racing (Race Car Presentation) ESB Parking Lot 40Engineering in Action Engineering Challenge Camp July 20-25, 2014 Hosted by the West Virginia University Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering & Mineral Resources and sponsored in part

  3. Point de Contact National Action climatique,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials 3 081 Europe in a changing world resources and ecosystems, and a sustainable supply and use of raw materials, in order to meet the needs écosystèmes · Sustainable supply of non-energy and non-agricultural raw materials Assurer l

  4. Quantum chaos viewed from quantum action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Huard; H. Kröger; G. Melkonyan; L. P. Nadeau; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2004-06-18

    We consider a mixed chaotic Hamiltonian system and compare classical with quantum chaos. As alternative to the methods of enegy level spacing statistics and trace formulas, we construct a quantum action and a quantum analogue phase space to analyse quantum chaos.

  5. Conversational Programming in Action Alexander Repenning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repenning, Alexander

    Conversational Programming in Action Alexander Repenning AgentSheets Inc. Boulder 80301, Colorado.0 culture, end-user programming, which is programming by end users with limited, if any, formal programming programming languages such as Logo have made programming substantially more accessible to end users. More

  6. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  7. Research Article Visual Control of Action Without

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loomis, Jack M.

    almost always entails retinal flow, research on the physiology of optic-flow processing has invari- ablyResearch Article Visual Control of Action Without Retinal Optic Flow Jack M. Loomis,1 Andrew C a field of obstacles and catching a ball, entails retinal flow with motion energy (first-order motion). We

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993: Volume 12, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  9. On Effective Action of Multiple M5-branes and ABJM Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiji Terashima; Futoshi Yagi

    2011-02-22

    We calculate the fluctuations from the classical multiple M5-brane solution of ABJM action which we found in the previous paper. We obtain D4-brane-like action but the gauge coupling constant depends on the spacetime coordinate. This is consistent with the expected properties of M5-brane action, although we will need to take into account the monopole operators in order to fully understand M5-branes. We also see that the Nambu-Poisson bracket is hidden in the solution.

  10. The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Catherine Anne White

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

  11. CUMULATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION (CEMA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    Project Description: "An Introduction to Groundwater and Oil Sands Operations." Plain language report about groundwater in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. Includes an overview of basic hydrology, groundwater monitoring, and basic oil sands operations as they relate to groundwater. Video illustration

  12. Five-Year Cumulative Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    202 Number 2, February, 1978 "Eros, Freedom, and Constraint in Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus" by VeVonique Fo'ti, Boston College "Toward a Defense of Direct Realism" by Lawrence Richard Carleton, University of Minnesota "Quinn on Ethical Egoism... 202 Number 2, February, 1978 "Eros, Freedom, and Constraint in Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus" by VeVonique Fo'ti, Boston College "Toward a Defense of Direct Realism" by Lawrence Richard Carleton, University of Minnesota "Quinn on Ethical Egoism...

  13. Considering Cumulative Effects under NEPA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for saleCHAPTER

  14. Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012environment 3D31, 2015 |

  15. Comments on Hall transport from effective actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix M. Haehl; Mukund Rangamani

    2015-01-18

    We consider parity-odd transport in 2+1 dimensional charged fluids restricting attention to the class of non-dissipative fluids. We show that there is a two parameter family of such non-dissipative fluids which can be derived from an effective action, in contradistinction with a four parameter family that can be derived from an entropy current analysis. The effective action approach allows us to extract the adiabatic transport data, in particular the Hall viscosity and Hall conductivity amongst others, in terms of the thermodynamic functions that enter as 'coupling constants'. Curiously, we find that Hall viscosity is forced to vanish, whilst the Hall conductivity is generically a non-vanishing function of thermodynamic data determined in terms of the hydrodynamic couplings.

  16. On Superconnections and the Tachyon Effective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alishahiha, M; Oz, Y; Alishahiha, Mohsen; Ita, Harald; Oz, Yaron

    2001-01-01

    We propose a form of the effective action of the tachyon and gauge fields for brane-antibrane systems and non-BPS Dp-branes, written in terms of the supercurvature. Kink and vortex solutions with constant infinite gauge field strength reproduce the exact tensions of the lower-dimensional D-branes. We discuss the relation to BSFT and other models in the literature.

  17. On Superconnections and the Tachyon Effective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Alishahiha; Harald Ita; Yaron Oz

    2000-12-22

    We propose a form of the effective action of the tachyon and gauge fields for brane-antibrane systems and non-BPS Dp-branes, written in terms of the supercurvature. Kink and vortex solutions with constant infinite gauge field strength reproduce the exact tensions of the lower-dimensional D-branes. We discuss the relation to BSFT and other models in the literature.

  18. Targeting Illegal Immigration: Local Ordinate Action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, Emily; Moffitt, Jessica; Montemayor, Victoria; Riedel, Sarah; Smith, Bart; Weizel, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    to prevent unauthorized immigration. However, from 1990 to 2005, estimates of the unauthorized alien population in the United States have risen from 3.5 million to 11.5 million people, a 325 percent increase. A small number of localities have taken action... to unauthorized aliens, while others passed legislation targeting day labor centers, loitering, and government services. Consistent with findings made in other studies,1 at the time of our study we found that only approximately 100 localities have...

  19. Topological susceptibility with the improved Asqtad action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bernard et al.

    2004-01-06

    As a test of the chiral properties of the improved Asqtad (staggered fermion) action, we have been measuring the topological susceptibility as a function of quark masses for 2 + 1 dynamical flavors. We report preliminary results, which show reasonable agreement with leading order chiral perturbation theory for lattice spacing less than 0.1 fm. The total topological charge, however, shows strong persistence over Monte Carlo time.

  20. National Biofuels Action Plan, October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-10-01

    To help industry achieve the aggressive national goals, Federal agencies will need to continue to enhance their collaboration. The Biomass Research and Development (R&D) Board was created by Congress in the Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000. The National Biofuels Action Plan outlines areas where interagency cooperation will help to evolve bio-based fuel production technologies from promising ideas to competitive solutions.

  1. SEAB Climate Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -Rob Roberts About UsWYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAINSEAB Climate Action

  2. N Springs expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Since signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in 1989, the parties to the agreement have recognized the need to modify the approach to conducting investigations, studies, and cleanup actions at Hanford. To implement this approach, the parties have jointly developed the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy. The strategy defines a non-time-critical expedited response action (ERA) as a response action ``needed to abate a threat to human health or welfare or the environment where sufficient time exists for formal planning prior to initiation of response. In accordance with the past-practice strategy, DOE proposes to conduct an ERA at the N Springs, located in the Hanford 100 N Area, to substantially reduce the strontium-90 transport into the river through the groundwater pathway. The purpose of this ERA proposal is to provide sufficient information to select a preferred alternative at N Springs. The nature of an ERA requires that alternatives developed for the ERA be field ready; therefore, all the technologies proposed for the ERA should be capable of addressing the circumstances at N Springs. A comparison of these alternatives is made based on protectiveness, cost, technical feasibility, and institutional considerations to arrive at a preferred alternative. Following the selection of an alternative, a design phase will be conducted; the design phase will include a detailed look at design parameters, performance specifications, and costs of the selected alternative. Testing will be conducted as required to generate design data.

  3. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Concepts and Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    California Energy Commission; Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Mathew, Paul; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-13

    Most energy benchmarking tools provide static feedback on how one building compares to a larger set of loosely similar buildings, without providing information at the end-use level or on what can be done to reduce consumption, cost, or emissions. In this article--Part 1 of a two-part series--we describe an 'action-oriented benchmarking' approach, which extends whole-building energy benchmarking to include analysis of system and component energy use metrics and features. Action-oriented benchmarking thereby allows users to generate more meaningful metrics and to identify, screen and prioritize potential efficiency improvements. This opportunity assessment process can then be used to inform and optimize a full-scale audit or commissioning process. We introduce a new web-based action-oriented benchmarking system and associated software tool-EnergyIQ. The benchmarking methods, visualizations, and user interface design are informed by an end-user needs assessment survey and best-practice guidelines from ASHRAE.

  4. Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993.

  5. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  6. Reconceptualising Power in Action Research: A Focauldian Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Madhuri

    2012-11-28

    In the last decade there has been a renewed interest in the employment of Action Research within Psychology. Action Research is an orientation to inquiry, rather than a distinct method. It involves democratisation of the ...

  7. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Wires Solutions - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires Solutions - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires...

  8. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous...

  9. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to...

  10. EERE Announces Next Steps on President's Climate Action Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Announces Next Steps on President's Climate Action Plan EERE Announces Next Steps on President's Climate Action Plan July 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Photo of President Obama...

  11. Virginia Tech Climate Action Commitment and Sustainability Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0 Virginia Tech Climate Action Commitment and Sustainability Plan Energy & Sustainability Committee April 22, 2009 #12; 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS VIRGINIA TECH CLIMATE ACTION COMMITMENT Manager, Information Technology James Torgersen Facilities Manager, Athletic Department Tom Tucker

  12. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.

