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1

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Practical Pyrgeometer Using the Representative Angle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple directional pyrgeometer is tested and compared with a conventional standard pyrgeometer. The system presented in this article has a narrow directional response and points to the representative zenith angle of 52.5°. Because of its ...

Satoshi Sakai; Aya Ito; Kazuhiro Umetani; Isao Iizawa; Masanori Onishi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

5

Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

On the Use of Pyrgeometers in Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and airborne observations show that the protective hemispheres of aircraft pyrgeometers are partly covered by water when used in cloud. This cover can reduce the incident longwave flux by as much as 60%. Improved agreement between ...

S. G. Bradley; R. G. Gibson

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Chopped Pyrgeometer: A New Step in Pyrgeometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of pyrgeometer, which uses modulation of the atmospheric radiation by a mechanical chopper, has been built for the use of ground-based and airborne measurement of broadband infrared atmospheric irradiances. The instrument basically ...

Dieter Lorenz; Peter Wendling; Peter Burkert; Friedrich Fergg; Günther Wildgruber

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMIE AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment) Planning Meeting AMIE Science Steering Committee Chuck Long, Tony DelGenio, Bill Gustafson, Bob Houze, Mike Jensen, Steve Klein, Ruby Leung, Xaihong Liu, Ed Luke, Peter May, Sally McFarlane, Pat Minnis, Courtney Schumacher, Andy Vogelmann, Yi Wang, Xiaoqing Wu, Shaohong Xie Agenda * Proposal due May 1 !!!!!! * Primary purpose of this meeting is discussions and planning in support of

9

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_pyrgeometer.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-05-111 ARM-05-111 2 Outline * Why the need for longwave data restriction? - Important Considerations and the 12 Wm -2 longwave results problem * What ARM data are effected? - List of station-dates * Can the data be adjusted? - Using available 20-sec data samples * How is ARM addressing pyrgeometer calibration? - In search of a measurement reference * References * Acronyms * Appendix - Fundamentals of pyrgeometer operation and calibration 3 Why a Data Access Restriction? The ARM Program's data quality control measures discovered an unexpected shift in the time series of longwave irradiance data. This followed a change in pyrgeometer calibration procedures for field instruments deployed at all SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD installations beginning in August 2002 and completed in March 2004.

10

Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Baseline Surface Radiation Network Pyrgeometer Round-Robin Calibration Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of improving the consistency of terrestrial and atmospheric longwave radiation measurements within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network, five Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometer (PIR) pyrgeometers and one modified Meteorological ...

Rolf Philipona; Claus Fröhlich; Klaus Dehne; John DeLuisi; John Augustine; Ellsworth Dutton; Don Nelson; Bruce Forgan; Peter Novotny; John Hickey; Steven P. Love; Steven Bender; Bruce McArthur; Atsumu Ohmura; John H. Seymour; John S. Foot; Masataka Shiobara; Francisco P. J. Valero; Anthony W. Strawa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effects of Solar Radiation on the Performance of Pyrgeometers with Silicon Domes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Eppley pyrgeometer with a silicon dome presents several anomalies during daytime measurements. These problems are related mainly to the solar heating of the dome, which causes nearly instantaneous fluctuations, about ±1%–2% ...

L. Alados-Arboledas; J. Vida; J. I. Jiménez

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 1 BLACKBODY RADIATION Introduction by frequency. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 2 When he tried to justify-4 lock-in amplifier. #12;Princeton University, Physics 311/312 Blackbody Radiation, Page 3 Schematic

14

Quantification of Solar Heating of the Dome of a Pyrgeometer for a Tropical Location: Ilorin, Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-year database (September 1992–August 1994) on global solar radiation and downward infrared radiation measured at Ilorin, Nigeria (8°32?N, 4°34?E), using a precision spectral pyranometer and pyrgeometer, respectively, was analyzed so as to ...

S. O. Udo

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image. PACS numbers: 42.30.Va, 42.25.Kb, 42.50.Ar, 42.25.Hz Ghost imaging were firstly realized by using entangled photon pairs generated in spontaneous parametric down conversion in 1995 [1,2]. The name ghost comes from the facts that an object in one path produces an image in another path in the measurement of coincident counting rates, and the image depends on both paths. Since then, many theoretical and experimental studies on this subject have been published [3-10]. Recently, there were discussions about whether quantum entanglement is necessary in the ghost imaging and whether a ghost imaging experiment can be realized with classical source [11-14]. Bennink et

Yangjian Cai; Shi-yao Zhu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Blackbody radiation in ?-Minkowski spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have computed the black body radiation spectra in $\\kappa-$Minkowski space-time, using the quantum mechanical picture of massless scalar particles as well as effective quantum field theory picture. The black body radiation depends on how the field theory (and thus how the $\\kappa-$Poincar\\'e algebra) handles the ordering effect of the noncommutative space-time. In addition, there exists a natural momentum cut-off of the order $\\kappa$, beyond which a new real mode takes its shape from a complex mode and the old real mode flows out to be a new complex mode. However, the new high momentum real mode should not be physical since its contributions to the black-body radiation spoils the commutative limit.

Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer to Measure the Absolute Outdoor Longwave Irradiance with Traceability to International System of Units, SI  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180{sup o} view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U{sub 95}) of {+-}3.96 W m{sup 02} with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m{sup 2} lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG, with a standard deviation of {+-}0.7 W m{sup -2}. These results suggest that the ACP design might be used for addressing the need to improve the international reference for broadband outdoor longwave irradiance measurements.

Reda, I.; Zeng, J.; Scheuch, J.; Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Attractive Optical Forces from Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackbody radiation around hot objects induces ac Stark shifts of the energy levels of nearby atoms and molecules. These shifts are roughly proportional to the fourth power of the temperature and induce a force decaying with the third power of the distance from the object. We explicitly calculate the resulting attractive blackbody optical dipole force for ground state hydrogen atoms. Surprisingly, this force can surpass the repulsive radiation pressure and actually pull the atoms against the radiation energy flow towards the surface with a force stronger than gravity. We exemplify the dominance of the "blackbody force" over gravity for hydrogen in a cloud of hot dust particles. This overlooked force appears relevant in various astrophysical scenarios, in particular, since analogous results hold for a wide class of other broadband radiation sources.

Matthias Sonnleitner; Monika Ritsch-Marte; Helmut Ritsch

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

An Analysis of Universality in Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the formulation of his law of thermal emission, Kirchhoff conferred upon blackbody radiation the quality of universality [G.Kirchhoff, Annalen der Physik 109, 275 (1860)]. Consequently, modern physics holds that such radiation is independent of the nature and shape of the emitted object. Recently, Kirchhoff's experimental work and theoretical conclusions have been reconsidered [P.M.L. Robitaille, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science 31(6), 1263 (2003). In this work, Einstein's derivation of the Planckian relation is reexamined. It is demonstrated that claims of universality in blackbody radiation are invalid.

Pierre-Marie Robitaille

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Field Intercomparison Technique to Improve the Relative Accuracy of Longwave Radiation Measurements and an Evaluation of CASES-99 Pyrgeometer Data Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for improving the relative accuracy of longwave radiation measurements by a set of pyrgeometers [the Eppley Laboratory Precision Infrared Radiometer (Model PIR)] are presented using 10 PIRs from the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface ...

S. P. Burns; J. Sun; A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer; S. P. Oncley; T. W. Horst

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies $\

Yudin, V I; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstaubler, T E; Riehle, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Blackbody radiation drag on a relativistically moving mirror  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the drag force on a mirror moving at relativistic velocity relative to blackbody radiation background.

N. R. Balasanyan; V. E. Mkrtchian

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

ORNL, ACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri Palanisamy, Karen Gibson...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri Palanisamy, Karen Gibson, W. Christopher Lenhardt Mission Research: Sean Moore Show me... - Exis'ng Func'onality * Mul'ple interfaces (Data,...

24

Blackbody radiation in a nonextensive scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exact analysis of the N-dimensional blackbody radiation process in a nonextensive à la Tsallis scenario is performed for values of the nonextensive’s index in the range (0 < q < 1). The recently advanced “Optimal Lagrange Multipliers ” (OLM) technique has been employed. The results are consistent with those of the extensive, q = 1 case. The generalization of the celebrated laws of Planck, Stefan-Boltzmann, and Wien are investigated.

S. Martínez; F. Pennini; A. Plastino; C. Tessone

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Black-body radiation in extra dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general form of the Stefan-Boltzmann law for the energy density of black-body radiation is generalized to a spacetime with extra dimensions using standard kinetic and thermodynamic arguments. From statistical mechanics one obtains an exact formula. In a field-theoretic derivation, the Maxwell field must be quantized. The notion of electric and magnetic fields is different in spacetimes with more than four dimensions. While the energy-momentum tensor for the Maxwell field is traceless in four dimensions, it is not so when there are extra dimensions. But it is shown that its thermal average is traceless and in agreement with the thermodynamic results.

H. Alnes; F. Ravndal; I. K. Wehus

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mass and temperature limits for blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spherically symmetric distribution of classical blackbody radiation is considered, at conditions in which gravitational self-interaction effects become not negligible. Static solutions to Einstein field equations are searched for, for each choice of the assumed central energy density. Spherical cavities at thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. filled with blackbody radiation, are then studied, in particular for what concerns the relation among the mass M of the ball of radiation contained in them and their temperature at center and at the boundary. For these cavities it is shown, in particular, that: i) there is no absolute limit to M as well to their central and boundary temperatures; ii) when radius R is fixed, however, limits exist both for mass and for boundary energy density rho_B: M <= K M_S(R) and rho_B <= Q/R^2, with K = 0.493 and Q = 0.02718, dimensionless, and M_S(R) the Schwarzschild mass for that radius. Some implications of the existence and the magnitude of these limits are considered. Finally the radial profiles for entropy for these systems are studied, in their dependence on the mass (or central temperature) of the ball of radiation.

Alessandro Pesci

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

29

Blackbody radiation-pumped CO/sub 2/ laser experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

Christiansen, W.H.; Insuik, R.J.; Deyoung, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Blackbody radiation shift of B$^+$ clock transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calculation of the blackbody radiation shift of the B$^+$ clock transition is performed. The polarizabilities of the B$^+$ $2s^2$ $^1$S$^e$, $2s2p$ $^1$P$^o$, and $2s2p$ $^3$P$^o$ states are computed using the configuration interaction method with an underlying semi-empirical core potential. The recommended dipole polarizabilities are 9.64(3) $a_0^3$, 7.78(3) $a_0^3$ and 16.55(5) $a_0^3$ respectively. The derived frequency shift for the $2s^2$ $^1$S$^e$ $\\to$ $2s2p$ $^3$P$^o_0$ transition at 300 K is 0.0160(5) Hz. The dipole polarizabilities agree with an earlier relativistic calculation (Safronova {\\em et al.} Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 107} 143006 (2011)) to better than 0.2%. Quadrupole and octupole polarizabilities and non-adiabatic multipole polarizabilities are also reported.

Cheng, Yongjun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies v1 and v2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a "synthetic" frequency v_{syn} (v1-e12 v2) largely immune to the BBRS. As an example, it is shown that in the case of ion 171Yb+ it is possible to create a clock in which the BBRS can be suppressed to the fractional level of 10^{-18} in a broad interval near room temperature (300\\pm 15 K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies v1 and v2. Here the frequency v_{syn} is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum and can be used as an atomic standard.

V. I. Yudin; A. V. Taichenachev; M. V. Okhapkin; S. N. Bagayev; Chr. Tamm; E. Peik; N. Huntemann; T. E. Mehlstaubler; F. Riehle

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Ionization of Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied an ionization of alkali-metal Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR). The results of the theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs Rydberg atoms are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at the three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependences on n. A Cooper minimum for BBR-induced transitions between bound Rydberg states of Li has been found. The calculated ionization rates are compared with our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with ...

Beterov, I I; Ryabtsev, I I; Entin, V M; Ekers, A; Bezuglov, N N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data Richard Coulter, Barry Lesht, and Brad Orr Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL INTRODUCTION The radar wind profilers (RWPs) located at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site have been collecting data for more than a decade at the intermediate facilities (I1: Beaumont, KS; I2: Medicine Lodge, KS; I3 Meeker OK) and 15 years at the Central Facility. They provide a good picture of the temporal and spatial variation across the SGP site over this time period Here we elucidate the variation of the height of the mixed layer (z i ) and precipitation, two parameters that illustrate the potential richness of the wind profiler data beyond wind profiles. Daytime Mixed Layer An automated routine, operating

35

Blackbody radiation and distribution function with three parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this work is to give the key to answer whether or not there is another numerical method which is different from the equation proposed by Planck to predict blackbody radiation by frequency. Firstly, Maxwell distribution function for molecule velocities was modified, resulting in a distribution function with three parameters for deriving monochromatic intensity of blackbody radiation through frequency. Then this simulation function was applied to estimate the energy density (Jm-2) of blackbody radiation by frequency at 5500 K, 5000 K, 4500 K, 4000 K, 3500 K and 2.73 K of temperature. The results of density simulated by means of distribution function suggested in this paper agree well with the experimental data. All of the correlation coefficients between actual and calculated data are 1.0; at the same time, the mean relative errors are less than 6.65% in total.

Changshi, Liu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Blackbody radiation and distribution function with three parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this work is to give the key to answer whether or not there is another numerical method which is different from the equation proposed by Planck to predict blackbody radiation by frequency. Firstly, Maxwell distribution function for molecule velocities was modified, resulting in a distribution function with three parameters for deriving monochromatic intensity of blackbody radiation through frequency. Then this simulation function was applied to estimate the energy density (Jm-2) of blackbody radiation by frequency at 5500 K, 5000 K, 4500 K, 4000 K, 3500 K and 2.73 K of temperature. The results of density simulated by means of distribution function suggested in this paper agree well with the experimental data. All of the correlation coefficients between actual and calculated data are 1.0; at the same time, the mean relative errors are less than 6.65% in total.

Liu Changshi

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Finite size corrections to the blackbody radiation laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the radiation of a blackbody in a cavity of finite size. For a given geometry, we use semiclassical techniques to obtain explicit expressions of the modified Planck's and Stefan-Boltzmann's blackbody radiation laws as a function of the size and shape of the cavity. We determine the range of parameters (temperature, size and shape of the cavity) for which these effects are accessible to experimental verification. Finally we discuss potential applications of our findings in the physics of the cosmic microwave background and sonoluminescence.

Antonio Miguel Garcia-Garcia

2007-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Blackbody Radiation in D-Dimensional Universes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blackbody radiation is analyzed in universes with $D$ spatial dimensions. With the classical electrodynamics suited to the universe in focus and recurring to the hyperspherical coordinates, it is shown that the spectral energy density as well as the total energy density are sensible to the dimensionality of the universe. Wien's displacement law and the Stefan-Boltzmann law are properly generalized.

Tatiana R. Cardoso; Antonio S. de Castro

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Blackbody radiation with compact and non-compact extra dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of blackbody radiation in flat space with non-compact extra dimensions was analysed recently. In the present article we reanalyse this problem with compact (and non-compact) extra dimensions in flat space to observe the consequences of this approach upon Wien's displacement and Stefan-Boltzmann law.

Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Einstein's coefficients and the nature of thermal blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that thermal radio emission has an induced character and argue that thermal blackbody radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. A new theory of thermal radio emission of non-uniform gas basing on the induced origin of emission and its astrophysical applications are considered. The nature of emission from various astrophysical objects is discussed.

F. V. Prigara

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiation of the blackbody in the external field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blackbody is considered in the external general field. The additional coefficients of stimulated emission and absorption are introduced into the Einstein mechanism. Then, the generalized Planck formula is derived. The Einstein and Debye formula for the specific heat is possible to generalize. The application of the theory to the sonoluminescence, the relic radiation and solar spectrum is discussed.

Miroslav Pardy

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Blackbody radiation shift in 87Rb frequency standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. Experimental measurements of the BBR shifts are difficult. In this work, we have calculated the blackbody radiation shift of the ground-state hyperfine microwave transition in 87Rb using the relativistic all-order method and carried out detailed evaluation of the accuracy of our final value. Particular care is taken to accurately account for the contributions from highly-excited states. Our predicted value for the Stark coefficient, k_S=-1.240(4)\\times 10^{-10}\\text{Hz/(V/m)}^{2} is three times more accurate than the previous calculation [1].

M. S. Safronova; Dansha Jiang; U. I. Safronova

2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

Black-body radiation shift of the Ga$^{+}$ clock transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blackbody radiation shift of the Ga$^+$ $4s^2 \\ ^1S^e_0 \\to 4s4p \\ ^3P^o_0$ clock transition is computed to be $-$$0.0140 \\pm 0.0048$ Hz at 300 K. The small shift is consistent with the blackbody shifts of the clock transitions of other group III ions which are of a similar size. The polarizabilities of the Ga$^+$ $4s^2 \\ ^1S^e_0$, $4s4p \\ ^3P^o_0$, and $4s4p \\ ^1P^o_1$ states were computed using the configuration interaction method with an underlying semi-empirical core potential. A byproduct of the analysis involved large scale calculations of the low lying spectrum and oscillator strengths of the Ga$^{2+}$ ion.

Cheng, Yongjun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quantum Driven Dissipative Parametric Oscillator in a Blackbody Radiation Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the general open system problem of a charged quantum oscillator confined in a harmonic trap, whose frequency can be arbitrarily modulated in time, that interacts with both an incoherent quantized (blackbody) radiation field and with an arbitrary coherent laser field. We assume that the oscillator is initially in thermodynamic equilibrium with its environment, a non-factorized initial density matrix of the system and the environment, and that at $t=0$ the modulation of the frequency, the coupling to the incoherent and the coherent radiation are switched on. The subsequent dynamics, induced by the presence of the blackbody radiation and the laser field, is studied in the framework of the influence functional approach. This approach allows incorporating, in \\emph{analytic closed formulae}, the non-Markovian character of the oscillator-environment interaction at any temperature as well the non-Markovian character of the blackbody radiation and its zero-point fluctuations. Expressions for the time evolution of the covariance matrix elements of the quantum fluctuations and the reduced density-operator are obtained.

Leonardo A. Pachón; Paul Brumer

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

Use of Long Time-series ACRF Measurements to Improve Data Quality Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Eighteenth ARM Science Team Meeting 1 Use of Long Time-Series ACRF Measurements to Improve Data Quality Analysis Sean Moore Mission Research and Technical Services Santa Barbara, CA ARM Data Quality Office University of Oklahoma Norman, OK March 12, 2008 Eighteenth ARM Science Team Meeting 2 ARM Data Quality Office Full Time Staff *Ken Kehoe *Randy Peppler *Karen Sonntag *Justin Monroe Student Analysts *Nathan Hiers (Sr) *Stephen Mullens (Sr) *Kimberly Rabon (Jr) *Lacey Evans (Jr) ARM Data Quality Office, National Weather Center The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK Sean Moore Mission Research and Technical Services Santa Barbara, CA March 12, 2008 Eighteenth ARM Science Team Meeting 3 Daily Quality Checks * Automated software checks every measurement for outliers against some pre-defined limits.

46

Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting, Meeting, 12 March 2008 Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry K. Berg, William I. Gustafson Jr., and Evgueni I. Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Science Team Meeting, 12 March 2008 Where are We Going? Development Simulation Evaluation Observations ARM Science Team Meeting, 12 March 2008 Development: Coupling Clouds to the Convective Boundary Layer * Shallow cumuli are turbulently coupled to the planetary boundary layer 4 3 2 1 0 Height (km) 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Distance (km) Simulation courtesy of M. Ovtchinnikov ARM Science Team Meeting, 12 March 2008 Development: Coupling Clouds to the Convective Boundary Layer * Parameterization should represent this coupling * The Cumulus Potential (CuP) scheme is one way - Accounts for sub-grid

47

High energy modifications of blackbody radiation and dimensional reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantization prescriptions that realize generalized uncertainty relations (GUP) are motivated by quantum gravity arguments that incorporate a fundamental length scale. We apply two such methods, polymer and deformed Heisenberg quantization, to scalar field theory in Fourier space. These alternative quantizations modify the oscillator spectrum for each mode, which in turn affects the blackbody distribution. We find that for a large class of modifications, the equation of state relating pressure $P$ and energy density $\\rho$ interpolates between $P=\\rho/3$ at low $T$ and $P=2\\rho/3$ at high $T$, where $T$ is the temperature. Furthermore, the Stefan-Boltzman law gets modified from $\\rho \\propto T^{4}$ to $\\rho \\propto T^{5/2}$ at high temperature. This suggests an effective reduction to 2.5 spacetime dimensions at high energy.

