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1

33rd Actinide Separations Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

30th Actinide Separations Conference, PNNL-SA-50126  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program booklet for the 30th Actinide Separations Conference. Contains agenda and abstracts for 27 poster and 38 oral presentations to be made during the 3-day meeting, May 23-25, 2006.

Delegard, Calvin H.

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide separations conference Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

region 1, 2. 2. Separation in-29;ight and the parent21;daughter method for heavy... . Mnzenberg et al., Proc. Actinides-1981 Conference, Paci28;c Grove, Cali-...

4

Nineteenth annual actinide separations conference: Conference program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the abstracts from the conference presentations. Sessions were divided into the following topics: Waste treatment; Spent fuel treatment; Issues and responses to Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board 94-1; Pyrochemical technologies; Disposition technologies; and Aqueous separation technologies.

Bronson, M. [ed.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process – ALSEP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

Nash, Kenneth L.; Sue Clark; G. Patrick Meier; Spiro Alexandratos; Robert Paine; Robert Hancock; Dale Ensor

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Actinide and lanthanide separation process (ALSEP)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The process of the invention is the separation of minor actinides from lanthanides in a fluid mixture comprising, fission products, lanthanides, minor actinides, rare earth elements, nitric acid and water by addition of an organic chelating aid to the fluid; extracting the fluid with a solvent comprising a first extractant, a second extractant and an organic diluent to form an organic extractant stream and an aqueous raffinate. Scrubbing the organic stream with a dicarboxylic acid and a chelating agent to form a scrubber discharge. The scrubber discharge is stripped with a simple buffering agent and a second chelating agent in the pH range of 2.5 to 6.1 to produce actinide and lanthanide streams and spent organic diluents. The first extractant is selected from bis(2-ethylhexyl)hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and mono(2-ethylhexyl)2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (HEH(EHP)) and the second extractant is selected from N,N,N,N-tetra-2-ethylhexyl diglycol amide (TEHDGA) and N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-3-oxapentanediamide (TODGA).

Guelis, Artem V.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Separations and Actinide Science -- 2005 Roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Separations and Actinide Science Roadmap presents a vision to establish a separations and actinide science research (SASR) base composed of people, facilities, and collaborations and provides new and innovative nuclear fuel cycle solutions to nuclear technology issues that preclude nuclear proliferation. This enabling science base will play a key role in ensuring that Idaho National Laboratory (INL) achieves its long-term vision of revitalizing nuclear energy by providing needed technologies to ensure our nation's energy sustainability and security. To that end, this roadmap suggests a 10-year journey to build a strong SASR technical capability with a clear mission to support nuclear technology development. If nuclear technology is to be used to satisfy the expected growth in U.S. electrical energy demand, the once-through fuel cycle currently in use should be reconsidered. Although the once-through fuel cycle is cost-effective and uranium is inexpensive, a once-through fuel cycle requires long-term disposal to protect the environment and public from long-lived radioactive species. The lack of a current disposal option (i.e., a licensed repository) has resulted in accumulation of more than 50,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel. The process required to transition the current once-through fuel cycle to full-recycle will require considerable time and significant technical advancement. INL's extensive expertise in aqueous separations will be used to develop advanced separations processes. Computational chemistry will be expanded to support development of future processing options. In the intermediate stage of this transition, reprocessing options will be deployed, waste forms with higher loading densities and greater stability will be developed, and transmutation of long-lived fission products will be explored. SASR will support these activities using its actinide science and aqueous separations expertise. In the final stage, full recycle will be enabled by advanced reactors and reprocessing methods based on pyrochemical methods and by using different fuel cycles that do not readily produce plutonium. SASR will facilitate the deployment of advanced pyrochemical separation technology and support development of reprocessing of thorium-based reactor fuels.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Process to remove actinides from soil using magnetic separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of separating actinide-containing components from an admixture including forming a slurry including actinide-containing components within an admixture, said slurry including a dispersion-promoting surfactant, adjusting the pH of the slurry to within a desired range, and, passing said slurry through a pretreated matrix material, said matrix material adapted to generate high magnetic field gradients upon the application of a strong magnetic field exceeding about 0.1 Tesla whereupon a portion of said actinide-containing components are separated from said slurry and remain adhered upon said matrix material is provided.

Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Stewart, Walter F. (Las Cruces, NM); Tolt, Thomas L. (Los Alamos, NM); Worl, Laura A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

Maxwell, S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an extractant permits the extraction of metal ions form highly acidic environment through the ability

Scott, M.J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conjugates of Actinide Chelator-Magnetic Nanoparticles for Used Fuel Separation Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The actinide separation method using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with actinide specific chelators utilizes the separation capability of ligand and the ease of magnetic separation. This separation method eliminated the need of large quantity organic solutions used in the liquid-liquid extraction process. The MNPs could also be recycled for repeated separation, thus this separation method greatly reduces the generation of secondary waste compared to traditional liquid extraction technology. The high diffusivity of MNPs and the large surface area also facilitate high efficiency of actinide sorption by the ligands. This method could help in solving the nuclear waste remediation problem.

You Qiang; Andrzej Paszczynski; Linfeng Rao

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides separation chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

separation chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: actinides separation chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.emsl.pnl.gov...

19

Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Actinide-lanthanide separation with solvents on the base of amides of heterocyclic diacids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of actinides from lanthanides with a particular emphasis on Am(III) from Eu(III) with amides of heterocyclic dicarboxylic diacids was reviewed. It was shown that the di-amides of the 2,2'-dipyridyl-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid are the most promising ligands for the simultaneous selective recovery of actinides from HLLW (high level radioactive liquid waste) within the GANEX concept. (author)

Babain, V.A.; Alyapyshev, M.Y.; Tkachenko, L.I. [Khlopin Radium Institute, 28, 2ndMurinski pr., St-Petersburg, Russia 19402 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Separation and analysis of actinides by extraction chromatography coupled with alpha-particle liquid scintillation spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the development and testing of a new method for the separation and analysis of most actinides of interest in environmental samples. It combines simplified extraction chromatography using highly selective absorption resins (EiChrom columns) to partition the individual actinides with the measurement of their alpha-particle activities by liquid scintillation spectrometry using the Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{sup TM}) system. Water and soil samples along with environment quality-assurance standards are routinely processed by this method with an accuracy of {+-}5 to 20% at activity levels of 0.01 to 0.1 Bq.

Cadieux, J.R. Jr.; Reboul, S.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

actinide separations optimized: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(more) Potter, Michael Wayne 1981-01-01 2 Optimal distance separating halfspace Optimization Online Summary: which uses a proof based on the Kuhn-Tucker conditions). Corollary...

23

Test of Actinide-Lanthanide Separation in an Aluminum-Based Pyrochemical System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of the actinide and lanthanide distribution between a liquid metal and a molten fluoride salt shows a significant increase of the separation coefficient by using an aluminum-based pyrochemical system instead of a zinc-based system. The obtained values partly depend on the LiF/AlF{sub 3} ratio and can reach more than 30 000 when AlF{sub 3} is in excess with regard to the formation of the cryolite (Li{sub 3} AlF{sub 6}). Furthermore, in the metal phase, the aluminum interacts with the lanthanides to a lesser extent than in other usual metallic solvents. This opens a new way to explore the feasibility of the separation of actinides and lanthanides in the field of nuclear fuel reprocessing.

Rault, Laurence [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (France); Heusch, Murielle [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (France); Allibert, Michel [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (France); Lemort, Florent [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) (France); Deschane, Xavier [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) (France); Boen, Roger [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) (France)

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dynamic tests for actinide/lanthanide separation by CMPO solvent in fluorinated diluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Actinide and lanthanide extraction by new solvent: 0.2 M phenyl-octyl-N,N-diiso-butylcarbamoyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO) + 30% TBP + formal of octafluoro-pentanol was studied. A dynamic test with this solvent was performed. It was shown that americium and lanthanides are effectively extracted from PUREX process raffinate. The separation of americium from light lanthanides was confirmed in the modified SETFICS flowsheet with this new solvent. (authors)

Tkachenko, L.; Babain, V.; Alyapyshev, M.; Vizniy, A.; Il'in, A. [V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinskiy Ave 28., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Shadrin, A. [A.A. Bochvar High-technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, 5-a, Rogova str., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2011 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work conducted in FY 2011 at PNNL to investigate new methods of separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from the trivalent lanthanide elements, and separation of Am from Cm. For the former, work focused on a solvent extraction system combining an acidic extractant (HDEHP) with a neutral extractant (CMPO) to form a hybrid solvent extraction system referred to as TRUSPEAK (combining the TRUEX and TALSPEAK processes). For the latter, ligands that strongly bing uranyl ion were investigated for stabilizing corresponding americyl ion.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

2011-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Mincher, B.J. [Idaho National Lab, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Actinides-1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide separations final Sample Search...  

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us to explore alternatives to some... , of minor actinides, i.e. neptunium, americium and curium. If stored in geological depositories, plutonium... actinides than uranium fuels,...

31

Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their academic experience. New information has been developed to qualify the extraction potential of a class of pyridine-functionalized tetraaza complexants indicating potential single contact Am-Nd separation factors of about 40. The methodology developed for characterization will find further application in our continuing efforts to synthesize and characterize new reagents for this separation. Significant new insights into the performance envelope and supporting information on the TALSPEAK process has also been developed.

Kenneth L. Nash

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Separation and Analysis of Actinides by Extraction Chromotography Coupled with Alpha Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the development and testing of a new method for the separation and analysis of most actinides of interest in environmental samples. It combines simplified extraction chromatography using highly selective absorption resins to partition the individual actinides with the measurement of their alpha activities by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The liquid scintillation counting technique pioneered by McDowell proved useful in determination of alpha emitting radionuclide in a wide variety of matrices. Alpha emitters are chemically extracted into an organic phase which also contains the scintillation cocktail. Oxygen is purged from the solution to improve the energy resolution of the measurement and the counting sample is sealed in a small glass tube for assay. The Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{trademark}) Spectrometer provides high counting efficiency, low background, pulse shape discrimination for photon/electron/{beta} particle rejection and moderate energy resolution in a compact package. Chemical extraction/liquid scintillation counting significantly reduces the extensive chemical purification and electroplating required for conventional alpha spectrometry with semiconductor detectors. PERALS{trademark} analyses have been used routinely for quickly surveying suspect samples and determining the source of unknown alpha activities.

Cadieux, J.R.; Reboul, S.H.

1995-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

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of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) Summary: of the actinide elements such as uranium and plutonium is central to predicting nuclear weapons performance......

34

TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method 3). Performance testing with simulated and actual waste solutions indicated that the material performs as well as or better than batches of modified MST prepared at the laboratory-scale. Particle size data of the vendor-prepared modified MST indicates a broader distribution centered at a larger particle size and microscopy shows more irregular particle morphology compared to the baseline MST and laboratory prepared modified MST. Stirred-cell (i.e., dead-end) filter testing revealed similar filtration rates relative to the baseline MST for both the laboratory and vendor-prepared modified MST materials. Crossflow filtration testing indicated that with MST-only slurries, the baseline MST produced between 30-100% higher flux than the vendor-prepared modified MST at lower solids loadings and comparable flux at higher solids loadings. With sludge-MST slurries, the modified MST produced 1.5-2.2 times higher flux than the baseline MST at all solids loadings. Based on these findings we conclude that the modified MST represents a much improved sorbent for the separation of strontium and actinides from alkaline waste solutions and recommend continued development of the material as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

EXPERIENCE SUMMARY Development of the TALSqueak (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separation using QUicker Extractants and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trivalent actinides Development of Warm Water Oxidation chemistry for remediation of Hanford's K Basin Development of the LimeAid Process to compliment the efforts of Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant Investigation sludge remediation of the Hanford Site Determination of thermodynamic parameters for biphasic systems

36

Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS?) and determined to have high affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibited low, but measureable affinities for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solutions (pH 3 and 6). The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable in concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may be candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions.

Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Actinide extraction methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

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Separations Technologies... . Both aqueous and nonaqueous (elec- trometallurgical) methods have been developed to separate and reduce... as to tailor their design to take...

39

Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide ma recycling Sample Search Results  

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by a chemical process. These plants can however not separate neptunium, americium and curium (minor actinides... to developing a process for separation of the minor actinides...

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41

Gadolinium speciation with Tetradentate, N-donor extractants for minor actinide/lanthanide separation: an XRD, mass spectrometry and EPR study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrophobic organic molecules CyMe{sub 4}-BTPhen (1) and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP (2) have been developed and tuned over many years to be able to separate the trivalent actinides from the trivalent lanthanides (Ln) selectively in bi-phasic solvent extraction processes for the separation of the long-lived radio-toxic minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The ability of these N-donor ligands to perform this separation is poorly understood, as is their speciation with the metal ions when extracted into the organic phase. Our previous work has shown Ln{sup 3+} speciation to be largely 1:2 Ln:L in nature with another small molecule, either water or nitrate, occupying a cavity between the tetradentate bound N-donor ligands. The identity of the small molecule changes across the lanthanide series, and here we continue investigations into this speciation. Complexes of these N-donor ligands with Gd{sup 3+} have been synthesised and characterised by X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy. We show that the N-donor ligands have no effect on the electronic configuration of Gd{sup 3+} and that the lanthanide contraction with the steric rigidity of the N-donor ligand appears to determine the size of the cavity between the coordinated ligands. This in turn appears to control the identity of the small molecule on the ninth site in the 1:2 Gd:L species. (authors)

Whittaker, D.M. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sharrad, C.A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sproules, S. [Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Environmental research on actinide elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Feasibility of actinide separation from UREX-like raffinates using a combination of sulfur- and oxygen-donor extractants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synergistic combination of bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithios-phosphinic acid and trioctylphosphine oxide has been recently shown to selectively remove uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium from aqueous environment containing up to 0.5 M nitric acid and 5.5 g/l fission products. Here the feasibility of performing this complete actinide recovery from aqueous mixtures is forecasted for a new organic formulation containing sulfur donor extractant of modified structure based on Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction data. A mixture of bis(bis-m,m-trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-dithios-phosphinic acid and TOPO in toluene enhances the extraction performance, accomplishing Am/Eu differentiation in aqueous mixtures up to 1 M nitric acid. The new organic recipe is also less susceptible to oxidative damage resulting from radiolysis. (authors)

Zalupski, P.R.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Feasibility of actinide separation from UREX-like raffinates using a combination of sulfur- and oxygen-donor extractants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synergistic combination of bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithiosphosphinic acid and trioctylphosphine oxide has been recently shown to selectively remove uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium from aqueous environment containing up to 0.5 M nitric acid and 5.5 g/L fission products. Here the feasibility of performing this complete actinide recovery from aqueous mixtures is forecasted for a new organic formulation containing sulfur donor extractant of modified structure based on Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction data. A mixture of bis(bis-m,m-trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-dithiosphosphinic acid and TOPO in toluene enhances the extraction performance, accomplishing Am/Eu differentiation in aqueous mixtures up to 1 M nitric acid. The new organic recipe is also less susceptible to oxidative damage resulting from radiolysis.

Peter R. Zalupski; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Analysis of large soil samples for actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Actinide Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuideON STELLAWongActinide

48

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Research in actinide chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH[sup [minus

Choppin, G.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides phosphinic resins Sample Search...  

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Databases and Resources 11 Development of an Automatic Method for Americium and Plutonium Separation and Summary: tetravalent and hexavalent actinides present in the real sample,...

53

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrenedivinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like.

Muscatello, Anthony C. (Arvada, CO); Navratil, James D. (Arvada, CO); Saba, Mark T. (Arvada, CO)

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermochemistry of the actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of equilibria by Knudsen effusion techniques and the enthalpy of formation of the actinide atoms is briefly discussed. Thermochemical data on the sublimation of the actinide fluorides is used to calculate the enthalpies of formation and entropies of the gaseous species. Estimates are made for enthalpies and entropies of the tetrafluorides and trifluorides for those systems where data is not available. The pressure of important species in the tetrafluoride sublimation processes is calculated based on this thermochemical data.

Kleinschmidt, P.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Actinide recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for the removal of plutonium polymer and ionic actinides from aqueous solutions by absorption onto a solid extractant loaded on a solid inert support such as polystyrene-divinylbenzene. The absorbed actinides can then be recovered by incineration, by stripping with organic solvents, or by acid digestion. Preferred solid extractants are trioctylphosphine oxide and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and the like. 2 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.; Saba, M.T.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Characterization of transuranium actinide alloy phase diagrams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloys of Np have been studied less than those,of the neighboring elements, U and Pu; the higher actinides have received even less attention. Recent interest in {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and other actinide isotopes as significant, long-lived and highly radiotoxic nuclear waste components, and particularly the roles of metallic materials new handling/separations and remediation technologies, demands that this paucity of information concerning alloy behaviors be addressed. An additional interest in these arises from the possibility of revealing fundamental properties and bonding interactions, which would further characterize the unique electronic structures (e.g., 5f electrons) of the actinide elements. The small empirical knowledge basis presently available for understanding and modeling the alloying behavior of Np is summarized here, with emphasis on our recent results for the Np-Am, Np-Zr and Np-Fe phase diag rams. In view of the limited experimental data base for neptunium and the transplutonium metals, the value of semi-empirical intermetallic bonding models for predicting actinide alloy thermodynamics is evaluated.

Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.; Gensini, M.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ogawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan)

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Actinide halide complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Actinide halide complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Zwick, Bill D. (Santa Fe, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, David L. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

McKibbin, Terry T. (Larimer County, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

McKibbin, T.T.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

64

Minor Actinides Transmutation Scenario Studies in PWR with Innovative Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the innovative fuels (CORAIL, APA, MIX, MOX-UE) in current PWRs, it is theoretically possible to obtain different plutonium and minor actinides transmutation scenarios, in homogeneous mode, with a significant reduction of the waste radio-toxicity inventory and of the thermal output of the high level waste. Regarding each minor actinide element transmutation in PWRs, conclusions are : neptunium : a solution exists but the gain on the waste radio-toxicity inventory is not significant, americium : a solution exists but it is necessary to transmute americium with curium to obtain a significant gain, curium: Cm244 has a large impact on radiation and residual power in the fuel cycle; a solution remains to be found, maybe separating it and keeping it in interim storage for decay into Pu240 able to be transmuted in reactor.

Grouiller, J. P.; Boucher, L.; Golfier, H.; Dolci, F.; Vasile, A.; Youinou, G.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

65

Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

Gregorich, K.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile.

Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Jostsons, Adam (Eastwood, AU); Allender, Jeffrey S. (North Augusta, SC); Rankin, David Thomas (Aiken, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Status of development of actinide blanket processing flowsheets for accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accelerator-driven subcritical nuclear system is briefly described that transmutes actinides and selected long-lived fission products. An application of this accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept to spent fuel from a commercial nuclear power plant is presented as an example. The emphasis here is on a possible aqueous processing flowsheet to separate the actinides and selected long-lived fission products from the remaining fission products within the transmutation system. In the proposed system the actinides circulate through the thermal neutron flux as a slurry of oxide particles in heavy water in two loops with different average residence times: one loop for neptunium and plutonium and one for americium and curium. Material from the Np/Pu loop is processed with a short cooling time (5-10 days) because of the need to keep the total actinide inventory, low for this particular ATW application. The high radiation and thermal load from the irradiated material places severe constraints on the separation processes that can be used. The oxide particles are dissolved in nitric acid and a quarternary, ammonium anion exchanger is used to extract neptunium, plutonium, technetium, and palladium. After further cooling (about 90 days), the Am, Cm and higher actinides are extracted using a TALSPEAK-type process. The proposed operations were chosen because they have been successfully tested for processing high-level radioactive fuels or wastes in gram to kilogram quantities.

Dewey, H.J.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Schroeder, N.C.; Smith, B.F.; Villarreal, R.; Walker, R.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Yates, M.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fuels options conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the Fuels Options Conference held May 9-10, 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia are presented. Twenty-three papers were presented at the conference that dealt with fuels outlook; unconventional fuels; fuel specification, purchasing, and contracting; and waste fuels applications. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

PREPARATION AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF THREE NEW ACTINIDE (IV) BOROHYDRIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium tetrakis-borohydrides were prepared by a different reaction which involves the actinide tetrafluoride

Banks, Rodney Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Plutonium and minor actinides utilization in Thorium molten salt reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FUJI-12 reactor is one of MSR systems that proposed by Japan. The original FUJI-12 design considers Th/{sup 233}U or Th/Pu as main fuel. In accordance with the currently suggestion to stay away from the separation of Pu and minor actinides (MA), in this study we evaluated the utilization of Pu and MA in FUJI-12. The reactor grade Pu was employed in the present study as a small effort of supporting THORIMS-NES scenario. The result shows that the reactor can achieve its criticality with the Pu and MA composition in the fuel of 5.96% or more.

Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian,; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides recycling studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

minor Actinides (predominantly... of data, the study of the possibility of transmuting heavy actinides in PWRs, the development of codes... on purely minor actinide fuel,...

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burning experiment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

actinide burning molten salt - liquid f... for fission products and actinides in subcritical cores with different neutron spectra. This experiment... on purely minor actinide...

74

Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Reavis, J.G.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents For Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations.

Hobbs, D.; Nyman, M.; Clearfield, A.; Maginn, E.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selected as part of the Generation IV reactors .. - 4 -The development of Generation IV fast reactors can make aconcepts selected for the Generation IV reactors, three,

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the heavy metal density of carbide fuel is 6% smallera heavy metal density close to that of the carbide fuel butcarbide fuel or inert matrix dispersion fuel due to the lowered heavy metal

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996. 12 p. Toshinsky, G.I. , LMFBR Operation in the Nuclearand characterization of LMFBR carbide and nitride fuels andcores with oxide fuel, “LMFBR recycle Pu/U”, are used.

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxford ; New York ; Oxford University Press. Fuel- Trac,Spent Fuel / Reprocessing, in Nuclear Industry Statusto Burn Non-Fissile Fuels. 2008. GA. Energy Multiplier

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems.reactors: Fabrication and properties and their optimization.

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total 2009 USA supply of electricity, all sources2009 supply of electricity in the USA [62] – all sources of

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Uses for Depleted Uranium Oxide. 2009, DOE. p.15. WNA. Uranium and Depleted Uranium. 2009 [cited 2010R. , Direct Use of Depleted Uranium As Fuel in a Traveling-

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Expansion Module Gas-cooled Fast Reactor High Enrichedfast reactors: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), sodium-cooledderived from the Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). This core

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Actinide minimization using pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transuranic actinides dominate the long-term radiotoxity in spent LWR fuel. In an open fuel cycle, they impose a long-term burden on geologic repositories. Transmuting these materials in reactor systems is one way to ease ...

Visosky, Mark Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

None

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Spam Conferences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2015 International Conference on Power and Mechanical Engineering ... The 2014 Asia-Pacific Electronics and Electrical Engineering Conference (EEEC 2014) ...

91

Proceedings of 2009 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii Grant #0423484 Separation and Energy Use Performance of Material Recycling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#0423484 Separation and Energy Use Performance of Material Recycling Systems Timothy Gutowski Malima I Abstract: This paper outlines current research on the performance of recycling processes and systems of recycling processes. Descriptive terminology for separation performance is presented. The goal

Gutowski, Timothy

92

Final Report on Actinide Glass Scintillators for Fast Neutron Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of an experimental investigation of actinide glass scintillators for fast-neutron detection. It covers work performed during FY2012. This supplements a previous report, PNNL-20854 “Initial Characterization of Thorium-loaded Glasses for Fast Neutron Detection” (October 2011). The work in FY2012 was done with funding remaining from FY2011. As noted in PNNL-20854, the glasses tested prior to July 2011 were erroneously identified as scintillators. The decision was then made to start from “scratch” with a literature survey and some test melts with a non-radioactive glass composition that could later be fabricated with select actinides, most likely thorium. The normal stand-in for thorium in radioactive waste glasses is cerium in the same oxidation state. Since cerium in the 3+ state is used as the light emitter in many scintillating glasses, the next most common substitute was used: hafnium. Three hafnium glasses were melted. Two melts were colored amber and a third was clear. It barely scintillated when exposed to alpha particles. The uses and applications for a scintillating fast neutron detector are important enough that the search for such a material should not be totally abandoned. This current effort focused on actinides that have very high neutron capture energy releases but low neutron capture cross sections. This results in very long counting times and poor signal to noise when working with sealed sources. These materials are best for high flux applications and access to neutron generators or reactors would enable better test scenarios. The total energy of the neutron capture reaction is not the only factor to focus on in isotope selection. Many neutron capture reactions result in energetic gamma rays that require large volumes or high densities to detect. If the scintillator is to separate neutrons from gamma rays, the capture reactions should produce heavy particles and few gamma rays. This would improve the detection of a signal for fast neutron capture.

Bliss, Mary; Stave, Jean A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

Miller, S.M.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Maginn, Edward J.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred instead. Multiple vacuum box locations may be set-up to supply several ICP-MS units with purified sample fractions such that a high sample throughput may be achieved, while still allowing for rapid measurement of short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

Van Der Sluys, William G. (Missoula, MT); Burns, Carol J. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Molecular dynamics simulation and topological analysis of the network structure of actinide-bearing materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actinide waste production and storage is a complex problem, and a whole-cycle approach to actinide management is necessary to minimize the total volume of waste. In this dissertation, I examine three actinide-bearing ...

Dewan, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide partitioning studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA : Minor Actinide LLFP : Long... of data, the study of the possibility of transmuting heavy actinides in PWRs, the development of codes... and transmutation were divided in...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides conditioning synthese Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND CONCEPT EVOLUTIONS Summary: , of minor actinides, i.e. neptunium, americium and curium. If stored in geological depositories, plutonium... actinides than uranium fuels,...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide target preparation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for such materials... ' actinides, to distinguish them from the larger quantities of uranium and plutonium also present in the fuel... to extract and recycle all actinides in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concept of valence instabilities in light actinides has been... response of ICF rare earth compounds and actinide materials. -The important aspects of physical property......

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide halide complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide complexation kinetics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It has been observed that complexes of lanthanide, actinide, and transition metal activate... that these actinide alkyl complexes undergo interesting C-H and C-N bond...

104

QUANTIFICATION OF ACTINIDE ALPHA-RADIATION DAMAGE IN MINERALS AND CERAMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are large amounts of heavy alpha-emitters in nuclear waste and nuclear materials inventories stored in various sites around the world. These include plutonium and minor actinides such as americium and curium. In preparation for geological disposal there is a consensus that actinides that have been separated from spent nuclear fuel should be immobilised within mineral-based ceramics rather than glass. Over the long-term, the alpha-decay taking place in these ceramics will severely disrupt their crystalline structure and reduce their durability. A fundamental property in predicting cumulative radiation damage is the number of atoms permanently displaced per alpha–decay. Currently, this number is estimated as 1000-2000 atoms/alpha decay event. Here, we report nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-counting experiments that measure close to 5000 atoms/alpha decay event in radiation damaged natural zircons. New radiological NMR measurements on highly radioactive, 239Pu zircon show damage similar to that created by 238U and 232Th in mineral zircons at the same dose, indicating no significant effect of dose rate. Based on these measurements, the initially crystalline structure of a 10 wt% 239Pu zircon would be amorphous after only 1400 years in a geological repository. These measurements establish a basis for assessing the long-term structural durability of actinide-containing ceramics based on an atomistic understanding of the fundamental damage event.

Farnan, Ian E.; Cho, Herman M.; Weber, William J.

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Walls, Philip A. (Cronulla, AU); Brummond, William Allen (Livermore, CA); Armantrout, Guy A. (Livermore, CA); Herman, Connie Cicero (Pleasanton, CA); Hobson, Beverly F. (Livermore, CA); Herman, David Thomas (Pleasanton, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA); Farmer, Joseph (Tracy, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and groundwaters. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. This study expands considerably on prior work due to the combination of Pu oxidation studies (for Pu speciation/chemical reactivity information), Pu isotope ratio work (for Pu source function information), and the detailed characterization of organic matter in size-fractionated groundwater samples. They have postulated that actinide associations with organic matter may be enhanced due to colloidal biopolymers. This report summarizes work completed after less than 2 years of a 3-year project. Activities thus far have included: (1) the development of sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, (2) the separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state in groundwater, (3) the development of techniques for the separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters, (4) a study of background Pu and organic carbon concentrations at the proposed study sites, and (5) field work at the Savannah River site (SRS).'

Buesseler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (US); Kelley, J.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide iii cations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Actinide(III) 2.26x10-7 log f(CO2) -5.50 Actinide(IV) 5.66x10... Actinide(III) case: Americium in WIPP Brine 12;Figure 2 Actinide(V) case: Neptunium in WIPP Brine 12... November...

109

CATEE Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference is coming to North Texas on Nov. 18-20, 2014, at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel.

110

Proliferation Resistance Evaluation of ACR-1000 Fuel with Minor Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and to enhance the spent fuel proliferation resistance. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs can play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In this work, an Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) fuel unit lattice cell model with 43 UO2 fuel rods will be used to investigate the effectiveness of a Minor Actinide Reduction Approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance. The main MARA objective is to increase the 238Pu / Pu isotope ratio by using the transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel and thereby increase the proliferation resistance even for a very low fuel burnup. As a result, MARA is a very effective approach to enhance the proliferation resistance for the on power refueling ACR system nuclear fuel. The MA transmutation characteristics at different MA loadings were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality assessed. The concept of MARA, significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy reconnaissance

Gray S. Chang

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

Timothy A. Hyde

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Separation of strontium from fecal matter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is presented of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

Kester, D.K.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Separation of strontium from fecal matter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of separating strontium from a sample of biomass potentially contaminated with various radionuclides. After the sample is reduced, dissociated, and carried on a first precipitate of actinides, the first precipitate is removed to leave a supernate. Next, oxalic acid is added to the supernate to cause a second precipitate of strontium and calcium. Then, after separating the second precipitate, nitric acid is added to the second precipitate to cause a third precipitate of strontium. The calcium remains in solution and is discarded to leave essentially the precipitate of strontium.

Kester, Dianne K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on key intergroup and intragroup separations found in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, specifically americium from lanthanides and americium from other actinides, most importantly americium from curium. Our goal...

Burns, Jonathan

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ultracapacitor separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris (Schenectady, NY)

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

12th international coal testing conference. Volume XII  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proceedings of the Twelfth International Coal Testing Conference are presented. The Conference was held September 8-11, 1996 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Fifteen papers were presented at the Conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Third technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conference dealt with the estimation of US peat reserves, methods for the gasification of peat, including biogasification, techniques for dewatering peat, and the harvesting of peat. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

actinide consumption nuclear: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the ThU fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on...

120

Review Article: The Effects of Radiation Chemistry on Solvent Extraction 3: A Review of Actinide and Lanthanide Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partitioning of the long-lived ?-emitters and the high-yield fission products from dissolved nuclear fuel is a key component of processes envisioned for the safe recycling of nuclear fuel and the disposition of high-level waste. These future processes will likely be based on aqueous solvent extraction technologies for light water reactor fuel and consist of four main components for the sequential separation of uranium, fission products, group trivalent actinides and lanthanides, and then trivalent actinides from lanthanides. Since the solvent systems will be in contact with highly radioactive solutions, they must be robust toward radiolytic degradation in an irradiated mixed organic, aqueous acidic environment. Therefore, an understanding of their radiation chemistry is important to the design of a practical system. In the first paper in this series we reviewed the radiation chemistry of irradiated aqueous nitric acid and the tributyl phosphate ligand for uranium extraction in the first step of these extractions. In the second, we reviewed the radiation chemistry of the ligands proposed for use in the extraction of cesium and strontium fission products. Here, we review the radiation chemistry of the ligands that might be used in the third step in the series of separations, for the group extraction of the lanthanides and actinides. This includes traditional organophosphorous reagents such as CMPO and HDEHP, as well as novel reagents such as the amides and diamides currently being investigated.

Bruce J. Mincher; Giuseppe Modolo; Stephen P. Mezyk

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS have been conducted. In this work, fission cross section resulted from MCNP6 prediction will be compared with result from TALYS calculation. MCNP6 with its event generator CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 have been validated and verified for several intermediate and heavy nuclides fission reaction data and also has a good agreement with experimental data for fission reaction that induced by photons, pions, and nucleons at energy from several ten of MeV to about 1 TeV. The calculation that induced within TALYS will be focused mainly to several hundred MeV for actinide and sub-actinide nuclides and will be compared with MCNP6 code and several experimental data from other evaluator.

Perkasa, Y. S. [Department of Physics, Sunan Gunung Djati State Islamic University Bandung, Jl. A.H Nasution No. 105 Cibiru, Bandung (Indonesia); Waris, A., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, R., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Su'ud, Z., E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

2015 Brownfields Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The 2015 Brownsfield Conference is a three-day conference focused on environmental revitalization and economic redevelopment. The conference has educational sessions with expert speakers,...

123

FY06 ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT #95061STRATEGIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF INORGANIC SORBENTSFOR CESIUM, STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations. During the fifth year of the project our studies focused along the following paths: (1) determination of Cs{sup +} ion exchange mechanism in sodium titanium silicates with sitinikite topology and the influence of crystallinity on ion exchange, (2) synthesis and characterization of novel peroxo-titanate materials for strontium and actinide separations, and (3) further refinements in computational models for the CST and polyoxoniobate materials.

Hobbs, D

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Neptunium separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two procedures for the separation of Np are presented; the first involves separation of /sup 239/Np from irradiated /sup 238/U, and the second involves separation of /sup 237/Np from a solution representing that from a dissolved fuel element.

Wild, J.F.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

Moody, K.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

RADIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF NEUTRON DEFICIENT ACTINIDE ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Column Chromatography 2. Americium and Curium t IV. COUNTINGberkellum, curium, and americium compared with theirfor the separation of curium and americium (trans- plutonium

Williams, Kimberly Eve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide standard ii-iii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a-U (*) Summary: and costly. Thus, while we were able to study the light and heavy actinide metals 1 in their cubic (high... applied to the study of some actinide...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide compound ufe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

49, dkcembre 1988 Summary: and actinide Laves phases. In comparison with RFE2 (R Rare earth) Laves phase compounds CeFe2 exhibits... M2 (Ac actinides) 5demon- strates that...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide system inconsistencies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of actinide metals Summary: heats of actinide metals M. J. Mortimer Chemistry Division, AERE Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 ORA, G... 'volution de ces grandeurs ainsi que celle de...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides exposure review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of actinide metals Summary: heats of actinide metals M. J. Mortimer Chemistry Division, AERE Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 ORA, G... 'volution de ces grandeurs ainsi que celle de...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide alloys Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of actinide metals Summary: heats of actinide metals M. J. Mortimer Chemistry Division, AERE Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 ORA, G... 'volution de ces grandeurs ainsi que celle de...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide chemistry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: actinide chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.emsl.pnl.gov ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide complexes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(04-400) Summary: of the electronic properties and reactions of actinide and transition metal complexes. Hay, who is a Laboratory... as a leader in actinide chemistry, Burns was...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide decay series Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

page C2-841 Summary: in the actinide series whereas the acti 1 es up to Pu metal are transition metal likeq" : The f states in Am... aux actinides metalliques et aux oxydes sont...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide complexing agent Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(04-400) Summary: of the electronic properties and reactions of actinide and transition metal complexes. Hay, who is a Laboratory... as a leader in actinide chemistry, Burns was...

137

Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, {sup 203}Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste simulant and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl{sub 2} from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. An experimental flowsheet was designed from the batch contact tests and tested counter-currently using 5.5 cm centrifugal contactors. Results from the counter-current test show that mercury can be removed from the acidic mixed SBW simulant and recovered separately from the actinides.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Enhancing BWR Proliferation Resistance Fuel with Minor Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. To accomplish these goals, international cooperation is very important and public acceptance is crucial. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu and 240Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu /Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm3) to the top (0.35 g/cm3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. We concluded that the concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides (237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in atoms for peace and the intermediate term of nuclear energy rennaissance.

Gray S. Chang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Eighth national passive solar conference. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighth National Passive Solar Conference was held near Santa Fe, New Mexico at the Glorieta Conference Center on September 5 to 11, 1983. Nearly 900 people from all across the nation and the world attended the conference. Close to 200 technical papers were presented, 50 solar product exhibits were available; 34 poster sessions were presented; 16 solar workshops were conducted; 10 renowned solar individuals participated in rendezvous sessions; 7 major addresses were delivered; 5 solar home tours were conducted; 2 emerging architecture sessions were held which included 21 separate presentations; and commercial product presentations were given for the first time ever at a national passive solar conference. Peter van Dresser of Santa Fe received the prestigious Passive Solar Pioneer Award, posthumously, from the American Solar Energy Society and Benjamin T. Buck Rogers of Embudo received the prestigious Peter van Dresser Award from the New Mexico Solar Energy Association. This report reviews conference organization, attendance, finances, conference evaluation form results, and includes press coverage samples, selected conference photos courtesy of Marshall Tyler, and a summary with recommendations for future conferences. The Appendices included conference press releases and a report by the New Mexico Solar Industry Development Corporation on exhibits management.