    2015-04-21

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed tomore »nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)« less

  13. Light quark spectrum with improved gauge and fermion actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; Claude Bernard; Tom DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; Jim Hetrick; Craig McNeile; Kari Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint; Matthew Wingate

    1997-11-08

    We report on a study of the light quark spectrum using an improved gauge action and both Kogut-Susskind and Naik quark actions. We have studied six different lattice spacings, corresponding to plaquette couplings ranging from 6.8 to 7.9, with five to six quark masses per coupling. We compare the two quark actions in terms of the spectrum and restoration of flavor symmetry. We also compare these results with those from the conventional action.

  14. FIRE Action Plan to Respond to Next Step Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FIRE Action Plan to Respond to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report #2 July 3, 2001 The FIRE Action s are listed among the NSO-PAC2 recommendations. 1. Response to NSO PAC-1 Report Representatives of the FIRE project presented an action plan for how to respond to issues that had been raised

  15. An N=1 Superfield Action for M2 branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Mauri; Anastasios C. Petkou

    2008-06-20

    We present an octonionic N=1 superfield action that reproduces in components the action of Bagger and Lambert for M2 branes. By giving an expectation value to one of the scalars we obtain the maximally supersymmetric superfield action for D2 branes.

  16. Generating Action Compilers by Partial Evaluation Anders Bondorf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palsberg, Jens

    Generating Action Compilers by Partial Evaluation Anders Bondorf DIKU, Department of Computer Compiler generation based on Mosses' action semantics has been studied by Brown, Moura, and Watt, and also by the second author. The core of each of their systems is a handwritten action compiler, producing either C

  17. Planning in Action Formalisms based on DLs: First Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baader, Franz

    Planning in Action Formalisms based on DLs: First Results Maja Milici´c Institut f¨ur Theoretische started work on inte- grating action formalisms with description logics (DLs), by investigating planning in the context of DLs. We prove that the plan existence problem is decidable for actions described in fragments

  18. Electric-Magnetic Duality in QED Effective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. S. Bae; Y. M. Cho; D. G. Pak

    2000-11-22

    Recently we have obtained a non-perturbative but convergent series expression of the one loop effective action of QED, and discussed the renormalization of the effective action. In this paper we establish the electric-magnetic duality in the quantum effective action.

  19. Data mining for Action Recognition Andrew Gilbert Richard Bowden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowden, Richard

    Data mining for Action Recognition Andrew Gilbert Richard Bowden Centre for Vision Speech of the features used. This paper improves the performance of action recognition through two data mining techniques, APriori association rule mining and Contrast Set Mining. These tech- niques are ideally suited to action

  20. Continuous fine-grained arm action recognition using motion spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous fine-grained arm action recognition using motion spectrum mixture models Xi Zhao, it is necessary to recognise the fine-grained arm action during user interactions with other people or objects. A method to recognise a set of arm actions on a fine-grained level (e.g. checking the wristband, drinking

  1. Group action in topos quantum physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flori, C.

    2013-03-15

    Topos theory has been suggested first by Isham and Butterfield, and then by Isham and Doering, as an alternative mathematical structure within which to formulate physical theories. In particular, it has been used to reformulate standard quantum mechanics in such a way that a novel type of logic is used to represent propositions. In this paper, we extend this formulation to include the notion of a group and group transformation in such a way that we overcome the problem of twisted presheaves. In order to implement this we need to change the type of topos involved, so as to render the notion of continuity of the group action meaningful.

  2. Generalized Gravitational Entropy from Total Derivative Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the generalized gravitational entropy from total derivative terms in the gravitational action. Following the method of Lewkowycz and Maldacena, we find that the generalized gravitational entropy from total derivatives vanishes. We compare our results with the work of Astaneh, Patrushev, and Solodukhin. We find that if total derivatives produced nonzero entropy, the holographic and the field-theoretic universal terms of entanglement entropy would not match. Furthermore, the second law of thermodynamics could be violated if the entropy of total derivatives did not vanish.

  3. NERSC.COE.key.actions-4.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncriefB ONERSCNERSC8 CoE Key Actions

  4. Climate Action Plan | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal Technologies Place:Standards Jump to:CliffsClimate Action

  5. Rainforest Action Network RAN | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ |RENERCOEnergyRadiumRailAction Network

  6. Renewable Energy Action Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b <RefurbishedDevelopment RED 2002 Jump to:Action

  7. Climate Protection Action Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action Fund (Redirected from

  8. Are Securities Class Actions “Supplemental” to SEC Enforcement? An Empirical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klausner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    sufficient to consider class actions supplemental. FurtherParticipants Michael Klausner Class Action Paper I havewriting on whether securities class actions can be justified

  9. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed El Hady; Benjamin B. Machta

    2014-10-05

    Many studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the Action Potential (AP). Despite a large and diverse body of experimental evidence, there is no theoretical consensus either for the physical basis of this mechanical wave nor its interdependence with the electrical signal. In this manuscript we present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model for these AWs allows us to predict, in terms of elastic constants, axon radius and axoplasmic density and viscosity, the shape of the AW that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the AP predicted by the Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) equations. We show that our model makes predictions that are in agreement with results in experimental systems including the garfish olfactory nerve and the squid giant axon. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology.

  10. 1 Responses to irrational actions in action observation and mentalising 2 networks of the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Antonia

    actions. Past studies in this area report mixed results, so the present paper uses new stimuli which 21- 45 prises the inferior parietal lobule (IPL), the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) 46 and a swathe) to the superior tem- 48 poral gyrus (STG). The IFG and IPL are commonly considered to be the 49 core of the human

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-07-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 321, Weather Station Fuel Storage, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 321 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 22, and consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area. This CAS contains a fuel storage area approximately 325 by 540 feet, which was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historical Camp Desert Rock facility, which was operational from 1951 to 1958. The corrective action investigation conducted in February 1999 found the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels to be total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics at two sample locations. During this investigation, the two corrective action objectives identified were (1) to prevent or mitigate exposure to near-surface soil containing contaminants of concern, and (2) to prevent spread of contaminants of concern beyond the corrective action unit. Based on the corrective action objectives, the two corrective action alternatives developed for consideration were: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; and Alternative 2 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. The two alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred corrective action alternative chosen on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety was Alternative 2. This alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at the Weather Station Fuel Storage site.

  12. El Nino and the Delayed Action Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutle, I; Römer, R A; Boutle, Ian; Taylor, Richard H. S.; Roemer, Rudolf A.

    2006-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the El Nino phenomenon using the mathematical model of delayed-action oscillator (DAO). Topics such as the influence of the annual cycle, global warming, stochastic influences due to weather conditions and even off-equatorial heat-sinks can all be discussed using only modest analytical and numerical resources. Thus the DAO allows for a pedagogical introduction to the science of El Nino and La Nina while at the same time avoiding the need for large-scale computing resources normally associated with much more sophisticated coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. It is an approach which is ideally suited for student projects both at high school and undergraduate level.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  15. Making the Sexual Political: Women’s Transnational Collective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minai, Naveen

    2010-01-01

    actions by women from Liberia, Nigeria and Kenya. I will useIn 2003, women in Liberia organized a sex boycott to protest

  16. Motivate Homeowner Action With Updated DOE Incentives Database...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Database Motivate Homeowner Action With Updated DOE Incentives Database Is customer motivation a barrier to marketing upgrades in your community? You can find ideas for incentives...

  17. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as a primary reference for PMOA PM-1 for development of Corrective Action Requests (CARs) and Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs), as well as the assessment of...

  18. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II On Friday, February 14, 2014 there...

  19. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Submittal of the Underground Salt...

  20. DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers (Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Requests for Test Data Issued) DOE Initiates Enforcement Actions Against 4 Showerhead Manufacturers...

  1. SEE Action Series: Local Strategies for Whole-Building Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program SEE Action Series: Local Strategies for Whole-Building Energy Savings Molly...

  2. Insights from Smart Meters: Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Characteristics That Drive Savings in Behavior-Based Programs Insights from Smart Meters: Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors, and Characteristics That Drive...

  3. COP 18 Side Event: Advancing Collaborative Action for Low Emissions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    COP 18 Side Event: Advancing Collaborative Action for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Low Emission Development Strategies Global Partnership Advancing...

  4. Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Side...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Side Event in Bonn Jump to: navigation, search Low Emission Development Strategies Global Partnership Advancing...

  5. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

  6. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Month, senior DOE officials will participate in events from San Francisco to North Carolina to Washington. Throughout October, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and...

  7. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding a Strategic Portable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a Strategic Portable Generation Reserve - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding a Strategic Portable Generation Reserve - October 17, 2012 EAC...

  8. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of the Next Generation Grid Operating System (Energy Management System) - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Development of the Next...

  9. The Effective Action for QCD at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lech Szymanowski

    1994-11-16

    I discuss the construction of the effective action for QCD suitable for the description of high-energy and small momentum transfer diffractive processes.

  10. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementing Effective Enterprise Security Governance, approved at the March 12-13, 2014 meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective Enterprise...