Viqar Husain; Sanjeev S. Seahra; Eric J. Webster

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Anomalously small blackbody radiation shift in Tl+ frequency standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. In the present work, we used configuration interaction + coupled-cluster method to evaluate polarizabilities of the $6s^2 ^1S_0$ and $6s6p ^3P_0$ states of Tl$^+$ ion; we find $\\alpha_0(^1S_0)=19.6$ a.u. and $\\alpha_0(^3P_0)=21.4$ a.u.. The resulting BBR shift of the $6s6p ^3P_0 - 6s^2 ^1S_0$ Tl$^+$ transition at $300 K$ is $\\Delta \

Zuhrianda, Z; Kozlov, M G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

High energy modifications of blackbody radiation and dimensional reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantization prescriptions that realize generalized uncertainty relations (GUP) are motivated by quantum gravity arguments that incorporate a fundamental length scale. We apply two such methods, polymer and deformed Heisenberg quantization, to scalar field theory in Fourier space. These alternative quantizations modify the oscillator spectrum for each mode, which in turn affects the blackbody distribution. We find that for a large class of modifications, the equation of state relating pressure $P$ and energy density $\\rho$ interpolates between $P=\\rho/3$ at low $T$ and $P=2\\rho/3$ at high $T$, where $T$ is the temperature. Furthermore, the Stefan-Boltzman law gets modified from $\\rho \\propto T^{4}$ to $\\rho \\propto T^{5/2}$ at high temperature. This suggests an effective reduction to 2.5 spacetime dimensions at high energy.

Husain, Viqar; Webster, Eric J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Anomalously small blackbody radiation shift in Tl+ frequency standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operation of atomic clocks is generally carried out at room temperature, whereas the definition of the second refers to the clock transition in an atom at absolute zero. This implies that the clock transition frequency should be corrected in practice for the effect of finite temperature of which the leading contributor is the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift. In the present work, we used configuration interaction + coupled-cluster method to evaluate polarizabilities of the $6s^2 ^1S_0$ and $6s6p ^3P_0$ states of Tl$^+$ ion; we find $\\alpha_0(^1S_0)=19.6$ a.u. and $\\alpha_0(^3P_0)=21.4$ a.u.. The resulting BBR shift of the $6s6p ^3P_0 - 6s^2 ^1S_0$ Tl$^+$ transition at $300 K$ is $\\Delta \

Z. Zuhrianda; M. S. Safronova; M. G. Kozlov

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the scales of length, time, and energy. Indeed, there are analogies between the electrostatic forces for groups of particles of discrete charge and the van der Waals forces in equilibrium thermal radiation. The differing Lorentz- or Galilean-transformation properties of the zero-point radiation spectrum and the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are noted in connection with their scaling properties. Also, the thermal effects of acceleration within classical electromagnetism are related to the existence of thermal equilibrium within a gravitational field. The unique scaling and phase-space properties of a discrete charge in the Coulomb potential suggest the possibility of an equilibrium between the zero-point radiation spectrum and matter which is universal (independent of the particle mass), and an equilibrium between a universal thermal radiation spectrum and matter where the matter phase space depends only upon the ratio mc^2/kT. The observations and qualitative suggestions made here run counter to the ideas of currently accepted quantum physics.

Timothy H. Boyer

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Precision calculation of blackbody radiation shifts for optical frequency metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that three group IIIB divalent ions, B+, Al+, and In+, have anomalously small blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of the ns^2 1S0 - nsnp 3P0 clock transitions. The fractional BBR shifts for these ions are at least 10 times smaller than those of any other present or proposed optical frequency standards at the same temperature, and are less than 0.3% of the Sr clock shift. We have developed a hybrid configuration interaction + coupled-cluster method that provides accurate treatment of correlation corrections in such ions, considers all relevant states in the same systematic way, and yields a rigorous upper bound on the uncertainty of the final results. We reduce the BBR contribution to the fractional frequency uncertainty of the Al+ clock to 4 \\times 10^{-19} at T=300K. We also reduce the uncertainties due to this effect at room temperature to 10^{-18} level for B+ and In+ to facilitate further development of these systems for metrology and quantum sensing. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the feasible precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks.

M. S. Safronova; M. G. Kozlov; Charles W. Clark

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

53

Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate {\\em in situ} thermometry at room-temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25 to 30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the Strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic wavelength lattices exist for both Strontium and Ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with $10^{-16}$ accuracy provide $10 \\, \\mathrm{mK}$ resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of $10^{-18}$.

Ovsiannikov, Vitali D; Gibble, Kurt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In this letter we show that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

T K Rai Dastidar

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law.

F. V. Prigara

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Precision calculation of blackbody radiation shifts for metrology at the 18th decimal place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical method to accurately treat correlation corrections in atoms with a few valence electrons, and apply it to calculate polarizabilities and the blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts of atomic frequency standards. The method combines the relativistic many-body all-order approach that is currently used in precision calculations for monovalent atoms, with the configuration-interaction approach that is applicable to many-electron systems. Our calculated polarizabilities are used to evaluate the blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts at 300K in the ns^2 - nsnp ^3P_0 clock transitions in Al+, B+, and In+. We estimate that our calculation reduces the relative uncertainty due to BBR shift at 300K in Al+ to 4x10^{-19}.

Safronova, M S; Clark, Charles W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Second-Generation Blackbody System for the Calibration and Verification of Sea-Going Infrared Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-operational shipborne radiometers provide a Fiducial Reference Measurement (FRM) for satellite validation of satellite sea surface skin temperature (SSTskin) retrievals. External reference blackbodies are required to verify the performance ...

Craig J. Donlon; W. Wimmer; I. Robinson; G. Fisher; M. Ferlet; T. Nightingale; B. Bras

58

Blackbody material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light emitting article comprises a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light emitting composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Trivelpiece, Alvin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

High accuracy correction of blackbody radiation shift in an optical lattice clock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have determined the frequency shift that blackbody radiation is inducing on the $5s^2$ $^1$S$_0$ -- $5s5p$ $^3$P$_0$ clock transition in strontium. Previously its uncertainty limited the uncertainty of strontium lattice clocks to $1\\times10^{-16}$. Now the uncertainty associated to the black body radiation shift correction translates to $5\\times 10^{-18}$ relative frequency uncertainty at room temperature. Our evaluation is based on a measurement of the differential dc-polarizability of the two clock states and on a modeling of the dynamic contribution using this value and experimental data for other atomic properties.

Middelmann, Thomas; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

High accuracy correction of blackbody radiation shift in an optical lattice clock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have determined the frequency shift that blackbody radiation is inducing on the $5s^2$ $^1$S$_0$ -- $5s5p$ $^3$P$_0$ clock transition in strontium. Previously its uncertainty limited the uncertainty of strontium lattice clocks to $1\\times10^{-16}$. Now the uncertainty associated to the black body radiation shift correction translates to $5\\times 10^{-18}$ relative frequency uncertainty at room temperature. Our evaluation is based on a measurement of the differential dc-polarizability of the two clock states and on a modeling of the dynamic contribution using this value and experimental data for other atomic properties.

Thomas Middelmann; Stephan Falke; Christian Lisdat; Uwe Sterr

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Shahar Hod

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Hod, Shahar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Blackbody radiation shift in a 43Ca+ ion optical frequency standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the prospect of an optical frequency standard based on 43Ca+, we calculate the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s_1/2-3d_5/2 clock transition, which is a major component of the uncertainty budget. The calculations are based on the relativistic all-order single-double method where all single and double excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Additional calculations are conducted for the dominant contributions in order to evaluate some omitted high-order corrections and estimate the uncertainties of the final results. The BBR shift obtained for this transition is 0.38(1) Hz. The tensor polarizability of the 3d_5/2 level is also calculated and its uncertainty is evaluated as well. Our results are compared with other calculations.

Bindiya Arora; M. S. Safronova; Charles W. Clark

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Anisotropic polarization, predicted as a result of the diffraction of blackbody radiation at a reflective phase grating with ideal conductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the course of analyzing the axiomatic principles that form the basis of statistical physics, the validity of the postulate that all the isoenergetic microstates of a closed system are equally probable was checked. This article reports the results of numerically modelling the interaction of thermodynamically equilibrium blackbody radiation with a reflective phase diffraction grating that possesses ideal conductivity. Cases are found in which anisotropy of the polarization parameters is guaranteed to appear inside a closed volume of initially homogeneous blackbody radiation, resulting in a formal decrease of its Boltzmann entropy as a consequence of deviation from the microcanonical Gibbs distribution. This is apparently caused by the discontinuous character of the change of the phase trajectories of the photons during diffraction, which makes the physical system under consideration nonergodic.

Savukov, Vladimir V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Determination of the 5d6s 3D1 state lifetime and blackbody radiation clock shift in Yb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stark shift of the ytterbium optical clock transition due to room temperature blackbody radiation is dominated by a static Stark effect, which was recently measured to high accuracy [J. A. Sherman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 153002 (2012)]. However, room temperature operation of the clock at 10^{-18} inaccuracy requires a dynamic correction to this static approximation. This dynamic correction largely depends on a single electric dipole matrix element for which theoretically and experimentally derived values disagree significantly. We determine this important matrix element by two independent methods, which yield consistent values. Along with precise radiative lifetimes of 6s6p 3P1 and 5d6s 3D1, we report the clock's blackbody radiation shift to 0.05% precision.

Beloy, K; Lemke, N D; Hinkley, N; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heuristic Derivation of Blackbody Radiation Laws using Principles of Dimensional Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized form of Wien's displacement law and the blackbody radiation laws of (a) Rayleigh and Jeans, (b) Rayleigh, (c) Wien and Paschen, (d) Thiesen and (e) Planck are derived using principles of dimensional analysis. This kind of scaling is expressed in a strictly mathematical manner employing dimensional pi-invariants analysis sometimes called Buckingham's pi-theorem. It is shown that in the case of the classical radiation law of Rayleigh and Jeans only one pi number occurs that has to be considered as a non-dimensional universal constant. This pi number may be determined theoretically or/and empirically. It is also shown that dimensional pi-invariants analysis yields a generalized form of Wien's displacement law. In this instance two pi numbers generally occur. Consequently, a universal function is established that is indispensable to avoid the so-called Rayleigh-Jeans catastrophe in the ultraviolet. Unfortunately, such a universal function cannot be inferred from dimensional arguments. It has to be derived theoretically or/and empirically, too. It is shown that such a similarity function can be deduced on the basis of heuristic principles, when criteria like the maximum condition regarding the generalized form of Wien's displacement law, the requirement of the power law of Stefan and Boltzmann, and Ehrenfest's arguments regarding the red and the violet requirements are adopted.

Gerhard Kramm; Fritz Herbert

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n = 7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly-excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in accuracy of the 3d_{5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3) a.u., in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007)]. The blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s - 3d_{5/...

Safronova, M S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n = 7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly-excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in accuracy of the 3d_{5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3) a.u., in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007)]. The blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s - 3d_{5/2} clock transition in Ca+ is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300K. Electric-quadrupole 4s -nd and electric-octupole 4s -nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 43Ca+ ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca+ atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

M. S. Safronova; U. I. Safronova

2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Minoru Biyajima; Takuya Mizoguchi

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Biyajima, Minoru

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Einstein-Hopf drag, Doppler shift of thermal radiation and blackbody friction: A unifying perspective on an intriguing physical effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal friction force acting on an atom moving relative to a thermal photon bath has recently been calculated on the basis of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field give rise to a drag force on an atom provided one allows for dissipation of the field energy via spontaneous emission. The drag force exists if the atomic polarizability has a nonvanishing imaginary part. Here, we explore alternative derivations. The damping of the motion of a simple harmonic oscillator is described by radiative reaction theory (result of Einstein and Hopf), taking into account the known stochastic fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Describing the excitations of the atom as an ensemble of damped harmonic oscillators, we identify the previously found expressions as generalizations of the Einstein-Hopf result. In addition, we present a simple explanation for blackbody friction in terms of a Doppler shift of the thermal radiation in the inertial frame of the moving atom...

Lach, G; Jentschura, U D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ARM - Field Campaign - International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instruments that alternately measure radiance from the sky and calibrate against a black body forming the basis for a instrument that could be used as a standard for the...

73

Evaluation of Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Gotseff, T. L. Stoffel, and C. Webb National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Broadband longwave (atmospheric) irradiance measurements are important for...

74

Ionization of Sodium and Rubidium nS, nP and nD Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Rb and Na Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR) are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states of Na and Rb, which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependencies on n. The calculated ionization rates are compared with the results of our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with n=8-20 at 300 K. A good agreement for all states except nS with n>15 is observed. We also present the useful analytical formulae for quick estimation ...

Beterov, I I; Ekers, A; Ryabtsev, I I; Tretyakov, D B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ionization of Sodium and Rubidium nS, nP and nD Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Rb and Na Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR) are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states of Na and Rb, which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependencies on n. The calculated ionization rates are compared with the results of our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with n=8-20 at 300 K. A good agreement for all states except nS with n>15 is observed. We also present the useful analytical formulae for quick estimation of BBR ionization rates of Rydberg atoms.

I. I. Beterov; D. B. Tretyakov; I. I. Ryabtsev; A. Ekers; N. N. Bezuglov

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

76

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers By Ibrahim Reda, Julian Gröbner * , Tom Stoffel, Daryl Myers, and Bruce Forgan ** Eighteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team Meeting *Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) ** Bureau of Meteorology, Australia Abstract Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance through out the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m 2 . In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our

77

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers Ibrahim Reda 1 Julian Gröbner 2 Tom Stoffel 1 Daryl Myers 1 Bruce Forgan 3 1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2. Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) 3. Bureau of Meteorology, Australia Abstract Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance through out the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m 2 . In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the

78

Evidence from the Special Relativity and Blackbody Radiation Theories for the Existence of Photons Possessing Zero Kinetic Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The traditional interpretation of radiative emission and absorption asserts that photons are created and annihilated in such processes. A Gedanken experiment is considered in which kinetic energy from observed photons is systematically removed until a limit of zero is reached. With the help of the relativistic Doppler effect it is shown that even for infinitesimally small kinetic energies the photons continue to exist, since in other inertial systems they will be observed to have a much higher energy/frequency falling in an easily detectable range. It is possible to formulate an alternative explanation for absorption and emission processes on this basis in terms of real photons with exactly zero kinetic energy being present before or after radiative interactions. Bolstering this hypothesis is the fact that the statistical mechanical treatment of photons interacting with oscillators in blackbody radiation theory predicts an infinite density of photons of this energy, both in the original Planck formulation employing Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics and in the subsequent Bose-Einstein description. These considerations demonstrate that the E = 0 state is greatly preferred as the product of absorption because of the requirement to have the interaction occur in a relatively narrow region of space- time. There is thus strong evidence that photons are not created and annihilated in radiative processes but simply have their kinetic energy changed either to or from a zero value. Accordingly a very high density of zero-energy photons is expected to exist uniformly throughout the universe. Finally, this development suggests that one should subject the creation-annihilation hypothesis to careful scrutiny in other areas of physics as well.

Robert J. Buenker

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Connecting blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics: A new minimum principle and a status review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new thermodynamic analysis is presented for the intimate connections between blackbody radiation and zero-point radiation within classical physics. First, using the thermodynamic behavior of an oscillator under an adiabatic change of frequency, we show that the thermodynamic functions can all be derived from a single function of w/T, analogous to Wien's displacement theorem. The high- and low-frequency limits allow asymptotic energy forms involving T alone or w alone, corresponding to energy equipartition and zero-point energy. It is then suggested that the actual thermodynamic behavior for a harmonic oscillator is given by the function satisfying the Wien displacement result which provides the smoothest possible interpolation between scale-decoupled energy equipartition at low frequency and scale-invariant zero-point energy at high frequency. This leads to the Planck spectrum. Second, we turn to radiation in a box with conducting walls and a conducting partition so that the discrete normal mode structure of the box becomes important. The contrasting Casimir energies are explored for the Rayleigh-Jeans and zero-point spectra. The Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum involves no change of energy with partition position, and the zero-point spectrum involves no change of entropy. It is suggested that the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation satisfies a natural minimum principle which corresponds to greatest independence of the system energy from the position of the partition for a fixed temperature. Numerical calculation is used for confirmation. Third, we review the previous derivations of the Planck radiation spectrum in classical physics, all of which involve zero-point radiation.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

satellite networking, specialized data movement processes, and a tight configuration management process. We present a description of the data flow from measurement to long-term...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the Performance of Pyrgeometers with Silicon Domes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net radiation and the individual components of incoming and outgoing solar and longwave radiation were measured over alfalfa (Medicago sativa. L.). Solar radiation was measured with precision spectral pyranometers and longwave radiation with ...

A. Weiss

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

reda(1)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrgeometer Calibrations for the ARM Program Pyrgeometer Calibrations for the ARM Program I. Reda, T. L. Stoffel, and J. A. Treadwell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado J. Hickey The Eppley Laboratory, Inc. Newport, Rhode Island Introduction Pyrgeometers are used to measure the longwave radiation. Accurate measurements from these radiometers require regular calibration using temperature controlled blackbody radiators. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and The Eppley Laboratory, Inc. (EPLAB) are developing a new automated system for calibrating EPLAB Precision Infrared Radiometers (PIRs) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Test results from the prototype system, now at NREL, will be used to develop a production version for deployment at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Radiometer

83

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

JC Liljegren

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Nature of Thermal Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was shown recently that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character, and it is quite possible that thermal black body radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. The induced origin of thermal black body emission leads to important astrophysical consequences, such as the existence of laser type sources and thermal harmonics in stellar spectra.

F. V. Prigara

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Accounting for the Solar Radiation Influence on Downward Longwave Irradiance Measurements by Pyrgeometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of broadband downward longwave (LW) irradiance are carried out at Lampedusa, Italy, in the Mediterranean, jointly with solar irradiance, since 2004 using shaded and unshaded Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometers (PIRs) and Kipp & ...

Daniela Meloni; Claudia Di Biagio; Alcide di Sarra; Francesco Monteleone; Giandomenico Pace; Damiano Massimiliano Sferlazzo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Effects of Natural Ventilation and Solar Radiation on the Performance of Pyrgeometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the authors present the results of field experiments carried out in Almería (36.83°N, 2.42°W), a seashore location in southeastern Spain, in order to evaluate the performance of Eppley precision infrared radiometer (PIR) ...

M. Pérez; L. Alados-Arboledas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modeling of Downward Surface Longwave Flux Density for Global Change Applications and Comparison with Pyrgeometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of satellite monitoring of global climate change depends on the ability to validate satellite inference methods against accurate “ground truth.” Under a recent World Meteorological Organization—World Climate Research Program activity ...

F. Miskolczi

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Blackbody radiation shift in the Sr optical atomic clock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluated the static and dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s^2 ^1S_0 and 5s5p ^3P_0^o states of Sr using the high-precision relativistic configuration interaction + all-order method. Our calculation explains the discrepancy between the recent experimental 5s^2 ^1S_0 - 5s5p ^3P_0^o dc Stark shift measurement \\Delta \\alpha = 247.374(7) a.u. [Middelmann et. al, arXiv:1208.2848 (2012)] and the earlier theoretical result of 261(4) a.u. [Porsev and Derevianko, Phys. Rev. A 74, 020502R (2006)]. Our present value of 247.5 a.u. is in excellent agreement with the experimental result. We also evaluated the dynamic correction to the BBR shift with 1 % uncertainty; -0.1492(16) Hz. The dynamic correction to the BBR shift is unusually large in the case of Sr (7 %) and it enters significantly into the uncertainty budget of the Sr optical lattice clock. We suggest future experiments that could further reduce the present uncertainties.

Safronova, M S; Safronova, U I; Kozlov, M G; Clark, Charles W

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a D-dimensional spacetime composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and D-4 compact dimensions. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) T^D, where a is the size of compact extra dimensions. For D=10, predicted from String Theory, and D=11, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for a as high as 2 x 10^{-7} m.

Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Blackbody radiation shift in the Sr optical atomic clock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluated the static and dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s^2 ^1S_0 and 5s5p ^3P_0^o states of Sr using the high-precision relativistic configuration interaction + all-order method. Our calculation explains the discrepancy between the recent experimental 5s^2 ^1S_0 - 5s5p ^3P_0^o dc Stark shift measurement \\Delta \\alpha = 247.374(7) a.u. [Middelmann et. al, arXiv:1208.2848 (2012)] and the earlier theoretical result of 261(4) a.u. [Porsev and Derevianko, Phys. Rev. A 74, 020502R (2006)]. Our present value of 247.5 a.u. is in excellent agreement with the experimental result. We also evaluated the dynamic correction to the BBR shift with 1 % uncertainty; -0.1492(16) Hz. The dynamic correction to the BBR shift is unusually large in the case of Sr (7 %) and it enters significantly into the uncertainty budget of the Sr optical lattice clock. We suggest future experiments that could further reduce the present uncertainties.

M. S. Safronova; S. G. Porsev; U. I. Safronova; M. G. Kozlov; Charles W. Clark

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a D-dimensional spacetime composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and D-4 compact dimensions. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) T^D, where a is the size of compact extra dimensions. For D=10, predicted from String Theory, and D=11, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for a as high as 2 x 10^{-7} m.

Ramos, Ramaton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Top Other Publications Beam Line, "The New Economy Model Universe", Spring 2000, Vol. 30, No. 1, Forward (pages 2-7) My Einstein Wrinkles In Time-Book Reviews Biographical...

94

New Calculations on Blackbody Energy Set the Stage for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a hypothetical perfect radiant heat source known as ... they successfully reproduced the energy levels of ... ion clocks have larger sources of uncertainty ...