Owen, A.; Zee, R.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method for recovery of actinides from actinide-bearing scrap and waste nuclear material using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for recovery of actinides from nuclear waste material containing sintered and other oxides thereof and from scrap materials containing the metal actinides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ to generate the hexafluorides of the actinides present therein. The fluorinating agent, O/sub 2/F/sub 2/, has been observed to perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are not detroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is readily prepared, stored and transferred to the place of reaction.

Asprey, L.B.; Eller, P.G.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

actinide materials annual: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

actinide materials annual First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Molecular dynamics simulation...

147

Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, was suggested which would yield a superior fit to the measured data. A series of measurements were performed to test the hypothesis suggested by this alternate group structure. Using a set of highly purified actinide samples (provided by Oak Ridge National...

Charlton, William S.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

actinides loading optimization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

actinides loading optimization First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Building load control...

149

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Conference Waiver  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 * September 2005|Conference

151

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

Noble, James S.

152

Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Toward understanding the thermodynamics of TALSPEAK process. Medium effects on actinide complexation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ingenious combination of lactate and diethylenetriamine-N,N,N’,N”,N”-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) as an aqueous actinide-complexing medium forms the basis of the successful separation of americium and curium from lanthanides known as the TALSPEAK process. While numerous reports in the prior literature have focused on the optimization of this solvent extraction system, considerably less attention has been devoted to the understanding of the basic thermodynamic features of the complex fluids responsible for the separation. The available thermochemical information of both lactate and DTPA protonation and metal complexation reactions are representative of the behavior of these ions under idealized conditions. Our previous studies of medium effects on lactate protonation suggest that significant departures from the speciation predicted based on reported thermodynamic values should be expected in the TALSPEAK aqueous environment. Thermodynamic parameters describing the separation chemistry of this process thus require further examination at conditions significantly removed from conventional ideal systems commonly employed in fundamental solution chemistry. Such thermodynamic characterization is the key to predictive modelling of TALSPEAK. Improved understanding will, in principle, allow process technologists to more efficiently respond to off-normal conditions during large scale process operation. In this report, the results of calorimetric and potentiometric investigations of the effects of aqueous electrolytes on the thermodynamic parameters for lactate protonation and lactate complexation of americium and neodymium will be presented. Studies on the lactate protonation equilibrium will clearly illustrate distinct thermodynamic variations between strong electrolyte aqueous systems and buffered lactate environment.

Peter R Zalupski; Leigh R Martin; Ken Nash; Yoshinobu Nakamura; Masahiko Yamamoto

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and groundwaters. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. This study expands considerably on prior work due to the combination of Pu oxidation studies (for Pu speciation/chemical reactivity information), Pu isotope ratio work (for Pu source function information), and the detailed characterization of organic matter in size-fractionated groundwater samples. The authors have postulated that actinide associations with organic matter may be enhanced due to colloidal biopolymers. This report summarizes work completed after less than 2 years of a 3-year project. Activities thus far have included: (1) the development of sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, (2) the separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state in groundwater, (3) the development of techniques for the separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters, (4) a study of background Pu and organic carbon concentrations at the proposed study sites, and (5) field work at the Savannah River Site (SRS).'

Buesseler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (US); Kelley, J.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

Dr. Ronald Baney

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of Dodecaniobate Keggin Chain Materials as Alternative Sorbents for SR and Actinide Removal from High-Level Nuclear Waste Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current baseline sorbent (monosodium titanate) for Sr and actinide removal from Savannah River Site's high level wastes has excellent adsorption capabilities for Sr but poor performance for the actinides. We are currently investigating the development of alternative materials that sorb radionuclides based on chemical affinity and/or size selectivity. The polyoxometalates, negatively-charged metal oxo clusters, have known metal binding properties and are of interest for radionuclide sequestration. We have developed a class of Keggin-ion based materials, where the Keggin ions are linked in 1- dimensional chains separated by hydrated, charge-balancing cations. These Nb-based materials are stable in the highly basic nuclear waste solutions and show good selectivity for Sr and Pu. Synthesis, characterization and structure of these materials in their native forms and Sr-exchanged forms will be presented.

Nyman, May; Bonhomme, Francois

2004-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Conference Talks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 ComputationalConcentratingPrincetonConference Talks 1-2

158

Separation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

Rubin, Leslie S. (Newton, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Complexation of lanthanides and actinides by acetohydroxamic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a suitable reagent for the complexant-based, as opposed to reductive, stripping of plutonium and neptunium ions from the tributylphosphate solvent phase in advanced PUREX or UREX processes designed for future nuclear-fuel reprocessing. Stripping is achieved by the formation of strong hydrophilic complexes with the tetravalent actinides in nitric acid solutions. To underpin such applications, knowledge of the complexation constants of AHA with all relevant actinide (5f) and lanthanide (4f) ions is therefore important. This paper reports the determination of stability constants of AHA with the heavier lanthanide ions (Dy-Yb) and also U(IV) and Th(IV) ions. Comparisons with our previously published AHA stability-constant data for 4f and 5f ions are made. (authors)

Taylor, R.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Sinkov, S.I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utilities and energy efficiency: new opportunities and risks. Conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A separate abstract was prepared for each of the eight papers (with discussions) presented at the conference. All abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Proceedings of the tenth conference on explosives and blasting technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-nine papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 5 papers for the Energy Data Base. The remaining 24 papers were not in scope for EDB.

Konya, C.J. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparative Study of f-Element Electronic Structure across a Series of Multimetallic Actinide, Lanthanide-Actinide and Lanthanum-Actinide Complexes Possessing Redox-Active Bridging Ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative examination of the electronic interactions across a series of trimetallic actinide and mixed lanthanide-actinide and lanthanum-actinide complexes is presented. Using reduced, radical terpyridyl ligands as conduits in a bridging framework to promote intramolecular metal-metal communication, studies containing structural, electrochemical, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented for (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}An[-N=C(Bn)(tpy-M{l_brace}C{sub 5}Me4R{r_brace}{sub 2})]{sub 2} (where An = Th{sup IV}, U{sup IV}; Bn = CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; M = La{sup III}, Sm{sup III}, Yb{sup III}, U{sup III}; R = H, Me, Et) to reveal effects dependent on the identities of the metal ions and R-groups. The electrochemical results show differences in redox energetics at the peripheral 'M' site between complexes and significant wave splitting of the metal- and ligand-based processes indicating substantial electronic interactions between multiple redox sites across the actinide-containing bridge. Most striking is the appearance of strong electronic coupling for the trimetallic Yb{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Yb{sup III}, Sm{sup III}-U{sup IV}-Sm{sup III}, and La{sup III}-U{sup IV}-La{sup III} complexes, [8]{sup -}, [9b]{sup -} and [10b]{sup -}, respectively, whose calculated comproportionation constant K{sub c} is slightly larger than that reported for the benchmark Creutz-Taube ion. X-ray absorption studies for monometallic metallocene complexes of U{sup III}, U{sup IV}, and U{sup V} reveal small but detectable energy differences in the 'white-line' feature of the uranium L{sub III}-edges consistent with these variations in nominal oxidation state. The sum of this data provides evidence of 5f/6d-orbital participation in bonding and electronic delocalization in these multimetallic f-element complexes. An improved, high-yielding synthesis of 4{prime}-cyano-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine is also reported.

Schelter, Eric J.; Wu, Ruilian; Veauthier, Jacqueline M.; Bauer, Eric D.; Booth, Corwin H.; Thomson, Robert K.; Graves, Christopher R.; John, Kevin D.; Scott, Brian L.; Thompson, Joe D.; Morris, David E.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

ACTINIDE-SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS AND DECONTAMINATION APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have briefly reviewed the biological hazards associated with the actinide elements. The most abundant transuranium element produced by both industrial nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons programs is plutonium. It is also potentially the most toxic - particularly due to its long-term hazard as a carcinogen if it is introduced into the body. This toxicity is due in large part to the chemical and biochemical similarities of Pu(IV) and Fe(III). Thus in mammals plutonium is transported and stored by the transport and storage systems for iron. This results in the concentration and long-term retention of an alpha-emitting radionuclide ({sup 239}Pu) at sites such as the bone marrow where cell division occurs at a high rate. The earliest attempts at removal of actinide contamination by chelation therapy were essentially heuristic in that sequestering agents known to be effective at binding other elements were tried with plutonium. The research described here is intended to be a rational approach that begins with the observation that since Fe(III) and Pu(IV) are so similar, and since microbes produce agents called siderophores that are extremely effective and selective sequestering agents for Fe(III), the construction of similar chelating agents for the actinides should be possible using the same chelating groups found in the siderophores. The incorporation of four such groups (primarily catechol and hydroxamic acid) results in multidentate chelating agents that can completely encapsulate the central actinide(IV) ion and achieve the eight-coordinate environment most favored by such ions. The continuing development and improvement of such sequestering agents has produced compounds which remove significant amounts of plutonium deposited in bone and which remove a greater fraction of the total body burden than any other chelation therapy developed to date.

Smith, William L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A very import, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. THe use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements )e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations.

P.E.D. Morgan; R.M. Housley; J.B. Davis; M.L. DeHaan

2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

Stout, D.L. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Carroll, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide recovery process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

report, April 2006 The report can... is a trivalent actinide and a chemical analog to curium, and it has many chemical similarities to trivalent... complexes stay in solution....

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides storage host Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the most developed of the immobilisation technologies... - emitting radionuclides of heavy metals (actinides, Raand Po). The specific activity of the ash ... Source:...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides including cm Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of waste actinides. Such damage can be studied by many techniques, including heavy-ionfast neutron... were presented and proposed, including; Fundamental studies...

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced actinide fuels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breeder Summary: energy moderation, actinide solubility, and initial fuel inventory. For heavy nuclei (HN) proportions... the fuel refabrication problem in the presence of...

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide decay heat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

then on, it is the actinides... --specifically, isotopes of plutonium, americium, and curium--that will contribute most to radioactive ... Source: Massachusetts Institute of...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides review hyperfine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, European... bande et la nature des liaisons chimiques sont tudies, pour les mtaux et composs d'actinides, ...

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides ix behavior Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Torstein - Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet Collection: Physics ; Materials Science 5 One-electron physics of the actinides A. Toropova, C. A. Marianetti, K....

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide region progress Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Databases and Resources 71 The materials test station: A fast-spectrum irradiation facility Eric J. Pitcher Summary: with significant inclusion of plutonium and minor actinides....

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide intermetallic laves-phase Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. - Essentially atomic electron-polaron mechanism reducing the magnetic moments of rare-earth and actinide... elements in intermetallic compounds is proposed. This mechanism is...

179

Crystal Chemistry of Early Actinides (Thorium, Uranium, and Neptunium) and Uranium Mesoporous Materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite their considerable global importance, the structural chemistry of actinides remains understudied. Thorium and uranium fuel cycles are used in commercial nuclear reactors in India… (more)

Sigmon, Ginger E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

importance in the chemistry of uranium, and these species5f orbitals in the chemistry of uranium complexes. Using CHchemistry studies involving the actinides dealt with volatile uranium

Heaven, Michael C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides bilan des Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(March 1977) p. 43. 8... heats of actinide metals M. J. Mortimer Chemistry Division, AERE ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 73...

182

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate an Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory to support chemical research activities related to the...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide partitioning part Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lowest f... . 2. -Variation of the atomic volume along the actinide, lanthanide and transition metal series Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide bearing nitride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 41 Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides Summary: ) of transition metals, rare earths and actinides in...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide transmutation reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

All these names are used... . The idea of combining powerful accelerators - with a subcritical reactor for transmutation purposes... homogeneous fuel Actinides MgO Tc Fast...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner core Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the fuel... of minor actinides whose management would be problematic. Scenario with Light Water Reactors and Fast... and difficult process. Indeed, a 1 GWe reactor, whether it is...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide based fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MA represents minor actinides such as Np, Am, and Cm. Fuel... of the performance on the subcritical level. Numerical experiments are carried out on a ... Source: Royal Institute...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide measurement quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 LA-UR 09-03222 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Summary: assurance QAPD Quality Assurance Program Document SNL Sandia National Laboratories SOTERM Actinide Source... on the...

189

LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and interactions occurring within the plasma, such as collisional energy transfer, that might be a factor in the reduction in neptunium emission lines. Neptunium has to be analyzed alone using LIBS to further understand the dynamics that may be occurring in the plasma of the mixed actinide fuel pellet sample. The LIBS data suggests that the emission spectrum for the mixed actinide fuel pellet is not simply the sum of the emission spectra of the pure samples but is dependent on the species present in the plasma and the interactions and reactions that occur within the plasma. Finally, many of the neptunium lines are in the near infrared region which is drastically reduced in intensity by the current optical setup and possibly the sensitivity of the emission detector in the spectral region. Once the optics are replaced and the optical collection system is modified and optimized, the probability of observing emission lines for neptunium might be increased significantly. The mixed actinide fuel pellet was analyzed under the experimental conditions listed in Table 1. The LIBS spectra of the fuel pellet are shown in Figures 1-49. The spectra are labeled with the observed wavelength and atomic species (both neutral (I) and ionic (II)). Table 2 is a complete list of the observed and literature based emission wavelengths. The literature wavelengths have references including NIST Atomic Spectra Database (NIST), B.A. Palmer et al. 'An Atlas of Uranium Emission Intensities in a Hollow Cathode Discharge' taken at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), R.L. Kurucz 1995 Atomic Line Data from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), J. Blaise et al. 'The Atomic Spectrum of Plutonium' from Argonne National Laboratory (BFG), and M. Fred and F.S. Tomkins, 'Preliminary Term Analysis of Am I and Am II Spectra' (FT). The dash (-) shown under Ionic State indicates that the ionic state of the transition was not available. In the spectra, the dash (-) is replaced with a question mark (?). Peaks that are not assigned are most likely real features and not noise but cannot be confidently assi

Judge, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

Particle separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Second technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The program includes peat resource surveys of eleven states, peat gasification process and equipment studies, dewatering studies, and environmental and socioeconomic factors in the development of peat technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for selected papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conference sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), was held on waste management. Topics included waste management, site remediation, waste minimization, economic and social aspects of waste management, and waste management training. Several case studies of US DOE facilities are included. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fourth technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The papers presented dealt with peat dewatering, international peat programs, environmental and socio-economic factors, peat gasification, peat harvesting, and the state peat surveys for 14 states. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Validation of Minor Actinide Cross Sections by Studying Samples Irradiated for 492 Days at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor - II: Burnup Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate neutron cross-section data of minor actinides (MAs), separated actinide samples and dosimetry samples were irradiated at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor for 492 effective full-power days. Irradiated samples were analyzed both at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This independent duplication has resulted in the generation of reliable radiochemical analysis data. Based on the burnup calculations of major actinide ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and dosimetry samples, the neutron flux distribution and the flux level were adjusted at the locations where MA samples were irradiated. The burnup calculations were carried out for MAs using the determined flux distribution and flux level. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data. A brief description of sample preparation and irradiation and a detailed discussion of radiochemical analysis at JAERI are given in a companion paper. The current paper discusses the burnup calculations and the validation of MA cross-section data in evaluated nuclear data libraries.

Tsujimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kohno, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Shinohara, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Sakurai, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Nakahara, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by; Uranium isotopes separation) Iteration methods (seemethod for activity coefficients, 43, 481 Uranium isotopes separation,

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A TRUEX-based separation of americium from the lanthanides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: The inextractability of the actinide AnO2+ ions in the TRUEX process suggests the possibility of a separation of americium from the lanthanides using oxidation to Am(V). The only current method for the direct oxidation of americium to Am(V) in strongly acidic media is with sodium bismuthate. We prepared Am(V) over a wide range of nitric acid concentrations and investigated its solvent extraction behavior for comparison to europium. While a separation is achievable in principal, the presence of macro amounts of cerium competes for the sparingly soluble oxidant and the oxidant itself competes for CMPO complexation. These factors conspire to reduce the Eu/Am separation factor from ~40 using tracer solutions to ~5 for extractions from first cycle raffinate simulant solution. To separate pentavalent americium directly from the lanthanides using the TRUEX process, an alternative oxidizing agent will be necessary.

Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt; Mary E. Case

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder E. Merle-Lucotte, D. Heuer, C. Le actinides. Studies [1] have thus been done on the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) [2] of Oak-Ridge to re fluoride salt LiF- ThF4 with 28%- mole 232 Th. This reflector, corresponding to a fertile blanket

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses--Criticality (keff) Predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most significant remaining challenges associated with expanded implementation of burnup credit in the United States is the validation of depletion and criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation - in particular, the availability and use of applicable measured data to support validation, especially for fission products. Applicants and regulatory reviewers have been constrained by both a scarcity of data and a lack of clear technical basis or approach for use of the data. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff have noted that the rationale for restricting their Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issue of validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach (both depletion and criticality) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the criticality (k{sub eff}) validation approach, and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the isotopic composition (depletion) calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For criticality validation, the approach is to utilize (1) available laboratory critical experiment (LCE) data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) program to support validation of the principal actinides and (2) calculated sensitivities, nuclear data uncertainties, and the limited available fission product LCE data to predict and verify individual biases for relevant minor actinides and fission products. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for representative pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor safety analysis models to demonstrate its usage and applicability, (3) provides reference bias results based on the prerelease SCALE 6.1 code package and ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross-section data, and (4) provides recommendations for application of the results and methods to other code and data packages.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Actinide Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements At LANSCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous data.

Tovesson, F.; Laptev, A. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Hill, T. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

UCN Actinides | Ultracold Neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S.1,summer gasoline priceActinides

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201

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

202

Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

Welch, R.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

DISTRIBUTION OF LANTHANIDE AND ACTINIDE ELEMENTS BETWEEN BIS-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHOSPHORIC ACID AND BUFFERED LACTATE SOLUTIONS CONTAINING SELECTED COMPLEXANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the renewed interest in the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, the TALSPEAK process is being considered for the separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanide fission products in a next generation reprocessing plant. However, an efficient separation requires tight control of the pH which likely will be difficult to achieve on a large scale. To address this issue, we measured the distribution of lanthanide and actinide elements between aqueous and organic phases in the presence of complexants which were potentially less sensitive to pH control than the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) used in the process. To perform the extractions, a rapid and accurate method was developed for measuring distribution coefficients based on the preparation of lanthanide tracers in the Savannah River National Laboratory neutron activation analysis facility. The complexants tested included aceto-, benzo-, and salicylhydroxamic acids, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), and ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}SCN). The hydroxamic acids were the least effective of the complexants tested. The separation factors for TPEN and NH{sub 4}SCN were higher, especially for the heaviest lanthanides in the series; however, no conditions were identified which resulted in separations factors which consistently approached those measured for the use of DTPA.