  11. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementing Effective Enterprise Security Governance, approved at the March 12-13, 2014 meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

  12. Executive Order 13212 - Actions To Expedite Energy-Related Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expedite Energy-Related Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 66, No. 99 - May 18, 2001 Executive Order 13212 - Actions To Expedite Energy-Related Projects: Federal Register...

  13. Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document features a Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) template for creating a Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future campaign handout.

  14. Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document features a Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) template for creating a Take Action Now: Empower a Secure Energy Future 2 handout.

  15. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the...

  16. Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal-Tribal Partnership on Climate Change Action Rounds Corner, Shifts Into High Gear at 2013 Tribal Nations Conference David Conrad David Conrad Deputy Director, Office of...

  17. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  18. Climate Action Planning: A Review of Best Practices, Key Elements...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Action Planning: A Review of Best Practices, Key Elements, and Common Climate Strategies for Signatories to the American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment...

  19. Climate Action Champions Request for Applications Informational Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Webinar will provide prospective Applicants with an overview of the Climate Actions Champions Request for Applications, the application process and respond to questions posed by attendees.

  20. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Webinar, January 2012 This presentation, "IndustrialCommercialInstitutional Boiler MACT - Combined Heat and Power: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy," by John...

  1. From Racism to Affirmative Action: Will Universities Span the Gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higginbotham, A. Leon

    1975-01-01

    implemented, subtle or blatant racism would not be one ofKEYNOTE ADDRESS "FROM RACISM TO AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: WILLif we are concerned about racism, and its consequences on

  2. On Higher Derivative Terms in Tachyon Effective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2001-05-08

    We reconstruct the tachyon effective action for unstable D-branes in superstring theory by examining its behaviour near exactly marginal deformations, where the ambigous higher derivative terms can be eliminated. We then compare this action with that obtained in boundary string field theory and find remarkable agreement. In particular, the tension for lower dimensional branes and the BI-action for the centre of mass motion are reprodued exactly. We also comment on the action for tachyons on the kink in a D-brane/anti-D-brane system and on bosonic string theory.

  3. National Action Plan on Demand Response | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting-discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as...

  4. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (ECASOP) Issued by Office of Project Management, Oversight, and Assessments (PMOA) PM-1 September 21, 2015 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EVMS CORRECTIVE ACTION SOP SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 ii...

  5. Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderóndela Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-06

    A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

  6. GALOIS ACTION ON KNOTS I: ACTION OF THE ABSOLUTE GALOIS GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furusho, Hidekazu

    .32). The topological group FracK of profinite knots is introduced as the group of fraction of the topological monoid K in Definition 2.33. A continuous action of the profinite Grothendieck-Teichm¨uller group GT [Dr2] on FracK field C. Then the group FracK of profinite knots admits a non- trivial topological GQ-module structure

  7. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  8. Comparison of RCRA SWMU corrective action and CERCLA remedial action. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupe, S.C.

    1991-09-30

    With the passage of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and the addition of expanded authorities to require corrective action for release of hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, the Solid Waste Disposal Act (hereafter referred to as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or RCRA) will dramatically influence the Superfund program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Not only will the RCRA corrective action program help prevent current RCRA sites from becoming Superfund sites, but it also offers EPA and the states an important alternative to address superfund sites that already exist. EPA recognized this and, hoping to conserve Superfund resources, developed a policy to defer listing of sites from the National Priority List if those sites can be addressed under RCRA's corrective action authorities. Private industry and federal agencies with problem sites that could qualify under either program need to compare the advantages and disadvantages of each program. EPA's deferral policy continues to evolve and appears to be ripe for expansion.

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved individual actions. Volume 14, Nos. 3 and 4, Part 1. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July - December 1995) and includes copies of Orders and Notices of Violation sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to individuals with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC. The Commission believes this information may be useful to licensees in making employment decisions.

  11. A New Quad at Walton Street Arboricultural Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Street and Walton Lane. The trees have been planted in a staggered row with relatively even spaces. Due in an inaccessible location such that concerns over public safety are reduced to an acceptable level, it may not qualify in higher categories. Young trees with a stem diameter of less that 150mm should be considered

  12. A New Quad at Walton Street Ground Investigation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    out by Geotechnical and Environmental Associates Limited (GEA) on the instructions of Stockley-brown and greyish brown sandy gravelly clay or a clayey gravelly sand with fragments of brick, concrete, ash and coal. The underlying Northmoor Sand and Gravel Formation initially comprised soft orange light brown

  13. J. Michael McQuade | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    acquisition, processing and display systems for health care, industrial imaging and remote sensing. He has broad experience managing basic technologies and the conversion of...

  14. Shalf_NUG2006_QuadCore.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4:Seymour Sack, 2003Gas (BillionMemory

  15. J. Michael McQuade | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice| Department of Energy ReviewbeThe Office ofImpactJ. Michael

  16. Construction of the Energy-Momentum Tensor for Wilson Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sonoda

    2015-09-02

    Given an arbitrary Wilson action of a real scalar field, we discuss how to construct the energy-momentum tensor of the theory. Using the exact renormalization group, we can determine the energy-momentum tensor implicitly, but we are short of obtaining an explicit formula in terms of the Wilson action.

  17. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  19. A Chronological History of Federal Fleet Actions and Mandates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-22

    This chronological history of Federal fleet actions and mandates provides a year-by-year timeline of the acts, amendments, executive orders, and other regulations that affect Federal fleets. The fleet actions and mandates included in the timeline span from 1988 to 2009.

  20. Chronological History of Federal Fleet Actions and Mandates (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    This chronological history of Federal fleet actions and mandates provides a year-by-year timeline of the acts, amendments, executive orders, and other regulations that affect Federal fleets. The fleet actions and mandates included in the timeline span from 1988 to 2009.

  1. Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Writing a good action plan is one thing; implementing it is another. Institutional change principles and methods can be incorporated into action plans (program design), but on-the-ground implementation activities must also be conducted in a manner that is suitable to the organizational context and the people in the roles being targeted.

  2. Construction of the Energy-Momentum Tensor for Wilson Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sonoda

    2015-04-11

    Given an arbitrary Wilson action of a real scalar field, we discuss how to construct the energy-momentum tensor of the theory. Using the exact renormalization group, we can determine the energy-momentum tensor implicitly, but we are short of obtaining an explicit formula in terms of the Wilson action.

  3. Genre Taxonomy: A Knowledge Repository of Communicative Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genre Taxonomy: A Knowledge Repository of Communicative Actions Takeshi Yoshioka1 Center taxonomy as a knowledge repository of communicative structures or "typified actions" enacted by organizational members. The Genre taxonomy aims at helping people to make sense of diverse types of communicative

  4. International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    International Workshop on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction (August 22 Support Digital Models GlobalGlobal RoadmapRoadmap Workshop Report and Summary of Key Findings Edited by on Global Roadmap and Strategic Actions for ICT in Construction | 22-24 August, 2007 | Finland - 2

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    into 18 categories: 1. Research: Centers and Academic Programs 2. Green Buildings 3. Renewable Energy 4UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED "I recognize the right #12;July 2011 UC IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED JULY 2011 This outline summarizes UC

  6. Alternatives/action plan report for outfall 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    This Document contains information pertaining to alternatives/action associated with controlling ammonia entering through outfall 17. This document identifies the location of contaminate source, the ammonia concentration levels entering East Fork Poplar Creek, and the action taken to reduce/eliminate the toxicity problem.

  7. EMERGENCY ACTION DATE OF LAST REVISION: 12 July 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN DATE OF LAST REVISION: 12 July 2013 #12;REVISION RECORD original issue #12;CAC-C EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN 8/6/13-4:13 PM page 3 C O N T E N T S 1.0 PURPOSE................................................................................ 4 2.0 REPORTING EMERGENCIES.................................................. 4 3.0 BUILDING

  8. Prepared for: EarthAction & the Alliance for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    #12;Prepared for: EarthAction & the Alliance for Renewable Energy EarthAction organizes to the People," promoting an innovative solution, Renewable Energy Payments (REPs), that gives everyone a chance to make a difference by producing, using, and selling renewable energy. The Alliance

  9. Neuromediated action of ?-casomorphins on ion transport in rabbit ileum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Neuromediated action of ?-casomorphins on ion transport in rabbit ileum D. TOME A. BEN MANSOUR that the action of the fl-casomorphin analog was neuromediated and suggest that this peptide acted) Correspondence: Daniel TOME. #12;modulating the release of neurotransmitters by the intrinsic nervous system

  10. SEE Action Webinar on Energy Efficiency Measure Cost Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action), this webinar will explain the importance of measure cost studies, review the current "state of the science" of measure cost development and estimation, and explore opportunities for future collaboration and advancement of measure cost research.