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microsoft Word - ACRF4thQuarterFY09 draft_nb__sal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1 - September 30, 2009, DOE/SC-ARM/P-09-016 iii Contents 1. Data Availability ................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Scientific Users ..................................................................................................................................... 2 3. Safety .................................................................................................................................................... 4

96

HISTORY AND CURRENT STATUS OF THE CIMEL SUN-PHOTOMETERS AT ACRF SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Tropical Western Pacific [TWP]-C2, the ARM Mobile Facility [AMF]). This comes on the heels of two important

97

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.7 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plate Total Precipitation Sensor (TPS) Mentor: Mark Ivey, Sandia National Laboratory Yankee Environmental Sciences provided a firmware upgrade to address the anomalous...

98

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November-December 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Temporal Variability of Fair-Weather Cumulus Statistics at the ACRF SGP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continental fair-weather cumuli exhibit significant diurnal, day-to-day, and year-to-year variability. This study describes the climatology of cloud macroscale properties, over the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (...

Larry K. Berg; Evgueni I. Kassianov

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Determination of Longwave Heat Flux at the Air-Sea Interface Using Measurements from Buoy Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for pyrgeometer operation is utilized for determining downwelling longwave radiation. Errors in downwelling longwave radiation measurements are due to differences in pyrgeometer body and dome temperatures compared to that of the ...

T. D. Dickey; D. V. Manov; R. A. Weller; D. A. Siegel

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - ACRF3rdQuarterFY09_DOE_SC_ARM_P_09_011.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This...

102

A Blackbody Design for SI-Traceable Radiometry for Earth Observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spaceborne measurements pinned to international standards are needed to monitor the earth’s climate, quantify human influence thereon, and test forecasts of future climate change. The International System of Units (SI, from the French for Système ...

P. Jonathan Gero; John A. Dykema; James G. Anderson

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Miami2001 Infrared Radiometer Calibration and Intercomparison. Part I: Laboratory Characterization of Blackbody Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second calibration and intercomparison of infrared radiometers (Miami2001) was held at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) during May–June 2001. The participants were from several groups ...

J. P. Rice; J. J. Butler; B. C. Johnson; P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; T. J. Nightingale; S. J. Hook; A. Abtahi; C. J. Donlon; I. J. Barton

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Quantum Cascade Laser–Based Reflectometer for On-Orbit Blackbody Cavity Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite measurements pinned to international standards are needed to monitor the earth’s climate, quantify human influence thereon, and test forecasts of future climate change. Credible observations require that measurement uncertainties be ...

P. Jonathan Gero; John A. Dykema; James G. Anderson

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blackbody radiation.emit equilibrium (blackbody) radiation characteristic of theand that lost to blackbody radiation from the reemission

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

PHYSICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS DIVISION, ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation/ Primordial Blackbody Radiation The experiment toof primordial blackbody radiation are Philip Lubin andRadiation/Primordial Blackbody Radiation Supernovae

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Investigation of the reaction of OH and CO to form H and CO? by photoelectron-photofragment coincidence spectroscopy in a cryogenic ion beam trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and surrounding blackbody radiation shields to be cooled topoint, 6. Coaxial blackbody radiation baffles. Elements in

Johnson, Christopher Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

ARM - SGP Radiometric Calibration Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pyrgeometers. The ARM Climate Research Facility requires accurate measurements of solar radiation from radiometers used in ground-based networks and airborne instrument...

109

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

100 pyrgeometers, a type of radiometer used for these measurements, for deployment in the Solar and Infrared Stations, SKYRAD, GNDRAD, and METRAD platforms at the Southern Great...

110

The Blackbody Radiation Spectrum Follows from Zero-Point Radiation and the Structure of Relativistic Spacetime in Classical Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of this article is entirely within classical physics. Any attempt to describe nature within classical physics requires the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation so as to account for the Casimir forces between parallel conducting plates at low temperatures. Furthermore, conformal symmetry carries solutions of Maxwell's equations into solutions. In an inertial frame, conformal symmetry leaves zero-point radiation invariant and does not connect it to non-zero-temperature; time-dilating conformal transformations carry the Lorentz-invariant zero-point radiation spectrum into zero-point radiation and carry the thermal radiation spectrum at non-zero temperature into thermal radiation at a different non-zero-temperature. However, in a non-inertial frame, a time-dilating conformal transformation carries classical zero-point radiation into thermal radiation at a finite non-zero-temperature. By taking the no-acceleration limit, one can obtain the Planck radiation spect...

Boyer, Timothy H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Calibration and Intercalibration of Sea-Going Infrared Radiometer Systems Using a Low Cost Blackbody Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many infrared radiometer systems available for the measurement of in situ sea surface skin temperature (SSST). Unfortunately, the marine environment is extremely hostile to optical components, and to ensure the accuracy of SSST ...

C. J. Donlon; T. Nightingale; L. Fiedler; G. Fisher; D. Baldwin; I. S. Robinson

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered a blackbody radiator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered frequency is that of infrared electromagnetic radiation, the light bulb radiates more energy in the infrared. The light from a flashlight can be considered as the emission of many photons of the same frequency

Kioussis, Nicholas

113

Cirrus Clouds and the Large-Scale Atmospheric State: Relationships Revealed by Six Years of Ground-Based Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of cirrus clouds observed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in Oklahoma are documented from a nearly continuous 6-yr record of 35-GHz cloud radar data. Cirrus frequency over the ACRF is ...

Gerald G. Mace; Sally Benson; Erik Vernon

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Applications of Ionic Clusters in High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ions by blackbody radiation or collisions withcathode heated due to blackbody radiation from the cell andby absorption of blackbody radiation, the precursor ions

Leib, Ryan David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Search for variation of the fine-structure constant and violation of Lorentz symmetry using atomic dysprosium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results - ac-Stark shift . Blackbody radiation . .in dysprosium iii Results - Blackbody radiationand U. I. Safronova. “Blackbody radiation shift in the ˆ{87}

Leefer, Nathan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Far Infrared Conductivity of Charge Density Wave Materials and the Oxygen Isotope Effect in High-T{sub c}  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vapor lamp produces blackbody radiation over the entirereflected from the blackbody radiation from the mylar windowroom If temperature blackbody radiation from the warm parts

Creager, W.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A MEASUREMENT OF ANISOTROPY IN THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION ON A LARGE ANGULAR SCALE AT 33 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component, the cosmic blackbody radiation is isotropic to 1variation of the cosmic blackbody radiation Itself. c c Thisin the Cosmic Blackbody Radiation Appendix B - Radiometer

Gorenstein, M.V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ACTIVITY SPECIFIC FIREARMS SAFETY PLAN FOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Activity Specific Firearm Safety Plan for ACRF/North Slope of Alaska Sandia National Laboratories Department 6383, Energy, Climate & Atmospheric Management ACRF/NSA/AAO Revision 14 Activity Specific Firearm Safety Plan for June 2010 ACRF/North Slope of Alaska Signature Page This safety plan is approved by the undersigned and includes the firearm and ammunition storage practices described in this document. Mark D Ivey ACRF/NSA/AAO Site Manager _________________________________Date: ______ Mark D Ivey Department 06339 Manager _________________________________Date: _______ Michael L Heister SNL Safety Engineer _________________________________Date:________

119

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surroundings, then the blackbody radiation emitted will bespectral bright- ness of blackbody radiation is given as [3

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the implanted layer, and blackbody radiation from the silicafor simplicity’s sake, as blackbody radiation following the

Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sonoluminescence test for equation of state in warm dense matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission by Planck blackbody radiation: Pl I ? = 2 hc 2 ?transport model and blackbody radiation, we calculate the

Ng, Siu-Fai

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Antenna-coupled Superconducting Bolometers for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of matter and blackbody radiation expanded and cooledthe already tiny 3 K blackbody radiation. While COBE showed

Myers, Michael James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microsoft PowerPoint - Poster-PIRs to WISG 2007.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM/NREL Pyrgeometer Calibration with Traceability to the ARM/NREL Pyrgeometer Calibration with Traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG) Ibrahim Reda 1 , Tom Stoffel 1 and Craig Webb 2 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 2 AEROMET, Inc., Billings, Oklahoma Abstract For global acceptance, ARM broadband irradiance measurements must be made with radiometers calibrated to internationally recognized references. The World Meteorological Organization's Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation (CIMO) established an interim pyrgeometer calibration standard in February 2006. The World Infrared Standard Group (WISG), comprised of four pyrgeometers, was developed by the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC). Working with PMOD/WRC, NREL has

124

Accurate Radiometric Measurement of the Atmospheric Longwave Flux at theSea Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The errors in pyrgeometer measurements of the atmospheric longwave flux at the sea surface due to differential heating of the sensor dome relative to the body and to shortwave leakage through the dome are evaluated. Contrary to the findings of ...

Robin W. Pascal; Simon A. Josey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An Integrated Surface Radiation Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated surface radiation measurement system has been developed to measure the surface radiation exchange flux. The system employs upward- and downward-looking Eppley pyrgeometers and pyranometers to separately measure four components: ...

A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Using a Blackbody to Calculate Net Longwave Responsivity of Shortwave Solar Pyranometers to Correct for Their Thermal Offset Error during Outdoor Calibration Using the Component Sum Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermopile pyranometers’ thermal offset has been recognized since the pyranometer’s inception. This offset is often overlooked or ignored because its magnitude is small compared to the overall solar signal at higher irradiance. With the demand of ...

I. Reda; J. Hickey; C. Long; D. Myers; T. Stoffel; S. Wilcox; J. J. Michalsky; E. G. Dutton; D. Nelson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Poster Abstract of Eighteenth ARM STM: Sort by Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z., Marchand, R., and Ackerman, T. A Comparison of Water Uptake by Aerosols Using Two Thermodynamic Models ABSTRACT, POSTER Xu, L. and Penner, J. ACRF Data Acquisition and...

129

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SC-ARMTR-082 1 1. Introduction This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as...

130

ARM - 2007 ARM Science Team Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACRF Infrastructure staff members attended the Seventeenth ARM Science Team Meeting in Monterey, California, from March 26-30, 2007. Dr. Kiran Alapaty, who was appointed as the...

131

CX-000570: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Office(s): Sandia Site Office Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Program, proposes to perform...

132

CX-000576: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Mexico Energy, Climate, and Atmospheric Management Department and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Program, propose to perform...

133

Brewer_ARM2009.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion to ACRF Sites P. Kiedron, P. Disterhoft, S. Stierle and J. Michalsky Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado and NOAA...

134

Orr 2007 ARM STM poster2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responsible for management and maintenance of nearly all data and instrument computers as well as personal computers at the ACRF sites (AMF, NSA, SGP and TWP). Cyber...

135

PHYSICS, COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Cosmic 3° Blackbody Radiation A part of thethe 3° K primordial blackbody radiation. The data collectedanisotropy in cosmic blackbody radiation of about 3 m O This

Birge, Robert W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Investigation of bit patterned media, thermal flying height control sliders and heat assisted magnetic recording in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breakdown of the Planck blackbody radiation law at nanoscaleas predicted by Plank’s blackbody radiation law is usuallycan exceed Plank’s blackbody radiation by more than three

Zheng, Hao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION EDGE BOLOMETER AND NOISE IN THIN FILMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the spectrum of absorbed power from the blackbody radiation.f(x) For blackbody radiation and a black detector, If theAt position chopped the blackbody radiation between 77 K and

Yeh, Nan-Hsiung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W/m 2 .µm) f (?T ) Blackbody radiation function I ? SpectralW/m 2 .sr.µm) I b,? Blackbody radiation intensity (W/m 2 .can be treated as blackbody radiation at temperature T sur .

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Planck’s blackbody radiation law”. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EVALUATING CLOUD RETRIEVAL ALGORITHMS WITH THE ARM BBHRP FRAMEWORK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties, including those from Microbase, the current `reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ARM Climate Research Facility Activities at Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is one of nine national laboratories that work together in support of the ACRF. PNNL scientists are internationally recognized as leaders in assessing climate change, its impacts, and mitigation strategies. For the ACRF, PNNL's primary responsibilities include: leading

142

VARIOUS APPLICATIONS OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at 1.5kHz to eliminate blackbody radiation from the furnace.The signal due to the blackbody radiation from the graphite

Koizumi, Hideaki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Duplex Rules June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Duplex Rules Who can stay in the duplex? The rental for the duplex is paid out of the ACRF/NSA/AAO Site Manager's (SM's) Site Development and Operations budget at Sandia National Laboratories. ACRF personnel working directly on tasks for the ACRF/NSA/AAO Site will have priority in the use of the duplex. Other ACRF users will be accommodated on an as-available basis. A total of six bedrooms are now available in the duplex; 4 rooms have twin bunk beds, 1 room has 2 twin beds, and 1 room has a queen size bed. The duplex can accommodate 11 people with doubling up in the rooms that have bunk and twin beds. The Site Manager, Mark Ivey, will confirm extension of duplex

144

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_Stoffel.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/SC-ARM/P-05-011 DOE/SC-ARM/P-05-011 2 Outline * Why the need for longwave data restriction? - Important Considerations and the 12 Wm -2 longwave results problem * What ARM data are effected? - List of station-dates * Can the data be adjusted? - Using available 20-sec data samples * How is ARM addressing pyrgeometer calibration? - In Search of a Measurement Reference * References * Acronyms * Appendix - Fundamentals of pyrgeometer operation and calibration 3 Why a Data Access Restriction? The ARM Program's data quality control measures discovered an unexpected shift in the time series of longwave irradiance data following a change in pyrgeometer calibration procedures for field instruments deployed at all SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD installations beginning in August 2002 and completed in March 2004.

145

ARM - VAP Process - diffcor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productsdiffcor Productsdiffcor Documentation & Plots Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Correction of Diffuse Shortwave Measurements (DIFFCOR) Instrument Categories Derived Quantities and Models The DIFFCORR1DUTT VAP uses two techniques to correct shortwave (SW) data during daytime hours, using information from a collocated pyrgeometer. First, the detector-only correction technique uses data in the form of irradiance loss from the pyrgeometer detector. Second, the full-correction technique uses information from collocated pyrgeometer detector data, plus the difference between the case and dome temperatures. Both techniques

146

Hydrostatic Equilibrium with Degenerate Fermions, Type-II Supernova, and Neutrino Burst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

much less than free charged particles do. In particular, the existing blackbody radiation of photons

Murayama, Hitoshi

147

ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence 2009 A n n u a l R e p o r t  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suggested that near infrared blackbody radiation emitted at deep ocean vents may provide sufficient energy

148

A Frequency-Domain Description of a Lock-in Amplifier John H. Scofield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameter, arctan [kd /(nd 1)] I Radiation intensity Ib Blackbody radiation intensity I0 Incident intensity

Scofield, John H.

149

The atom completed and a new particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the observed CMB will exhibit a blackbody radiation spectrum. The Cos- mic Background Explorer (COBE

Murayama, Hitoshi

151

Physics 112 Mathematical Notes Winter 2000 1. Power Series Expansion of the FermiDirac Integral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) , a result that we found in the discussion of the thermodynamics of blackbody radiation. 4. Relations

California at Santa Cruz, University of

152

Physics 112 Second Midterm Exam February 22, 2000 MIDTERM EXAM INSTRUCTIONS: You have 90 minutes to complete this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In particular, the existing blackbody radiation of photons could subsequently expand freely, uncoupled to matter

California at Santa Cruz, University of

153

BAND STRUCTURE CALCULATION FOR QUANTUM DOT SOLAR CELLS USING K.P Som N. Dahal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(lT ) Blackbody radiation function Il Spectral radiation intensity, W/m2 .sr.mm Ib,l Blackbody radiation intensity as blackbody radiation at temperature Tsur. In the case of furnace heating, the surrounding tempera- ture a furnace. Then, the radiative heat flux incident on both sides is the blackbody radiation intensity

Honsberg, Christiana

154

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007 Annette Koontz, for ACRF Engineering Management Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL Ingest Developers: Sutanay Choudhury Brian Ermold Krista Gaustad Annette Koontz Work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research February 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004.1 Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production

156

Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Improved Method for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Method for Searching ACRF Data Quality and Problem Report Improved Method for Searching ACRF Data Quality and Problem Report Databases Doty, Kathy Brookhaven National Laboratory Wagener, Richard Brookhaven National Laboratory The implementation and use of a new ACRF Metadata Search Tool is presented. The tool has been developed to facilitate searching for ACRF metadata from a single, flexible and powerful user interface, rather than multiple interfaces as in the past. The metadata available for searching via the new tool includes Data Quality Reports (DQRs), Problem Identification Forms (PIFs), Attachments (additional information for PIFs), Data Quality Problem Reports (DQPRs), Corrective Action Reports (CARs), and some limited but useful search capabilities for Baseline Change Requests (BCRs) and Engineering Change Requests (ECRs). The system is built on common, proven

158

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie; ,

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie; ,

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie; ,

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie; ,

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie; ,

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Atmosphere (CASA) consortium, and this concept is being assessed to determine utility to ARM and ACRF science objectives. There is a good analysis data set available to...

169

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Charges/Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

25, 2011 .pdf file (1.2MB)) Report of the BERAC Review Panel on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) .pdf file (578KB), a report...

171

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

172

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

173

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

174

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

175

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

176

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

177

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

178

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

179

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

180

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

182

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

183

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

184

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

185

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

186

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

187

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

192

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

195

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

196

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

197

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

198

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

203

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Diurnal Variation of Atlantic Ocean Tropical Cyclone aoud DistributionInferred from Geostationary Satellite Infrared Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-measured equivalent blackbody temperatures of Atlantic Ocean tropical cyclones are used to describe the associated convection and cloud patterns. Average equivalent blackbody temperatures were developed from 538 geostationary satellite ...

Joseph Steranka; Edward B. Rodgers; R. Cecil Gentry

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

PHYSICS 311/312 ADVANCED LAB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L1-1 Blackbody Radiation are investigated using a magnetic spectrometer. Limits can be placed on the mass of the neutrino. Blackbody Radiation The Planck distribution is measured with an infrared spectrometer and Wein's law is deduced

211

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Water Heat Pipe Blackbody as a Reference Spectral Radiance Source Between 50 C and 250 C. Published: Date Unknown. ...

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

212

Physics 112 Mathematical Notes Winter 2000 1. Power Series Expansion of the Fermi-Dirac Integral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the blackbody radiation law, which governs emission from an idealized object of a specified temperature. Having

California at Santa Cruz, University of

213

Physics 112 Second Midterm Exam February 22, 2000 MIDTERM EXAM INSTRUCTIONS: You have 90 minutes to complete this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the discussion of the thermodynamics of blackbody radiation. 4. Relations to Special Functions It turns out

California at Santa Cruz, University of

214

Courses of Instruction InstruCtIon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not in- cluded. From the StefanÃ?Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation, the radiative energy loss can

Bolding, M. Chad

215

III. Accelerator Physics and Exotic Beam Technology -117-III. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND EXOTIC BEAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: not only were 225 Ra atoms optically trapped, but the beneficial effect of blackbody radiation on the trap

Kemner, Ken

216

Radiance Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Temperature using Detectors Calibrated for Absolute Spectral Power Response, HW ... A Third Generation Water Bath Based Blackbody Source, JB ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Special Topics Courses offered for Fall 2012 MEA 493.002/593.002 -Fundamentals of Climate Change Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enhanced radiative heat transfer over the predictions of the Planck blackbody radiation theory 40,41 . Shen of magnitude larger than that of the blackbody radiation limit. In addition, the effect of metallic-3 #12;q12 T1,T2,d = 0 Ib 0 T1 - Ib 0 T2 12 ,d d 2 where Ib 0 T is the spectral blackbody radiation

218

ARM - Datastreams - rad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsrad Datastreamsrad Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAD Radiation measurements at AMF/Niamey, Niger/S1 Active Dates 2006.01.13 - 2008.12.13 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Radiation Measurements at AMF (RAD) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance Downwelling Longwave Hemispheric Irradiance, Pyrgeometer W/m^2 down_long_hemisp ( time ) Downwelling Pyrgeometer Case Thermistor Resistance Kohms down_long_hemisp_case_resist ( time )

219

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

220

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison at the NSA ARM site Barrow Stamnes, K. (a), Dutton, E.G. (b), Marty, Ch. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Philipona, R. (e), Stoffel, T. (f), Storvold, R. (c), and Zak, B.D. (g), Stevens Institute of Technology, New Jersey (a), NOAA, Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (b), University of Alaska Fairbanks (c), State University of New York at Albany (d), World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland (e), National Renewable Energy Lab, Boulder (f), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (g) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The first International Prgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison (IPASRC I), which was held in fall 1999 at the ARM SGP site in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ARM/NSA Vehicle Use Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operating Procedures for Scaffold Use October 2007 Operating Procedures for Scaffold Use October 2007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Operating Procedures for The Use of Scaffolds at ACRF/NSA/AAO Meteorological Towers Introduction: An aluminum scaffold structure is used at ARM Climate Research Facility/North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Sites to access instruments mounted on the meteorological tower as shown in Figure 1 below. The scaffold is typically used for maintenance of instruments mounted on moveable booms or for maintenance of guest or temporary instruments. The scaffold is a commercially-available product that was purchased from Upright, Inc. and was fitted with aluminum grating platforms by Cubic Designs, Inc. of

222

DRAFT Bear Safety Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bear Safety Plan June 2010 Bear Safety Plan June 2010 NSA_bsp_Rev9.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Bear Safety Plan Background As a major part of DOE's participation in the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (AAO) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) exists on the North Slope of Alaska with its Central Facility near the town of Barrow. A secondary facility exists at Atqasuk, a town 100km inland from Barrow. Other instrumentation locations in more remote areas on the North Slope may be established in later stages of the project. Polar bears, and to a lesser extent, brown bears (barren ground grizzly) are significant hazards within the ACRF/NSA/AAO