Rudisill, Tracy S.; Diprete, David P.; Thompson, Major C.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been determined that poorly crystalline CST and SNT prepared at low temperature (100-150 C) exhibit much faster kinetics in uptake of Sr2+. In-situ X-ray studies has shown that SNT is a precursor phase to the formation of CST. It is possible to form mixtures of CST and SNT in a single reactant mix by control of temperature and time of reaction. It has been found that addition of a small amount of Cs+ to the reactant mix for the preparation of Nb-CST allows formation of the crystals in one day rather than ten days at 200 C. These discoveries suggest that a proper mix of sorbents (SNT, CST, Nb-CST) can be made easily at low cost that would remove all the HLW at the Savannah River site with a single in-tank procedure. The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Clearfield, Abraham

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been determined that poorly crystalline CST and SNT prepared at low temperature (100-150 deg. C) exhibit much faster kinetics in uptake of Sr2+. 2. In-situ X-ray studies has shown that SNT is a precursor phase to the formation of CST. 3. It is possible to form mixtures of CST and SNT in a single reactant mix by control of temperature and time of reaction. 4. It has been found that addition of a small amount of Cs+ to the reactant mix for the preparation of Nb-CST allows formation of the crystals in one day rather than ten days at 200 deg. C. 5. These discoveries suggest that a proper mix of sorbents (SNT, CST, Nb-CST) can be made easily at low cost that would remove all the HLW at the Savannah River site with a single in-tank procedure. Research Objective The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Clearfield, Abraham

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Dirac equation in electronic structure calculations: Accurate evaluation of DFT predictions for actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brooks, Johansson, and Skriver, using the LMTO-ASA method and considerable insight, were able to explain many of the ground state properties of the actinides. In the many years since this work was done, electronic structure calculations of increasing sophistication have been applied to actinide elements and compounds, attempting to quantify the applicability of DFT to actinides and actinide compounds and to try to incorporate other methodologies (i.e. DMFT) into DFT calculations. Through these calculations, the limits of both available density functionals and ad hoc methodologies are starting to become clear. However, it has also become clear that approximations used to incorporate relativity are not adequate to provide rigorous tests of the underlying equations of DFT, not to mention ad hoc additions. In this talk, we describe the result of full-potential LMTO calculations for the elemental actinides, comparing results obtained with a full Dirac basis with those obtained from scalar-relativistic bases, with and without variational spin-orbit. This comparison shows that the scalar relativistic treatment of actinides does not have sufficient accuracy to provide a rigorous test of theory and that variational spin-orbit introduces uncontrolled errors in the results of electronic structure calculations on actinide elements.

Wills, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mattsson, Ann E [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Integral Validation of Minor Actinide Nuclear Data by using Samples Irradiated at Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reliability of nuclear data for minor actinides was evaluated by using the results of the post-irradiation experiment for actinide samples irradiated at the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor. The burnup calculations with JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI.8, and JEFF-3.0 were performed. From the comparison between the experimental data and the calculational results, in general, the reliability of nuclear data for the minor actinides are at an adequate level for the conceptual design study of transmutation systems. It is, however, found that improvement of the accuracy is necessary for some nuclides, such as 238Pu, 242Pu, and 241Am.

Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but they have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. Their proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water. They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100--210% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80 % of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Speciation and structural characterization of plutonium and actinide-organic complexes in surface and ground waters. Annual progress report, September 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The authors proposed research is designed to study the association of actinides with dissolved organic complexes in subsurface waters. Actinide-humic matter associations in natural waters have been investigated previously, but the authors have postulated that much of the actinide binding activity may be supported by colloidal biopolymers. To investigate this, they are developing techniques to sample and identify organic constituents in groundwater, and to measure the Pu associated with different fractions of organic matter. Year 1 activities have focused on: (1) sampling techniques to minimize contamination and artifact formation, and to establish mass balances, (2) separation of Pu isotopes by oxidation state, and (3) analytical development of techniques for separation and identification of organic constituents from natural waters. The authors proposed research calls for field work at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites (SRS and HS, respectively). Towards this, they have been working on establishing protocols for ultra-clean (fg level) cross-flow filtration (CFF) techniques suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. A series of tests have been completed and the results have shown no Pu contamination from the CFF system was observable as long as the system is rigorously cleaned with acid, base and nano-pure water (Table 1). They have also collected a water sample from a pond near the laboratory in Woods Hole, MA to test blank conditions in the field, and to determine system mass balances. Blank levels were found to be satisfactory, and the mass balance is 100 \\261 10% for both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, the only two isotopes measurable in the sample. This is one of the major assurances for the success of the project because CFF will be the major sampling tool the authors will use to study natural Pu-organic complexes. Another important result from the field test is that > 80% of the dissolved Pu (based on the TIMS measurements) is in colloidal form.'

Buessler, K.O.; Repeta, D.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Proceedings of the Fourteenth DOE solar photochemistry research conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central themes of this year's Solar Photochemistry Research Conference encompassed initial charge separation in photosynthesis, photoinduced charge separation in other organized assemblies, electron transfer, organic and inorganic photochemistry, and photoelectrochemistry. This volume contains a copy of the program the abstracts of 29 formal presentations and 47 posters, a record of the discussion following each presentation, and an address list for the 96 attendees. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. .

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Delayed Neutron and Delayed Photon Characteristics from Photofission of Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed neutron (DN) and delayed photon (DP) emissions from photofission reactions play an important role for applications involving nuclear material detection and characterization. To provide new, accurate, basic nuclear data for evaluations and data libraries, an experimental programme of DN and DP measurements has been undertaken for actinides with bremsstrahlung endpoint energy in the giant resonance region ({approx}15 MeV). In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method will be described. Experimental results for DN and DP characteristics will be presented for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Finally, an example of an application to study the contents of nuclear waste packages will be briefly discussed.

Dore, D.; Berthoumieux, E.; Leprince, A.; Ridikas, D. [DSM/IRFUS/PhN, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Ledoux, X. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon, F-91297 (France); Agelou, M.; Carrel, F.; Gmar, M. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

Laurinat, James E.; Askew, Neal M.; Hensel, Steve J.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

Geiling, D.W. [ed.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide elements volume Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

no 5-6, Tome 33, Mai-Juin 1972,page C3-57 RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONIC BAND STRUCTURE OF THE HEAVY METALS Summary: and properties of the actinide elements before discussing the band...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides np pu Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NpTe, PuTe. Actinides compounds with the ThCr2Si2 type structure Since the discovery of heavy... . - The magneticand electricaltransport propertiesof the U, Np and Pu...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide transmutation physics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fission Barriers and Half-Lives Summary: Acta Phys. Hung. A 251 (2006) 000-000 HEAVY ION PHYSICS On the Multiple-Humped Fission Barriers... and Half-Lives of Actinides...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides fuel research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: in safety, proliferation resistance, and can be designed to breed fuel or burn heavy actinides. One... . The number of fuel pins in a fuel assembly of a PWR core is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - application aux actinides Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

au Journal de Physique 111, Vol. 1,dCcembre 1991 Summary: and actinides : application to curium. Radiochim. Acta. 5253, part 1, 119 (1991). 12;... . MAUCHlEN CEADCCDPESPEA...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burning fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: in safety, proliferation resistance, and can be designed to breed fuel or burn heavy actinides. One... . The number of fuel pins in a fuel assembly of a PWR core is...

223

Configuration adjustment potential of the Very High Temperature Reactor prismatic cores with advanced actinide fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor actinides represent the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes. As one of their potential incineration options, partitioning and transmutation in fission reactors are seriously considered worldwide. If implemented, these technologies could...

Ames, David E, II

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide waste forms Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.-F. Lucchini, M.K. Richmann, and D.T. Reed. 2008. "Actinide (III) Solubility in WIPP Brine: Data Summary... ) but carbonate phases can be formed at the higher fugacities...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide nuclei indirectly Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 (2009) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 3 PRODUCTION OF NEW SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI IN COMPLETE FUSION... physics. The cold Pb- and Bi-based 1 and hot actinide-based 2 complete...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide nuclei induced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 (2009) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 3 PRODUCTION OF NEW SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI IN COMPLETE FUSION... physics. The cold Pb- and Bi-based 1 and hot actinide-based 2 complete...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide-based complete-fusion reactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fusion reactions. The yields of superheavies with Z > 118 are sensitive... physics. The cold Pb- and Bi-based 1 and hot actinide-based 2 complete fusion reactions were...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide nuclei Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 (2009) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 3 PRODUCTION OF NEW SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI IN COMPLETE FUSION... physics. The cold Pb- and Bi-based 1 and hot actinide-based 2 complete...

229

Optimization of actinide transmutation in innovative lead-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis investigates the potential of fertile free fast lead-cooled modular reactors as efficient incinerators of plutonium and minor actinides (MAs) for application to dedicated fuel cycles for transmutation. A methodology ...

Romano, Antonino, 1972-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinides solution chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solution chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: actinides solution chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.emsl.pnl.gov...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide metal compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

effects in the X-ray photoemission spectra of the actinides Summary: in 3d transition metal compounds and ns (n 4 , 5) levels in rare earth systems, it is clear that ME......

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide elements progress Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-207 Alkali metal actinide complex halides: thermochemical and structural Summary: Elements and...

233

Extraction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides by ``CMPO-like`` calixarenes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extractive properties of calix[4]arenes bearing carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide moieties on their upper rim toward trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations were investigated. The study revealed that these molecules selectively extract light lanthanides and actinides from heavy lanthanides. All parameters present in the extraction system were varied to determine the origin of the selectivity. It was found that this selectivity requires a calix[4]arene platform and acetamidophosphine oxide groups containing phenyl substituents on the four phosphorus atoms.

Delmau, L.H.; Simon, N. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France)] [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Schwing-Weill, M.J. [ECPM, Strasbourg (France)] [and others] [ECPM, Strasbourg (France); and others

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Voltage Control Technical Conference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intro Voltage Control Conference - BPA Active Power Control in Wind Parks - Siemens Interconnection Criteria for Frequency Response Requirements - NERC Model Validation...

235

Alaska BIA Providers Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is hosting the 24th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference in Anchorage, Alaska, Dec. 1-5, 2014.

236

Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes” is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF{sub 6} volatilization and chromatographic separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To recover U, Pu, MA (Np, Am, Cm) and some specific fission products FPs (Cs, Sr, Tc, etc.) from various spent nuclear fuels (LWR/FBR: Oxide, Metal Fuels), we are studying an advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF6 volatilization (Pyro) and chromatographic separation (Aqueous). Spent fuels are de-cladded by means of thermal and mechanical methods and then applied to the fluorination/volatilization process, which selectively recovers the most amount of U. Then, the remained fuel components are converted to oxides and dissolved by HNO{sub 3} solution. Compared to U, since Pu, MA and FPs are significantly less abundant in spent fuels, the scale of the aqueous separation process could become reasonably small and result in less waste. For the chromatographic separation processes, we have prepared different types of porous silica-based organic/inorganic adsorbents with fast diffusion kinetics, improved chemical stability and low pressure drop in a packed column. So they are advantageously applicable to efficient separation of the actinides and FP elements from the fuel dissolved solution. In this work, adsorption and separation behavior of representative actinides and FP elements was studied. Small scale separation tests using simulated and genuine fuel dissolved solutions were carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed process. (authors)

Wei, Yuezhou [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Liu, Ruiqin; Wu, Yan; Zu, Jianhua; Zhao, Long [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Mimura, Hitoshi [Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Shi, Weiqun; Chai, Zhifang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Jinling; Ding, Youqian [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

Noble, James S.

239

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

240

Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to methods of fluorination and more particularly to the use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ for the preparation of actinide hexafluorides, and for the extraction of deposited actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof from reaction vessels. The experiments set forth hereinabove demonstrate that the room temperature or below use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ will be highly beneficial for the preparation of pure actinide hexafluorides from their respective tetrafluorides without traces of HF being present as occurs using other fluorinating agents: and decontamination of equipment previously exposed to actinides: e.g., walls, feed lines, etc.

Eller, P.G.; Malm, J.G.; Penneman, R.A.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Americium separation from nuclear fuel dissolution using higher oxidation states.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the complexity in current AFCI proposals is driven by the need to separate the minor actinides from the lanthanides. Partitioning and recycling Am, but not Cm, would allow for significant simplification because Am has redox chemistry that may be exploited while Cm does not. Here, we have explored methods based on higher oxidation states of Am (AmV and AmVI) to partition Am from the lanthanides. In a separate but related approach we have also initiated an investigation of the utility of TRUEX Am extraction from thiocyanate solution. The stripping of loaded TRUEX by Am oxidation or SCN- has not yet proved successful; however, the partitioning of inextractable AmV by TRUEX shows promise.

Bruce J. Mincher

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Proceedings of the conference on electron beam melting and refining - state of the art 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference proceedings summarizes state-of-the-art work in the field of electron-beam melting and refining, as presented at the 1996 conference. Papers are grouped as follows: invited papers; tutorial papers; electron beam melting related fundamentals; electron beam evaporation papers; and miscellaneous papers. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for some contributions to this proceedings.

Bakish, R. [ed.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

ICCK Conference Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MITâ??s Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics, since those two communities do not meet very often (it had been 6 years since the last time this conference had been held). The conference at MIT was so successful that European scientists decided to organize a similar conference (it will be held in Seville, Spain in July 2013). Almost 200 scientists participated, with more than 100 oral presentations and many poster presentations. A complete list of the presentations and their abstracts are given in the attachment. The conference led to many peer-reviewed papers published in several Special Issues of the International Journal of Chemical Kinetics in early 2012.

Green, William H. [MIT

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Minor actinide transmutation in thorium and uranium matrices in heavy water moderated reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The irradiation of Th{sup 232} breeds fewer of the problematic minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) than the irradiation of U{sup 238}. This characteristic makes thorium an attractive potential matrix for the transmutation of these minor actinides, as these species can be transmuted without the creation of new actinides as is the case with a uranium fuel matrix. Minor actinides are the main contributors to long term decay heat and radiotoxicity of spent fuel, so reducing their concentration can greatly increase the capacity of a long term deep geological repository. Mixing minor actinides with thorium, three times more common in the Earth's crust than natural uranium, has the additional advantage of improving the sustainability of the fuel cycle. In this work, lattice cell calculations have been performed to determine the results of transmuting minor actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in a thorium matrix. 15-year-cooled group-extracted transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel were used as the fissile component in a thorium-based fuel in a heavy water moderated reactor (HWR). The minor actinide (MA) transmutation rates, spent fuel activity, decay heat and radiotoxicity, are compared with those obtained when the MA were mixed instead with natural uranium and taken to the same burnup. Each bundle contained a central pin containing a burnable neutron absorber whose initial concentration was adjusted to have the same reactivity response (in units of the delayed neutron fraction ?) for coolant voiding as standard NU fuel. (authors)

Bhatti, Zaki; Hyland, B.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, 1 Plant Road, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Proceedings: 17th Asilomar conference on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the 1983 conference was to provide for the technical exchange of ideas relating to the science and technology of the immediate effects of nuclear weapon explosions. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 of the papers.

Hickman, R.G.; Meier, C.A. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Proceedings of second Franco-American conference on industrial energy conservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A separate abstracts was prepared for each of the 20 papers presented at the conference. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 5 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

Poirier, J.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt at the eutectic composition (58 mol% LiCl, 42 mol% KCl), which is used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. The same process being used for EBRII fuel is currently being studied for widespread international implementation. The methods will focus on first-principles and first- principles derived interatomic potential based simulations, primarily using molecular dynamics. Results will be validated against existing literature and parallel ongoing experimental efforts. The simulation results will be of value for interpreting experimental results, validating analytical models, and for optimizing waste separation by potentially developing new salt configurations and operating conditions.

Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking State Conference Conference Proceedings Prepared by: Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute Courtney Smith of the Science Conference Texas Water Resources Institute TR-427 June 2012 #12;#12;Texas Water Resources

249

Ironmaking Conference Proceedings: Volume 53  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference provided shared insight into the challenges being encountered as the industry moves to more closely couple ironmaking capacity with the steelmaking/continuous caster process. The proceedings are divided into the following sections: Cokemaking operations; Cokemaking process control and quality; Coal and coke research; Cokemaking environmental; Developing cokemaking technologies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace burdening; Blast furnace raw materials; Blast furnace rebuilds/relines/repairs; Blast furnace control; Blast furnace refractories; Blast furnace injection; Direct reduction and smelting; Sintering; Joint ironmaking and steelmaking; Process technology forum--New processes; and Process technology forum--Fluid flow and process control. Sixty-one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated in the 1970's and carried out in an uninterrupted way over the course of the past three d

Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications, Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use on conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Recovery of minor actinides from spent fuel using TPEN-immobilized gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of separation experiments was performed in order to study the recovery process for minor actinides (MAs), such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm), from the actual spent fuel by using an extraction chromatographic technique. N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(4-propenyloxy-2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPPEN) is an N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) analogue consisting of an incorporated pyridine ring that acts as not only a ligand but also as a site for polymerization and crosslinking of the gel. The TPPEN and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) were dissolved into dimethylformamide (DMF, Wako Co., Ltd.) and a silica beads polymer, and then TTPEN was immobilized chemically in a polymer gel (so called TPEN-gel). Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which was highly irradiated up to 119 GWD/MTM in the experimental fast reactor Joyo, was used as a reference spent fuel. First, uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were separated from the irradiated fuel using an ion-exchange method, and then, the platinum group elements were removed by CMPO to leave a mixed solution of MAs and lanthanides. The 3 mol% TPPEN-gel was packed with as an extraction column (CV: 1 ml) and then rinsed by 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}(pH 4.0) for pH adjustment. After washing the column by 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 4.0), Eu was detected and the recovery rate reached 93%. The MAs were then recovered by changing the eluent to 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 2.0), and the recovery rate of Am was 48 %. The 10 mol% TPPEN-gel was used to improve adsorption coefficient of Am and a condition of eluent temperature was changed in order to confirm the temperature swing effect on TPEN-gel for MA. More than 90% Eu was detected in the eluent after washing with 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 3.5) at 5 Celsius degrees. Americium was backwardly detected and eluted continuously during the same condition. After removal of Eu, the eluent temperature was changed to 32 Celsius degrees, then Am was detected (pH 3.0). Finally remained Am could be stripped from TPPEN-gel by changing the pH of the eluent to 2.0. These results These results prove that the proposed recovery process for MAs is a potential candidate for future reprocessing methods based on the extraction chromatographic technique. (authors)

Koyama, S.; Suto, M.; Ohbayashi, H. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai (Japan); Oaki, H. [Solutions Research Organization, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Takeshita, K. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Rural electric power conference, papers presented at the annual conference, 24th, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conference proceedings contains 14 papers, of which one is indexed separately. The topics discussed are the following: aspects of the Electric Power Research Institute; the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978; the cost of Service Computer Program; appliance saturation surveys; load management; supervisory control and the data acquisition system; power system harmonics; ground potential and currents; stray voltage on the dairy farm; temporary protective grounding of distribution circuits; capacitor bank protection; fault determination; and load characteristics of electric excavators.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

257

AISES National Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The AISES National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three day event convening graduate, undergraduate, and high school junior and senior students, teachers, workforce professionals, corporate and...