  11. Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, Paul; Diamond, Rick

    2009-04-01

    General Services Administration (GSA) has been a pioneer in using Smart Building technologies but it has yet to achieve the full benefits of an integrated, enterprise-wide Smart Building strategy. In July 2008, GSA developed an initial briefing memorandum that identified five actions for a Smart Buildings feasibility study: (1) Identify and cluster the major building systems under consideration for a Smart Buildings initiative; (2) Identify GSA priorities for these clusters; (3) Plan for future adoption of Smart Building strategies by identifying compatible hardware; (4) Develop a framework for implementing and testing Smart Building strategies and converged networks; and (5) Document relevant GSA and industry initiatives in this arena. Based on this briefing memorandum, PBS and FAS retained consultants from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Noblis, and the Building Intelligence Group to evaluate the potential for Smart Buildings within GSA, and to develop this report. The project has included extensive interviews with GSA staff (See Appendix A), a review of existing GSA standards and documents, and an examination of relevant GSA and industry initiatives. Based on interviews with GSA staff and a review of GSA standards and documents, the project team focused on four goals for evaluating how Smart Building technology can benefit GSA: (1) Achieve Energy Efficiency Mandates--Use Smart Building technology as a tool to meet EISA 2007 and EO 13423 goals for energy efficiency. (2) Enhance Property Management--Deploy enterprise tools for improved Operations and Maintenance (O&M) performance and verification. (3) Implement Network as the Fourth Utility--Utilize a converged broadband network to support Smart Building systems and provide GSA clients with connectivity for voice, data and video. (4) Enhance Safety and Security--Harmonize Physical Access Control Systems (PACS) with Smart Building Systems.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

  13. 1 EPA Actions in Response to WIPP Release EPA Actions in Response to Release of Radioactive Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 EPA Actions in Response to WIPP Release EPA Actions in Response to Release of Radioactive Material from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Since the release of radioactive material on February 14, 2014 at the WIPP, EPA has been working closely with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED

  14. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  17. Euler - Heisenberg effective action and magnetoelectric effect in multilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Katsnelson; G. E. Volovik; M. A. Zubkov

    2013-01-24

    The low energy effective field model for the multilayer graphene (at ABC stacking) is considered. We calculate the effective action in the presence of constant external magnetic field $B$ (normal to the graphene sheet). We also calculate the first two corrections to this effective action caused by the in-plane electric field $E$ at $E/B \\ll 1$ and discuss the magnetoelectric effect. In addition, we calculate the imaginary part of the effective action in the presence of constant electric field $E$ and the lowest order correction to it due to the magnetic field ($B/E \\ll 1$).

  18. Thermodynamics using p4-improved staggered fermion action on QCDOC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chulwoo Jung

    2005-10-05

    We present an exploratory study of the thermodynamics of $N_f=3$ QCD with an improved staggered fermions using the QCDOC supercomputer. We use a p4 action with MILC-style smeared links (Fat 7). Some details of the implementation of the p4 action on QCDOC are discussed and performance benchmarks are given. We show preliminary results for the quark mass dependence of the pseudo-critical temperature $T_c$ from several lattice volumes . We also make a comparison between p4fat7 and the old p4 action.

  19. Comparing topological charge definitions using topology fixing actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruckmann, Falk; Jansen, Karl; Marinkovic, Marina; Urbach, Carsten; Wagner, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We investigate both the hyperbolic action and the determinant ratio action designed to fix the topological charge on the lattice. We show to what extent topology is fixed depending on the parameters of these actions, keeping the physical situation fixed. At the same time the agreement between different definitions of topological charge - the field theoretic and the index definition - is directly correlated to the degree topology is fixed. Moreover, it turns out that the two definitions agree very well. We also study finite volume effects arising in the static potential and related quantities due to topology fixing.

  20. Comparing topological charge definitions using topology fixing actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falk Bruckmann; Florian Gruber; Karl Jansen; Marina Marinkovic; Carsten Urbach; Marc Wagner

    2010-04-05

    We investigate both the hyperbolic action and the determinant ratio action designed to fix the topological charge on the lattice. We show to what extent topology is fixed depending on the parameters of these actions, keeping the physical situation fixed. At the same time the agreement between different definitions of topological charge - the field theoretic and the index definition - is directly correlated to the degree topology is fixed. Moreover, it turns out that the two definitions agree very well. We also study finite volume effects arising in the static potential and related quantities due to topology fixing.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krause

    2010-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 562 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of CAAs for the 13 CASs within CAU 562. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 27, 2009, through May 12, 2010, as set forth in the CAU 562 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. A data quality assessment (DQA) performed on the CAU 562 data demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at 10 of the 13 CASs in CAU 562, and thus corrective action is required. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 562 is shown in Table ES-1. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 13 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 562. • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-26-11, 02-44-02, 02-59-01, 02-60-02, 02-60-03, 02-60-04, 02-60-05, 23-60-01, 23-99-06, and 25-60-04. The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposures to contaminated media to acceptable levels. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is recommended for the remaining 10 CASs in CAU 562. • A Corrective Action Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection that contains a detailed description of the proposed actions that will be taken to implement the selected corrective actions.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV Operations Office

    1999-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved, material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1997; Volume 16, Number 2, Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July--December 1997) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994, Volume 13, No. 4, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1994) and includes copies of letters Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  10. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Energy Assurance Planning Conference June 28-29, 2012 Gaylord Hotel and Convention Center, National Harbor, MD After-Action Report August 2012 Co-Sponsored by: U.S....

  11. The Dangerous Allure of the Issue Class Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    In the complex and chaotic world of mass torts, a class action that aggregates the claims of aggrieved individuals against a common defendant would seem not only a prudent solution, but possibly even a necessary one. The ...

  12. SEE Action Webinar on Community-Based Social Marketing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network, this webinar will describe community-based social marketing as a behavior-based approach for developing energy efficiency programs.

  13. National Action Plan Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency

    2008-11-01

    Establishes a goal of achieving all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025 and presents 10 implementation goals as a framework for advancing the National Action Plan’s key policy recommendations.

  14. Obstacles to Determining Punitive Damages in Class Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Laura J.

    2001-01-01

    Courts and commentators have often embraced the class action device as an ideal means of assessing punitive damages fairly in mass tort cases. In this Article, Professor Hines sounds a cautionary note by identifying a number of procedural...

  15. Challenging the Issue Class Action End-Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    An ever-increasing number of courts and commentators have advocated a simple solution to the seemingly insuperable problem of troublesome individual issues that often thwart certification of a Rule 23(b)(3) class action on predominance grounds...

  16. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine Goal to Identify Context-Rules, Roles and Tools to Develop Action Plan to Implement Plan to Measure and Evaluate. Institutional Change...

  17. Time-Dependent Utility and Action Under Uncertainty Eric Horvitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    Time-Dependent Utility and Action Under Uncertainty Eric Horvitz Palo Alto Laboratory Rockwell systems Doyle, 1988, Horvitz, 1988, Boddy and Dean, 1989, Russell and Wefald, 1989, Breese and Horvitz

  18. A transaction cost approach to unilateral presidential action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchbanks, Miner Peek, III

    2006-04-12

    Presidents have two major assets at their disposal when seeking to alter policy: executive orders and legislative action. There are certain advantages and disadvantages to each course. Although presidency scholars have focused extensively...

  19. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding the Race to the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Race to the Top Initiative, approved at the June 5-6, 2013 EAC Meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action on the Race to the Top Initiative - June 6, 2013 More Documents &...

  20. Department of Energy Initiates Formal Enforcement Action in Los...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    departmental enforcement actions at the Office of Enforcement. Media contact(s): Megan Barnett, DOE, (202) 586-4940 Julianne Smith, NNSA, (202) 586-7371 Addthis Related Articles...

  1. Higher Derivative Corrections to O-Plane Actions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhao

    2014-11-17

    Higher derivative corrections to effective actions are very important and of great interest in string theory. The aim of this dissertation is to develop a method to constrain the higher derivative corrections to O-plane ...

  2. MEDITERRANEAN ACTION PLAN MEDITERRANEAN COMMISSION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    urbanisation and promoting sustainable urban development..............16 2.3. Promoting `quality' agricultureMEDITERRANEAN ACTION PLAN MEDITERRANEAN COMMISSION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT MEDITERRANEAN STRATEGY FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Draft (work in progress) UNEP/MAP Athens, 17 February 2005 #12

  3. Education For Empowerment and Social Action in Rural America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostendorf, David; Levitas, Daniel

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe both the underlying assumptions and results of the educationaI efforts of one grassroots, community-based organization, Prairiefire Rural Action, Inc....

  4. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After establishing a goal and assessing the rules, roles, and tools, federal agencies can develop an action plan (select the strategies that will be implemented over time to achieve and maintain energy and sustainability goals).