223

U.S. Department of Energys Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Office of Science ARM Science Team Meeting Sheraton Waterside Hotel Norfolk, VA Rickey Petty March 13 th , 2008 Routine AVP Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Objectives Routine Flights sampling Low-altitude liquid-water clouds in the BL @ SGP Obtain representative statistics cloud microphysical properties. Validate retrieval algorithms Support process studies/model simulations of CLOWD-type clouds Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy ACRF Mission and Structure Management Structure Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy ACRF IOPR Process New Instruments: ARM IOPR system located at: http://www.arm.gov/acrf/fc.stm Field Campaign Guideline (PDF) Proposal Submission Form

224

ARM Orientation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Obtaining Data from the Obtaining Data from the ACRF Archive Orientation for new Science Team Members One click to the ACRF Data Archive ACRF Data Archive - Newly Designed Home Page Emphasis on guiding users in their selection of data access tools Accessing ARM Data: Options Comparison of Browser/Interface Options Interface name Accessible data "Shopping" approach (armarchive@ornl.gov, 1-888-ARM-DATA) ARM Data Browser Routine ARM data "I know what I want. Do you have it?" Searching with predefined selection criteria. Catalog Interface Routine ARM data "I am not sure what I want. I need to see what you have available." Browsing a hierarchy of availability summaries. Thumbnail Browser Most routine ARM data "I will know what I want when I see it." Searching with a combination of predefined selection

225

Data Domain to Model Domain Conversion Package | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Domain to Model Domain Conversion Package Data Domain to Model Domain Conversion Package Data Domain to Model Domain Conversion Package The Data Domain to Model Domain Conversion Package project will develop methods and implement a novel approach for generating data ensembles by using the latest available statistical modeling tools and knowledge of relevant physical and chemical process to develop climatologically aware methods for processing ACRF and other spatially sparse data sets. Data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites are employed mainly in column radiation models, to validate the models and develop new parameterizations. Currently, no single methodology can be used with data collected at the spatial scale of the ACRF sites or from specific AmeriFlux locations, to

226

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Teaching Climate Change Studies Tools for Teaching Climate Change Studies A.M. Maestas and L.A. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) develops public outreach materials and educational resources for schools. Studies prove that science education in rural and indigenous communities improves when educators integrate regional knowledge of climate and environmental issues into school curriculum and public outreach materials. In order to promote understanding of ACRF climate change studies, ACRF Education and Outreach has developed interactive kiosks about climate change for host communities close to the research sites. A kiosk for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) community was installed at the Iñupiat Heritage Center in 2003, and a

227

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

228

Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - February 2007 formatted_P-07-002.2.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

229

Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - Nov-Dec 2006 formatted .doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November-December 2006 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

230

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

231

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

232

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

233

Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - January 2007 formatted.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

234

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

235

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007 James Liljegren ACRF Instrument Team Coordinator Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research Summary The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in

236

Speech recognition using augmented conditional random fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic modeling based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) is employed by state-of-the-art stochastic speech recognition systems. Although HMMs are a natural choice to warp the time axis and model the temporal phenomena in the speech signal, their conditional ... Keywords: augmented conditional random fields (ACRFs), augmented spaces, discriminative compression, hidden Markov models (HMMs)

Yasser Hifny; Steve Renals

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

GOOGLE AND GIS INTEGRATED ON THE ARM WEBSITE: A WORK IN PROGRESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOOGLE AND GIS INTEGRATED ON THE ARM WEBSITE: A WORK IN PROGRESS A. Cialella and R. Wagener Upton, NY 11973-5000 www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Google Maps API scripting code was embedded in the ARM Web pages to geographically represent the ACRF Sites globally. Google Maps API includes the capability

238

Time and Frequency News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST/CU 'Star Comb' Joins Quest for Earthlike Planets Release Date: 03/06 ... New Calculations on Blackbody Energy Set the Stage for Clocks with ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Velocity of sound in the relic photon sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the velocity of sound in the blackbody gas of photons and in the gas of relic photons. Derivation is based on the thermodynamic theory of the photon gas and the Einstein relation between energy and mass. The spectral form for the n-dimensional blackbody is derived. The 1D, 2D and 3D blackbody radiation is specified. It is mentioned the possibility of creation of the Mach cone in case that the high energy cosmical particles moves with the speed greater than the velocity of sound in cosmical relic photon sea. Key words: Sound, elasticity, thermodynamics, blackbody, relic photons, Mach's cone.

Pardy, Miroslav

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Velocity of sound in the relic photon sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the velocity of sound in the blackbody gas of photons and in the gas of relic photons. Derivation is based on the thermodynamic theory of the photon gas and the Einstein relation between energy and mass. The spectral form for the n-dimensional blackbody is derived. The 1D, 2D and 3D blackbody radiation is specified. It is mentioned the possibility of creation of the Mach cone in case that the high energy cosmical particles moves with the speed greater than the velocity of sound in cosmical relic photon sea. Key words: Sound, elasticity, thermodynamics, blackbody, relic photons, Mach's cone.

Miroslav Pardy

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A radia\\c{c}\\~ao de corpo negro e o surgimento da f\\'isica qu\\^antica: Notas de aula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the study of blackbody radiation in the early twentieth century by the German physicist Max Planck gave rise to the quantum theory.

Martins, Tiago Carvalho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The new beamline 3 at SURF III for source-based radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Blackbody radiation is calculable by the temperature of the cavity and the ... 5 However, the spectral distribution of a black- body source depends ...

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Resonance Factor in Einstein's Hidden Variables (Addition)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planck shifted to black-body radiation in 1900, using purely thermal experimental data (100% entropy, 0% resonance). As a result, when Planck performed his ...

244

Optical Technology Division 1993 - Technical Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was used to characterize two heat-pipe blackbodies ... hosted a workshop on cross-calibration that ... Two transfer radiometers are being designed, built ...

245

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Heat Flux Sensors Calibration Using Black-Body Radiation. ... 12-15, 2007, Richmond, VA, 1-8 ... Siebel, R. Studying the Response of Building Systems ...

246

Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each wavelength of the solar spectrum, or external quantumgray curve shows the solar spectrum (blackbody radiation)covers most of the solar spectrum where irradiance is

Tu, Bor-An Clayton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NIST SURF Long-Term Monitoring of the Ultraviolet Irradiance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... converted into a dedicated primary irradiance source ... SR) is the only standard source available, since ... the range of the blackbody standard sources. ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

NIST Thermal infrared transfer radiometer (TXR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The primary method uses either the ambient background water bath blackbody and ... where it performed in-situ measurements of various sources in a ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. ?ep(?) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth ?p(???, from which the profiles of ?ep(???are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP ?ep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL ?ep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar ?ep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ?w are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ?w aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to -3%).

Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

stoffel-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Broadband and Spectral Irradiance Measurements at the Radiometer Calibration Facility During the 1997 Integrated Intensive Observation Period T. L. Stoffel National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado G. Hodges Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado J. J. Michalsky State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Summary A unique collection of broadband and spectral solar irradiance measurements was made at the Radiometer Calibration Facility (RCF) during the 1997 Integrated Intensive Observation Period (IOP). Absolute cavity radiometers, ultraviolet photometers, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) photometers, pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and a scanning spectroradiometer were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to meet the

251

The ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility Best Estimate Radiative Flux CD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BEFlux VAP directly compares data from the three Normal Incidence Perheliometers, shaded pyranometers, and shaded pyrgeometers at the SGP CF. Extensive analysis with several years of data has produced limits of typical ranges of agreement when these instruments are performing as expected. These limits are used to screen the data, and then the average is taken of the two that agree best, given that at least two instruments agree to within the established limits. This is done for the downwelling direct normal and diffuse shortwave, and the downwelling longwave. The total (global) downwelling shortwave is then the sum of the direct and diffuse components.

Long, CN

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ARM - ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Support International Polar Year Begins at ACRF with 3-week Campaign in Barrow Aerosol Affects on Clouds To Be Studied Yearlong Study to Improve Polar Measurements of Radiative Energy Education Efforts Educational Kiosk CD Available at No Cost-Request Yours Today! POLAR-PALOOZA: Climate science goes on tour! Partnership Extends Support for National Science Teacher Conference Teacher's Domain Combines Culture and Climate Other Links ACRF IPY Home U.S. IPY Home ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) The Department of Energy's International Polar Year (IPY) contributions will be conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) located in the North Slope of Alaska. This DOE user facility

253

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cimel_ARM_STM_2008_poster_final.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cimel Sunphotometers Cimel Sunphotometers at ACRF Sites History and Current Status Laurie Gregory, Richard Wagener, and Lynn Ma Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York More Information Cimel (CSPHOT) Instrument Page: http://www.arm.gov/instruments/instrument.php?id=csphot Aeronet http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/ ARM eXternal Data Center (XDC): http://www.xdc.arm.gov/, xdc_oper@arm.gov. ARM Google: http://google.arm.gov/ search for "Cimel OR CSPHOT OR CSPOT" ARM Cimel Sunphotometers As of August 2007, the ARM External Data Center took on a limited form of mentorship for the Cimel Sunphotometers (CSPHOTs) to coordinate the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aeronet's and ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) site operations' activities to ascertain proper functioning, calibration, and

254

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

255

 

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Issue: K Author: Mark D. Ivey Page 1 of 24 DR 6 / 30 / 2010 ES&H STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (ES&H SOP) Title: ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MEASUREMENT CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY/NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA/ADJACENT ARCTIC OCEAN (ACRF/NSA/AAO) PROJECT OPERATING PLAN (U) Location: North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Owners: Mark D Ivey, Department 6383, Manager Mark D Ivey, Department 6383, ACRF/NSA/AAO Site Project Manager and Site ES&H Coordinator Document Release or Change History: SP473406/Issue Release/Change No (Authorization No.) Date A DR E970005SA, Rev 0 07/14/97 B CN E970005SA, Rev 1 10/28/98 C CN E970005SA, Rev 2 03/15/00

256

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-0707 ARM-0707 Report on the ARM Climate Research Facility EXPANSION WORKSHOP October 31 - November 1, 2007 Reston, Virginia Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE AC05 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/SC-ARM-0707 iii Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to provide the infrastructure needed to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere. Designated as a national user facility the ACRF

257

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

258

ARM - Education Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 9, 2007 [Education] April 9, 2007 [Education] Barrow Teachers Learn About International Polar Year Bookmark and Share Two Barrow teachers, Gary Boen and Imelda Cabana, were sent to the NSTA conference in St. Louis. Science teachers in Barrow, Alaska, know that climate change is something their students can experience simply by stepping out into their own back yards. But that doesn't mean teachers don't need resources and materials to help them engage their students in climate studies. Last month, ACRF Education and Outreach sponsored two teachers from ACRF's host community of Barrow to attend the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) 2007 National Conference in Saint Louis, Missouri. Imelda Cabana, from Eben Hopson Middle School, and Gary Boen, from Kiita Alternative School, were

259

Preliminary Analysis of ARM SGP Area Sky Cover and Downwelling SW Irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clarifying and Implementing a Stricter DOD Definition Across Datastreams Clarifying and Implementing a Stricter DOD Definition Across Datastreams C. Sivaraman, B. Ermold, M. Macduff Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Definition of DOD: All dimension, attribute and variable types and names are considered part of a DOD. A change in any part of the DOD is considered a version change. Outcomes: ACRF enforces greater consistency in data Downstream users benefit (DQ, VAPs, scientists) Identify inconsistencies across datastreams Datastream development is more efficient BODS interface, updated libraries Improved data analysis tools for ACRF and ARM Visual Datastream history tool (below) Issues with current DOD history: The DOD History page: http://science.arm.gov/tool/dod/showdod.php * Tracks both content and structure. * Needs Custom Configuration

260

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear and Cloudy Regions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Chiu, J., University of Reading Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Pilewskie, P., University of Colorado Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Chiu C, A Marshak, Y Knyazikhin, P Pilewskie, and W Wiscombe. 2009. "Physical interpretation of the spectral radiative signature in the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy regions." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1419-1430. (a) Total sky images on 18 May 2007, and (b) plot of SWS normalized zenith radiances. In (b), arrows pointed at the time axis correspond to the times

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Department of Energys Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's Energy's Office of Science University of Illinois Champaign, IL Rickey Petty October 14 th , 2008 ARM Aerial Vehicle Workshop Advances in Airborne Instrumentation Parameters Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) - Mission  The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) has been designated a national user facility for the purpose of providing this unique asset for the study of global change to the broader national and international research community. Research at this facility will include the study of alterations in climate, land productivity, oceans or other water resources, atmospheric chemistry, and ecological systems that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. Global change research also includes the study,

262

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

263

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Establishing Continuous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Establishing Continuous Atmospheric Profiles at the North Slope of Alaska Establishing Continuous Atmospheric Profiles at the North Slope of Alaska ACRF Delamere, Jennifer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, David Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Troyan, David Brookhaven National Laboratory Clothiaux, Eugene The Pennsylvania State University Accurate and continuous vertical profiles of the atmospheric state above the North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility (NSA ACRF) are a necessity for both accurate forward radiative transfer calculations and cloud microphysical retrievals. In particular, such profiles are a critical component of two important initiatives at the NSA site, the Broadband

264

Remote/New sites: Many Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote/New sites: Many Field Remote/New sites: Many Field Campaigns require temporary installations on non-ACRF sites. This requires identification of landowners, negotiation of leases, and infrastructure logistics for electrical and internet connectivity. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by UChicago-Argonne LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy SGP Field Campaigns: The Other Side of Operations Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 Dan Nelson 2 David Breedlove 2 Douglas L. Sisterson 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK Background Implementation All departments must work closely together to implement a campaign. In addition they must have the flexibility to adapt to new and unique instrument deployments. The

265

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: External Data Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Data Stream Review External Data Stream Review Wagener, Richard Brookhaven National Laboratory Ma, Lynn DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory Gregory, Laurie Brookhaven National Laboratory Tichler, Joyce DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory Horwedel, Betsy Oak Ridge National Laboratory Cialella, Alice Brookhaven National Laboratory In terms of data volume, about half the data in the ACRF archive were generated outside of the ARM program and collected by the eXternal Data Center (XDC) from external sources, processed to standard formats, documented, and forwarded to the archive. This constitutes a unique resource drawing many users to the archive, however it involves a significant effort and we must assure that the effort is spent where it provides the most benefit to the ACRF science mission. Here, we present a

266

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Berg, LK, and EI Kassianov. 2008. "Temporal variability of fair-weather cumulus statistics at the ARM SGP site." Journal of Climate 21, 3344-3358. Figure 1. Five-year mean ARSCL VAP values of cloud fraction (black), cloud-base height (orange circles), cloud-top height (red), cloud thickness (blue), and cloud-chord length (green), and their average daily bias for each year (B) and low-altitude moisture (C). While fair-weather clouds (FWC) are small in size, they are ubiquitous,

267

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

268

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Improved Data Logging and Collection and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems M.T. Ritsche, D.J. Holdridge Environmental Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL R. Pearson Australian Bureau of Meteorology Darwin, NT Australia Background Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: * Achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance.

269

Sandia VG Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company for the United States Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. * DOE/ARM = Dept of Energy/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, DOE's principal climate research program; www.arm.gov DOE/ARM UAS Plans Through Sandia, DOE/ARM* is putting in place a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) hosting capability on the North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) already exist at Barrow and Atqasuk; DOE/ARM restricted airspace exists at Oliktok Point; only restricted airspace on the North Slope of Alaska Atqasuk ACRF UAS Basing Capability: Restricted Airspace R2204 along with Permit to Use the USAF Oliktok Point Radar Station Facilities under R2204 Oliktok Point USAF Long Range Radar Station

270

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms  

SciTech Connect

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ARM Quick-looks Database for North Slope Alaska (NSA) sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From these pages one can monitor parts of the data acquisition process and access daily data visualizations from the different instruments. These data visualizations are produced in near real time automatically and are called Quick-Looks (QLs). The quick-looks contains unofficial data of unknown quality. Once data is released one can obtain the full data-set from any instrument available, and along with that, a statement about the data quality from the ARM archive. The database provides Quick-looks for the Barrow ACRF site (NSA C1), the Atqasuk ACRF site (NSA C2), or the SHEBA ice campaign of 1997 and 1998. As of 12-17-08, the database had more than 528,000 quick-looks available as data figures and data plots. No password is required for Quick-look access. (Specialized Interface)

Stamnes, Knut (NSA Site Scientist)

272

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

When low- to intermediate mass...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present the Spectral Energy Distribution of HR 4049 based on literature data and new continuum measurements at 850 µm. The SED shows variable absorption in the UV, and a large IR excess, both caused by circumstellar dust. The shape of the IR excess from 1 µm all the way down to 850 µm can be nearly perfectly fitted with a single blackbody function at T ? 1150 K or alternatively with a sum of blackbodies in a narrow temperature range. The energy emitted in this IR continuum radiation is about one-third of the stellar luminosity. We show that this blackbody radiation must be due to the presence of a circumbinary disk with a large height. This disk must also be gas-rich, in agreement with the observations of molecular bands in the ISO-SWS spectrum. We present two possible scenario’s for explaining the shape and the intensity of the IR excess. The first scenario involves large grains (a ? 1 mm) that each radiate like a blackbody. The second scenario argues that the blackbody radiation is due to a very optically thick circumbinary disk. We investigate if such a disk would indeed produce blackbody radiation by presenting results from radiative transfer calculations. We further quantify the properties of such a disk and its stability in the framework of (hydro)dynamics, grain settling, radiation pressure and grain drift. The virtues and shortcomings of both models for the origin of the IR blackbody are discussed by contrasting

C. Dominik; C. P. Dullemond; J. Cami; H. Van Winckel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research April 1 - June 30, 2005, ARM-05-015 Contents 1 Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2 Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3 Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables 1 Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF Sites for the Period April 1 -

275

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research October 1 - December 31, 2004, ARM-05-013 Contents 1 Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2 Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables 1 Operational Statistics for the ACRF Sites for the Period October 1, 2003- December 31, 2004 Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer

276

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2006 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2006, ARM 06-008 Contents 1 Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2 Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3 Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables 1 Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF and AMF Sites for the Period January 1 -

277

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future December 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored b y the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em ployees, makes any warranty, express or i mplied, or assu mes

278

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2006 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research April 1 - June 30, 2006, ARM 06-010 Contents 1 Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2 Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3 Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables 1 Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF and AMF Sites for the Period April 1 -

279

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2006 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research October 1 - December 31, 2006, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-001 Contents 1. Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3. Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables Table 1. Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF and AMF Sites for the Period October 1 -

280

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2005, ARM-05-014 Contents 1 Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2 Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3 Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 3 Tables 1 Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF Sites for the Period January 1 -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Small-Scale Cloud Activity over the Maritime Continent and the Western Pacific as Revealed by Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud systems over the Maritime Continent and the tropical western Pacific defined by the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) were tracked, and their evolution was compared with cloud parameters [e.g., minimum blackbody brightness ...

Yoshimi Kondo; Atsushi Higuchi; Kenji Nakamura

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Defects, thermal phenomena and design in photonic crystal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of blackbodies has been an ongoing source of fascination and scientific research for over a hundred years. Kirchhoff's law states that emissivity and absorptivity are equal for an object in thermal equilibrium. ...

Chan, David Lik Chin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

ARM XDC Datastreams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the in-flight calibration data derived from measurements of cold space and the on-board black-body calibration target. Angles are calculated from the orbit geometry and are stored...

285

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heat radiation from long cylindrical objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat radiated by objects smaller than or comparable in size to the thermal wavelength can be very different from the classical blackbody radiation as described by the Planck and Stefan-Boltzmann laws. We use methods ...

Golyk, Vladyslav A.