258

Indian Housing Training Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This four-day conference will provide housing professionals with the tools to maintain good homes, build affordable homes, improve public safety, and provide essential building blocks to a healthy...

259

RES California Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The NCAIED’s RES California conference and tradeshow will feature respected tribal leaders, state and local elected officials, top CEOs, the NCAIED’s “Twenty Grand Business Plan Competition”,...

260

Alaska Rural Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Organized and sponsored by the Alaska Energy Authority and the Alaska Center for Energy and Power, the Alaska Rural Energy Conference is a three-day event featuring a wide array of technical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alaska Rural Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Rural Energy Conference is a three-day event offering a large variety of technical sessions covering new and ongoing energy projects in Alaska, as well as new technologies and needs for...

262

GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation Waldo Tobler Geography Department University, line, area, or field phenomena, then the sixteen common classes of transformation are: point -> point (scalar, vector, tensor) data, to obtain eighty distinct possible classes of transformation. The common

Tobler, Waldo

263

NAIHC 2015 Legislative Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC), the 20th Annual Legislative Conference offers Tribes a chance to take part in the decisions made by Congress and the Administration in Washington, D.C.

264

Experimental level-structure determination in odd-odd actinide nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of experimental determination of level structure in odd-odd actinide nuclei is reviewed. A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei is applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation are derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings are used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

Hoff, R.W.

1985-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

Minor Actinides Loading Optimization for Proliferation Resistant Fuel Design - BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One approach to address the United States Nuclear Power (NP) 2010 program for the advanced light water reactor (LWR) (Gen-III+) intermediate-term spent fuel disposal need is to reduce spent fuel storage volume while enhancing proliferation resistance. One proposed solution includes increasing burnup of the discharged spent fuel and mixing minor actinide (MA) transuranic nuclides (237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel. Thus, we can reduce the spent fuel volume while increasing the proliferation resistance by increasing the isotopic ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, MAs are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. A typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of adding MAs (237Np and/or 241Am) to enhance proliferation resistance and improve fuel cycle performance for the intermediate-term goal of future nuclear energy systems. However, adding MAs will increase plutonium production in the discharged spent fuel. In this work, the Monte-Carlo coupling with ORIGEN-2.2 (MCWO) method was used to optimize the MA loading in the UO2 fuel such that the discharged spent fuel demonstrates enhanced proliferation resistance, while minimizing plutonium production. The axial averaged MA transmutation characteristics at different burnup were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality and the ratio of 238Pu/Pu discussed.

G. S. Chang; Hongbin Zhang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sixth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conference was held on coal preparation, utilization and environmental control. Topics included: combustion of fuel slurries; combustor performance; desulfurization chemically and by biodegradation; coal cleaning; pollution control of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides; particulate control; and flue gas desulfurization. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS).

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Proceedings of the Nineteenth DOE Solar Photochemistry Research Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of reports presented at the Nineteenth DOE Solar Photochemistry Research Conference. Sessions included photophysical properties of transition metal complexes, cage effects on photochemistry, charge transfer, photo-induced charge separation in biomimetic molecules, photosynthesis, and electron transfer.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

actinide crystal structures: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analogue and separately to a gadolinium-DOTA analogue. The rare earth the trivalent rare earths.9-11 Metal complexes of DOTA and numerous synthetic DOTA derivatives have been...

270

Meniscus Membranes For Separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

Dye, Robert C. (Irvine, CA); Jorgensen, Betty (Jemez Springs, NM); Pesiri, David R. (Aliso Viejo, CA)

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Meniscus membranes for separations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

Dye, Robert C. (Irvine, CA); Jorgensen, Betty (Jemez Springs, NM); Pesiri, David R. (Aliso Viejo, CA)

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program DOE Geothermal Technologies Program presentation...

273

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results, Reaching Beyond Conference Proceedings Available - The Smart Grid Experience: Applying Results,...

274

HP Laboratories 4/28/02 Tofari:Users:berettag:Research:Conferences:EI 98:ontologyOHP.doc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HP Laboratories 4/28/02 Tofari:Users:berettag:Research:Conferences:EI 98:ontologyOHP.doc 0Structure-Packard Company. All rights reserved. #12;HP Laboratories 4/28/02 Tofari:Users:berettag:Research:Conferences:EI 98 radioactive · use a real big magnet · store needles separately from hay #12;HP Laboratories 4/28/02 Tofari:Users:berettag:Research:Conferences:EI

Beretta, Giordano

275

Proceedings of 2004 Solar Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of 2004 Solar Conference July 11­14, 2004, Portland, Oregon USA ISEC2004-65168 A HYBRID

Kissock, Kelly

276

ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE IN METALS AND ALLOYS. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF THE LIGHT ACTINIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE IN METALS AND ALLOYS. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF THE LIGHT ACTINIDES B. D. DUNLAP electrons. A review is given of some areas of current interest, especially where hyperfine techniques have the 60 keV y-ray of 237Np[l]. At that time, our understanding of the electronic properties

Boyer, Edmond

277

Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. A measurement of the average assembly burnup is required and that measurement must be within 10% of the utility burnup record for the assembly to be accepted. The measurement device must be accurate to within 10%. Each step is described in detail for use with any computer code system and is then demonstrated with the SCALE 4.2 computer code package using 27BURNUPLIB cross sections.

DOE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

40th Indian Law Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Bar Association is hosting the 40th Annual Indian Law Conference. This two-day conference focuses on the significant changes that have occurred in the relationship between Tribal Nations and the United States in the last four decades. The conference will cover several topics, including climate change, Indian Law, tribal courts, and more.

280

Membrane Separations Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMBRANE SEPARATIONS RESEARCH James R. Fair Chemical Engineering Department The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 ABSTRACT The use of membranes for separating gaseous and liquid mixtures has grown dramatically in the past 15... years. Applications have been dominated by light gas separations and water purification. During this pioneering period, equipment containing the membrane suIfaces has been developed to a point where failures are minimal and the membranes themselves...

Fair, J. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call February 4, 2011 -...

282

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page 1 Lead Author L. Alexander  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9

New Hampshire, University of

283

Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Stenkamp, Victoria S. (Richland, WA)

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mobile Conference Connection Conferencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Conference Connection Conferencing · Help increase productivity while out of the office-mail meeting invitations from your mobile device · Access to "Click to Join" features · Initiate an Instant or other mobile devices can provide a quick and efficient means to respond to work demands. But, what

287

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) ›PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Morisato, Atsushi (Tokyo, JP)

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Proceedings of the 1991 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conference, which was the sixth held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The objectives of the Conference were to: Identify and evaluate the state-of-the-art and recommend; new initiatives to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; Foster cooperation among federal and industrial representatives with the common goal of national security via energy conservation. The 1991 Oil Technology Conference comprised: (a) two plenary sessions devoted to presentations and summations by public and private sector representatives from the United States, Europe, and Canada; and, (b) four workshops which focused on mainstream issues in oil-heating technology. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDonald, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gas Separation Using Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial membrane-based gas separator systems based upon high-flux, asymmetric polysulfone hollow fibers were first introduced in 1977 by Monsanto. These systems were packaged in compact modules containing large amounts of permeation surface area...

Koros, W. J.; Paul, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

USABC Battery Separator Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Separator Development P.I. - Ron Smith Presenter - Kristoffer Stokes, Ph.D. Celgard, LLC Project ID ES007 May 10, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

296

Proceedings: Second Annual Pacific Northwest Alternative and Renewable Energy Resources Conference.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at the conference are published in this volume. The purpose of the conference was to solicit regional cooperation in the promoting of near-term development of such alternative and renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest as: cogeneration; biomass; wind; small hydro; solar end-use applications; and geothermal direct heat utilization. Separate abstracts of selected papers were prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

Cliff B. Davis

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Final Technical Progress Report Long term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key source of uncertainty in assessing actinide mobility is the relative importance of transport by: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depends on several environmental factors and they compete with one another. A scientific assessment of the long-term risks associated with actinides in surface soils depends on better quantifying each of these three modes of mobility. The objective from our EMSP study was to quantify the mobility of soil actinides by wind erosion, water erosion, and vertical migration at three semiarid sites where actinide mobility is a key technical, social and legal issue. This EMSP project was the first to evaluate all three factors at a site. The approach has been to investigate both short- and long-term issues based on field and lab studies and model comparisons. Our results demonstrate the importance of incorporating threshold responses into a modeling framework that accounts for environmental factors and natural disturbances that trigger large changes in actinide mobility. The study measured erosional losses of sediment and fallout cesium (an actinide analogue) from field plots located near WIPP in 1998. The results highlight the large effect of burning as a disturbance on contaminant transport and mobility via runoff and erosion. The results show that runoff, erosion, and actinide transport are (1) strongly site specific-differences in radionuclide transport between WIPP and Rocky Flats differed by a factor of twelve because of soil and vegetation differences, and (2) are strongly impacted by disturbances such as fire, which can increase runoff, erosion, and actinide transport by more than an order of magnitude. In addition, a laboratory experiment using soil columns was conducted to investigate the vertical transport of contaminants in sandy soils. Nine columns of soil collected from the vicinity of the WIPP site were prepared. The column consisted of a piece of PVC pipe 20 cm in diameter and approximately 22 cm long. A thin ''marker layer'' of white soil was added to the top of each column followed by a thin layer of soil that had been spiked with 137Cs, cerium and lanthanum was applied to the surface. Approximately 900 cm of water (the equivalent of about 30 years of rainfall) was then applied at a rate of 3.2 L d-1. All of the activity contained in the soil core appeared to be in the top few mm of soil, i.e. there was virtually no movement of the 134Cs labeled particles. Finally, a library of object-oriented model components was created using Visual Basic to support the construction of contaminant transport models. These components greatly simplify the task of building 1- to 3- dimensional simulation models for risk assessment. The model components created under this funding were subsequently applied to help answer questions regarding risks from irrigation associated with potential releases from the Yucca Mountain waste repository.

Thomas B. Kirchner

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Metabolic Engineering VII Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

Kevin Korpics

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fourteenth combustion research conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 92 papers (arranged alphabetically by author) are included. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base. (DLC)

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

AGU Chapman Conference Hydrogeologic Processes: Building and Testing Atomistic- to Basin-Scale Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents details of the Chapman Conference given on June 6--9, 1994 in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This conference covered the scale of processes involved in coupled hydrogeologic mass transport and a concept of modeling and testing from the atomistic- to the basin- scale. Other topics include; the testing of fundamental atomic level parameterizations in the laboratory and field studies of fluid flow and mass transport and the next generation of hydrogeologic models. Individual papers from this conference are processed separately for the database.

Weaver, B. [American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

2011 IAEA General Conference  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement Awardflash2007-42attachment1.pdfmodule(EE) | DepartmentFeedstockConference2011

305

Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, M. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, J. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters and Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research in this area since October 2007 has resulted in seven completed publications and more papers of the completed work are in progress. Our work during this period principally focused on actinide complexes with secondary emphasis on spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of metal complexes. As the publications are available online with all of the details of the results, tables and figures, we are providing here only a brief summary of major highlights, in each of the categories.

Balasubramanian, K

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Summer Conference: Research in Forensic Psychiatry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1st Summer Conference: Research in Forensic Psychiatry The University of Regensburg Forensic Conference: Research in Forensic Psychiatry in Regensburg. The conference schedule comprises nearly fifty contributions from various disciplines within forensic research. The broad scope of contributions highlights

Schubart, Christoph

309

Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

Novak, C.F. [ed.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

JOWOG 22/2 - Actinide Chemical Technology (July 9-13, 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate provides world-class, safe, secure, and reliable special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities that support the nation's defense, energy, and environmental needs. We safely and efficiently process plutonium, uranium, and other actinide materials to meet national program requirements, while expanding the scientific and engineering basis of nuclear weapons-based manufacturing, and while producing the next generation of nuclear engineers and scientists. Actinide Process Chemistry (NCO-2) safely and efficiently processes plutonium and other actinide compounds to meet the nation's nuclear defense program needs. All of our processing activities are done in a world class and highly regulated nuclear facility. NCO-2's plutonium processing activities consist of direct oxide reduction, metal chlorination, americium extraction, and electrorefining. In addition, NCO-2 uses hydrochloric and nitric acid dissolutions for both plutonium processing and reduction of hazardous components in the waste streams. Finally, NCO-2 is a key team member in the processing of plutonium oxide from disassembled pits and the subsequent stabilization of plutonium oxide for safe and stable long-term storage.

Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Jacquelyn C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finstad, Casey C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mulford, Roberta Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonald, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sonya M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Conferences & Meetings | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office hosts a conference each year featuring hot topics and key figures in the biomass industry. Office staff also participate in various meetings and the bienniel Peer...

313

Tanana Chiefs Conference Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tanana Chiefs Conference is holding its annual convention to discuss issues in the region, hold elections, and adopt resolutions presented by Tribes.

314

Nebraska Wind Conference and Exhibition  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The theme of the conference is "Harvesting Nebraska's Potential," which focuses on Nebraska's competitive position for attracting wind development. More information will be available on the 6th...

315

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

11th International coal testing conference. Volume XI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 11th International Coal Conference held May 10-12, 1995 in Lexington, KY are presented. Fourteen papers were presented on various aspects of coal analysis and combustion, petrographic characterization of fly ash, trace elements in coal, microscopy of steam coals, fuel specifications, and HCl evolution during coal combustion. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Transportation Protocols Working Group First Conference Call...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Call March 1, 1999 Conference Call Summary The first conference call of the Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TECWG) DOE Transportation Protocols Working...

320

European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

24th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The BIA Tribal Providers Conference is the second largest conference in Alaska, providing opportunities for tribal leaders, native corporations and rural representatives to connect with federal...

322

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal Conference 2013 - Geothermal Policies and Impacts in the U.S. Iceland Geothermal...

323

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

by SNL's Ross Guttromson, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - NYSERDA-DOE Joint Energy Storage Initiative - Georgianne Huff, SNL.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Testing...

324

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Peak Shifting - Steve Willard, PNM.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage - Loic Gaillac, SCE.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - Flow Battery Solution...

325

10th Annual Small Wind Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This conference is designed for small wind professionals, including installers, manufacturers, dealers, distributors, educators, and advocates. The conference features presentations, exhibits,...

326

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

Chang, Y. Alice (Des Plaines, IL); Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

CONFERENCE REPORT ECIR 2013: 35th European Conference on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Moscow (Russia). The conference was jointly organized by Yandex and Higher School of Economics (HSE of the conference introduced some new features: a two-tier program committee, a redesigned men- toring program reviewed by at least three members of an international two-tier Program Committee. Of the papers submitted

Kamps, Jaap

328

AWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

» slides (ppt) 10:15 » Break 10:45 » Food and Agriculture Issues How will climate change impact foodAWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program APRU World Institute Workshop on Climate Board 2:30 » Climate Changes Overview Richard C.J. SOMERVILLE, Distinguished Professor, Scripps

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

329

An Assessment of Spent Fuel Reprocessing for Actinide Destruction and Resource Sustainability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reprocessing and recycling of spent nuclear fuel can benefit the nuclear fuel cycle by destroying actinides or extending fissionable resources if uranium supplies become limited. The purpose of this study was to assess reprocessing and recycling in both fast and thermal reactors to determine the effectiveness for actinide destruction and resource utilization. Fast reactor recycling will reduce both the mass and heat load of actinides by a factor of 2, but only after 3 recycles and many decades. Thermal reactor recycling is similarly effective for reducing actinide mass, but the heat load will increase by a factor of 2. Economically recoverable reserves of uranium are estimated to sustain the current global fleet for the next 100 years, and undiscovered reserves and lower quality ores are estimated to contain twice the amount of economically recoverable reserves--which delays the concern of resource utilization for many decades. Economic analysis reveals that reprocessed plutonium will become competitive only when uranium prices rise to about %24360 per kg. Alternative uranium sources are estimated to be competitive well below that price. Decisions regarding the development of a near term commercial-scale reprocessing fuel cycle must partially take into account the effectiveness of reactors for actnides destruction and the time scale for when uranium supplies may become limited. Long-term research and development is recommended in order to make more dramatic improvements in actinide destruction and cost reductions for advanced fuel cycle technologies.The original scope of this work was to optimize an advanced fuel cycle using a tool that couples a reprocessing plant simulation model with a depletion analysis code. Due to funding and time constraints of the late start LDRD process and a lack of support for follow-on work, the project focused instead on a comparison of different reprocessing and recycling options. This optimization study led to new insight into the fuel cycle. AcknowledgementThe authors would like to acknowledge the support of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project 125862 for funding this research.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Smith, James D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The technical and economic impact of minor actinide transmutation in a sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the frame work of the French National Act of June 28, 2006 pertaining to the management of high activity, long-lived radioactive waste, one of the proposed processes consists in transmuting the Minor Actinides (MA) in the radial blankets of a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). With this option, we may assess the additional cost of the reactor by comparing two SFR designs, one with no Minor Actinides, and the other involving their transmutation. To perform this exercise, we define a reference design called SFRref, of 1500 MWe that is considered to be representative of the Reactor System. The SFRref mainly features a pool architecture with three pumps, six loops with one steam generator per loop. The reference core is the V2B core that was defined by the CEA a few years ago for the Reactor System. This architecture is designed to meet current safety requirements. In the case of transmutation, for this exercise we consider that the fertile blanket is replaced by two rows of assemblies having either 20% of Minor Actinides or 20% of Americium. The assessment work is performed in two phases. - The first consists in identifying and quantifying the technical differences between the two designs: the reference design without Minor Actinides and the design with Minor Actinides. The main differences are located in the reactor vessel, in the fuel handling system and in the intermediate storage area for spent fuel. An assessment of the availability is also performed so that the impact of the transmutation can be known. - The second consists in making an economic appraisal of the two designs. This work is performed using the CEA's SEMER code. The economic results are shown in relative values. For a transmutation of 20% of MA in the assemblies (S/As) and a hypothesis of 4 kW allowable for the washing device, there is a large external storage demanding a very long cooling time of the S/As. In this case, the economic impact may reach 5% on the capital part of the Levelized Unit Electricity Cost (LUEC). A diminished concentration at 10% of MA, reduces the size of the external storage and the cooling time of the assemblies becomes compatible with the management of the irradiated fuel. Even with a low allowable power for the washing device, the economic impact on the capital cost is less than 2.5%. (authors)

Gautier, G. M.; Morin, F. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Dechelette, F.; Sanseigne, E. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN DTN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Chabert, C. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Separators for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided are separators for use in an electrochemical cell comprising (a) an inorganic oxide and (b) an organic polymer, wherein the inorganic oxide comprises organic substituents. Preferably, the inorganic oxide comprises an hydrated aluminum oxide of the formula Al.sub.2O.sub.3.xH.sub.2O, wherein x is less than 1.0, and wherein the hydrated aluminum oxide comprises organic substituents, preferably comprising a reaction product of a multifunctional monomer and/or organic carbonate with an aluminum oxide, such as pseudo-boehmite and an aluminum oxide. Also provided are electrochemical cells comprising such separators.