  5. Seventh Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a time frame for completion of the action. RESOURCE STRATEGY Energy efficiency is the first priority resource in the Northwest Power Act. The Council's analysis for the Seventh Plan affirmed that energy .......................................................................................................................................2 Resource Strategy

  6. DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN Department Name: IAB Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN For Department Name: IAB Greenhouse Date DEAP Adopted: January 24 Greenhouse Building address: 911 Yukon Drive Building coordinator: Mark Wright Building coordinator telephone assembly locations Inside assembly location: Butrovich lobby Outside assembly location: IAB Greenhouse

  7. First order gravity: Actions, topological terms and boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    We consider first order gravity in four dimensions. This means that the fundamental variables are a tetrad $e$ and a SO(3,1) connection $\\omega$. We study the most general action principle compatible with diffeomorphism invariance. This implies, in particular, considering besides the standard Einstein-Hilbert term, other terms that either do not change the equations of motion, or are topological in nature. Having a well defined action principle also implies adding additional boundary terms, whose detailed form may depend on the particular boundary conditions at hand. We consider spacetimes that include a boundary at infinity, satisfying asymptotically flat boundary conditions and/or an internal boundary satisfying isolated horizons boundary conditions. For our analysis we employ the covariant Hamiltonian formalism where the phase space $\\Gamma$ is given by solutions to the equation of motion. For each of the possible terms contributing to the action we study the well posedness of the action, its finiteness, t...

  8. Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

  9. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action Alternative in an EA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land...

  10. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  11. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  12. A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PROTECTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE FROM SEISMIC ACTIONS QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -DISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PROTECTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE FROM SEISMIC ACTIONS STRENGTH DEMAND EXCEEDS CODE COMPLIANT DESIGN TO PROTECTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE FROM SEISMIC ACTIONS CURRENT STRUCTURAL DESIGN PRACTICE · SEISMIC ENERGYA MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PROTECTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE FROM SEISMIC ACTIONS QUEENSLAND

  13. High order Chin actions in path integral Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakkos, K.; Casulleras, J.; Boronat, J.

    2009-05-28

    High order actions proposed by Chin have been used for the first time in path integral Monte Carlo simulations. Contrary to the Takahashi-Imada action, which is accurate to the fourth order only for the trace, the Chin action is fully fourth order, with the additional advantage that the leading fourth-order error coefficients are finely tunable. By optimizing two free parameters entering in the new action, we show that the time step error dependence achieved is best fitted with a sixth order law. The computational effort per bead is increased but the total number of beads is greatly reduced and the efficiency improvement with respect to the primitive approximation is approximately a factor of 10. The Chin action is tested in a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator, a H{sub 2} drop, and bulk liquid {sup 4}He. In all cases a sixth-order law is obtained with values of the number of beads that compare well with the pair action approximation in the stringent test of superfluid {sup 4}He.

  14. Corrective action decision document for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit Number 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-26

    The North Disposal Trench, located north of the eastern most lagoon, was installed in 1963 to receive solid waste and construction debris from the Operation Roller Coaster man camp. Subsequent to Operation Roller Coaster, the trench continued to receive construction debris and range cleanup debris (including ordnance) from Sandia National Laboratories and other operators. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities (VCA Spill Area) at an area associated with the North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Site (CAS). Remediation activities at this site were conducted in 1995. A corrective action investigation was conducted in September of 1996 following the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP); the detailed results of that investigation are presented in Appendix A. The Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), a part of the Nellis Air Force Range, which is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air.

  15. Do More Transparent Corporate Actions Following a Restatement Influence the SEC's Decision to Issue an Enforcement Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Files, Rebecca Lynn

    2010-10-12

    This study examines whether corporate transparency about a restatement influences the Securities and Exchange Commission's (SEC) decision to issue an enforcement action. I consider corporate transparency to be higher when firms initiate...

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-08

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  20. IMPACTS. Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    This annual report tracks the energy and other benefits of our commercialized technologies. From the 1980s to 2009, cumulative net energy savings are estimated at 10.0 quads, with an associated cost savings of $50.55 billion (in 2009 dollars).

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-05-03

    The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  2. Theory of Josephson Photomultipliers: Optimal Working Conditions and Back Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luke C. G. Govia; Emily J. Pritchett; Seth T. Merkel; Deanna Pineau; Frank K. Wilhelm

    2012-06-02

    We describe the back action of microwave-photon detection via a Josephson photomultiplier (JPM), a superconducting qubit coupled strongly to a high-quality microwave cavity. The back action operator depends qualitatively on the duration of the measurement interval, resembling the regular photon annihilation operator at short interaction times and approaching a variant of the photon subtraction operator at long times. The optimal operating conditions of the JPM differ from those considered optimal for processing and storing of quantum information, in that a short $T_2$ of the JPM suppresses the cavity dephasing incurred during measurement. Understanding this back action opens the possibility to perform multiple JPM measurements on the same state, hence performing efficient state tomography.

  3. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

  5. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

  6. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 214: BUNKERS AND STORAGE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to document that the closure of CAU 214 complied with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan closure requirements. The closure activities specified in the Corrective Action Plan were based on the approved corrective action alternatives presented in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Decision Document.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada: Revision No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-12-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-21-003-TANL; 09-21-001-TA09; TA-19-002-TAB2; TA-21-002-TAAL; and 03-19-001. The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU. The corrective action alternative recommended for CAU 410 is Clean Closure; therefore, no corrective action or corrective action plan is required. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities.

  8. 4d Lorentzian Holst action with topological terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Jimenez Rezende; Alejandro Perez

    2009-02-19

    We study the Hamiltonian formulation of the general first order action of general relativity compatible with local Lorentz invariance and background independence. The most general simplectic structure (compatible with diffeomorphism invariance and local Lorentz transformations) is obtained by adding to the Holst action the Pontriagin, Euler and Nieh-Yan invariants with independent coupling constants. We perform a detailed canonical analysis of this general formulation (in the time gauge) exploring the structure of the phase space in terms of connection variables. We explain the relationship of these topological terms, and the effect of large SU(2) gauge transformations in quantum theories of gravity defined in terms of the Ashtekar-Barbero connection.

  9. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  11. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Sites, Nevada with ROTC 1, Errata Sheet, Revision 0, January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the seven CASs within CAU 139. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from June 26 through September 27, 2006, as set forth in the CAU 139 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP).

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  14. Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming Time Bomb:* Actions Needed to Avert Disaster James Hansen 26 October 2009 Club statements relating to policy are personal opinion Global Warming Status 1. Knowledge Gap Between - What Benefits of Solution Despite the publicity that global warming has received, there is a large gap between

  15. On harmonic measures and group actions Alberto Candel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candel, Alberto

    On harmonic measures and group actions Alberto Candel CSUN I Congreso Hispano-Franc´es de Matem´aticas Zaragoza, 13 Julio del 2007 #12;Harmonic measures Harmonic measures for foliated spaces were introduced in foliation theory by Lucy Garnett. #12;Harmonic measures Harmonic measures for foliated spaces were

  16. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  17. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  18. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  19. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  20. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209 Associated Species: spruce grouse: Carol R. Foss Affiliation: New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat on mineral soils. In northern New Hampshire, these range from well or moderately well drained upland forests

  1. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  2. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  3. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  4. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  5. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  6. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  7. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  8. On Gravity, Torsion and the Spectral Action Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Pfaeffle; Christoph A. Stephan

    2011-06-03

    We consider compact Riemannian spin manifolds without boundary equipped with orthogonal connections. We investigate the induced Dirac operators and the associated commutative spectral triples. In case of dimension four and totally anti-symmetric torsion we compute the Chamseddine-Connes spectral action, deduce the equations of motions and discuss critical points.

  9. FIRE Actions in Response to Next Step Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRE Actions in Response to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report NSO-PAC CHARGES #1. The present level of effort in physics analysis is not fully adequate for ongoing high priority FIRE studies a strong focused effort on the FIRE physics and engineering studies. High priority must also be given

  10. COMMUNITY ACTION: A NEGLECTED SITE OF INNOVATION FOR SUSTAINABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    COMMUNITY ACTION: A NEGLECTED SITE OF INNOVATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT? by Gill Seyfang for sustainable development? by Gill Seyfang1 and Adrian Smith2 1 Centre for Social and Economic Research at the `Grassroots Innovations for Sustainable Development' conference (June 10th , 2005, UCL, London) convened

  11. Global warming is real, and Nevertheless, practical actions, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Global warming is real, and Nevertheless, practical actions, which ICEBERG BREAKS OFF the San BY JAMES HANSEN Global Warming Defusing the #12;became strikingly apparent to me one summer afternoon. Objective analysis of global warming requires quantitative knowledge of three issues: the sensitivity

  12. On Managing Temporal Information for Handling Durative Actions in LPG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerevini, Alfonso E.

    On Managing Temporal Information for Handling Durative Actions in LPG Alfonso Gerevini, Alessandro Branze 38, 25123 Brescia, Italy fgerevini,saetti,serinag@ing.unibs.it Abstract. LPG is a recent planner good performance. This paper focuses on how LPG represents and manages temporal information to handle

  13. Franchising, Arbitration, and the Future of the Class Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drahozal, Christopher R.; Wittrock, Quentin R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we consider whether arbitration clauses are likely to result in the extinction of the class action. In our view, the answer is no. We reach that conclusion for two main reasons. First, at least some parties that draft standard form...