287

Synchronous identification of friendly targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

Telle, John M. (126 Shady Oak Cir., Tijeras, NM 87059); Roger, Stutz A. (5 Kiowa La., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Very high power THz radiation at Jefferson Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM Frequency (THz) JLab ERL NSLS Black Body Watts/cm 1E-4scientific program at the NSLS infrared beamline” Nucl.The blackbody is at 2000K, the NSLS source is described in

Carr, G.L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G.P.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

MICROSTRUCTURE ON A BLACK CHROME SOLAR SELECTIVE ABSORBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorp- tance in the solar spectrum while exhibiting thereflectance, the solar spectrum and blackbody spectrum ( 100the air mass 1 solar terrestrial spectrum ) and l00°C, 300°C

Lampert, Carl M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results from the Longwave Effective Cloud Fraction Results from the Longwave Effective Cloud Fraction in the Cloudiness Intercomparison E.E. Takara and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction While it may seem to be a simple quantity, cloud amount is somewhat elusive. Different types of instruments placed next to each other can give different cloud amounts because they use different parts of the spectrum, have different fields of view, sampling rates, etc. Another consideration is that cloud amount depends on the physical scale under consideration. The cloud amount appropriate for comparison to a single pyrgeometer is not likely to be useful for a grid square with 100-km sides. In terms of N e , the average longwave surface flux F, over an area that is compared to individual clouds,

291

splitt(2)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement in the Assessment of SIRS Broadband Improvement in the Assessment of SIRS Broadband Longwave Radiation Data Quality M. E. Splitt University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah C. P. Bahrmann Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction Validation of the performance of the Solar Infrared Station (SIRS) pyrgeometers is being conducted for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP). Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site extended facilities (EFs). Improvements to this effort include comparison of the downwelling longwave irradiance to estimates from several published algorithms based on surface meteorological conditions (including temperature, vapor pressure, and the clearness index). The algorithms provide estimates for clear skies, overcast skies, and all-sky conditions (during daylight

292

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Radiation-Aerosol Experiment (1996) at IAPh, Russia Cloud-Radiation-Aerosol Experiment (1996) at IAPh, Russia Golitsyn, G.S., Anikine, P.P., and Sviridenkov, M.A., Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In 1996, local measurements of the optical properties of the near-surface aerosol were carried out parallel with aureole measurements of the aerosol in the atmospheric column. The spectral radiation was measured by a complex of spectrometers. Global radiation was controlled by standard equipment (pyrheliometer, pyranometer, pyrgeometer). A microwave sounder was used to determine the liquid water path of clouds and water vapor content. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data from the National Oceanic and

293

Clough-SA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longwave Broadband QME Based on ARM Longwave Broadband QME Based on ARM Pyrgeometer and AERI Measurements S. A. Clough, A. D. Brown, C. Andronache, and E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts T. R. Shippert and D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, and R. O. Knuteson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Accurate modeling of the downwelling longwave flux at the surface is critical to our understanding of a number of important issues: the earth's energy balance; processes at the atmosphere's lower boundary including ice melt and ocean forcing; and evaluating our ability to model atmospheric fluxes for dynamical models including numerical weather prediction and climate models. Under the Atmospheric

294

ARM - Field Campaign - IPASRC II Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IPASRC II Campaign 2001.03.05 - 2001.03.16 Lead Scientist : Rune Storvold Data Availability All IPASRC II related data will be collected from the different principal investigators at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute. For further information, contact Chris Marty, (907) 474-7360, or Rune Storvold, (907) 474-6639. For data sets, see below. Summary The second IPASRC II was successfully carried out at the NSA-CART site at Barrow from March 5 to March 15, 2001. During most of the time, great weather and clear skies provided measurements of longwave downward irradiances between 130 and 170 Wm-2 and air temperatures between -25 and -35 degrees Celsius. All pyrgeometers were

295

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Philipona, R. (a), Dutton, E.G. (b), Wood, N. (b), Anderson, G. (b), Stoffel, T. (c), Reda, I. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Wendling, P. (e), Stiffter, A. (e), Clough, S.A. (f), Mlawer, E.J. (f), Revercomb, H. (g), and Shippert, T. (h), World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland (a), NOAA, Climate Monitoring and Diagnosic Laboratory (b), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (c), State University of New York at Albany (d), DLR, Oberfaffenhofen, Germany (e), Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc. (f), University of Wisconsin-Madison (g), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (h) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The first International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer

296

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

297

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons Between Measured and Modeled Longwave Irradiances During Arctic Comparisons Between Measured and Modeled Longwave Irradiances During Arctic Winter: Results from the Second International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer Comparison (IPARSC-II) Marty, Ch.(a), Storvold, R.(a), Philipona, R.(b), Delamere, J.(c), Dutton, E.(d), Michalsky, J.(e), Stamnes, K.(f), Eide, H.(f), and Stoffel, T.(g), Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks (a), World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland (b), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Boston (c), Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory NOAA, Boulder (d), State University of New York at Albany (e), Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey (f), National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden (g) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting

298

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Determination of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of the Arctic Indirect Aerosol Effect from AERI and Determination of the Arctic Indirect Aerosol Effect from AERI and Multispectral Radiometer Data Lubin, Dan University of California, San Diego Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory We have detected and quantified the aerosol indirect radiative effect in the longwave by identifying the spectral signatures of liquid water clouds having smaller droplet effective droplet radius using AERI. Statistically significant differences in the longwave emission spectra appear between low CN and high CN cases as measured in NOAA CMDL aerosol number concentration data at Barrow, Alaska. An independent verification of this indirect effect detection is provided by downwelling longwave flux measurements from the NSA pyrgeometers, which show consistently larger fluxes in the high CN

299

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2008, DOE/SC-ARM/P-09-009 Contents 1. Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3. Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Tables Table 1. Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF Sites for the Period January 1 - March 31,

300

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research October 1 - December 31, 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-08-001 Contents 1. Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3. Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Tables Table 1. Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF Sites for the Period October 1 - December

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Charge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Review of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility February 3-4, 2005 American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C. June 2005 W.R. Ferrell Climate Change Research Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DOE/SC-ARM-0502 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 1 2. SUMMARY OF ACRF INFRASTRUCTURE REVIEW PANEL COMMENTS................ 3 2.1 Management.................................................................................................................... 3 2.2 Research Support ............................................................................................................

302

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research April 1 - June 30, 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-010 Contents 1. Data Availability....................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts............................. 2 3. Safety ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Tables 1. Operational Statistics for the Fixed ACRF Sites for the Period April 1 - June 30, 2007.

303

Raman Lidar (RL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SGPRL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures height and time resolved profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. The system is a non-commercial custom-built instrument developed by Sandia National Laboratories specifically for the ARM Program. It is fully computer automated, and will run unattended for many days following a brief (~5-minute) startup period. The self-contained system (requiring only external electrical power) is housed in a climate-controlled 8’x8’x20’ standard shipping container.

Newsom, RK

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ARM - Datastreams - aeri01summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

summary summary Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025141 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERI01SUMMARY Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) 01: summary data Active Dates 1995.07.22 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Ambient blackbody temperature - apex K ABBapexTemp ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature K ABBbottomTemp ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature - rim top K ABBtopTemp ( time )

305

ARM - Datastreams - aeriengineer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaeriengineer Datastreamsaeriengineer Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025145 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERIENGINEER Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): engineering data Active Dates 1997.10.21 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Ambient blackbody temperature - apex K ABBapexTemp ( time ) Ambient Blackbody apex temperature weight /1 ABBapexTempWeight ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature K ABBbottomTemp ( time )

306

High accuracy measure of atomic polarizability in an optical lattice clock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite being a canonical example of quantum mechanical perturbation theory, as well as one of the earliest observed spectroscopic shifts, the Stark effect contributes the largest source of uncertainty in a modern optical atomic clock through blackbody radiation. By employing an ultracold, trapped atomic ensemble and high stability optical clock, we characterize the quadratic Stark effect with unprecedented precision. We report the ytterbium optical clock's sensitivity to electric fields (such as blackbody radiation) as the differential static polarizability of the ground and excited clock levels: 36.2612(7) kHz (kV/cm)^{-2}. The clock's fractional uncertainty due to room temperature blackbody radiation is reduced an order of magnitude to 3 \\times 10^{-17}.

Sherman, J A; Hinkley, N; Pizzocaro, M; Fox, R W; Ludlow, A D; Oates, C W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 1e8 Rydberg atoms subject to 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

Tscherbul, Timur V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as decaying quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 10^8 Rydberg atoms subject to suitably amplified cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) at 2.7 K, allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

Timur V. Tscherbul; Paul Brumer

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

309

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

A. Sandoval-Villalbazo a and R. Maartens b a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brillouin scattering of photons off the density fluctuations in a fluid is potentially important for cosmology. We derive the Brillouin spectral distortion of blackbody radiation, and discuss the possible implications for the cosmic microwave background. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect is slightly modified by Brillouin distortion, but only at very long wavelengths. 1

Departmento De Física Y Matemáticas; Lomas Santa; Fe México D. F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Casimir energy of a spherical shell in $?-$Minkowski spacetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Casimir energy of a spherical shell of radius $a$ in $\\kappa$-Minkowski spacetime for a complex field with an asymmetric ordering and obtain the energy up to $O(1/\\kappa^2)$. We show that the vacuum breaks particle and anti-particle symmetry if one requires the spectra to be consistent with the blackbody radiation at the commutative limit.

Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Quantum thermodynamic functions for an oscillator coupled to a heat bath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small systems (of interest in the areas of nanophysics, quantum information, etc.) are particularly vulnerable to environmental effects. Thus, we determine various thermodynamic functions for an oscillator in an arbitrary heat bath at arbitrary temperatures. Explicit results are presented for the most commonly discussed heat bath models: Ohmic, single relaxation time and blackbody radiation.

G. W. Ford; R. F. O'Connell

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Collisionally Induced Atomic Clock Shifts and Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts and blackbody radiation effects for atomic clock transitions using a density matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Results for a finite temperature ${}^{87}$Sr ${}^1S_0$ ($F = 9/2$) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

Y. B. Band; I. Osherov

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law. There is an inversion of the high energy level population at sufficiently high temperatures.

F. V. Prigara

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Observing Forest Fires with the GOES-8, 3.9-µm Imaging Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blackbody radiation at 3.9 µm increases rapidly with temperature. This fact suggests a potential application by fire weather meteorologists of the 3.9-µm imagery data provided by the new GOES-8 weather satellite. The ability of the 3.9-µm channel ...

John F. Weaver; James F. W. Purdom; Timothy L. Schneider

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Light production metrics of radiation sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light production by a radiation source is evaluated and reviewed as an important concept of physics from the Black-Body point of view. The mechanical equivalent of the lumen, the unit of perceived light, is explained and evaluated using radiation physics arguments. The existence of an upper limit of luminous efficacy is illustrated for various sources and implications are highlighted.

C. Tannous

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Physically based modeling and animation of fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a physically based method for modeling and animating fire. Our method is suitable for both smooth (laminar) and turbulent flames, and it can be used to animate the burning of either solid or gas fuels. We use the incompressible Navier-Stokes ... Keywords: blackbody radiation, chemical reaction, fire, flames, implicit surface, incompressible flow, smoke, stable fluids, vorticity confinement

Duc Quang Nguyen; Ronald Fedkiw; Henrik Wann Jensen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Engineering Light Course instructor: Dr. Thomas Bifano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a laser pointer, to make a light bulb like Thomas Edison's, to discover how engineers ruined achievements/challenges Course goals Why study light 9/10/12 Lecture 2: Edison's light bulb, light and color bulbs o Observing blackbody radiation color 9/12/12 Field Trip: Museum of Science Light exhibits

Guenther, Frank

319

Engineering Light Course instructor: Dr. Thomas Bifano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a laser pointer, to make a light bulb like Thomas Edison's, to discover how engineers ruined · Smart lighting 9/10/12 Lecture 2: Edison's light bulb, light and color · What engineers do, engineering bulbs o Observing blackbody radiation color 9/12/12 Field Trip: Museum of Science · Light exhibits

Bifano, Thomas

320

Black Hole Spectrum: Continuous or Discrete?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate a qualitative argument, based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, to support the claim that when the effects of matter fields are assumed to overshadow the effects of quantum mechanics of spacetime, the discrete spectrum of black hole radiation, as such as predicted by Bekenstein's proposal for a discrete black hole area spectrum, reduces to Hawking's black-body spectrum.

Jarmo Makela

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework  

SciTech Connect

Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Factors Controlling the Properties of Multi-Phase Arctic Stratocumulus Clouds A. Fridlind and A. Ackerman National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California S. Menon and I. Sednev Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California Introduction The October 2004 Multi-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's (ACRF's) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale focused on measuring the properties of autumn transition-season arctic stratus and the environmental conditions controlling them, including concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our work aims to use a large-eddy simulation (LES) code with embedded size-resolved cloud

323

Microsoft Word - 2009-03 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.3.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future JW Voyles March 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

324

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November - December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

325

ARM - Field Campaign - Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) Campaign Links ISDAC Website Related Campaigns Parameterization of Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds During ISDAC 2010.10.01, Korolev, AAF ISDAC - Second Year Supplemental Surface Spectral Irradiance Measurements 2009.04.07, Lubin, NSA ISDAC - NASA ARCTAS Coordination with ARM 2008.04.01, Ferrare, NSA ISDAC / RISCAM - Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) 2008.04.01, Collins, NSA ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer 2008.03.31, Lubin, NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/isdac/

326

ARM - 2006 ARM Science Team Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Meeting 2006 Meeting 2006 Meeting Home Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Title Pictures Posters Presentations Meeting Archives ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings Past Science Team Meetings 2006 ARM Science Team Meeting March 27-18 | Albuquerque, New Mexico | Hyatt Regency Albuquerque The Hyatt Regency - Albequerque The Hyatt Regency - Albequerque Meeting Highlights Just over 300 ARM scientists and ACRF infrastructure staff took part in the 16th ARM Science Team meeting held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on March 27-31, 2006. After an initial day of focused meetings among the ARM Working Groups, Dr. David Thomassen, Acting Associate Director of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), opened the meeting's plenary session with remarks about the role of ARM within the DOE, and its

327

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

328

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

329

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Review, Status, and Plans K.B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K.P. Moran National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Earth System Research Laboratory-Physical Sciences Division Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program currently operates five millimeter-wave cloud radars (MMCRs) at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale's Barrow site, and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale's Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. Currently, three different signal processors are deployed, and we are in process of upgrading the remaining two radars to provide higher reliability and efficiency along with

330

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyses from TWP-ICE Analyses from TWP-ICE C.N. Long and J.H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington N. Tapper and J. Beringer Monash University Melbourne, Australia B. Atkinson Australian Bureau of Meteorology Darwin, Australia Introduction Surface data collected during Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) includes radiation and standard meteorological measurements at six remote sites, as well as those at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Darwin site (Figure 1). Five of these remote sites include not only unshaded broadband hemispheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) instruments, but also a multi- detector SW radiometer designed to simultaneously measure both the downwelling diffuse and total SW

331

ARM - Field Campaign - ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology 2008.07.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Michael Howard For data sets, see below. Description Goals of assist were to intercompare radiance spectra and profile retrievals from a new AERI-like instrument, called "ASSIST" with the SGP site AERI(s) and calculations from Radiosondes measurements. * To bring the ASSIST instrument to the SGP ACRF and perform simultaneous measurements of the sky radiation with those from the AERI. * On relatively cloud-free days, release a special radiosonde at the

332

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future Revision 2 A.S. Koontz, S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold K.L. Gaustad September 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

333

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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5 5 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future A.S. Koontz, S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold N. N. Keck K.L. Gaustad R.C. Perez June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

334

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September - October 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

335

Slide 1  

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deployment (fiber) deployment (fiber) 9.20-25.2006, 10.25.2006-1.15.2007 Communication: in the field similar to above: instrument to computer via optical fiber Original location: ~250m SE of Great White Sample data: A Total Precipitation Sensor at the Barrow ACRF Site ABSTRACT A Yankee Environmental TPS-3100 Total Precipitation Sensor was installed near the Barrow ARM Climate Research Facility (south of the NOAA facility and east of the Great White shelter) in September 2006. Data ingest software was completed by the end of 2006. Precipitation data from the TPS-3100 are being collected and archived at present. The sensor head of the TPS-3100, the "hotplate" sensor, consists of two heated plates about five inches in diameter. The plates are oriented parallel to the ground, one facing

336

1  

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Refurbishment and Upgrade of the Refurbishment and Upgrade of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Raman Lidar D.D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J.E.M. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Raman lidar (CARL) is an autonomous, turn-key system that profiles water vapor, aerosols, and clouds throughout the diurnal cycle for days without attention (Goldsmith et al. 1998). CARL was first deployed to the Southern Great Plains CRF during the summer of 1996 and participated in the 1996 and 1997 water vapor intensive operational periods (IOPs). Since February 1998, the system has collected over 38,000 hrs of data (equivalent of almost 4.4 years), with an average monthly uptime of 62% during

337

Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the  

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Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the Expansion of Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska in Time for the International Polar Year Zak, Bernard Sandia National Laboratories Ivey, Mark Sandia National Laboratories Zirzow, Jeffrey Sandia National Laboratories Brower, Walter UIC Science Division ARM/NSA Ivanoff, James NSA Whiteman, Doug NSA/AAO Sassen, Kenneth University of Alaska Fairbanks Truffer-Moudra, Dana University of Alaska Fairbanks Category: Infrastructure & Outreach The International Polar Year (IPY; 2007-2008) will stimulate research in both polar regions, primarily focusing on the rapid climate-related changes occurring at high latitudes. In part in preparation for the IPY, facilities at the NSA ACRF are undergoing expansion. In addition, with funding through NOAA, Phase 1 of the planned $60M Barrow Global Climate Change Research

338

The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and  

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The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and Preliminary Assessments of Instrument Deployments in 2006 Dedecker, Ralph University of Wisconsin Demirgian, Jack Argonne National Laboratory Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Instruments One of the key operational instruments at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). This instrument provides the ARM program with surface-based observations of infrared spectrally resolved radiance from a vertically directed cone with better than 1% accuracy. The data from

339

Research Highlight  

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Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol humidification factor f(RH) from Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol extinction and relative humidity. Upgrades to the Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF)

340

Microsoft Word - 2009-05 Instrument Report DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.5.doc  

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5 5 ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information JW Voyles May 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

1  

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Cloud Properties Derived from Cloud Properties Derived from Dual-View Satellite Data over the Continental United States J. Kirk Ayers and R. Palikonda Analytical Services and Materials Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia P. Heck CIMSS/University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin R. Arduini Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Corresponding Author J. Kirk Ayer (j.k.ayers@larc.nasa.gov) Introduction Development of a consistent, accurate quantification of the cloud field over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains site (an area with extensive surface observations) is crucial to the development of improved parameterizations in models

342

ARM - Evaluation Product - SASHE Langley Regressions  

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ProductsSASHE Langley Regressions ProductsSASHE Langley Regressions Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : SASHE Langley Regressions Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SAS-He) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) - an instrument that has been in the ACRF stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SAS-He provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

343

Research Highlight  

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Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

344

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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1 1 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future Revision 4 A.S. Koontz, S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold K.L. Gaustad January 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

345

Slide 1  

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Participation Participation in CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intraseasonal Variability in Year 2011) and Coordination between CINDY/DYNAMO and AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment) Chidong Zhang RSMAS, University of Miami Chris Fairall, Richard Johnson, Mike McPhaden Background I: Importance of the MJO/TIV *Monsoons, ENSO, IODZM *Teleconnections, extratropical circulation/weather * Extreme events (midlat rainfall, tropical storm/cyclones) *Earth's rotation rate, length of the day *Atmospheric and oceanic chemistry and biosystem (ozone, CO 2 , aerosols, chlorophyll) *Prediction potential (> 20 days) Background II: Challenges presented by the MJO *A poster child of numerical model deficiency *inability to consistently/knowingly reproduce the MJO/TIV by global climate models

346

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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2 2 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future Revision 5 A.S. Koontz S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold N. N. Keck K.L. Gaustad R.C. Perez March 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

347

Barrow  

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5 5 Barrow & Atqasuk Visitor Guide June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Informal Introduction to Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska Barrow * Introduction: The ARM Climate Research Facility/North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean Barrow Site is located a few miles to the east of Barrow, near the northern-most point of the United States. Barrow is typically accessible only by air or boat, although special "rollagon" trains have gone in and out of Barrow in past winters. The population of Barrow in the year 2000 was 4,500 residents. Since Barrow serves as the seat of the North Slope Borough government, it has many amenities that might not be expected in a town of its

348

Microsoft Word - 2009-09 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.9.doc  

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9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information JW Voyles September 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

349

PowerPoint Presentation  

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CPWG Instruments Group CPWG Instruments Group Report Chuck Long With help from: Rich Coulter, Jim Mather, Kevin Widener, Eugene Clothiaux, Jimmy Voyles, Others... Moving forward * New 3-channel MWRs - Purchase of 2 this FY, soliciting bids - Tentative plans for 2/yr until one for each CF and spares are purchased. * Photo-acoustic aerosol absorption instrument in process * Upgrade for the BOM C-Pol radar has gone through On hold * SUNY Oxygen A-band instrument - de-scoped by the ACRF Review Board - Concerns over having 3 separate "development" instrument systems come in all in the same year MMCRs * Barrow antenna replaced in December * Measuring circular cross-pol until early Feb when problem found (thanks Jay and Hans!) * SGP antenna next for replacement * SGP to be upgraded to PIRAQ in next

350

Orr 2009 ARM STM poster2.ppt  

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Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP A U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago-Argonne, LLC Accomplishments and Status of SGP During 2008 Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 David Breedlove 2 Richard Eagan 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK INSTRUMENTS GENERAL STATISTICS * Instrument Availability - Averaged over 95% during 2008. * Electronic Repair Lab - $20,000 in savings * Calibrations - Over 140 instruments calibrated * Guest Instruments Supported - 40 * Site visitors - Over 100 visits by scientists and guests at the Central Facility. * Field Campaigns - 18 Campaigns supported last year. Acknowledgments We would like to thank the entire SGP staff for another year of excellence and for their continued support of all aspects of operations. This

351

PowerPoint Presentation  

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Spectral Shortwave Spectral Shortwave Quality Measurement Experiment (SW QME) at the Southern Great Plains ACRF J. Delamere, E. Mlawer (AER, Inc.) P. Kiedron (CIRES/U. Colorado) J. Michalsky (NOAA/ESRL/GMD) C. Long, C. Flynn, T. Shippert (PNNL) P. Pilewskie, P. McBride (LASP/U. Colorado) The Shortwave QME Paradigm Critical evaluation of all components of closure study in the shortwave..... * Radiometric measurement quality * Accuracy of calculation (LBLRTM/CHARTS) * Line parameters (HITRAN) * MT_CKD continuum model * Extraterrestrial spectrum * Model inputs * Radiosonde, MWRRET * Spectral Surface Albedo * Aerosol Properties (ABE) * Cloud Properties (Microbase) Spectral Surface Albedo Algorithm 1. Based on the 6 MFR channel albedos, every surface classified as either: * Snow * Brown Vegetation/Soil

352

Microsoft Word - 2009-07 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.7.doc  

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7 7 ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information JW Voyles July 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

353

delamere_swqme_arm08_poster.ppt  

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Shortwave Spectral Radiative Closure Studies Shortwave Spectral Radiative Closure Studies at the ARM Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility Step 2: Input these properties to the line-by-line radiative transfer model LBLRTM/CHARTS with the HITRAN 2004 line parameter database, including updates through 2007, and MT_CKD continuum model. Compute transmittance, radiance/irradiance. Step 3: Determine best estimate of radiative properties from available radiometric measurements. Step 5: Diagnose cause of measurement/model discrepancies. Improve Steps 1 through4. Step 1: Determine best estimate of atmospheric and surface properties at the SGP ACRF. To do this, use ARM's sophisticated aerosol and cloud remote sensing instrumentation, daily radiosonde launches, and surface microwave radiometers.