Carlson, Steven Allen; Anakor, Ifenna Kingsley

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Synergistic selective extraction of actinides(III) over lanthanides from nitric acid using new aromatic diorganyldithiophosphinic acids and neutral organophosphorus compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New aromatic dithiophosphinic acids (R{sub 2}PSSH) with R = C{sub 6}H{sub 5{sup {minus}}}, ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}}, FC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} were synthesized, characterized and tested as potential separating agents for trivalent actinides over lanthanides. The extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and other lanthanides was carried out from nitric acid medium with mixtures of R{sub 2}PSSHs and neutral organophosphorus compounds. There was no detectable extraction when R{sub 2}PSSHs were used alone as extractants for either Am(III) or Eu(III) (D{sub Am,Eu} < 10{sup {minus}3}) under the experimental conditions used in this study. High separation factors (D{sub Am}/D{sub Eu} > 20) with D{sub Am} > 1 were achieved in the nitric acid range 0.1--1 mol/L by means of a synergistic mixture of bis(chlorophenyl)dithiophosphinic acid + tributylphosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or tributylphosphine oxide (TBPO). The high radiation resistance (up to 10{sup 6} Gy absorbed {gamma}-doses) of the extractants was also demonstrated.

Modolo, G.; Odoj, R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

334

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

Bartlit, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Denton, William H. (Abingdon, GB3); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

LEAP 1992: Conference summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

Dover, C.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

LEAP 1992: Conference summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

Dover, C.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Previous Conferences | EMSL  

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339

APS 1995 Conferences  

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340

APS 1996 Conferences  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

APS 1997 Conferences  

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342

APS 1998 Conferences  

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343

APS 1999 Conferences  

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344

APS 2000 Conferences  

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345

APS 2001 Conferences  

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346

APS 2002 Conferences  

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347

APS 2003 Conferences  

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348

APS 2004 Conferences  

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349

APS 2005 Conferences  

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350

APS 2006 Conferences  

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351

Conferences & Events | EMSL  

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352

Conferences, workshops, trainings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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353

Events & Conferences | ORNL  

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354

ConferenceCall  

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355

Utilization of Minor Actinides as a Fuel Component for Ultra-Long Life Bhr Configurations: Designs, Advantages and Limitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project assessed the advantages and limitations of using minor actinides as a fuel component to achieve ultra-long life Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) configurations. Researchers considered and compared the capabilities of pebble-bed and prismatic core designs with advanced actinide fuels to achieve ultra-long operation without refueling. Since both core designs permit flexibility in component configuration, fuel utilization, and fuel management, it is possible to improve fissile properties of minor actinides by neutron spectrum shifting through configuration adjustments. The project studied advanced actinide fuels, which could reduce the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository and enable recovery of the energy contained in spent fuel. The ultra-long core life autonomous approach may reduce the technical need for additional repositories and is capable to improve marketability of the Generation IV VHTR by allowing worldwide deployment, including remote regions and regions with limited industrial resources. Utilization of minor actinides in nuclear reactors facilitates developments of new fuel cycles towards sustainable nuclear energy scenarios.

Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

COMPUTERS AND GAMES CONFERENCE Bruno Bouzy 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other events: the 12th World Computer Chess Championship, and the 9th Computer Olympiad. The conference the organisation for this successful conference. The proceedings of the conference will be published by SpringerTHE 4TH COMPUTERS AND GAMES CONFERENCE Bruno Bouzy 1 Paris, France The 4th Computers and Games

Bouzy, Bruno

357

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Photochemical isotope separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Steam separator latch assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced Separation Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Steam separator latch assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Kobsa, Irvin R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture over a polymeric membrane which comprises a polymer capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds at temperature ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psi. The membranes which possess pore sizes ranging from about 10 to about 500 Angstroms are cast from a solvent solution and recovered.

Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL); Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Des Plaines, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Proceedings: National conference on environmental externalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the National Conference on Environmental Externalities. A environmental externality is the environmental impact of a process or a plant that society must endure. It is a social cost and is paid, but not by the company who produced it or the company`s customers who endure it. The main purpose of this report is to gather the many designs and ideas of how and why to internalize the externalities into the pricing systems of the public utility commissions, especially that of the electric utilities. Economic and sociological aspects of the internalization of these externalities are given in these proceedings. Individual papers are processed separately for databases. (MB)

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asia-Pacific coal technology conference was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 14--16, 1989. Topics discussed included the following: Expanded Horizons for US Coal Technology and Coal Trade; Future Coal-Fired Generation and Capacity Requirements of the Philippines; Taiwan Presentation; Korean Presentation; Hong Kong Future Coal Requirements; Indonesian Presentation; Electric Power System in Thailand; Coal in Malaysia -- A Position Paper; The US and Asia: Pacific Partners in Coal and Coal Technology; US Coal Production and Export; US Clean Coal Technologies; Developments in Coal Transport and Utilization; Alternative/Innovative Transport; Electricity Generation in Asia and the Pacific: Power Sector Demand for Coal, Oil and Natural Gas; Role of Clean Coal Technology in the Energy Future of the World; Global Climate Change: A Fossil Energy Perspective; Speaker: The Role of Coal in Meeting Hawaii's Power Needs; and Workshops on Critical Issues Associated with Coal Usage. Individual topics are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Innovative Separations Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Long-term risk from actinides in the environment: Modes of mobility. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The mobility of actinides in surface soils is a key issue of concern at several DOE facilities in arid and semiarid environments, including Rocky Flats, Hanford, Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Key sources of uncertainty in assessing Pu mobility are the magnitudes of mobility resulting from three modes of transport: (1) wind erosion, (2) water erosion, and (3) vertical migration. Each of these three processes depend on numerous environmental factors and they compete with one another, particularly for actinides in very shallow soils ({approximately} 1 \\265m). The overall goal of the study is to quantify the mobility of soil actinides from all three modes. The authors study is using field measurements, laboratory experiments, and ecological modeling to address these three processes at three DOE facilities where actinide kinetics are of concern: WIPP, Rocky Flats, and Hanford. Wind erosion is being measured with suite of monitoring equipment, water erosion is being studied with rainfall simulation experiments, vertical migration is being studied in controlled laboratory experiments, and the three processes are being integrated using ecological modeling. Estimates for clean up of soil actinides for the extensive tracts of DOE land range to hundreds of billion $ in the US Without studies of these processes, unnecessary clean-up of these areas may waste billions of dollars and cause irreparable ecological damage through the soil removal. Further, the outcomes of litigation against DOE are dependent on quantifying the mobility of actinides in surface soils. This report provides a summary of work for the first year of a 3-year project; subcontracts to collaborating institutions (Colorado State University and New Mexico State University) were not in place until late December 1997, and hence this report focuses on the results of the 5 months from January through May 1998. The major result to date is a review of literature on the potential for using soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am as tracers for plutonium in soil. Measurements of {sup 239}Pu contamination in the environment are expensive and time consuming, requiring radiochemical analysis and alpha spectroscopy. They evaluated the literature for measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am, both of which are more cost-effectively measured by gamma spectrometry, as tracers for Pu in soil. Their results indicate that: significant positive correlation exists between Pu, Cs, and Am in soils and sediments at several locations including Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and Hanford; atmospheric transport of Pu and Cs from worldwide fallout is essentially the same; the attachment of Pu and Cs to soil particles of various size is very similar; both Pu and Cs movement in the environment correlate well with soil and sediment particle movements; a significant correlation between Pu, Cs, and Am was found in soil as a function of depth, indicating similar vertical migration behavior (most of the activity of these radionuclides is confined to the top 10--20 cm of soil at virtually all locations); most Pu and Cs are strongly absorbed onto clay and organic matter in soils and there is essentially very little leaching of Pu, Am and Cs through soil columns. Based on the above information, they believe that {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am are excellent tracers for both {sup 239}Pu and soil particle transport processes in clay, mineral bearing and/or organic soils. Therefore, Cs and Am would be good tracers for the proposed water erosion and vertical migration work, at least for both Rocky Flats and Hanford. The correlation between Pu and Cs may not be as strong in sandy soil (e.g. WIPP site), however, examination of more data is needed.'

Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, J.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (US); Kirchner, T. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

TheTheTheTheThe Robert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TheTheTheTheThe Robert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote ConferenceRobert and Sarah Boote Conference ininininin BooteRobert and Sarah BooteRobert and Sarah BooteRobert and Sarah BooteRobert and Sarah Boote

Machery, Edouard

370

Micro-Analysis of Actinide Minerals for Nuclear Forensics and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a viable tool for nondestructive determination of the crystal phase of relevant minerals. Collecting spectra on particles down to 5 microns in size was completed. Some minerals studied were weak scatterers and were better studied with the other techniques. A decent graphical software package should easily be able to compare collected spectra to a spectral library as well as subtract out matrix vibration peaks. Due to the success and unequivocal determination of the most common mineral false positive (zircon), it is clear that Raman has a future for complementary, rapid determination of unknown particulate samples containing actinides.

M. Morey, M. Manard, R. Russo, G. Havrilla

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Actinide extraction from simulated and irradiated spent nuclear fuel using TBP solutions in HFC-134a  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was demonstrated that solutions of TBP-nitric acid adduct in liquid Freon HFC-134a (1.2 MPa, 25 deg. C) allowed for recovery of uranium with nearly the same effectiveness as supercritical CO{sub 2} at 30 MPa. At nearly quantitative recovery of U and Pu, a DF of ca. 10 can be attained on dissolution and extraction of simulated SNF samples. The possibility of recovery of actinides contained in cakes produced by oxide conversion of simulated and irradiated SNF with solutions of TBP and DBE in Freon HFC-134a was shown. (authors)

Shadrin, A.; Babain, V.; Kamachev, V.; Murzin, A.; Shafikov, D.; Dormidonova, A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, RPA, 28, 2-nd Murinskii ay., St-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Low-Temperature Synthesis of Actinide Tetraborides by Solid-State Metathesis Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of actinide tetraborides including uranium tetraboride (UB,), plutonium tetraboride (PUB,) and thorium tetraboride (ThB{sub 4}) by a solid-state metathesis reaction are demonstrated. The present method significantly lowers the temperature required to {approx_equal}850 C. As an example, when UCl{sub 4}, is reacted with an excess of MgB{sub 2}, at 850 C, crystalline UB, is formed. Powder X-ray diffraction and ICP-AES data support the reduction of UCl{sub 3}, as the initial step in the reaction. The UB, product is purified by washing water and drying.

Lupinetti, Anthony J.; Garcia, Eduardo; Abney, Kent D.

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Conceptual configurations of an accelerator-driven subcritical system utilizing minor actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper purposes an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical (ADS) system which utilizes the Minor Actinides (MAs) from the US spent nuclear fuel inventory. A mobile fuel concept with micro-particles suspended in the liquid metal is adopted in the purposed system to avoid difficulties of developing and testing new MAs solid fuel forms. Three ADS configurations were developed and analyzed using the Monte Carlo fuel burnup methodology. The analyses demonstrated the capabilities of the proposed system to utilize the MAs and to dispose of the US spent nuclear fuels. (authors)

Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. [Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Spelman College 7th Annual Spelman College Leadership Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Theme for this year's conference is still being developed - last year, the conference focused on "best practices to help women achieve better personal and professional sustainability. Conference...

375

New Partners for Smart Growth Conference | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

New Partners for Smart Growth Conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability conference. The three-day conference is themed, "Practical Tools and Innovative...

376

Cyclic membrane separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In one of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the other part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. Ambient air is charged to the membrane separation unit during the latter part of the cycle.

Bowser, John

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cyclic membrane separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

Nemser, Stuart M.

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

PRESS RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE July 9 - 13, 2014 Sponsored by the Tropical Fruit & Vegetable Society of the Redland & the Fruit & Spice Park 24801 SW 187th Avenue, Homestead, Florida

Jawitz, James W.

379

10. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

Meisler, M.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

OIGA Conference and Trade Show  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Join more than 2,500 industry professionals from all over the country at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association's (OIGA) annual conference specifically devoted to all aspects of the Indian Gaming...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Second United Nations International Conference  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy ON THE ANALYSIS O F BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Q Hugh Bradner and F r a n k Solmitz INTRODUCTION A j...

382

ITCN 49th Annual Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada (ITCN) is hosting its annual conference titled, "Making A Difference for Nevada Tribes." ITCN is a consortia of the 27 tribal communities throughout the state of...

383

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

384

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fifteenth combustion research conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

9. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actinides like curium with heavy ions of such elements ascontaining curium would require forced cooling and heavy

Leggett, Christina Joy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong Austin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Beta-delayed fission and neutron emission calculations for the actinide cosmochronometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gamow-Teller beta-strength distributions for 19 neutron-rich nuclei, including ten of interest for the production of the actinide cosmochronometers, are computed microscopically with a code that treats nuclear deformation explicitly. The strength distributions are then used to calculate the beta-delayed fission, neutron emission, and gamma deexcitation probabilities for these nuclei. Fission is treated both in the complete damping and WKB approximations for penetrabilities through the nuclear potential-energy surface. The resulting fission probabilities differ by factors of 2 to 3 or more from the results of previous calculations using microscopically computed beta-strength distributions around the region of greatest interest for production of the cosmochronometers. The indications are that a consistent treatment of nuclear deformation, fission barriers, and beta-strength functions is important in the calculation of delayed fission probabilities and the production of the actinide cosmochronometers. Since we show that the results are very sensitive to relatively small changes in model assumptions, large chronometric ages for the Galaxy based upon high beta-delayed fission probabilities derived from an inconsistent set of nuclear data calculations must be considered quite uncertain.

Meyer, B.S.; Howard, W.M.; Mathews, G.J.; Takahashi, K.; Moeller, P.; Leander, G.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technical and economic assessment of different options for minor actinide transmutation: the French case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been performed to assess the industrial perspectives of partitioning and transmutation of long-lived elements. These studies were carried out in tight connection with GEN-IV systems development. The results include the technical and economic evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios along with different options for optimizing the processes between the minor actinide transmutation in fast neutron reactors, their interim storage and geological disposal of ultimate waste. The results are analysed through several criteria (impacts on waste, on waste repository, on fuel cycle plants, on radiological exposure of workers, on costs and on industrial risks). These scenario evaluations take place in the French context which considers the deployment of the first Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) in 2040. 3 management options of minor actinides have been studied: no transmutation, transmutation in SFR and transmutation in an accelerator-driven system (ADS). Concerning economics the study shows that the cost overrun related to the transmutation process could vary between 5 to 9% in SFR and 26 % in the case of ADS.

Chabert, C.; Coquelet-Pascal, C. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Saturnin, A. [CEA, DEN, Marcoule (France); Mathonniere, G.; Boullis, B.; Warin, D. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA-NC, Paris-la-Defense (France); Caron-Charles, M. [AREVA-NP, Paris-la-Defense (France); Garzenne, C. [EDF, Paris (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Determining the dissolution rates of actinide glasses: A time and temperature Product Consistency Test study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification has been identified as one potential option for the e materials such as Americium (Am), Curium (Cm), Neptunium (Np), and Plutonium (Pu). A process is being developed at the Savannah River Site to safely vitrify all of the highly radioactive Am/Cm material and a portion of the fissile (Pu) actinide materials stored on site. Vitrification of the Am/Cm will allow the material to be transported and easily stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Am/Cm glass has been specifically designed to be (1) highly durable in aqueous environments and (2) selectively attacked by nitric acid to allow recovery of the valuable Am and Cm isotopes. A similar glass composition will allow for safe storage of surplus plutonium. This paper will address the composition, relative durability, and dissolution rate characteristics of the actinide glass, Loeffler Target, that will be used in the Americium/Curium Vitrification Project at Westinghouse Savannah River Company near Aiken, South Carolina. The first part discusses the tests performed on the Loeffler Target Glass concerning instantaneous dissolution rates. The second part presents information concerning pseudo-activation energy for the one week glass dissolution process.

Daniel, W.E.; Best, D.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume I, Part 3, Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conference sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), was held on waste management. Topics of discussion were transuranic waste management, chemical and physical treatment technologies, waste minimization, land disposal technology and characterization and analysis. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Proceedings of IMECE2006 2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of IMECE2006 2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition 2006 by ASME Proceedings of IMECE2006 2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress electrical power via oxidation and reduction half reactions that are separated in space. In this case

Yao, Bin

394

Energy in the urban environment. Proceedings of the 22. annual Illinois energy conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conference addressed the energy and environmental challenges facing large metropolitan areas. The topics included a comparison of the environmental status of cities twenty years ago with the challenges facing today`s large cities, sustainable economic development, improving the energy and environmental infrastructure, and the changing urban transportation sector. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume I, Part 2, Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conference sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) was held on Waste Mangement. Topics discussed were waste stabilization technologies regulations and standards, innovative treatment technology, waste stabilization projects. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Second biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume provides the proceedings for the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, Environment, Agriculture, and Industry which was held August 21-24, 1995. The volume contains copies of full papers as provided by the researchers. Individual papers were separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Twenty-ninth ORNL/DOE conference on analytical chemistry in energy technology. Abstracts of papers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet contains separate abstracts of 55 individual papers presented at this conference. Different sections in the book are titled as follows: laser techniques; resonance ionization spectroscopy; laser applications; new developments in mass spectrometry; analytical chemistry of hazardous waste; and automation and data management. (PLG)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS systems consume about 1.2 tons of actinides per year and produce 3 GW thermal power, with a proton beam power of 25 MW. Total MA fuel that would be consumed in the first 10 years of operation is 9.85, 11.80, or 12.68 tons, respectively, for the systems with 5, 7, or 10% actinide fuel particles loaded in the LBE. The corresponding annual MA fuel transmutation rate after reaching equilibrium at 10 years of operation is 0.83, 0.94, or 1.02 tons/year, respectively. Assuming that the ADS systems can be operated for 35 full-power years, the total MAs consumed in the three ADS systems are 30.6, 35.3, and 37.2 tons, respectively. For the three configurations, it is estimated that 3.8, 3.3, or 3.1 ADS system units are required to utilize the entire 115 tons of MA fuel in the SNF inventory, respectively.

Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Second annual clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held at Atlanta, Georgia, September 7--9, 1993. The Conference, cosponsored by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), seeks to examine the status and role of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) and its projects. The Program is reviewed within the larger context of environmental needs, sustained economic growth, world markets, user performance requirements and supplier commercialization activities. This will be accomplished through in-depth review and discussion of factors affecting domestic and international markets for clean coal technology, the environmental considerations in commercial deployment, the current status of projects, and the timing and effectiveness of transfer of data from these projects to potential users, suppliers, financing entities, regulators, the interested environmental community and the public. Individual papers have been entered separately.

Not Available

1993-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

Proceedings of the 1993 oil heat technology conference and workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the proceedings of the 1993 Oil Heat Technology Conference and Workshop, held on March 25--26 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and sponsored by the US Department of Energy - Office of Building Technologies (DOE-OBT), in cooperation with the Petroleum Marketers Association of America. This Conference, which was the seventh held since 1984, is a key technology-transfer activity supported by the ongoing Combustion Equipment Technology (Oil-Heat R&D) program at BNL, and is aimed at providing a forum for the exchange of information among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, and marketers of oil-fired space- conditioning equipment. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDonald, R.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electrified Separation Processes in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For any separation procedure in the chemical industry, a certain amount of reversible work in the form of free energy is required, as dictated by the second law of thermodynamics. Classical techniques for effecting liquid-phase separations...

Appleby, A. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded Magnetic Nanoparticles for Spent Nuclear Fuel. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded...

403

Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and Recommendations Blackout 2003: Electric System Working Group Technical Conference - Comments and Recommendations...

405

annual conference cambridge: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer 12 Annual International Conference of Territorial Intelligence Physics Websites Summary: XIIth Annual International Conference of Territorial...

406

annual sigcse conference: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer 8 Annual International Conference of Territorial Intelligence Physics Websites Summary: XIIth Annual International Conference of Territorial...

407

New density functional theory approaches for enabling prediction of chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Equation of State (EOS) construction is a prominent part of Sandia's capabilities to support engineering sciences. This capability is based on amending experimental data with information gained from computational investigations, in parts of the phase space where experimental data is hard, dangerous, or expensive to obtain. A prominent materials area where such computational investigations are hard to perform today because of limited accuracy is actinide and lanthanide materials. The Science of Extreme Environment Lab Directed Research and Development project described in this Report has had the aim to cure this accuracy problem. We have focused on the two major factors which would allow for accurate computational investigations of actinide and lanthanide materials: (1) The fully relativistic treatment needed for materials containing heavy atoms, and (2) the needed improved performance of DFT exchange-correlation functionals. We have implemented a fully relativistic treatment based on the Dirac Equation into the LANL code RSPt and we have shown that such a treatment is imperative when calculating properties of materials containing actinides and/or lanthanides. The present standard treatment that only includes some of the relativistic terms is not accurate enough and can even give misleading results. Compared to calculations previously considered state of the art, the Dirac treatment gives a substantial change in equilibrium volume predictions for materials with large spin-orbit coupling. For actinide and lanthanide materials, a Dirac treatment is thus a fundamental requirement in any computational investigation, including those for DFT-based EOS construction. For a full capability, a DFT functional capable of describing strongly correlated systems such as actinide materials need to be developed. Using the previously successful subsystem functional scheme developed by Mattsson et.al., we have created such a functional. In this functional the Harmonic Oscillator Gas is providing the necessary reference system for the strong correlation and localization occurring in actinides. Preliminary testing shows that the new Hao-Armiento-Mattsson (HAM) functional gives a trend towards improved results for the crystalline copper oxide test system we have chosen. This test system exhibits the same exchange-correlation physics as the actinide systems do, but without the relativistic effects, giving access to a pure testing ground for functionals. During the work important insights have been gained. An example is that currently available functionals, contrary to common belief, make large errors in so called hybridization regions where electrons from different ions interact and form new states. Together with the new understanding of functional issues, the Dirac implementation into the RSPt code will permit us to gain more fundamental understanding, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of materials of importance for Sandia and the rest of the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Mattsson, Ann Elisabet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Economist Conferences to hold international Life Science conference in Uppsala, Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economist Conferences to hold international Life Science conference in Uppsala, Sweden Press, Sweden When: November 22, 2012 Group and confere C of Tr In D C ThDelia Meth-Cohn, Editorial Director Speakers Official publication on the conference and Sweden's leading daily newspaper. PR & Media Sofia

409

Conference Navigator 2.0: Community-Based Recommendation for Academic Conferences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(HT) 20092 , User Modeling, Adaptation, and Personalization (UMAP) 20093 , and 4th European Conference1 Conference Navigator 2.0: Community-Based Recommendation for Academic Conferences Chirayu. Large conferences are one of the venues suffering from this overload. Faced with several parallel

Brusilovsky, Peter

410

Gas separation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method for production of high purity hydrogen and high purity carbon monoxide from a mixed gas stream comprising these components together with carbon dioxide and a zero to a minor amount of one or more other gaseous contaminants is described comprising the steps of: (a) passing the mixed gas stream into and through a first bed of solid adsorbent capable of selectively adsorbing carbon dioxide and water while discharging from the bed a dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent; (b) introducing the dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent into a cryogenic environment for cooling the same therein under conditions effective for condensation of at least the major part of the carbon monoxide present in the dry CO/sub 2/-freed effluent; (c) withdrawing from the cryogenic environment carbon monoxide of high purity; (d) separately withdrawing from the cryogenic environment an uncondensed first gas stream product comprised of crude hydrogen and subjecting the first gas stream product to selective adsorption of non-hydrogen components therefrom in a second bed of solid absorbent, while recovering from the second bed the non-sorbed fraction as a product stream of essentially pure hydrogen; (e) purging the second solid adsorbent bed to desorb non-hydrogen components sorbed therein in step (d), and withdrawing from the bed a gas stream comprising the desorbed non-hydrogen components.

Nicholas, D.M.; Hopkins, J.A.; Roden, T.M.; Bushinsky, J.P.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Organic contaminant separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is presented of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube. The solvent is capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus is presented for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium. The apparatus includes a composite tube comprised of a blend of a polyolefin and a polyester. The composite tube has an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and has sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube. 2 figures.

Del Mar, P.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

AWEA Offshore Windpower Conference & Exhibition 2014 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AWEA Offshore Windpower Conference & Exhibition 2014 AWEA Offshore Windpower Conference & Exhibition 2014 October 7, 2014 12:00PM EDT to October 8, 2014 9:00PM EDT Atlantic City,...

413

American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition October 7, 2014 9:00AM EDT to October 8, 2014 5:00PM EDT AWEA...

414

2013 White House Tribal Nations Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Wednesday, November 13, President Obama will host the White House Tribal Nations Conference at the Department of the Interior. The conference will provide leaders from the 566 federally...

415

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

416

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

417

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Day 2, chaired by NETL's Kim Nuhfer, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - Low Cost Energy Storage - Ted Wiley, Aquion.pdf Ess 2010 Update Conference - Solid State Li Metal...

418

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

419

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

420

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Terry Aselage, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - Advanced Stationary Electrical Energy Storage R&D at PNNL - Z Gary Yang, PNNL.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - A New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

422

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

chaired by ARPA-E's Mark Johnson, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid - Yet-Ming Chiang, MIT.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - DOE...

423

Alaska Rural Energy Conference | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alaska Rural Energy Conference Alaska Rural Energy Conference September 23, 2014 12:00PM EDT to September 25, 2014 9:00PM EDT Fairbanks, AK http:www.akruralenergy.org...

424

Actinide Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the EffectsAcknowledgment StatementGuidance »| Y-12

425

NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

426

Preproposal Conference & Site Tour | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preproposal Conference & Site Tour | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

427

2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

President Obama will host the 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference at the Capital Hilton in Washington, DC. The conference will provide leaders from the 566 federally recognized tribes the opportunity to interact directly with the President and members of the White House Council on Native American Affairs. Each federally recognized tribe will be invited to send one representative to the conference. Additional details about the conference will be released at a later date.

428

Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

429

22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 Crowne Plaza St. Paul Riverfront for Transportation Studies 22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference Welcome to the Conference The University of Minnesota's Center for Transportation Studies is pleased to present its 22nd Annual Transportation Research

Minnesota, University of

430

COLING 2014 The 25th International Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLING 2014 The 25th International Conference on Computational Linguistics Proceedings), a collocated event at the 25th International Conference on Computational Linguistics (COLING 2014) , 23 - 29 of the Conference the 5th Workshop on South and Southeast Asian NLP WSSANLP - 2014 August 23, 2014 Dublin, Ireland

431

International Conference on INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), will be held in Wrexham, North East Wales, UK from Wednesday 7th to Friday 9th September 2005. The conferenceInternational Conference on INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS ITA 05 Wednesday 7th - Friday 9 computing and engineering. Accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Suitable topics

Davies, John N.

432

Cyclic Mode of Transmutation of Minor Actinides in Heavy-Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of process of transmutation of americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel in heavy-water reactor during first 10 lifetimes and at transition to equilibrium mode are calculated. During transmutation, dangerous nuclides, first of all, {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu are accumulated. They cause an increase of radiotoxicity. At first 10 cycles of a transmutation, the radiotoxicity is increased by 11 times in comparison with initial load of transmuted actinides. Heavy-water reactor with thermal power of 1000 MW can transmute americium and curium extracted from 7-8 VVER-1000 type reactors. It means that the required power of transmutation reactor makes about 4 % of thermal power of VVER-1000 type reactors. (authors)

Gerasimov, Aleksander S.; Kiselev, Gennady V.; Myrtsymova, Lidia A.; Zaritskaya, Tamara S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, SSC RF ITEP, Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K. [Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), 310 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1170 (United States); Hope, Kevin M. [Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Harman Hall, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL, 35115 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Pre-neutron emission mass distributions for low-energy neutron-induced actinide fission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the driving potential of a fissile system, we propose a phenomenological fission potential for a description of the pre-neutron emission mass distributions of neutron-induced actinide fission. Based on the nucleus-nucleus potential with the Skyrme energy-density functional, the driving potential of the fissile system is studied considering the deformations of nuclei. The energy dependence of the potential parameters is investigated based on the experimental data for the heights of the peak and valley of the mass distributions. The pre-neutron emission mass distributions for reactions 238U(n, f), 237Np(n, f), 235U(n, f), 232Th(n, f) and 239Pu(n, f) can be reasonably well reproduced. Some predictions for these reactions at unmeasured incident energies are also presented.

Xiaojun Sun; Chenggang Yu; Ning Wang

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tunneling through equivalent multihumped fission barriers: Some implications for the actinide nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparison of the penetrabilities calculated in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation through equivalent multihumped fission barriers shows that the penetrability saturates to its maximum value much more slowly for a three-humped potential than that for comparable two-humped and single-humped potentials. An analysis of the slopes of the near-barrier photofission cross sections of actinides yields results that can be understood in terms of the predicted potential barrier shapes for these nuclei, and thus provides evidence in support of resolving the ''thorium anomaly'' along the lines suggested by Moeller and Nix. Our results further indicate that the uranium nuclei, and in particular /sup 236/U, may more likely exhibit three-humped potential shapes in which the apparent consequences of both the second and third minima may be observable.

Bhandari, B.S.; Al-Kharam, A.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

Maxwell, III, Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Sheldon T. (Augusta, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Low-temperature synthesis of actinide tetraborides by solid-state metathesis reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The synthesis of actinide tetraborides including uranium tetraboride (UB.sub.4), plutonium tetraboride (PuB.sub.4) and thorium tetraboride (ThB.sub.4) by a solid-state metathesis reaction are demonstrated. The present method significantly lowers the temperature required to .ltoreq.850.degree. C. As an example, when UCl.sub.4 is reacted with an excess of MgB.sub.2, at 850.degree. C., crystalline UB.sub.4 is formed. Powder X-ray diffraction and ICP-AES data support the reduction of UCl.sub.3 as the initial step in the reaction. The UB.sub.4 product is purified by washing water and drying.

Lupinetti, Anthony J. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Eduardo (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Sub-barrier capture with quantum diffusion approach: actinide-based reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the quantum diffusion approach the behavior of capture cross sections and mean-square angular momenta of captured systems are revealed in the reactions with deformed nuclei at subbarrier energies. The calculated results are in a good agreement with existing experimental data. With decreasing bombarding energy under the barrier the external turning point of the nucleusnucleus potential leaves the region of short-range nuclear interaction and action of friction. Because of this change of the regime of interaction, an unexpected enhancement of the capture cross section is expected at bombarding energies far below the Coulomb barrier. This effect is shown its worth in the dependence of mean-square angular momentum of captured system on the bombarding energy. From the comparison of calculated and experimental capture cross sections, the importance of quasifission near the entrance channel is shown for the actinide-based reactions leading to superheavy nuclei.

V. V. Sargsyan; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; H. Q. Zhang

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Yields of neutron-rich nuclei by actinide photofission in giant dipole resonance region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photofission of actinides is studied in the region of nuclear excitation energies that covers the entire giant dipole resonance (GDR) region. A comparative analysis of the behavior of the symmetric and asymmetric modes of photon induced fission as a function of the average excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus is performed. The mass distributions of $^{238}$U photofission fragments are obtained at the endpoint bremsstrahlung energy of 29.1 MeV which corresponds to mean photon energy of 13.7$\\pm$0.3 MeV that coincides with GDR peak for $^{238}$U photofission. The integrated yield of $^{238}$U photofission as well as charge distribution of photofission products are calculated and its role in the production of neutron-rich nuclei and their exoticity is explored.

Debasis Bhowmick; Debasis Atta; D. N. Basu; Alok Chakrabarti

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Study on Equilibrium Characteristics of Thorium-Plutonium-Minor Actinides Mixed Oxides Fuel in PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study on characteristics of thorium-plutonium-minor actinides utilization in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the equilibrium burnup model has been conducted. For a comprehensive evaluation, several fuel cycles scenario have been included in the present study with the variation of moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (MFR) of PWR core design. The results obviously exhibit that the neutron spectra grow to be harder with decreasing of the MFR. Moreover, the neutron spectra also turn into harder with the rising number of confined heavy nuclides. The required {sup 233}U concentration for criticality of reactor augments with the increasing of MFR for all heavy nuclides confinement and thorium and uranium confinement in PWR.

Waris, A.; Permana, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Su'ud, Z. [Bosscha Laboratory, Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

Yields of neutron-rich nuclei by actinide photofission in giant dipole resonance region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photofission of actinides is studied in the region of nuclear excitation energies that covers the entire giant dipole resonance (GDR) region. A comparative analysis of the behavior of the symmetric and asymmetric modes of photon induced fission as a function of the average excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus is performed. The mass distributions of $^{238}$U photofission fragments are obtained at the endpoint bremsstrahlung energy of 29.1 MeV which corresponds to mean photon energy of 13.7$\\pm$0.3 MeV that coincides with GDR peak for $^{238}$U photofission. The integrated yield of $^{238}$U photofission as well as charge distribution of photofission products are calculated and its role in the production of neutron-rich nuclei and their exoticity is explored.

Bhowmick, Debasis; Basu, D N; Chakrabarti, Alok

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fabrication of advanced oxide fuels containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

R and D of advanced fuel containing minor actinide for use in fast reactors is described related to the composite fuel with MgO matrix. Fabrication tests of MgO composite fuels containing Am were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently used commercial manufacturing technology. Am-containing MgO composite fuels having good characteristics, i.e., having no defects, a high density, a homogeneous dispersion of host phase, were obtained. As related technology, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the present MgO composite fuel were also analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Furthermore, phase relations of MA oxide which was assumed to be contained in MgO matrix fuel were experimentally investigated. (authors)

Miwa, Shuhei; Osaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Ishi, Yohei; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Separations Science and Technology, Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991--March 1992. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Two other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) a membrane-assisted solvent extraction method for treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds and (2) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Betts, S.; Chamberlain, D.B. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Separation Science and Technology semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Section of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1992--March 1993. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Two other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process and (2) treatment schemes for liquid wastes stored or being generated at Argonne.

Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Betts, S. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Bowers, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Separation science and technology. Semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April-September 1992. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Two other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) a membrane-assisted solvent extraction method for treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds and (2) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Betts, S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hardening Neutron Spectrum for Advanced Actinides Transmutation Experiments in the ATR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most effective method for transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast rest reactor in the United States, initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. Such a test facility, with a spectrum similar but somewhat softer than that of the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), has been constructed in the INEEL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The radial fission power distribution of the actinide fuel pin, which is an important parameter in fission gas released modelling, needs to be accurately predicted and the hardened neturon spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum is compared. The comparison analyses in this study are peformed using MCWO, a well-developed tool that couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and build-up code ORIGEN-2. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations and detailed radial fission power profile calculations for a typical fast reactor (LMFBR) neutron spectrum and the hardened neturon spectrum test region in the ATR. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the cadmium basket used in the advanced fuel test assembly in the ATR can effectively depress the linear heat generation rate in the experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum in the test region.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Plant Mounds as Concentration and Stabilization Agents for Actinide Soil Contaminants in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around the base of shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. An important factor in their formation is that shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, 241Am, and U in plant mounds at safety experiment and storage-transportation test sites of nuclear devices. Although aerial concentrations of these contaminants were highest in the intershrub or desert pavement areas, the concentration in mounds were higher than in equal volumes of intershrub or desert pavement soil. The NAEG studies found the ratio of contaminant concentration of actinides in soil to be greater (1.6 to 2.0) in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. At Project 57 on the NTTR, 17 percent of the area was covered in mounds while at Clean Slate III on the TTR, 32 percent of the area was covered in mounds. If equivalent volumes of contaminated soil were compared between mounds and desert pavement areas at these sites, then the former might contain as much as 34 and 62 percent of the contaminant inventory, respectively. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. In addition, preservation of shrub mounds could be important part of long-term stewardship if these sites are closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls.