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  15. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons Charles L. Cox* , Winfried Denk§ , David W. Tank§ , and Karel Svoboda*¶ *Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cold Spring Harbor, Murray Hill, NJ 07974 Communicated by James D. Watson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor

  16. Cape Fear River Basin Action Plan for Migratory Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cape Fear River Basin Action Plan for Migratory Fish C ape Fear Rive r Pa rt n er ship developed with a vision of a healthy Cape Fear River for fish and people. The partnership's mission is to restore and demonstrate the value of robust, productive, and self-sustaining stocks of migratory fish in the Cape Fear

  17. Regional Drinking Water Security Action research, policy and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    electricity, household energy use, small-town planning, post-harvest agriculture, water policy analysisRegional Drinking Water Security Action research, policy and analysis Milind Sohoni Centre, research Companies in development sector, think-tanks and NGOs Current Research Drinking water, grid

  18. REQUEST FOR CHANGE/ACTION South Carolina Department of Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    REQUEST FOR CHANGE/ACTION South Carolina Department of Education Division of School Effectiveness ­ Office of Educator Certification 3700 Forest Drive, Suite 500 Columbia, South Carolina 29204 www first South Carolina certificate. All subsequent changes, additions or modifications to a certificate

  19. UCSF RESIDENTS AND CLINICAL FELLOWS "INSURANCE ACTION FORM"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    that the information entered in this application is complete and true, and I accept these terms. As a participant in UC a copy and enter enrollment in GME Insurance Database 1. ACTION: Check All appropriate boxes: Check: Department and Unit/Division: If Health Net, enter PCP "Enrollment ID" : ** 3. DEPENDENT INFORMATION: E

  20. Recent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    -soil, water, energy end-user defined or demand-driven-drinking water. Towards change-deliver technology Block 380 Thakar people. 200 animals. 40 households. And an acute shortage of water for 5 monthsRecent Action-Research and future course in Water Sector. Milind Sohoni, CTARA, IIT

  1. Expedited approach to a carbon tetrachloride spill interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowdery, C.; Primrose, A.; Uhland, J.; Castaneda, N.

    1998-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation was selected as an interim measure for a carbon tetrachloride spill site where source removal or in situ treatment cannot currently be implemented due to the surrounding infrastructure. Rather than delay action until the site is more accessible to an interim action, this more expedited approach would support a final action. Individual Hazard Substance Site (IHSS) 118.1 is a former underground storage tank at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) that stored carbon tetrachloride for process use. Inadvertent releases associated with filling and failure of the tank system resulted in an accumulation of carbon tetrachloride in a bedrock depression around a group of former process waste tanks. Access to the source of contamination is obstructed by numerous utilities, the process waste tanks, and other components of the site infrastructure that limit the ability to conduct an effective remedial action. A preremedial field investigation was conducted in September 1997 to identify and delineate the extent of the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. Data collected from the investigation revealed that natural processes might be limiting the migration of contaminants from the source area.

  2. Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The Idaho site and its cleanup contractor have launched a series of corrective actions they will complete before safely resuming startup operations at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) following an incident in June that caused the new waste treatment facility to shut down.

  3. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

  4. Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3393E Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Paul Mathew (CEC), and by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. #12;Data Center ........................................................................................................3 3. Overall Data Center Performance Metrics

  5. Vision and action* Cornelia Fermiill er and Yiannis Aloimonos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    for synthesizing an artificial vision system by studying vision competences of increasing complexity andVision and action* Cornelia Fermiill er and Yiannis Aloimonos Our work on active vision has by the idea of approaching vision for behavioural systems in the form of modules that are directly related

  6. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN 2.0 University of Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    in its ecological performance. In 2007, as the first Ivy League signatory to the American College a vision of environmental sustainability at Penn. In 2009, the launch of the Climate Action Plan set concrete goals and began the formal process of integrating sustainability into coursework, community

  7. TITLE: Engendering Resilience: Building Sustainable Communities through Women's Collective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    challenges. The conversation during lunch focused on urban resilience as a key piece of a sustainable future. Participants also discussed some of the parallels between the work in urban Brazil and work on Sustainable, collective action and sustainable urban communities. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future TOPICAL LUNCH

  8. CALL TO ACTION TO SCALE UP GLOBAL HEPATITIS RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    CALL TO ACTION TO SCALE UP GLOBAL HEPATITIS RESPONSE Background Viral hepatitis is now responsible hepatitis and some 2 billion have been infected with hepatitis B virus. Most people with chronic hepatitis B, contributing to global increases in both of these chronic diseases. Millions of acute infections with hepatitis

  9. Management 4313.583 Organizing for Action (Spring 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management 4313.583 ­ Organizing for Action (Spring 2015) Spears School of Business Oklahoma State University Instructor: Dr. Dennis L. Mott, Professor of Management Contact Information: Office: OSULearn (Online Classroom) Wednesday 10- 11:30 a.m. Course administration Information: EMAIL

  10. Delta Decadal Initiative: A framework for actionable research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    actions from upstream deplete them from water and sediment : on a global scale >40% of river discharge of the Alluvial-Delta Landscape 1928 Flood Control Act Slide courtesy of R. Twilley #12;21 Flood Protection Local Resource exploration Sea level Rise Intensified tropical storms Food security Political

  11. Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

  12. MASS ACTION IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM WALTER J. FREEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    NW1 Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Freeman, Walter J. Mass action> Chapter 2 Timeâ??Dependent Properties Measurement of Neural Events Representation of Events by Functions Inputâ??Output Functions Linear Inputâ??Output Functions The Impulse and the Impulse Response Linear

  13. On extendability of group actions on compact Riemann surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conder, Marston

    of such groups. The associated signatures appear in Table 1 below, the #12;rst eight corresponding to normalOn extendability of group actions on compact Riemann surfaces E. Bujalance #3; , F.J. Cirre y , M.D.E. Conder z 28 September 2001 Abstract The question of whether a given group G which acts faithfully

  14. Generic Properties of Actions of F_n 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, James Mitchell

    2011-10-21

    embeds into the tracial ultraproduct of the hyperfinite II1 factor. We conclude by showing the finite approximation result may be transferred to a subspace of the space of all topological actions of Fn on the Cantor set. Within this class, we show the set...

  15. Generalized Chern-Simons action and maximally supersymmetric gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Movshev; A. Schwarz

    2013-04-28

    We study observables and deformations of generalized Chern-Simons action and show how to apply these results to maximally supersymmetric gauge theories. We describe a construction of large class of deformations based on some results on the cohomology of super Lie algebras proved in the Appendix.

  16. BPS Soliton Solutions of a D3-brane Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2014-07-07

    The world-volume action of a probe D3-brane in $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ with $N$ units of flux has the field content, symmetries, and dualities of the $U(1)$ factor of ${\\cal N} = 4$ $U(N+1)$ super Yang--Mills theory, spontaneously broken to $U(N) \\times U(1)$ by being on the Coulomb branch, with the massive fields integrated out. Thus, it might be the exact effective action (a highly effective action), or else a useful approximation to it. We construct an $SL(2,Z)$ multiplet of BPS soliton solutions of the D3-brane action and show that in the $N=1$ case they correspond to the electrically charged states that have been integrated out as well as magnetic monopoles and dyons. Their charges are uniformly spread on a spherical surface, a soliton bubble, which can be interpreted as a phase boundary. This picture is consistent with previous results in the string theory and field theory literature.

  17. From global change science to action with social sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, C. P.; Mooney, Sian; Allen, D.; Beller-Simms, Nancy; Fish, T.; Grambsch, A.; Hohenstein, W.; Jacobs, Kathy; Kenney, Melissa A.; Lane, Meredith A.; Langner, L.; Larson, E.; McGinnis, D. L.; Moss, Richard H.; Nichols, L. G.; Nierenberg, Claudia; Seyller, E. A.; Stern, Paul; Winthrop, R.

    2014-08-01

    US efforts to integrate social and biophysical sciences to address the issue of global change exist within a wider movement to understand global change as a societal challenge and to inform policy. Insights from the social sciences can help transform global change research into action.

  18. Sustainable Energy for All A Framework for Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Edison Lobão, Minister of Energy and Mines of Brazil Peter Löscher, President and CEO, Siemens Helge Lund1 Sustainable Energy for All A Framework for Action The Secretary-General's High-level Group on Sustainable Energy for All January 2012 #12;2 The Secretary-General's High-level Group on Sustainable Energy

  19. White Bluffs Pickling Acid Cribs expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended in a letter dated March 4, 1992 (Attachment 1) that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the White Bluffs Pickling Acid Cribs Site. The lead regulatory agency for this ERA is the EPA, with Ecology providing support. The goal of this ERA is to reduce the potential of any residual contaminant migration from the cribs to the soil column and groundwater. The cribs are the only waste site within the 100-IU-5 operable unit. Since the operable unit is surrounded by other waste units, tracing the potential groundwater contamination from the 100-IU-5 operable unit for this ERA would not be effective. Groundwater will be investigated with the 100-IU-2 operable unit. This ERA proposal presents the characterization data from the site investigations conducted in November of 1992. This information is evaluated to present the best method for reducing potential of contaminant migration from the disposal unit, ensuring both protection of human health and the environment. The ERA proposal will undergo a public review. EPA and Ecology will issue an Action Agreement Memorandum after comment resolution. This Action Memorandum may authorize implementation of the ERA proposal`s recommended alternative. The ERA may also provide a No Further Action Interim Record of Decision (IROD) of the 100-IU-5 operable unit.