354

Communications: NREL PowerPoint Presentation Template with Light Background  

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AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: Moving the White CoolCell ARM Radiative Processes Working Group Analyses by Mary Anderberg & Tom Stoffel March 10, 2008 ACRF Upwelling Irradiances Infrared UIR Shortwave US Pt Reyes, CA Banizoumbou Niger AMF Upwelling Irradiances Warren et al. visits FKB... BCR 01402: Move 7 m before on 10 m Tower AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 14, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 15, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 1, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 5, 2007 UIR US Surface Albedo (AM) Surface Albedo (PM) Radiometer View Factors * * * 90% Irradiance Contribution Height (AGL) Effective Radius 3 m 9 m 10 m 29 m Radiometer Sensitivities Pyranometer +/- 10 Wm -2 vs 0.4% of 200 Wm-2 (0.8 Wm

355

ARM - 2006 Science Team Meeting Presentations  

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Presentations Presentations 2006 Meeting 2006 Meeting Home Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Title Pictures Posters Presentations Meeting Archives ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings Past Science Team Meetings 2006 Science Team Meeting Presentations Monday, March 27, 2006 ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs: Overview and History Warren Wiscombe (PDF, 6 MB) ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs: Infrastructure Overview 2006 Jimmy Voyles (PDF, 4MB) ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs: An Incomplete Introduction to ACRF Instrumentation Jim Liljegren (PDF, 4MB) ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs: ARM Data Quality Office - Real-Time Assessment of ARM Data Randy Peppler (PDF, 12MB) ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs: Getting Data from the ARM Archive

356

Microsoft Word - 2009-04 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P=09.004.4.doc  

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4 4 ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information JW Voyles April 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

357

Research Highlight  

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A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

358

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)  

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govCampaignsCloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) govCampaignsCloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) Campaign Links CLASIC Website Related Campaigns CLASIC - SAM Support 2007.06.09, DeVore, SGP CLASIC - 9.4 GHz Phase Array Radar 2007.06.08, Kollias, SGP CLASIC - Southern Great Plains Aerosol Evolution Study (SGPAES) 2007.06.08, Collins, SGP CLASIC - Land Surface 2007.06.01, Jackson, SGP CLASIC - Radiosonde Campaign 2007.06.01, Orr, SGP CLASIC - SGP Particle Phase Experiment 2007.06.01, Martin, SGP CLASIC - Land-Cloud Coupled Data Assimilation System 2007.06.01, Jackson, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) 2007.06.01 - 2007.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/clasic/ Lead Scientist : Mark Miller

359

StormVEx_2009ARM_poster  

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StormVEx Question: StormVEx Question: Can these distinctions be made in orographic clouds with snow akes, water droplets, and active dynamics? Aerial view of SPL Summer/Fall at SPL Winter/Spring at SPL Science team at AMF2 location during Winter 2009 site visit SPL The core goal of ACRF is improving the representation of clouds in global models. The ability to convert the remote sensing measurements to cloud properties has been ham- pered by a critical shortage of correlative data for valida- tion and development of new algorithms. Such data sets are normally created by episodic and expensive aircraft measurements. StormVEx will create a correlative data set equivalent to ~200-300 aircraft flights in liquid and mixed phase clouds. This will be achieved by placing the AMF2 in

360

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

362

Slide 1  

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Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Moisture Budget for CLASIC Peter J. Lamb 1,2 , Avraham Zangvil 3 , Diane H. Portis 1 1 1 Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies The University of Oklahoma 2 School of Meteorology, The University of Oklahoma 3 Meteorology Unit, Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel ARM Science Team Meeting March 2009 CLASIC CLOUD AND LAND SURFACE INTERACTION CAMPAIGN Southern Great Plains Site ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) June 9-30 2007 CLASIC Science Questions (1) What are the roles of cumulus convection and spatial variations in land cover in depleting low-level water vapor as it is advected into the SGP region? (2) What are the relationships between cumulus clouds and the soil-plant-atmosphere

363

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Matrosov, S. Y., CIRES/NOAA/ESRL/University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A An example of MMCR (a) and WACR (b) ARM radar measurements of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all hydrometeors in the vertical column is an important task, which is crucial for model parameterization and validation purposes. For many years, the remote sensing efforts within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were focused primarily on either non-precipitating or only weakly-precipitating (e.g., drizzling)

364

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

365

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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3 3 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future Revision 3 A.S. Koontz, S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold K.L. Gaustad November 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

366

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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3 3 ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future Revision 6 A.S. Koontz, S. Choudhury B.D. Ermold N. N. Keck K.L. Gaustad R.C. Perez April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

367

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

368

Cold Weather Hazards  

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0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

369

do_over.sized.v2.pdf  

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author author Andy Vogelmann vogelmann@bnl.gov 631-474-4424 SUMMARY SUMMARY Preliminary tests provided of an artificial neural network, trained on C-Pol data, that uses infrared satellite data to determine precipitation regimes. * Encouraging results show skill in most classes, including the difficult stratiform-anvil discrimination. * Differences arise between comparable neural net trainings that will be the addressed in further research. TWP Cloud Behavior Analyses - Approaches for Model Validation with ACRF Observations Andrew M Vogelmann 1 , Ed Luke 1 , Courtney Schumacher 2 , Mike Jensen 1 , Erwin Boer 3 , Pavlos Kollias 4 , Minghua Zhang 5 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Texas A&M University, 3 LUEBEC, 4 McGill University, 5 State University of New York at Stony Brook

370

Microsoft Word - 2009-06 Instrument Report_DOE_SC_ARM_P_09_004.6.doc  

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6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information JW Voyles June 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

371

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

372

3. New Cloud Climatology  

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New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

373

Microsoft Word - 2009-02 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09.004.2.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future JW Voyles February 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

374

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

375

ARM - Facility News Article  

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New Data Stream Available from Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar New Data Stream Available from Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar Bookmark and Share Inside the instrument shelter, the MMCR data system collects radar spectral data and processes these into reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral width. Inside the instrument shelter, the MMCR data system collects radar spectral data and processes these into reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral width. As a result of upgrades to the Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) processors (see http://www.arm.gov/acrf/updates051504.stm#nsammcr) at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locales, two MMCR data streams-mmcrcalC1.a1 (calibration data) and mmcrmomentsC1.a1 (spectral "moments" data)-have been combined

376

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: MICROBASE, A Continuous  

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MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future MICROBASE, A Continuous Baseline Microphysical Retrieval: Status and Future Plans Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Michael, Paul Brookhaven National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah The MICROBASE_PI and MICROBASE_PA value-added products (VAPs) are integral components of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The goal of the BBHRP project is to determine atmospheric heating and cooling rate profiles in the column above the active sensors at each ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and within a larger volume around each site, representative of a global climate model grid cell. To produce the heating rate profiles,

377

Research Highlight  

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"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

378

ARM XDC Datastreams  

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Diagnostic Analyses Diagnostic Analyses Documentation ECMWFDIAG Instrument External Datastream Descriptions ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses (ECMWFDIAG) Information updated on July 3, 2013, 6:19 pm GMT General Data Description Diagnostic Analyses data are derived from ECMWF model runs in simulated vertical profiles of diagnostic variables at specific locations or for area averages. The Physical Parametrization Group at ECMWF generates these data as a courtesy to ARM for all the ACRF sites including the changing location of the mobile facility. These data can only be distributed to ARM scientists. ARM scientists who obtain these data must agree to acknowledge use of the data in their

379

Research Highlight  

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The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

380

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments RSS Archive 2005-2006  

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5-2006 5-2006 2007 · 2008 · 2009 George Smoot Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory "Blackbody Form" Research Yields 2006 Nobel Prize George Smoot made an announcement in 1992 that "essentially silenced all the scientific critics of the Big Bang theory." (See the October 3, 2006 edition of Today at Berkeley Lab.) For research leading up to that announcement, Smoot was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics 2006. Smoot, an astrophysicist at Berkeley Lab since 1974 and a UC Berkeley physics professor since 1994, shared the award with John C. Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Together they discovered the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Read more on this discovery at the DOE R&D Accomplishments Featured Scientists page.

384

CMB  

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Hubble Diagram Hubble Diagram CMB BBN Cosmic Microwave Background One of the predictions that the Big Bang theory leads to, concerns some left over pieces that could tell us the temperature of the universe.. IF we believe that the Big Bang is how the universe began, then theorists predict that we should see a remnant microwave background. It is microwave because that is the area of the spectrum in which it is found. When we look out into space with our bare eyes, we see bright objects and a whole lot of "empty" space. However, if we examine the sky with a radio telescope, we see an almost perfect blackbody spectrum in the microwave spectrum. What is a blackbody and why is it radiating? How did we find the Cosmic Microwave Background? And can we fit a curve to the data taken for the Cosmic

385

Nobel Prize in Physics 2006  

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their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation" their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation" John C. Mather Button 1/2 of prize Button USA Button born 1945 Button CA - NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA Button AA - NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA Button WA - NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA Button Additional Information George F. Smoot Button 1/2 of prize Button USA Button born 1945 Button CA - University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley California, USA Button AA - Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Button WA - Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Button Additional Information *Explanation of CA, AA & WA*

386

Plasma channel optical pumping device and method  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for optically pumping a gaseous laser using blackbody radiation produced by a plasma channel which is formed from an electrical discharge between two electrodes spaced at opposite longitudinal ends of the laser. A preionization device which can comprise a laser or electron beam accelerator produces a preionization beam which is sufficient to cause an electrical discharge between the electrodes to initiate the plasma channel along the preionization path. The optical pumping energy is supplied by a high voltage power supply rather than by the preionization beam. High output optical intensities are produced by the laser due to the high temperature blackbody radiation produced by the plasma channel, in the same manner as an exploding wire type laser. However, unlike the exploding wire type laser, the disclosed invention can be operated in a repetitive manner by utilizing a repetitive pulsed preionization device.

Judd, O' Dean P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

microwaverpp.dvi  

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microwave microwave background 1 26. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND Revised September 2013 by D. Scott (University of British Columbia) and G.F. Smoot (UCB/LBNL). 26.1. Introduction The energy content in radiation from beyond our Galaxy is dominated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), discovered in 1965 [1]. The spectrum of the CMB is well described by a blackbody function with T = 2.7255 K, this spectral form being one of the main pillars of the hot Big Bang model for the early Universe. The lack of any observed deviations from a blackbody spectrum constrains physical processes over cosmic history at redshifts z ∼ < 10 7 (see earlier versions of this review). All viable cosmological models predict a very nearly Planckian spectrum inside the current observational limits (although that could change with more sensitive spectral experiments in the future [2]). Currently the key CMB observable

388

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Exact microscopic theory of electromagnetic heat transfer between a dielectric sphere and plate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-field electromagnetic heat transfer holds great potential for the advancement of nanotechnology. Whereas far-field electromagnetic heat transfer is constrained by Planck's blackbody limit, the increased density of states in the near-field enhances heat transfer rates by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional limit. Such enhancement opens new possibilities in numerous applications, including thermal-photo-voltaics, nano-patterning, and imaging. The advancement in this area, however, has been hampered by the lack of rigorous theoretical treatment, especially for geometries that are of direct experimental relevance. Here we introduce an efficient computational strategy, and present the first rigorous calculation of electromagnetic heat transfer in a sphere-plate geometry, the only geometry where transfer rate beyond blackbody limit has been quantitatively probed at room temperature. Our approach results in a definitive picture unifying various approximations previously used to treat this problem, and provides new physical insights for designing experiments aiming to explore enhanced thermal transfer.

Clayton Otey; Shanhui Fan

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Plasma channel optical-pumping device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method are described for optically pumping a gaseous laser using blackbody radiation produced by a plasma channel which is formed from an electrical discharge between two electrodes spaced at opposite longitudinal ends of the laser. A preionization device which can comprise a laser or electron beam accelerator produces a preionization beam which is sufficient to cause an elctrical discharge between the electrodes to initiate the plasma channel along the preionization path. The optical pumping energy is supplied by a high voltage power supply rather than by the preionization beam. High output optical intensities are produced by the laser due to the high temperature black-body radiation produced by the plasma channel, in the same manner as an exploding wire type laser. However, unlike the exploding wire type laser, the disclosed invention can be operated in a repetitive manner by utilizing a repetitive pulsed preionization device.

Judd, O.P.

1981-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum from the Full COBE/FIRAS Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have refined the analysis of the data from the FIRAS (Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer) on board the COBE (COsmic Background Explorer). The FIRAS measures the difference between the cosmic microwave background and a precise blackbody spectrum. We find new tighter upper limits on general deviations from a blackbody spectrum. The RMS deviations are less than 50 parts per million of the peak of the CMBR. For the Comptonization and chemical potential we find $|y| < 15\\times10^{-6}$ and $|\\mu| < 9\\times10^{-5}$ (95\\% CL). There are also refinements in the absolute temperature, 2.728 $\\pm$ 0.004 K (95\\% CL), and dipole direction, $(\\ell,b)=(264.14^\\circ\\pm0.30, 48.26^\\circ\\pm0.30)$ (95\\% CL), and amplitude, $3.372 \\pm 0.007$ mK (95\\% CL). All of these results agree with our previous publications.

D. J. Fixsen; E. S. Cheng; J. M. Gales; J. C. Mather; R. A. Shafer; E. L. Wright

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fritz Hasenohrl and E = mc^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1904, the year before Einstein's seminal papers on special relativity, Austrian physicist Fritz Hasenohrl examined the properties of blackbody radiation in a moving cavity. He calculated the work necessary to keep the cavity moving at a constant velocity as it fills with radiation and concluded that the radiation energy has associated with it an apparent mass such that E = 3/8 mc^2. Also in 1904, Hasenohrl achieved the same result by computing the force necessary to accelerate a cavity already filled with radiation. In early 1905, he corrected the latter result to E = 3/4 mc^2. In this paper, Hasenohrl's papers are examined from a modern, relativistic point of view in an attempt to understand where he went wrong. The primary mistake in his first paper was, ironically, that he didn't account for the loss of mass of the blackbody end caps as they radiate energy into the cavity. However, even taking this into account one concludes that blackbody radiation has a mass equivalent of m = 4/3 E/c^2 or m = 5/3 E/c^2 depending on whether one equates the momentum or kinetic energy of radiation to the momentum or kinetic energy of an equivalent mass. In his second and third papers that deal with an accelerated cavity, Hasenohrl concluded that the mass associated with blackbody radiation is m = 4/3 E/c^2, a result which, within the restricted context of Hasenohrl's gedanken experiment, is actually consistent with special relativity. Both of these problems are non-trivial and the surprising results, indeed, turn out to be relevant to the "4/3 problem" in classical models of the electron. An important lesson of these analyses is that E = mc^2, while extremely useful, is not a "law of physics" in the sense that it ought not be applied indiscriminately to any extended system and, in particular, to the subsystems from which they are comprised.

Stephen Boughn

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

On parton distributions in a photon gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

I. Alikhanov

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Efficiency of luminescence in luminescent solar concentrators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power effiency of luminescence excited by solar radiation in luminescent solar collectors is calculated for a glass sheet doped with CR/sup 3 +/. The achievable chemical potential for an optically thick absorber irradiated by diluted blackbody radiation as a function of Cr/sup 3 +/ concentration, sheet thickness, sunlight dilution, and luminescence quantum yield leads directly to overall conversion efficiency of solar power to luminescence power.

Lempicki, A.

1983-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A NEW METHOD OF PULSE-WISE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved spectral analysis, though a very promising method to understand the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is difficult to implement in practice because of poor statistics. We present a new method for pulse-wise time-resolved spectral study of the individual pulses of GRBs, using the fact that many spectral parameters are either constants or smooth functions of time. We use this method for the two pulses of GRB 081221, the brightest GRB with separable pulses. We choose, from the literature, a set of possible models that includes the Band model, blackbody with a power law (BBPL), and a collection of blackbodies with a smoothly varying temperature profile, along with a power law (mBBPL), and two blackbodies with a power law (2BBPL). First, we perform a time-resolved study to confirm the spectral parameter variations, and then we construct the new model to perform a joint spectral fit. We find that any photospheric emission in terms of blackbodies is required mainly in the rising parts of the pulses and the falling part can be adequately explained in terms of the Band model, with the low-energy photon index within the regime of synchrotron model. Interestingly, we find that 2BBPL is comparable or sometimes even better, though marginally, than the Band model, in all episodes. Consistent results are also obtained for the brightest GRB of Fermi era-GRB 090618. We point out that the method is generic enough to test any spectral model with well-defined parameter variations.

Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

On an Improvement of the Planck radiation Energy Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probability distribution function for thermodynamics and econophysics is obtained by solving an equilibrium equation. This approach is different from the common one of optimizing the entropy of the system or obtaining the state of maximum probability, which usually obtains as a result the Boltzmann distribution. The Gamma distribution is proposed as a better equation to describe the blackbody radiation in substitution of Planck's radiation equation. Also, a new form of entropy is proposed, that maintains the correct relation with the Clausius' formula.

Diego Saa

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fritz Hasenohrl and E = mc^2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1904, the year before Einstein's seminal papers on special relativity, Austrian physicist Fritz Hasenohrl examined the properties of blackbody radiation in a moving cavity. He calculated the work necessary to keep the cavity moving at a constant velocity as it fills with radiation and concluded that the radiation energy has associated with it an apparent mass such that E = 3/8 mc^2. Also in 1904, Hasenohrl achieved the same result by computing the force necessary to accelerate a cavity already filled with radiation. In early 1905, he corrected the latter result to E = 3/4 mc^2. In this paper, Hasenohrl's papers are examined from a modern, relativistic point of view in an attempt to understand where he went wrong. The primary mistake in his first paper was, ironically, that he didn't account for the loss of mass of the blackbody end caps as they radiate energy into the cavity. However, even taking this into account one concludes that blackbody radiation has a mass equivalent of m = 4/3 E/c^2 or m = 5/3 E/c^...

Boughn, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Observation of the submillimeter cosmic background spectrum  

SciTech Connect

An experimental measurement of the spectrum of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation is described. The experiment consists of measuring the night sky emission at an altitude of 39 km, correcting for the atmospheric molecular line emission, and placing limits on the contamination from sources of continuum radiation such as the apparatus itself and the earth. The observations were made on 24 July 1974 using a fully calibrated liquid-helium-cooled balloon- borne spectrophotometer. Important features of the apparatus include a cooled antenna, a polarizing interferometer, and a germanium bolometric detector. The characterization of the spectrophotometer includes the large angle response and emission of the antenna. The calibration of the instrument and corrections to the observed sky spectrum are based on measurements made during the flight. A simple model of the molecular line emission is used to determine the atmospheric contribution. The resulting spectrum covers the frequency range from 4 to 17 cm$sup -1$ and establishes that the cosmic background radiation follows the high frequency quantum cutoff for a 3K blackbody. A blackbody temperature of 2.99/sub -.$sub 14$/$sup +$.$sup 07$/K is deduced from our data. The present status of the cosmic background observations, which span more than three decades in frequency, is analyzed and it is concluded that they are all consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2.90 +- .04K (+- 1 SIGMA). This firmly supports the Big Bang cosmological model of the universe. (auth)

Woody, D.P.

1975-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 10, 381160 Braunschweig (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Sources of cosmic microwave radiation and dark matter identified: millimeter black holes (m.b.h.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The universe is filled with blackbody millimeter radiation (CMBR), temperature 2.7{\\deg} Kelvin[1]. Big-bang cosmology explains this by the initial thermalization of photons scattered by electrons[2]. This explanation requires ad hoc previous existence of photons and thermal electrons. On the other hand most of the mass of the universe is unknown dark matter3. It explains anomalous dynamical properties, like that of stars in galaxies[4,5,6] . Alternatively the anomalies have been explained by adjusting and modifying well known laws ("Modified Newtonian dynamics"[7]). Here we show that millimeter black holes (m.b.h.) explain both: the background radiation, by its partial "evaporation", and the dark matter. Black holes emit blackbody radiation (Hawking[8] evaporation), and this is what is observed in the CMBR. Millimeter size black holes emit blackbody radiation at a temperature of 2.7{\\deg} Kelvin, and this is the resulting CMBR . Partial evaporation of ~10^30 m.b.h. gives the observed background field of photons being emitted and absorbed at the same rate by the m.b.h. The number of photons is constant, as observed. Their temperature decreases with time because the mass of the m.b.h. (and therefore its size) increases with time (the mass-boom effect[9]). The total mass of the m.b.h. is the dark matter. Hence dark matter is not so "dark" after all. Two important cosmological items are here identified by only one source: millimeter black holes.