D.S. Shafer; J. Gommes

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

Separators - Technology review: Ceramic based separators for secondary batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Besides a continuous increase of the worldwide use of electricity, the electric energy storage technology market is a growing sector. At the latest since the German energy transition ('Energiewende') was announced, technological solutions for the storage of renewable energy have been intensively studied. Storage technologies in various forms are commercially available. A widespread technology is the electrochemical cell. Here the cost per kWh, e. g. determined by energy density, production process and cycle life, is of main interest. Commonly, an electrochemical cell consists of an anode and a cathode that are separated by an ion permeable or ion conductive membrane - the separator - as one of the main components. Many applications use polymeric separators whose pores are filled with liquid electrolyte, providing high power densities. However, problems arise from different failure mechanisms during cell operation, which can affect the integrity and functionality of these separators. In the case of excessive heating or mechanical damage, the polymeric separators become an incalculable security risk. Furthermore, the growth of metallic dendrites between the electrodes leads to unwanted short circuits. In order to minimize these risks, temperature stable and non-flammable ceramic particles can be added, forming so-called composite separators. Full ceramic separators, in turn, are currently commercially used only for high-temperature operation systems, due to their comparably low ion conductivity at room temperature. However, as security and lifetime demands increase, these materials turn into focus also for future room temperature applications. Hence, growing research effort is being spent on the improvement of the ion conductivity of these ceramic solid electrolyte materials, acting as separator and electrolyte at the same time. Starting with a short overview of available separator technologies and the separator market, this review focuses on ceramic-based separators. Two prominent examples, the lithium-ion and sodium-sulfur battery, are described to show the current stage of development. New routes are presented as promising technologies for safe and long-life electrochemical storage cells.

Nestler, Tina; Schmid, Robert; Münchgesang, Wolfram; Bazhenov, Vasilii; Meyer, Dirk C. [Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Leipziger Str. 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Schilm, Jochen [Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien und Systeme IKTS, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Fraunhofer-Technologiezentrum Halbleitermaterialien THM, Am St.-Niclas-Schacht 13, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

451

Separation process using microchannel technology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosed invention relates to a process and apparatus for separating a first fluid from a fluid mixture comprising the first fluid. The process comprises: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator in contact with a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the first fluid is sorbed by the sorption medium, removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing first fluid from the sorption medium and removing desorbed first fluid from the microchannel separator. The process and apparatus are suitable for separating nitrogen or methane from a fluid mixture comprising nitrogen and methane. The process and apparatus may be used for rejecting nitrogen in the upgrading of sub-quality methane.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Dublin, OH); Perry, Steven T. (Galloway, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Bothell, WA); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Burwell, Deanna (Cleveland Heights, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); McDaniel, Jeffrey S. (Columbus, OH); Rogers, Jr.; William A. (Marysville, OH); Silva, Laura J. (Dublin, OH); Weidert, Daniel J. (Lewis Center, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Dublin, OH); Chadwell, G. Bradley (Reynoldsburg, OH)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Membrane Separations of Liquid Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMBRANE SEPARATIONS OF LIQUID MIXTURES Douglas R. Lloyd Separations Research Program Department of Chemical Engineering The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas In recent years considerable attention has been given to the need... for reduced energy costs in the chemical processing industry. A major portion of the energy consumed in this industry is associated with the separation and recovery of chemicals. Membrane processes offer energy-efficient, cost effective methods...

Lloyd, D. R.

454

Separation Membrane Development (Separation Using Encapsulated Metal Hydride)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Separation Membrane Development (Separation Using Encapsulated Metal Hydride) L. Kit Heung Savannah: The first is to produce a sol-gel encapsulated metal hydride packing material that will a) absorbs hydrogen may be that hydrogen must come from multiple sources. These sources will include renewable (solar

455

Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Save the date for this international gathering of energy-producing Tribes, governments, and companies envisioning a path forward toward a more sustainable future. This two-day conference and expo will provide information on national policy and budget, state oil and gas, tribal energy companies and tribal policies for success.

456

Annual Conference On Best Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 5th Annual Conference On Best Practices in the Education of Children with Down Syndrome April and Liberal Arts and Sciences C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University and The Down Syndrome Advocacy. Emily Jones B. Developing Behaviorally Based Programming for Infants and Toddlers with Down Syndrome (*3

Ranadli, Robert

457

Separator material for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell is characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

Cieslak, W.R.; Storz, L.J.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

Fairbanks, Richard R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Separator material for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

Cieslak, Wendy R. (1166 Laurel Loop NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Storz, Leonard J. (2215 Ambassador NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Three phase downhole separator process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Demonstration of a TODGA/TBP process for recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from a PUREX raffinate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of the partitioning of trivalent actinides from a PUREX raffinate has been demonstrated with a TODGA + TBP extractant mixture dissolved in an industrial aliphatic solvent TPH. Based on the results coming from cold and hot batch extraction studies and with the aid of computer code calculations a continuous counter current process have been developed and two flowsheets were tested using miniature centrifugal contactors. The feed solutions was a synthetic PUREX raffinate, spiked with {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs. More than 99.9 % of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides were extracted and back-extracted and very high decontamination factors to most fission products were obtained. Co-extraction of zirconium, molybdenum and palladium was prevented using oxalic acid and HEDTA. However 10% of ruthenium was extracted and only 3 % could be back extracted using diluted nitric acid. (authors)

Modolo, G.; Asp, H.; Vijgen, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energieforschung, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Malmbeck, R.; Magnusson, D. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements - ITU, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sorel, C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Valrho - CEA, DRCP/SCPS, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Actinide destruction and power peaking analysis in a 1000 MWt advanced burner reactor using moderated heterogeneous target assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of moderated heterogeneous subassemblies located in the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor on minor actinide (MA) destruction rates over the lifecycle of the core. Additionally, particular emphasis was placed on the power peaking of the pins and the assemblies with the moderated targets as compared to standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets and a core without MA targets present. Power peaking analysis was performed on the target assemblies and on the fuel assemblies adjacent to the targets. The moderated subassemblies had a marked improvement in the overall destruction of heavy metals in the targets. The design with acceptable power peaking results had a 12.25% greater destruction of heavy metals than a similar ex-core unmoderated assembly. The increase in minor actinide destruction was most evident with americium where the moderated assemblies reduced the initial amount to less than 3% of the initial loading over a period of five years core residency. In order to take advantage of the high minor actinide destruction and minimize the power peaking effects, a hybrid scenario was devised where the targets resided ex-core in a moderated assembly for the first 506.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and were moved to an in-core arrangement with the moderated targets removed for the remainder of the lifecycle. The hybrid model had an assembly and pin power peaking of less than 2.0 and a higher heavy metal and minor actinide destruction rate than the standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets either in-core or ex-core. The hybrid model has a 54.5% greater Am reduction over the standard ex-core model. It also had a 27.8% greater production of Cm and a 41.5% greater production of Pu than the standard ex-core model. The radiotoxicity of the targets in the hybrid design was 20% less than the discharged standard ex-core targets.

Kenneth Allen; Travis Knight; Samuel Bays

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Test of the adequacy of using smoothly joined parabolic segments to parametrize the multihumped fission barriers in actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adequacy of using smoothly joined parabolic segments to parametrize the multihumped fission barriers has been tested by examining its simultaneous consistency with the three relevant fission observables, namely, the near-barrier fission cross sections, isomeric half-lives, and the ground-state spontaneous fission half-lives of a wide variety of a total of 25 actinide nuclides. The penetrabilities through such multihumped fission barriers have been calculated in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, and the various fission half-lives have been determined using the formalism given earlier by Nix and Walker. The results of our systematic analysis of these actinide nuclides suggest that such a parametrization is quite adequate at least for the even-even nuclei, as it reproduces satisfactorily their various observed fission characteristics. Major difficulties remain, however, for the odd mass and for the doubly odd nuclei where the calculated ground-state spontaneous fission half-lives are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those measured. Possible reasons for such discrepancies are discussed. Fission branching ratios of the decay of the shape isomers in various actinide nuclides have also been calculated and are compared with their measured values.

Bhandari, B.S. (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Garyounis, Benghazi (Libya))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

1993 International conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation, Prague, Czech Republic, September 5--11, 1993. Combined foreign trip report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the trip was to attend the 1993 International Conference on Nuclear Waste Management and Environmental Remediation. The principal objective of this conference was to facilitate a truly international exchange of information on the management of nuclear wastes as well as contaminated facilities and sites emanating from nuclear operations. The conference was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Czech and Slovak Mechanical Engineering Societies, and the Czech and Slovak Nuclear Societies in cooperation with the Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the OECD Nuclear Agency. The conference was cosponsored by the American Nuclear Society, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Society, the (former USSR) Nuclear Society, and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. This was the fourth in a series of biennial conferences, which started in Hong Kong, in 1987. This report summarizes shared aspects of the trip; however, each traveler`s observations and recommendations are reported separately.

Slate, S.C. [comp.; Allen, R.E. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Spectroscopic and physicochemical measurements for on-line monitoring of used nuclear fuel separation processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation processes for used nuclear fuel are often complicated and challenging due to the high constraints in purity of the products and safeguards of the process streams. In order to achieve a safe, secure and efficient separation process, the liquid streams in the separation process require close monitoring. Due to the high radiation environment, sampling of the materials is difficult. Availability of a detection technique that is remote, non-destructive and can avoid time-delay caused by retrieving samples would be beneficial and could minimize the exposure to personnel and provide material accountancy to avoid diversion (non-proliferation). For example, Ultra Violet (UV), Visible (Vis), Near-Infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy that detect and quantify elements present in used nuclear fuel, e.g. lanthanides, actinides and molecules such as nitrate, can be used. In this work, we have carried out NIR and Raman spectroscopy to study aqueous solutions composed of different concentrations of nitric acid, sodium nitrate, and neodymium at varied temperatures. A chemometric model for online monitoring based on the PLS-Toolbox (MATLAB) software has been developed and validated to provide chemical composition of process streams based on spectroscopic data. In conclusion, both of our NIR and Raman spectra were useful for H{sup +} and NO{sub 3} prediction, and only NIR was helpful for the Nd{sup 3+} prediction.

Nee, Ko; Nilsson, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of California, 916 Engineering Tower, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Bryan, S.; Levitskaia, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO BOX 999, Richland, CA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring of clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.

Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

2005 clean coal and power conference. Conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the conference was 'The paradox: today's coal technologies versus tomorrow's promise'. The sessions covered: today's technologies, tomorrow's potential; economic stability; energy security; transition to sustainable energy future; new coal power technologies leading to zero emission coal; existing power plants - improved performance through use of new technology; and carbon capture and storage R & D - challenges and opportunities. Some of the papers only consist of the viewgraphs/overheads.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Energy Savings Through Application of Model Predictive Control to an Air Separation Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Savings Through Application of Model Predictive Control to an Air Separation Facility Thomas C. Hanson PauiF. Scharf Manager Senior Engineering Associate Process Development Process Control Technology Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, New York...TM based operator interface was developed by Praxair to make the system usable in our operations. 174 ESL-IE-96-04-24 Proceedings from the Eighteenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 17-18, 1996 Benefits overview MPC has...

Hanson, T. C.; Scharf, P. F.

475

Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS EIGHTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION -DOE/NETL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS EIGHTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL May ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL May 4 ­ 7, 2009 Abstract Reservoir simulation is the industry

Mohaghegh, Shahab

480

Continuous magnetic separator and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actinide separations conference" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Pump and centrifugal separator apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention relates to agitating means for preventing the accumulation of particulate matter at the contaminate outlet orifices in a pump and centrifugal separator apparatus. The pump separator apparatus includes a rotatable casing forming a chamber for centrifugally separating the oil, water and contaminant matter in an oil well production fluid. The clean oil is collected by a stationary pitot tube in the chamber, the clean water is drawn off at an outlet port near the outer periphery of the chamber, and the dirty water and contaminants are discharged through outlet orifices formed in the outer wall of the casing. The agitating means includes rotating jet ports for directing streams of pressurized fluid tangentially along the inner surface of the casing to agitate accumulations of separated solid contaminant matter thereby preventing the clogging of the outlet orifices.

Erickson, J.W.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Fluorine separation and generation device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for the electrolytic separation of fluorine from a mixture of gases is disclosed. Also described is the process and apparatus for the generation of fluorine from fluorine/fluoride containing solids, liquids or gases.

Jacobson, Craig P. (Moraga, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA); Stefan, Constantin I. (Hayward, CA)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fluorine separation and generation device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for the electrolytic separation of fluorine from a mixture of gases is disclosed. Also described is the process and apparatus for the generation of fluorine from fluorine/fluoride containing solids, liquids or gases.

The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

Messages from Conference Chairs.................................... 1 Messages from Program Chairs................... ........ ............. 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-chairs for the 9th International Conference on Mobile Data Management (MDM), it is our pleasure to welcome youContents Messages from Conference Chairs.................................... 1 Messages from Program Chairs................... ........ ............. 2 Conference Officers

485

Quest for Environmentally-Benign Ligands for Actinide Separations: Thermodynamic, Spectroscopic, and Structural Characterization of U(VI) Complexes with Oxa-Diamide and Related Ligands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zhang P. ; Wang J. ; Rao L. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2005, 23 (Madic, C. ; Testard, F. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2004, 22 (4),Yaita, T.i; Tachimori, S. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2004, 22 (

Tian, Guoxin; Advanced Light Source

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

Hobbs, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

REVIEW OF ACTINIDE AND STRONTIUM LOADING DATA FOR MST AND MMST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRNL reviewed the relevant data from MST and mMST fissile loading studies to determine if further studies were required. With respect to MST, SRNL found that the published results adequately bound the expected conditions that Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process will operate under. The lack of strontium data does not represent an issue as strontium is not relevant to criticality. There is no threat to criticality safety from the lack of strontium loading data. However, SRNL proposes a single test with MST to ensure that future SCIX operations are conservatively bounded and strontium maximum loading is understood. With respect to attempts to maximally load mMST, SRNL's knowledge on actinide and strontium loading is limited to uranium behavior. mMST has a very weak affinity for uranium, and even extended contact time at high uranium concentration shows minimal loading onto mMST. This leaves questions about the ability to load plutonium, neptunium and strontium. SRNL proposes to perform two tests with mMST to ensure that questions on plutonium, neptunium, and strontium sorption are answered, as well as ensuring that future mMST operations are conservatively bounded.

Peters, T.; Hobbs, D.; Fink, S.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

488

Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Compositions for Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a depletion code validation approach for criticality safety analysis using burnup credit for actinide and fission product nuclides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) compositions. The technical basis for determining the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations is comparison of calculations to available measurements obtained from destructive radiochemical assay of SNF samples. Probability distributions developed for the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations were applied to the SNF compositions of a criticality safety analysis model by the use of a Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling method to determine bias and bias uncertainty in effective neutron multiplication factor. Application of the Monte Carlo uncertainty sampling approach is demonstrated for representative criticality safety analysis models of pressurized water reactor spent fuel pool storage racks and transportation packages using burnup-dependent nuclide concentrations calculated with SCALE 6.1 and the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data. The validation approach and results support a recent revision of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Interim Staff Guidance 8.

Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Microbial Transformation of TRU and Mixed Waste: Actinide Speciation and Waste Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to understand the susceptibility of transuranic and mixed waste to microbial degradation (as well as any mechanism which depends upon either complexation and/or redox of metal ions), it is essential to understand the association of metal ions with organic ligands present in mixed wastes. These ligands have been found in our previous EMSP study to limit electron transfer reactions and strongly affect transport and the eventual fate of radionuclides in the environment. As transuranic waste (and especially mixed waste) will be retained in burial sites and in legacy containment for (potentially) many years while awaiting treatment and removal (or remaining in place under stewardship agreements at government subsurface waste sites), it is also essential to understand the aging of mixed wastes and its implications for remediation and fate of radionuclides. Mixed waste containing actinides and organic materials are especially complex and require extensive study. The EMSP program described in this report is part of a joint program with the Environmental Sciences Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Stony Brook University portion of this award has focused on the association of uranium (U(VI)) and transuranic analogs (Ce(III) and Eu(III)) with cellulosic materials and related compounds, with development of implications for microbial transformation of mixed wastes. The elucidation of the chemical nature of mixed waste is essential for the formulation of remediation and encapsulation technologies, for understanding the fate of contaminant exposed to the environment, and for development of meaningful models for contaminant storage and recovery.

Halada, Gary P

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

490

Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solubility testing method for several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{reg_sign}) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Profiles developed for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples show good agreement with in vitro and in vivo tests performed by other investigators on samples from the same uranium mills.

Metzger, R.L.; Jessop, B.H.; McDowell, B.L. [Radiation Safety Engineering, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Improving the actinides recycling in closed fuel cycles, a major step towards nuclear energy sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing the sustainability of nuclear energy is a longstanding road that requires a stepwise approach to successively tackle the following 3 objectives. First of all, optimize the consumption of natural resource to preserve them for future generations and hence guarantee the energetic independence of the countries (no uranium ore is needed anymore). The current twice-through cycle of Pu implemented by France, UK, Japan and soon China is a first step in this direction and already allows the development and optimization of the relevant industrial processes. It also allows a major improvement regarding the conditioning of the ultimate waste in a durable and robust nuclear glass. Secondly, the recycling of americium could be an interesting option for the future with the deployment of FR fleet to save the repository resource and optimize its use by allowing a denser disposal. It would limit the burden towards the future generations and the need for additional repositories before several centuries. Thirdly, the recycling of the whole minor actinides inventory could be an interesting option for the far-future for strongly decreasing the waste long-term toxicity, down to a few centuries. It would bring the waste issue back within the human history, which should promote its acceptance by the social opinion.

Poinssot, C.; Grandjean, S.; Masson, M. [RadioChemistry and Processes Department, CEA Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Bouillis, B.; Warin, D. [Innovation and Industrial Support Direction, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide targets extracted Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by a chemical process. These plants can however not separate neptunium, americium and curium (minor ... Source: Uppsala Universitet, Department of Theoretical Physics...

493

Proceedings of IADC Middle East Drilling Conference, Dubai, November 1998. 1 IADC Middle East Drilling Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of IADC Middle East Drilling Conference, Dubai, November 1998. 1 IADC Middle East Drilling Conference Case-Based Reasoning, a method for gaining experience and giving advise on how to avoid and how to free stuck drill strings. IADC Middle East Drilling Conference, Dubai, Nov. 3 - 4, 1998. P