  20. Modeling a Snap-Action, Variable-Delay Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 2, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America When exposed to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or TNFModeling a Snap-Action, Variable-Delay Switch Controlling Extrinsic Cell Death John G. Albeck1

  1. HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA OF MULTIVALUED ACTION FUNCTIONALS ETTORE ALDROVANDI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA OF MULTIVALUED ACTION FUNCTIONALS ETTORE ALDROVANDI ABSTRACT. We outline­time'') which do not glue into a globally defined differential form (of top degree on M ). Amongst the primary density, that is, a top­degree form, is produced from a local ansatz, where ``local'' means

  2. Computing with Actions and Communications Wan Fokkink1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fokkink, Wan

    , process algebra, is logi- cally and mathematically interesting. On top of that, process algebra #12. In this paper we aim to give an im- pression of the algebra of actions and communications as it has been developed during the past quarter of a century. We present specifically the system ACP, Algebra

  3. FIRE Action Plan to Respond to Next Step Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2: Progress in implementing the action plan is limited to date. Some significant progress was made the performance of FIRE under the ITER98(y,2) confinement scaling law. Small perturbations around the design point the community (specifically #12;2 chosen from among the participants of the recent UFA Burning Plasma Science

  4. Board Interlocks and the Diffusion of Strategic Actions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, Nai Hua

    2014-04-10

    . In this dissertation, I specifically focus on mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in emerging markets as the strategic action of interest. Next, I turn to the theory of triads in structural sociology and examine the influence of a closed triad. I theorize that Simmelian...

  5. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

  6. SymposiumandIndustrialAffiliatesProgramLightinAction Industrial Affiliates Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    SymposiumandIndustrialAffiliatesProgramLightinAction #12;Industrial Affiliates Program Friday, 8 Session I Abstract: Recently Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been hailed as the "third industrial revolution" by Economist magazine [April -2012]. Precision of the product manufactured by AM largely depends

  7. RCCPB Working Paper #39 Collective Action Dilemmas in Technical Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robeson, Scott M.

    from the Internet of Things Industry Tian Bowen IU RCCPB Visiting Scholar & Ph.D. Candidate School's Internet of Things industry, this paper seeks to reveal the logic of collective action and suggest possible the Internet of Things industry ("IoT") as a technological frontier in which it has the chance to exert global

  8. Scaling study of an improved fermion action on quenched lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Gwi Cho; Shoji Hashimoto; Jun-Ichi Noaki; Takashi Kaneko; Andreas Jüttner; Justus Tsang; Marina Marinkovic

    2014-12-19

    We present scaling studies for heavy-quark observables calculated with an $O(a^2)$-improved fermion action on tree-level Symanzik improved gauge configurations. Lattices of $1/a = $ 2.0-3.8 GeV with an equal physical volume 1.6 fm are used. The results are compared with the standard domain-wall and naive Wilson fermions.

  9. Scaling study of an improved fermion action on quenched lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yong-Gwi; Noaki, Jun-Ichi; Kaneko, Takashi; Jüttner, Andreas; Tsang, Justus; Marinkovic, Marina

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling studies for heavy-quark observables calculated with an $O(a^2)$-improved fermion action on tree-level Symanzik improved gauge configurations. Lattices of $1/a = $ 2.0-3.8 GeV with an equal physical volume 1.6 fm are used. The results are compared with the standard domain-wall and naive Wilson fermions.

  10. Perturbative Check of the Action and Energy Lattice Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Feuerbacher

    2003-09-04

    Lattice sum rules are checked using lattice perturbation theory. The action sum rule gives a relation between the quark-antiquark potential, its logarithmic derivative with respect to distance and the expectation value of the action; the energy sum rule expresses the potential as the sum of the energy in the gluon fields and of an anomalous term. Two different independent calculations of the quark-antiquark potential are presented, and the transversality of the gluonic vacuum polarization on the lattice is proven. The crucial part of the action sum rule is an identity whose explicit check using perturbation theory provides methods and results which are useful for checking the energy sum rule. Additionally, the gauge invariance of the expectation value of the Wilson loop up to next-to-leading order is proven. The possibility of restricting the expectation value of the action to one fixed time slice is discussed. The energy sum rule is checked perturbatively up to next-to-leading order and shown to be satisfied with good numerical accuracy. The various contributions to the quark-antiquark potential are analyzed, and the restriction of the expectation value of the sum over all spatial plaquettes (the energy in the magnetic fields) to one fixed time slice is examined.

  11. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Coalgate, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

  12. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during February 1999. Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected at 0.6-m (2-ft) intervals from the surface to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1999b). Soil sample results indicated that two locations in the bermed area contain total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel at concentrations of 124 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 377 mg/kg. This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). The TPH-impacted soil will be removed and disposed as part of the corrective action.

  14. Conservation principles and actionConservation principles and action schemes in the synthesis ofschemes in the synthesis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pineda, Luis

    Diagrammatic reasoning Reasoning Learning Perception Design and creativity Theorem proving Ubiquitous in science Dr. Luis Pineda, IIMAS, UNAM, 2009 The theory...The theory... Action schemes (a synthetic machinery) A notion of re-interpretation A geometric description machinery Conservation principles The arithmetic

  15. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

  18. CORRRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 427: AREA 3 SEPTIC WASTE SYSTEMS 2 AND 6, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-06-23

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 (Corrective Action Unit 427) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 427 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites, each an individual septic waste system (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Septic Waste System 2 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW02. (2) Septic Waste System 6 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW06. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. From November 1997 through January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste System Numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997b). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated that contamination is present in some portions of the CAU and not in others as described in Table ES-1 and shown in Figure A.2-2 of Appendix A. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 427: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing TPH at concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per kilogram (NAC, 1996b). (2) Close Sep tic Tank 33-5 in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code 459 (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls; Alternative 3 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5, Excavation, and Disposal The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 427 is Alternative 2, Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils. During corrective action implementation, this alternative will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  19. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    redistribution by emissions trading) is the time for whichof offset such as emissions trading (see below). For thebefore any possible emissions trading, are plotted against

  20. Evaluating cumulative ascent: Mountain biking meets Mandelbrot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Rapaport

    2011-03-10

    The problem of determining total distance ascended during a mountain bike trip is addressed. Altitude measurements are obtained from GPS receivers utilizing both GPS-based and barometric altitude data, with data averaging used to reduce fluctuations. The estimation process is sensitive to the degree of averaging, and is related to the well-known question of determining coastline length. Barometric-based measurements prove more reliable, due to their insensitivity to GPS altitude fluctuations.

  1. SMOOTH INTERPOLATION WITH CUMULATIVE CHORD CUBICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozera, Ryszard

    and Software Engineering The University Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009 WA, Perth Australia Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009 WA, Perth Australia lyle@maths.uwa.edu.au Abstract Smooth

  2. Entanglement, noise, and the cumulant expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquín E. Drut; William J. Porter

    2015-08-19

    We put forward a variation of a recently proposed method to overcome the signal-to-noise problem found in Monte Carlo calculations of the entanglement entropy of interacting fermions. The present method takes advantage of the approximate lognormal distributions that characterize the signal-to-noise properties of other approaches. We test our technique by implementing it in combination with the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm and calculating the second R\\'enyi entanglement entropy of the 1D Hubbard model.