Antonio Alfonso-Faus; Marius Josep Fullana i Alfonso

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

Spectral Evolution of the Continuum and Disc Line in Dipping in GRO J1655-40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery is reported of emission features in the X-ray spectrum of GRO J1655-40 obtained using Rossi-XTE on 1997, Feb 26. The features have been fitted firstly by two Gaussian lines, which in four spectra have average energies of 5.85+/-0.08 keV and 7.32+/-0.13 keV, strongly suggestive that these are the red- and blueshifted wings of an iron disc line from material with velocity ~0.33 c. The blue wing is apparently less bright than expected for a disc line subject to Doppler boosting, however, known absorption in the spectrum of GRO J1655-40 at energies between ~7 and 8 keV can reduce the apparent brightness of the blue wing. The spectra have also been fitted well using the full relativistic disc line model of Laor, plus an absorption line. This gives a restframe energy between 6.4 and 6.8 keV indicating that the line is from highly ionized iron K_alpha. The Laor model also shows that the line originates at radii extending from ~10 Schwarzschild radii (r_S) outwards. The line is direct evidence for the black hole nature of the compact object. The continuum is well described by dominant disc blackbody emission plus Comptonized emission. During dipping, spectral evolution is well modelled by allowing progressive covering of the disc blackbody and simple absorption of the Comptonized emission showing that the thermal emission is more extended. Acceptable fits are only obtained by including the disc line in the covering term, indicating that it originates in the same inner disc region as the thermal continuum. Dip ingress times and durations are used to provide the radius of the disc blackbody emitter as 170-370 r_S, and the radius of the absorber.

M. Balucinska-Church

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Feasibility Study of Using High-Temperature Raman Spectroscopy for On-Line Monitoring and Product Control of the Glass Vitrification Process  

SciTech Connect

A pulse-gating Raman spectroscopy setup was developed in this project. The setup was capable of performing in-situ high-temperature Raman measurements for glasses at temperatures as high as 1412 C. In the literature, high-temperature Raman measurements have only been performed on thin films of glass to minimize black-body radiation effects. The pulse-gating Raman setup allows making high-temperature measurements for bulk melts while effectively minimizing black-body radiation effects. A good correlation was found between certain Raman characteristic parameters and glass melt temperature for sodium silicate glasses measured in this project. Comparisons were made between the high-temperature Raman data from this study and literature data. The results suggest that an optimization of the pulse-gating Raman setup is necessary to further improve data quality (i.e., to obtain data with a higher signal-to-noise ratio). An W confocal Raman microspectrometer with continuous wave laser excitation using a 325 nm excitation line was evaluated selectively using a transparent silicate glass ad a deep-colored high-level waste glass in a bulk quantity. The data were successfully collected at temperatures as high as approximately 1500 C. The results demonstrated that the UV excitation line can be used for high-temperature Raman measurements of molten glasses without black-body radiation interference from the melt for both transparent and deep-color glasses. Further studies are needed to select the best laser system that can be used to develop high-temperature Raman glass databases.

Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Piepel, G.F.; Li, H.; Elliott, M.L.; Su, Y.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

XMM-Newton observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud: X-ray outburst of the 6.85 s pulsar XTE J0103-728  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bright X-ray transient was seen during an XMM-Newton observation in the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in October 2006. The EPIC data allow us to accurately locate the source and to investigate its temporal and spectral behaviour. X-ray spectra covering 0.2-10 keV and pulse profiles in different energy bands were extracted from the EPIC data. The detection of 6.85 s pulsations in the EPIC-PN data unambiguously identifies the transient with XTE J0103-728, discovered as 6.85 s pulsar by RXTE. The X-ray light curve during the XMM-Newton observation shows flaring activity of the source with intensity changes by a factor of two within 10 minutes. Modelling of pulse-phase averaged spectra with a simple absorbed power-law indicates systematic residuals which can be accounted for by a second emission component. For models implying blackbody emission, thermal plasma emission or emission from the accretion disk (disk-blackbody), the latter yields physically sensible parameters. The photon index of the power-law of ~0.4 indicates a relatively hard spectrum. The 0.2-10 keV luminosity was 2x10^{37} with a contribution of ~3% from the disk-blackbody component. A likely origin for the excess emission is reprocessing of hard X-rays from the neutron star by optically thick material near the inner edge of an accretion disk. From a timing analysis we determine the pulse period to 6.85401(1) s indicating an average spin-down of ~0.0017 s per year since the discovery of XTE J0103-728 in May 2003. The X-ray properties and the identification with a Be star confirm XTE J0103-728 as Be/X-ray binary transient in the SMC.

F. Haberl; W. Pietsch

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Universe Adventure - Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index Pages Index Pages Help Teachers Credits Developers Feedback Links Glossary: A-E | F-J | K-O | P-T | U-Z Fundamentals of Cosmology Cosmology The Beginnings of Cosmology The Ancient Universe The Modern Universe -> Cosmic Conundrums: Cosmology Light The Electromagnetic Spectrum -> Movie: Travelling Photons -> Down the Rabbit Hole: At the Speed of Light -> Classroom Cosmology: The Speed of Light Apparent Magnitude -> Sidequest: Absolute and Apparent Magnitude -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Luminosity versus Observed Brightness -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Standard Candles -> Cosmic Conundrums: Light Matter Blackbody Radiation -> Movie: Temperature Matter and Atoms -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Electric Charge -> Down the Rabbit Hole: Quantum Mechanics -> Cosmic Conundrums: Matter

408

The Stefan-Boltzmann law in a small box and the pressure deficit in hot SU(N) lattice gauge theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The blackbody radiation in a box L^3 with periodic boundary conditions in thermal equilibrium at a temperature T is affected by finite-size effects. These bring about modifications of the thermodynamic functions which can be expressed in a closed form in terms of the dimensionless parameter LT. For instance, when LT~4 - corresponding to the value where the most reliable SU(N) gauge lattice simulations have been performed above the deconfining temperature T_c - the deviation of the free energy density from its thermodynamic limit is about 5%. This may account for almost half of the pressure deficit observed in lattice simulations at T~ 4 T_c.

F. Gliozzi

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

Driving Rydberg-Rydberg transitions from a co-planar microwave waveguide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coherent interaction between ensembles of helium Rydberg atoms and microwave fields in the vicinity of a solid-state co-planar waveguide is reported. Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, at frequencies between 25 GHz and 38 GHz, have been studied for states with principal quantum numbers in the range 30 - 35 by selective electric-field ionization. An experimental apparatus cooled to 100 K was used to reduce effects of blackbody radiation. Inhomogeneous, stray electric fields emanating from the surface of the waveguide have been characterized in frequency- and time-resolved measurements and coherence times of the Rydberg atoms on the order of 250 ns have been determined.

Hogan, S D; Merkt, F; Thiele, T; Filipp, S; Wallraff, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss a few observational consequences of such a picture of dark energy.

Vishnu Jejjala; Michael Kavic; Djordje Minic

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Dynamic polarizabilities for the low lying states of Ca+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamic polarizabilities of the 4s, 3d and 4p states of Ca$^+$, are calculated using a relativistic structure model. The wavelengths at which the Stark shifts between different pairs of transitions are zero are computed. Experimental determination of the magic wavelengths can be used to estimate the ratio of the $f_{3d_{J}\\to 4p_{J'}}$ and $f_{4s_{1/2} \\to 4p_{J'}}$ oscillator strengths. This could prove valuable in developing better atomic structure models and in particular lead to improved values of the polarizabilities needed in the evaluation of the blackbody radiation shift of the Ca$^+$ ion.

Tang, Yong-Bo; Shi, Ting-Yun; Mitroy, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

THERMAL RADIATION FROM AN ACCRETION DISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasiperiodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a twotemperature plasma of an accretion disk. It was shown earlier that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character and that this statement is probably valid for thermal blackbody radiation in others spectral ranges (Prigara 2003). According to this conception thermal radiation from non-uniform gas is produced by an ensemble of individual emitters.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stochastic Methods in Atomic Systems and QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that treating the blackbody radiation field as a heat bath enables one to utilize powerful techniques from the realm of stochastic physics (such as the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the related radiation damping) in order to treat problems that could not be treated rigorously by conventional methods. We illustrate our remarks by discussing specifically the effect of temperature on atomic spectral lines, and the solution to the problem of runaway solutions in the equation of motion of a radiating electron. We also present brief discussions relating to anomalous diffusion and wave packet spreading in a radiation field and the influence of quantum effects on the laws of thermodynamics.

R. F. O'Connell

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

On An Improvement Of The Planck Radiation Energy Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright c?2006 The probability distribution function for thermodynamics and econophysics is obtained by solving an equilibrium equation. This approach is different from the common one of optimizing the entropy of the system or obtaining the state of maximum probability, which usually obtains as a result the Boltzmann distribution. The Gamma distribution is proposed as a better equation to describe the blackbody radiation in substitution of Planck’s radiation equation. Also, a new form of entropy is proposed, that maintains the correct relation with the Clausius ’ formula.

Diego Saá

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT  

SciTech Connect

To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fusion and Advanced Electromagnetic Technology Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

RESONANT H{sup -} PHOTODETACHMENT: ENHANCED PHOTODESTRUCTION AND CONSEQUENCES FOR RADIATIVE FEEDBACK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen negative ion plays a crucial role in the formation of hydrogen molecules in the early universe. Cooling through excitation of H{sub 2} drives the formation of the first cosmological objects. The H{sub 2} molecules are produced primarily by a reaction sequence initiated by H{sup -}. We explore the influence of enhanced photodestruction rates that arise due to absorption by resonance states of H{sup -} lying near 11 eV. We examine the feedback effects that occur in radiation fields characteristic of Population III stars, blackbody sources, power-law spectra, and the hydrogen Lyman modulated sawtooth spectra of the high-redshift intergalactic medium.

Miyake, S.; Stancil, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Sadeghpour, H. R.; Dalgarno, A. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McLaughlin, B. M. [David Bates Building, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, 7 College Park, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Forrey, R. C. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, Berks Campus, Reading, PA 19610 (United States)], E-mail: shinyam@physast.uga.edu, E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu, E-mail: hrs@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: adalgarno@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: b.mclaughlin@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: rcf6@psu.edu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The CMBR and the Seeds of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is the radiation left over from the hot Big Bang. Its blackbody spectrum and small anisotropy provide clues about the origin and early evolution of the Universe. In particular, the spectrum of the CMBR rules out many non-gravitational models of structure formation, and the anisotropy of the CMBR provides a measure of the gravitational potential at the time of last scattering, about 300,000 years after the Big Bang. The density inhomogeneities needed to produce the gravitational potential perturbations traced by the CMBR have grown to become the galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and superclusters that we see today.

Edward L. Wright

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

to Accepted for Publication by The Astrophysical Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slim disks have been received much attention because of the increasing evidence for the super-critical accreting objects. In this paper, we make an attempt to construct a unified model, in which the viscosity and the dimensionless accretion rate can span rather wide ranges. We replace blackbody radiation under diffusion approximation with a bridged formula, which accounts for both blackbody radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung in opticallythick and-thin cases, respectively. Thus this allows us to investigate the structures of and the emergent spectra from slim disks in a wider parameter space, covering transition regions from optically thick to optically thin. We show that there is a maximum transition radius, roughly Rtr,max/Rg ? 50 when ?M / ?MC ? 15. The emergent spectra from the unified model of the accretion disk have been calculated. A simple model of hot corona above the slim disk is taken into account for the hard X-ray spectrum in this paper based on Wang & Netzer (2003). We have applied the present model to the microquasar GRS 1915+105, narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies RE J1034+396 and Akn 564. Our model can explain well the broadband X-ray spectra of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies, microquasars and possible ultra-luminous compact X-ray sources. The present model can be widely applied to the candidates of super-critical accreting objects. Subject headings: accretion, accretion disks—galaxies: active—X-rays: spectra 1.

Lin-hong Chen; Jian-min Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Slim Disks with Transition Regions and Applications to Microquasars and Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slim disks have been received much attention because of the increasing evidence for the super-critical accreting objects. In this paper, we make an attempt to construct a unified model, in which the viscosity and the dimensionless accretion rate can span rather wide ranges. We replace blackbody radiation under diffusion approximation with a bridged formula, which accounts for both blackbody radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung in optically-thick and -thin cases, respectively. Thus this allows us to investigate the structures of and the emergent spectra from slim disks in a wider parameter space, covering transition regions from optically thick to optically thin. We show that there is a maximum transition radius, roughly $R_{\\rm tr, max}/R_g\\sim 50$ when $\\dot{M}/\\dot{M}_{\\rm C}\\sim 15$. The emergent spectra from the unified model of the accretion disk have been calculated. A simple model of hot corona above the slim disk is taken into account for the hard X-ray spectrum in this paper based on Wang & Netzer (2003). We have applied the present model to the microquasar GRS 1915+105, narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies RE J1034+396 and Akn 564. Our model can explain well the broadband X-ray spectra of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies, microquasars and possible ultra-luminous compact X-ray sources. The present model can be widely applied to the candidates of super-critical accreting objects.

Lin-Hong Chen; Jian-Min Wang

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation  

SciTech Connect

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

Goff, David R. (Star City, WV); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Peculiarly Narrow SED of GRB 090926B with MAXI and Fermi/GBM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) on the International Space Station (ISS) detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB) on 2009, September 26, GRB\\,090926B. This GRB had extremely hard spectra in the X-ray energy range. Joint spectral fitting with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope shows that this burst has peculiarly narrow spectral energy distribution and is represented by Comptonized blackbody model. This spectrum can be interpreted as photospheric emission from the low baryon-load GRB fireball. Calculating the parameter of fireball, we found the size of the base of the flow $r_0 = (4.3 \\pm 0.9) \\times 10^{9} \\, Y^{\\prime \\, -3/2}$ cm and Lorentz factor of the plasma $\\Gamma = (110 \\pm 10) \\, Y^{\\prime \\, 1/4}$, where $Y^{\\prime}$ is a ratio between the total fireball energy and the energy in the blackbody component of the gamma-ray emission. This $r_0$ is factor of a few larger, and the Lorentz factor of 110 is smaller by also factor of a few than other bu...

Serino, Motoko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nakahira, Satoshi; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Isobe, Naoki; Kimura, Masashi; Kitayama, Hiroki; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Matsumura, Takanori; Matsuoka, Masaru; Morii, Mikio; Nakajima, Motoki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Sugimori, Kousuke; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Toizumi, Takahiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamazaki, Kyohei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAPPING OF YOUNG STARS IN THE INNER 180 pc OF NGC 1068: CORRELATION WITH MOLECULAR GAS RING AND STELLAR KINEMATICS  

SciTech Connect

We report the first two-dimensional mapping of the stellar population and non-stellar continua within the inner 180 pc (radius) of NGC 1068 at a spatial resolution of 8 pc, using integral field spectroscopy in the near-infrared. We have applied the technique of spectral synthesis to data obtained with the instrument NIFS and the adaptive optics module ALTAIR at the Gemini North Telescope. Two episodes of recent star formation are found to dominate the stellar population contribution: the first occurred 300 Myr ago, extending over most of the nuclear region; the second occurred just 30 Myr ago, in a ring-like structure at Almost-Equal-To 100 pc from the nucleus, where it is coincident with an expanding ring of H{sub 2} emission. Inside the ring, where a decrease in the stellar velocity dispersion is observed, the stellar population is dominated by the 300 Myr age component. In the inner 35 pc, the oldest age component (age {>=} 2 Gyr) dominates the mass, while the flux is dominated by blackbody components with temperatures in the range 700 K {<=} T {<=} 800 K which we attribute to the dusty torus. We also find some contribution from blackbody and power-law components beyond the nucleus which we attribute to dust emission and scattered light.

Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogerio; Vale, Tiberio Borges [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, IF, CP 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Riffel, Rogemar A.; Diniz, Marlon R. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); McGregor, Peter J., E-mail: thaisa@ufrgs.br [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

GRB110721A: AN EXTREME PEAK ENERGY AND SIGNATURES OF THE PHOTOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for {approx}24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 {+-} 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 {+-} 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from {approx}80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after {approx}2 s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

Axelsson, M. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'M. Merlin' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cecchi, C.; D'Ammando, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Chaves, R. C. G. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Conrad, J. [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Cutini, S., E-mail: magnusa@astro.su.se, E-mail: moretti@particle.kth.se, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: josefin.larsson@astro.su.se, E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Forecasts for CMB ?- and i-type spectral distortion constraints on the primordial power spectrum on scales 8 < k < 10^4 Mpc^-1 with the future Pixie-like experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silk damping at redshifts 1.5 x 10^4 < z < 2 x 10^6 erases CMB anisotropies on scales corresponding to the comoving wavenumbers 8 < k < 10^4 Mpc^-1 (10^5 < \\ell < 10^8). This dissipated energy is gained by the CMB monopole, creating distortions from a blackbody in the CMB spectrum of the \\mu-type and the i-type. We study, using Fisher matrices, the constraints we can get from measurements of these spectral distortions on the primordial power spectrum from future experiments such as Pixie, and how these constraints change as we change the frequency resolution and the sensitivity of the experiment. We show that the additional information in the shape of the $i$-type distortions, in combination with the \\mu-type distortions, allows us to break the degeneracy between the amplitude and the spectral index of the power spectrum on these scales and leads to much tighter constraints. We quantify the information contained in both the \\mu-type distortions and the i-type distortions taking into account the partial degeneracy with the y-type distortions and the temperature of the blackbody part of the CMB. We also calculate the constraints possible on the primordial power spectrum when the spectral distortion information is combined with the CMB anisotropies measured by the WMAP, SPT, ACT and Planck experiments.

Rishi Khatri; Rashid A. Sunyaev

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

SPECTRAL AND TIMING PROPERTIES OF THE MAGNETAR CXOU J164710.2-455216  

SciTech Connect

We report on spectral and timing properties of the magnetar CXOU J164710.2-455216 in the massive star cluster Westerlund 1. Using 11 archival observations obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton over approximately 1000 days after the source's 2006 outburst, we study the flux and spectral evolution of the source. We show that the hardness of the source, as quantified by hardness ratio, blackbody temperature, or power-law photon index, shows a clear correlation with the 2-10 keV absorption-corrected flux and that the power-law component flux decayed faster than the blackbody component for the first {approx}100 days. We also measure the timing properties of the source by analyzing data spanning approximately 2500 days. The measured period and period derivative are 10.610644(17) s (MJD 53999.06) and <4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1} (90% confidence) which imply that the spin-inferred dipolar magnetic field of the source is less than 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G. This is significantly smaller than was suggested previously. We find evidence for a second flux increase, suggesting a second outburst between MJDs 55068 and 55832. Finally, based on a crustal cooling model, we find that the source's cooling curve can be reproduced if we assume that the energy was deposited in the outer crust and that the temperature profile of the star right after the 2006 outburst was relatively independent of density.

An, Hongjun; Archibald, Robert; Cumming, Andrew [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kaspi, Victoria M.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameterizing the Radiative Properties of Midlatitude Clouds Parameterizing the Radiative Properties of Midlatitude Clouds Sassen, K. (a), Comstock, J.M. (b), and Wang, Z. (a), University of Utah (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A major goal of the ARM program is to obtain the requisite information needed to improve the treatment of the radiative effects of clouds in large-scale models that ultimately must be relied on to predict the impact of human-induced activities on global climate change. The clouds of the middle and upper troposphere are especially difficult to treat because of their variable optical properties, which range from optically thin in the visible, and graybody emitters in the infrared, to dense blackbody emitters. Approaches to obtain this information involve the development of

432

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

433

ARM - Field Campaign - AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP 2004.01.12 - 2006.06.29 Lead Scientist : David Turner Data Availability Data were collected and submitted to the ARM Archive for IOPs. For data sets, see below. Summary There were three, potentially four, phases to this experiment. The length of time required for each phase was the time needed to ensure at least one severe clear period, which occur relatively frequently in January and February on the North Slope. The phases were: 1) Run the two systems side-by-side in their nominal modes to ensure that the calibration is reproducible. 2) Adjust the set-point of the hot blackbody on the second system from 60

434

Thermalization of Starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the fate of starlight in the Steady-State Cosmology. We discover that it is largely unaffected by the presence of ions in intergalactic space as it gets progressively red-shifted from the visible all the way down to the plasma frequency of the intergalactic matter. At that point, after about 450 Gyr - and contrary to previously published claims - the radiation will be thermalized. Under the assumptions adopted by Gold, Bondi, Hoyle, Narlikar, Burbidge and others concerning the creation of matter in the Steady-State Cosmology, and using reasonable estimates for the baryonic mass-density and mass-fraction of 4He, the analysis predicts a universal radiation field matching the CMB, i.e. having a black-body spectrum and temperature of about 2.7 K. The Steady-state Cosmology predicts that this radiation field will appear to originate from the intergalactic plasma.