  3. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  4. Report - Considering Cumulative Effects Under NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: v2.7 Multiple<Energy domesticT-Mobile

  5. RESEARCH and RELATED BUDGET - Cumulative Budget

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget ||Department ofRequest for RecordsRESEARCH and RELATED

  6. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT/CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 527: HORN SILVER MINE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADDKR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). Corrective Action Unit 527 is located within Area 26 of the NTS and consists of CAS 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. This CADDKR refers to the site as CAU 527 or the Horn Silver Mine (HSM). This CADDKR provides or references the specific information necessary to support the closure of this CAU. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from November 12,2003 through January 21,2004. Additional sampling of liquid obtained from HSM-3 was conducted on May 3,2004. Corrective action investigation activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527 (NNSAiNV, 2002a). Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities identified the explosive nitrobenzene as a contaminant of concern (COC) on the floor of the 500-foot drift (HSM No.2). No other COCs were identified in the rock samples collected during the investigation activities. The air samples collected from borings HSM-1, HSM-2, and HSM-3 showed volatile organic compounds (primarily gasoline-related contaminants) to be present above the acceptable residential exposure criteria in the boreholes. A conservative modeling effort demonstrated that these concentrations would not migrate to the surface at concentrations that will present an unacceptable risk to future land users. However, other COCs are assumed to exist based on historical documentation on the types of waste placed in the shaft; therefore, the mine including the 300- and 500-foot drifts is considered to be contaminated above action levels. Current results of the field investigation show there are no active transport mechanisms or exposure routes for the contaminants identified in the 500-foot drift. The analytical data did not show the migration of COCs beyond the floor of the 500-foot drift or from the air within the drift. On a conservative basis, the subsurface volume of the zone of contamination is limited to a depth from 150 ft to a maximum of 670 feet below ground surface extending to a radius of 300 feet from the mineshaft. Based on these data, a use restriction will be established for this volume of soil. In addition, the security of the mineshaft is maintained and does not allow unauthorized personnel to enter the vicinity of the mineshaft. Since the removal of the contaminants is not feasible, the close in place with administrative controls corrective action alternative is appropriate because it will prevent inadvertent contact with the subsurface COCs and meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site. Post-closure monitoring will be conducted for one year. This monitoring will include using the lysimeter at HSM-3 and the data logger to measure precipitation-induced vadose zone moisture flow through the rock beneath the waste shaft at the Horn Silver Mine. Results of the monitoring will be documented in a letter report at the end of one year, anticipated in June 2005. A copy of this report will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. After one year of monitoring, a determination will be made by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office if future monitoring is needed or if use restriction boundaries need to be adjusted. If a large enough pulse of water moves into the lysimeter, a sample will he collected for laboratory analysis. If there is not sufficient volume of liquid collected for a sample or if no COCs are detected in collected samples at the end of this time period, it is recommended that the monitoring wells at the HSM be sealed in accordance with the State of Nevada regulations.

  7. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  8. Progress on four flavor QCD with the HISQ action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; A. Bazavov; C. Bernard; C. DeTar; W. Freeman; Steven Gottlieb; U. M. Heller; J. E. Hetrick; J. Laiho; L. Levkova; J. Osborn; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint; R. S. Van de Water

    2009-11-04

    We describe recent progress on generation of gauge configurations using the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action that was designed by the HPQCD/UKQCD collaboration. The HISQ action requires two levels of smearing with a reunitarization of the links before the second smearing. We describe how we deal with the occurrence of occasional large forces arising from the reunitarization step. The MILC collaboration is currently generating ensembles with approximate lattice spacings of 0.15, 0.12, 0.09, and 0.06 fm, with the strange and charm quark masses close to their physical values and the mass of the light quarks m_l set to 0.2 m_s. We present recent results for pion taste splittings, light hadron masses, the static potential, the eta_c dispersion relation and the topological susceptibility.

  9. ${\\cal N} = 1$ Euler Anomaly Flow from Dilaton Effective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochazka, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We consider ${\\cal N} =1$ supersymmetric gauge theories in the conformal window. The running of the gauge coupling is absorbed into the metric by applying a suitable matter superfield- and Weyl-transformation. The computation becomes equivalent to one of a free theory in a curved background carrying the information of the renormalisation group flow. We use the techniques of conformal anomaly matching and dilaton effective action, by Komargodski and Schwimmer, to rederive the difference of the Euler anomaly coefficient $\\Delta a \\equiv a_{\\rm UV} - a_{\\rm IR} $ for the ${\\cal N} =1$ theory. The structure of $\\Delta a $ is therefore in one-to-one correspondence with the Wess-Zumino dilaton action.

  10. Florida state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Florida. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  11. Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  12. Testing Topology Conserving Gauge Actions for Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -i. Nagai; K. Jansen; W. Bietenholz; L. Scorzato; S. Necco; S. Shcheredin

    2005-09-29

    We explore gauge actions for lattice QCD, which are constructed such that the occurrence of small plaquette values is strongly suppressed. Such actions originate from the admissibility condition in order to conserve the topological charge. The suppression of small plaquette values is expected to be advantageous for numerical studies in the $\\epsilon$-regime and also for simulations with dynamical quarks. Performing simulations at a lattice spacing of about 0.1 fm, we present numerical results for the static potential, the physical scale $r_0$, the stability of the topological charge history, the condition number of the kernel of the overlap operator and the acceptance rate against the step size in the local HMC algorithm.

  13. Improved Actions for QCD Thermodynamics on the Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Beinlich; F. Karsch; E. Laermann

    1995-10-18

    Finite cut-off effects strongly influence the thermodynamics of lattice regularized QCD at high temperature in the standard Wilson formulation. We analyze the reduction of finite cut-off effects in formulations of the thermodynamics of $SU(N)$ gauge theories with three different $O(a^2)$ and $O(a^4)$ improved actions. We calculate the energy density and pressure on finite lattices in leading order weak coupling perturbation theory ($T\\rightarrow \\infty$) and perform Monte Carlo simulations with improved $SU(3)$ actions at non-zero $g^2$. Already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$ we find a strong reduction of finite cut-off effects in the high temperature limit, which persists also down to temperatures a few times the deconfinement transition temperature.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham and Sam Marutzky

    2011-07-01

    This CADD/CAP follows the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) stage, which results in development of a set of contaminant boundary forecasts produced from groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the Frenchman Flat CAU. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located in the southeastern portion of the NNSS and comprises 10 underground nuclear tests. The tests were conducted between 1965 and 1971 and resulted in the release of radionuclides in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Two important aspects of the corrective action process are presented within this CADD/CAP. The CADD portion describes the results of the Frenchman Flat CAU data-collection and modeling activities completed during the CAI stage. The corrective action objectives and the actions recommended to meet the objectives are also described. The CAP portion describes the corrective action implementation plan. The CAP begins with the presentation of CAU regulatory boundary objectives and initial use restriction boundaries that are identified and negotiated by NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The CAP also presents the model evaluation process designed to build confidence that the flow and contaminant transport modeling results can be used for the regulatory decisions required for CAU closure. The first two stages of the strategy have been completed for the Frenchman Flat CAU. A value of information analysis and a CAIP were developed during the CAIP stage. During the CAI stage, a CAIP addendum was developed, and the activities proposed in the CAIP and addendum were completed. These activities included hydrogeologic investigation of the underground testing areas, aquifer testing, isotopic and geochemistry-based investigations, and integrated geophysical investigations. After these investigations, a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was developed to forecast contaminant boundaries that enclose areas potentially exceeding the Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards at any time within 1,000 years. An external peer review of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was completed, and the model was accepted by NDEP to allow advancement to the CADD/CAP stage. The CADD/CAP stage focuses on model evaluation to ensure that existing models provide adequate guidance for the regulatory decisions regarding monitoring and institutional controls. Data-collection activities are identified and implemented to address key uncertainties in the flow and contaminant transport models. During the CR stage, final use restriction boundaries and CAU regulatory boundaries are negotiated and established; a long-term closure monitoring program is developed and implemented; and the approaches and policies for institutional controls are initiated. The model evaluation process described in this plan consists of an iterative series of five steps designed to build confidence in the site conceptual model and model forecasts. These steps are designed to identify data-collection activities (Step 1), document the data-collection activities in the 0CADD/CAP (Step 2), and perform the activities (Step 3). The new data are then assessed; the model is refined, if necessary; the modeling results are evaluated; and a model evaluation report is prepared (Step 4). The assessments are made by the modeling team and presented to the pre-emptive review committee. The decision is made by the modeling team with the assistance of the pre-emptive review committee and concurrence of NNSA/NSO to continue data and model assessment/refinement, recommend additional data collection, or recommend advancing to the CR stage. A recommendation to advance to the CR stage is based on whether the model is considered to be sufficiently reliable for designing a monitoring system and developing effective institutional controls. The decision to advance to the CR stage or to return to step 1 of the process is then made by NDEP (Step 5).

  15. LA Intro RCED/PLR 1 Least Action, Lagrangian & Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    . There are two E - L equations r : mr # mr "2 + GMm r2 = 0; and " : d dt mr2 "( )= 0. The secon or stationary value ! S = (T "V)dt tA tB # #12;LA Intro RCED/PLR 6 Least Action by brute force x y O R A B C D ! y = v0 u0R " # $ % & 'x(R ( x) Numerical integration... Fixed distance R and time tR Horizontal

  16. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  17. Graphene membranes and the Dirac-Born-Infeld action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Babington

    2011-07-08

    We propose the use of the Dirac-Born-Infeld action in the phenomenological description of graphene sheet dynamics and interactions. Both the electronic properties of the Dirac fermions and the overall dynamics can be incorporated into this model. Classical static configurations, as well as quantum fluctuations of the membrane degrees of freedom can be studied in this framework. This makes it an interesting tool for Casimir physics and novel QED processes.

  18. Antimatter in the Direct-Action Theory of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, R E

    2015-01-01

    One of Feynman's greatest contributions to physics was the interpretation of negative energies as antimatter in quantum field theory. A key component of this interpretation is the Feynman propagator, which seeks to describe the behavior of antimatter at the virtual particle level. Ironically, it turns out that one can dispense with the Feynman propagator in a direct-action theory of fields, while still retaining the interpretation of negative energy solutions as antiparticles.

  19. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  20. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.