M. Ibison

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heating of solar chromosphere by electromagnetic wave absorption in a plasma slab model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heating of chromospheric inter-network regions by means of the absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves that originate from the photospheric blackbody radiation is studied in the framework of a plasma slab model. The absorption is provided by the electron-neutral collisions. Given the uncertain nature of the collision cross-section due to the plasma micro-turbulence, it is shown that for plausible physical parameters, the heating flux produced by the absorption of EM waves in the chromosphere is between $20 - 45$ % of the chromospheric radiative loss flux requirement. It is also established that there is an optimal value for the collision cross-section, $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ m$^{2}$, that produces the maximal heating flux of 1990 W m$^{-2}$.

Tsiklauri, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration  

SciTech Connect

We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study govCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study 2010.12.06 - 2010.12.13 Lead Scientist : Kyle Leesman For data sets, see below. Description During December 2010, a prototype LWIR cloud camera system was deployed at the Southern Great Plains Guest Instrument Facility (SGP-GIF). The system consisted of a microbolometer camera (~7-15 ìm) to capture sky imagery, a blackbody calibration source, and a GPS receiver used to estimate atmospheric column water vapor and constrain atmospheric compensation. The camera system collected calibrated sky radiance images co-incident with the SGP Central Facility with the goal of quantitatively assessing its ability

438

takara-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Broken Cloud Field Approximations in the Longwave E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Abstract Because clouds play an important role in the earth's radiation energy budget, improving the cloud models in general circulation models (GCMs) is a necessary step for climate studies. In partially cloudy skies, the geometric and optical properties of individual cloud elements need to be considered. In general, GCMs ignore the geometry of ice clouds and water clouds. They also ignore the optical properties of water clouds, modeling them as blackbodies. In this work, the accuracy of cloud approximations will be examined in the 8-µm to 12-µm window region. Calculations for water clouds and ice clouds of two geometries in two different atmospheric conditions show

439

CX-009561: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61: Categorical Exclusion Determination 61: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Using Solid Particles as Heat Transfer Fluid for Use in Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Plants CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/04/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. DOE is proposing to provide federal funding to the University of Colorado, in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to conduct computer based modeling that advances concentrated solar power (CSP) thermal systems. DOE funding would be used for computer based modeling to develop, verify and validate a first-principle modeling tool for use in the optimization, scale-up, and design of a near-blackbody receiver. CX-009561.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005581: Categorical Exclusion Determination

440

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chasing Dark Matter Axions to the Quantum Limit Chasing Dark Matter Axions to the Quantum Limit Steve Asztalos LLNL ABSTRACT The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) at LLNL searches for dark-matter axions through their Primakoff conversion to microwave photons, resonantly enhanced in a high-Q cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. ADMX remains the world's quietest spectral receiver in the GHz regime, capable of detecting a single RF photon per minute above cavity blackbody and amplifier noise. ADMX had previously covered a frequency range of 460 to 812 MHz (1.9 - 3.4 micro-eV); over that octave of mass range axions were excluded as the Milky Way halo dark matter for well-motivated models of the coupling of the axion to two photons. An upgrade of ADMX has since been completed, which replaced the previous HFET amplifiers with SQUID

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441

Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg Feature Archive George Smoot George F. Smoot won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg have joined the growing list of Nobel Laureates associated with DOE. Smoot won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in blackbody and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Smoot is an astrophysicist at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and a UC Berkeley physics professor. He shared the award with John C. Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Roger D. Kornberg of Stanford University won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription. A significant portion of Kornberg's research leading to this prize was performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

442

ARM - Datastreams - aerich2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaerich2 Datastreamsaerich2 Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025144 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERICH2 Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): channel 2 data Active Dates 1994.01.10 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable AERI instrument unit serial number unitless AERIunitNumber ( time ) Observation Altitude m Altitude ( time ) Temperature of the AERI blackbody support structure K BBsupportStructureTemp ( time )

443

Berkeley Lab Nobel Laureates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George F. Smoot III George F. Smoot III 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics • October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) • Bibliography of Dr. Smoot's Works • October 3, 2006 Press Conference (Video) The October 3, 2006 press conference at Berkeley Lab introducing its newest Nobel Prize winner, George Smoot, to a throng of visiting media is available for viewing online. George F. Smoot III, Nobel Prize recipient, 2006 • Bibliography of Dr. Smoot's Works LBL-6468: Detection of anisotropy in the cosmic blackbody radiation LBL-6493: Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation LBL-7553: Abundances and spectra for cosmic ray nuclei from Li to Fe for 2-GeV/n to 150-GeV/n LBL-8266: Search for linear polarization of the cosmic background radiation LBL-9282: Southern hemisphere measurements of the anisotropy in the cosmic

444

A Higher Order GUP with Minimal Length Uncertainty and Maximal Momentum II: Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent paper, we presented a nonperturbative higher order generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) that is consistent with various proposals of quantum gravity such as string theory, loop quantum gravity, doubly special relativity, and predicts both a minimal length uncertainty and a maximal observable momentum. In this Letter, we find exact maximally localized states and present a formally self-adjoint and naturally perturbative representation of this modified algebra. Then we extend this GUP to D dimensions that will be shown it is noncommutative and find invariant density of states. We show that the presence of the maximal momentum results in upper bounds on the energy spectrum of the free particle and the particle in box. Moreover, this form of GUP modifies blackbody radiation spectrum at high frequencies and predicts a finite cosmological constant. Although it does not solve the cosmological constant problem, it gives a better estimation with respect to the presence of just the minimal length.

Pouria Pedram

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped HD$^+$ ions in the Lamb-Dicke regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the feasibility of nearly-degenerate two-photon rovibrational spectroscopy in ensembles of trapped, sympathetically cooled hydrogen molecular ions using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation (REMPD) scheme. Taking advantage of quasi-coincidences in the rovibrational spectrum, the excitation lasers are tuned close to an intermediate level to resonantly enhance two-photon absorption. Realistic simulations of the REMPD signal are obtained using a four-level model that takes into account saturation effects, ion trajectories, laser frequency noise and redistribution of population by blackbody radiation. We show that the use of counterpropagating laser beams enables optical excitation in an effective Lamb-Dicke regime. Sub-Doppler lines having widths in the 100 Hz range can be observed with good signal-to-noise ratio for an optimal choice of laser detunings. Our results indicate the feasibility of molecular spectroscopy at the $10^{-14}$ accuracy level for improved tests of molecular QED, a new det...

Tran, Vu Quang; Douillet, Albane; Koelemeij, Jeroen C J; Hilico, Laurent

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Stimulated Emission of Radiation in a Single Mode for both Resonance and Non-resonance for Various Initial Photon Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reexamines the results of Cummings in which the quantum mechanical two-level-system (TLS) interacts with the electromagnetic field with various initial distributions and extends that work for both resonant and non-resonant to large values of time. The results presented here include the initial pure coherent state, the field whose initial density matrix is the Gaussian superposition of coherent states (blackbody radiation) and density matrices of the field represented by various combinations of mixed coherent and thermal states with and without squeezing This paper provides, in addition to the matrix elements to the various states, both the algebraic and graphical representation for the first order correlation function G^(1)= for resonance and non-resonance. It is found that in all case, the application of non-resonance leads to oscillations in the first order correlation which was thought only to apply for the coherent state even for the case of the pure thermal state.

M. T. Tavis; F. W. Cummings

2012-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

Thermal Correction to the Molar Polarizability of a Boltzmann Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metrology in atomic physics has been crucial for a number of advanced determinations of fundamental constants. In addition to very precise frequency measurements, the molar polarizability of an atomic gas has recently also been measured very accurately. Part of the motivation for the measurements is due to ongoing efforts to redefine the International System of Units (SI) for which an accurate value of the Boltzmann constant is needed. Here, we calculate the dominant shift of the molar polarizability in an atomic gas due to thermal effects. It is given by the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction, which emerges when the probing electric field is Lorenz transformed into the rest frame of the atoms that undergo thermal motion. While this effect is small when compared to currently available experimental accuracy, the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction is much larger than the thermal shift of the polarizability induced by blackbody radiation.

Jentschura, U D; Mohr, P J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL H  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In 1904, the year before Einstein’s seminal papers on special relativity, Austrian physicist Fritz Hasenöhrl examined the properties of blackbody radiation in a moving cavity. He calculated the work necessary to keep the cavity moving at a constant velocity as it fills with radiation and concluded that the radiation energy has associated with it an apparent mass such that E = 3 8 mc2. In a subsequent paper, also in 1904, Hasenöhrl achieved the same result by computing the force necessary to accelerate a cavity already filled with radiation. In early 1905, he corrected the latter result to E = 3 4 mc2. This result, i.e., m = 4 3 E/c2, has led many to conclude that Hasenöhrl fell victim to the same “mistake ” made by others who derived this relation between the mass and electrostatic energy of the electron. Some have attributed

Fritz Hasenöhrl; E Mc; Stephen Boughn A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thermal Correction to the Molar Polarizability of a Boltzmann Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metrology in atomic physics has been crucial for a number of advanced determinations of fundamental constants. In addition to very precise frequency measurements, the molar polarizability of an atomic gas has recently also been measured very accurately. Part of the motivation for the measurements is due to ongoing efforts to redefine the International System of Units (SI) for which an accurate value of the Boltzmann constant is needed. Here, we calculate the dominant shift of the molar polarizability in an atomic gas due to thermal effects. It is given by the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction, which emerges when the probing electric field is Lorenz transformed into the rest frame of the atoms that undergo thermal motion. While this effect is small when compared to currently available experimental accuracy, the relativistic correction to the dipole interaction is much larger than the thermal shift of the polarizability induced by blackbody radiation.

U. D. Jentschura; M. Puchalski; P. J. Mohr

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Infrared emission spectra or uranium and thorium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The region between 1 and 5.5 ..mu..m has been observed with a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. See-through hollow cathode lamps with calcium fluoride windows were operated at high current. Special precautions were required to minimize interference by blackbody radiation from the hot cathode. Observed lines were measured to an absolute accuracy of about 0.001 cm/sup -1/ and about 5% relative intensity accuracy. The argon carrier gas lines were readily distinguished by their much wider Doppler-broadened linewidths. Many lines were assigned to neutral or singly-ionized thorium on the basis of predicted transition wavenumbers calculated from accurate level lists. However, many lines remain to be assigned. This new spectral data connects to, and extends similar, spectral information given in our uranium and thorium atlases which cover the ultraviolet and visible regions.

Palmer, B.A.; Phillips, M.V.; Engleman, R. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings (SCSs). SCS loops emit strong bursts of electromagnetic waves, which might affect various cosmological and astrophysical observations. We take into account the effect on the CMB anisotropy, CMB blackbody spectrum, BBN, observational implications on radio wave burst and X-ray or gamma-ray events, and stochastic gravitational wave background measured by pulsar timing experiments. We then derive constraints on the parameters of SCS from current observations and estimate prospects for detecting SCS signatures in on-going observations. As a result, we find that these constraints exclude broad parameter regions, and also that on-going radio wave observations can probe large parameter space.

Koichi Miyamoto; Kazunori Nakayama

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nonlinear analysis of a simple model of temperature evolution in a satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse a simple model of the heat transfer to and from a small satellite orbiting round a solar system planet. Our approach considers the satellite isothermal, with external heat input from the environment and from internal energy dissipation, and output to the environment as black-body radiation. The resulting nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the satellite's temperature is analysed by qualitative, perturbation and numerical methods, which show that the temperature approaches a periodic pattern (attracting limit cycle). This approach can occur in two ways, according to the values of the parameters: (i) a slow decay towards the limit cycle over a time longer than the period, or (ii) a fast decay towards the limit cycle over a time shorter than the period. In the first case, an exactly soluble average equation is valid. We discuss the consequences of our model for the thermal stability of satellites.

Jose Gaite; Angel Sanz-Andrés; Isabel Pérez-Grande

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

The effect of photo-electric absorption on space-charge limited flow in pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo-electric absorption of blackbody photons is an important process which limits the acceleration of ions under the space-charge limited flow boundary condition at the polar caps of pulsars with positive corotational charge density. Photo-electric cross-sections in high magnetic fields have been found for the geometrical conditions of the problem, and ion transition rates calculated as functions of the surface temperatures on both the polar cap and the general neutron-star surface. The general surface temperature is the more important and, unless it is below 10^5 K, limits the acceleration electric field in the open magnetosphere to values far below those needed either for electron-positron pair creation or slot-gap X-ray sources. But such ion beams are unstable against growth of a quasi-longitudinal Langmuir mode at rates that can be observationally significant as a source of coherent radio emission.

Jones, P B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Two-color mid-infrared thermometer with a hollow glass optical fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a low-temperature optical-fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. A single 700-{mu}m-bore hollow glass optical fiber collects and transmits radiation that is then modulated and split into two paths by a reflective optical chopper. Two different thermoelectrically cooled mid-infrared HgCdZnTe photoconductors monitor the chopped signals that are recovered with lock-in amplification. With the two previously obtained blackbody calibration equations, a computer algorithm calculates the true temperature and emissivity of a target in real time, taking into account reflection of the ambient radiation field from the target surface. The small numerical aperture of the hollow glass fiber and the fast response of the detectors, together with the two-color principle, permit high spatial and temporal resolution while allowing the user to dynamically alter the fiber-to-target distance. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.M.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-399, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Soltz, B.A. [Conversion Energy Enterprises, 81 Pinebrook Road, Spring Valley, New York 10977 (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

High planarity x-ray drive for ultrafast shockless-compression experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spatially planar ({delta}time/time{approx}0.2%) longitudinal stress drive extending over millimeter scale lengths is used to shocklessly compress an aluminum sample to a peak stress of 210 GPa over nanosecond time scales. Direct laser irradiation onto the inner wall of an Au halfraum creates an x ray distribution with a near-uniform blackbody temperature of up to 137 eV. The x rays ablate material from a low-Z foil in a region of planarity closely matched to the diameter of the halfraum. The resultant ablatively driven shock is converted into a ramp-stress-wave in a secondary aluminum target through unloading across an intermediate vacuum gap. Higher peak stresses and shorter associated risetimes result from increasing input laser energy. Ramp-compression experiments can provide single shot equation-of-state data close to the isentrope, information on the kinetics of phase transformations, and material strength at high pressures.

Smith, Raymond F.; Pollaine, Stephen M.; Moon, Stephen J.; Lorenz, K. Thomas; Celliers, Peter M.; Eggert, Jon H.; Park, Hye-Sook; Collins, Gilbert W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Debris Disk around the Central Star of the Helix Nebula?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess emission from a point-like source coincident with the central star of the Helix Nebula is detected with Spitzer at 8, 24, and 70 um. At 24 um, the central source is superposed on an extended diffuse emission region. While the [OIV] 25.89 um line contributes to the diffuse emission, a 10-35 um spectrum of the central source shows a strong thermal continuum. The excess emission from the star most likely originates from a dust disk with blackbody temperatures of 90--130 K. Assuming a simple optically thin debris disk model, the dust is distributed in a ring between ~35 and ~150 AU from the central star, possibly arising from collisions of Kuiper-Belt-like Objects or the break-up of comets from an Oort-like cloud that have survived from the post-main-sequence evolution of the central star.

Kate Y. L. Su; Y. -H. Chu; G. H. Rieke; P. J. Huggins; R. Gruendl; R. Napiwotzki; T. Rauch; W. B. Latter; K. Volk

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Unifying disc-jet behaviour in X-ray binaries: an optical/IR approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron emission from jets produced by X-ray binaries can be detected at optical and infrared (IR) frequencies. I show that optical/IR colour-magnitude diagrams of the outbursts of nine X-ray binaries successfully separate thermal disc emission from non-thermal jet emission, in both black hole and neutron star sources. A heated single-temperature blackbody is able to reproduce the observed relations between colour and magnitude, except when excursions are made to a redder colour than expected, which is due to jet emission. The general picture that is developed is then incorporated into the unified picture of disc-jet behaviour in black hole X-ray binaries. At a given position of a source in the X-ray hardness-intensity diagram, the radio, IR and optical properties can be inferred. Similarly, it is possible to predict the X-ray and radio luminosities and spectral states from optical/IR monitoring.

David M. Russell; Dipankar Maitra; Rob P. Fender; Fraser Lewis

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermodynamics and Hawking radiation of five-dimensional rotating charged Goedel black holes  

SciTech Connect

We study the thermodynamics of Goedel-type rotating charged black holes in five-dimensional minimal supergravity. These black holes exhibit some peculiar features such as the presence of closed timelike curves and the absence of a globally spatial-like Cauchy surface. We explicitly compute their energies, angular momenta, and electric charges that are consistent with the first law of thermodynamics. Besides, we extend the covariant anomaly cancellation method, as well as the approach of the effective action, to derive their Hawking fluxes. Both the methods of the anomaly cancellation and the effective action give the same Hawking fluxes as those from the Planck distribution for blackbody radiation in the background of the charged rotating Goedel black holes. Our results further support that Hawking radiation is a quantum phenomenon arising at the event horizon.

Wu Shuangqing [College of Physical Science and Technology, HuaZhong Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Peng Junjin [College of Physical Science and Technology, HuaZhong Normal University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); College of Science, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Infrared emission from interplanetary dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard models of the interplanetary dust emission fail to account satisfactorily for IR observations. A new model of the dust, based on very simple assumptions on the grain structure (spherical and homogeneous) and chemical composition (astronomical silicates, graphite, blackbodies) is developed. Updated values of the refractive indexes have been included in the analysis. The predictions of the model (absolute values of the fluxes, spectral shape, elongation dependence of the emission) have then been compared with all the available IR observations performed by the ARGO (balloon-borne experiment by University of Rome), AFGL and Zodiacal Infrared Project (ZIP) (rocket experiments by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Bedford, Mass.), and IRAS satellite. Good agreement is found when homogeneous data sets from single experiments (e.g., ZIP and ARGO) are considered separately. 19 references.

Temi, P.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.; Salama, A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Germanium Back Contact Type Thermophotovoltaic Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Ge back contact type photovoltaic cell has been proposed to reduce resistance loss for high current densities in thermophotovoltaic systems. The back contact structure requires less surface recombination velocities than conventional structures with front grid contacts. A SiO2/SiNx double anti-reflection coating including a high refractive index SiNx layer was studied. The SiNx layer has an enough passivation effect to obtain high efficiency. The quantum efficiency of the Ge cell was around 0.8 in the 800-1600 nm wavelength range. The conversion efficiency for infrared lights was estimated at 18% for a blackbody surface and 25% for a selective emitter by using the quantum efficiency and a simulation analysis.

Nagashima, Tomonori; Okumura, Kenichi [Future Project Div., Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm Fluorescence Above 1400 C.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorescence from three samples of YAG:Tm, and three samples of YAG:Dy, with different activator concentrations, was measured for a wide temperature range, extending from room temperature to about 1700 C. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured for emissions at 460 nm from the YAG:Tm and at 453, 480, and 575 nm from YAG:Dy. The measurement system is described, including techniques for accommodating the high background blackbody radiation encountered at these very high temperatures. Data compilations are shown, including the fluorescence lifetimes over the temperature range of the measurement. This study has extended the high-temperature range of phosphor thermometry by approximately 200 C and shown the feasibility of using phosphor materials for very high temperature noncontact thermometry, opening up further applications for engines, materials, high-temperature processing, and related areas.

Cates, M.R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Comptonization efficiencies of the variability classes of GRS 1915+105  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Galactic microquasar GRS 1915+105 exhibits at least seventeen types of variability classes. Intra and inter class transitions are reported to be observed within seconds to hours. Since the observation was not continuous, these classes appeared to be exhibited in a random order. Our goal is to predict a sequence of these classes. In this paper, we compute the ratio of the photon counts obtained from the power-law component and the blackbody component of each class and call this ratio as the `Comptonizing efficiency' (CE) of that class. We sequence the classes in the ascending order of CE and find that this sequence matches with a few class transitions observed by RXTE satellite and IXAE instruments on board IRS-P3. A change in CE corresponds to a change in the optical depth of the Compton cloud. Our result implies that the optical depth of the Compton cloud gradually rises as the variability class becomes harder.

Pal, Partha Sarathi; Nandi, Anuj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Spectral resolution for a five-element, filtered, x-ray detector array using the method of Backus and Gilbert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining the spectrum from a five-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors. This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({approx}100-2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with a classical unfold method, based on a histogram representation of the source spectrum. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV blackbody) and the unfolded spectrum. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics. (c)

Fehl, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Chandler, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Stygar, W. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert  

SciTech Connect

The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS  

SciTech Connect

The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

MBE growth of GaInAsSb p/n junction diodes for thermophotovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress in the development of quaternary III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices based on MBE grown Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y}. TPV is of great interest for a variety of applications. The objective of this work is to develop a TPV cell which is tunable to the emission spectrum of a heated blackbody, at temperatures in the range of 1200--1473 K. One aspect of this tuning is to match the band gap, E{sub gap}, of the photovoltaic device to the peak output of the heat source., An advantage of the quarternary III-V semiconductor systems is that devices can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on a suitable binary substrate, such as GaSb or InAs, and the band gap and lattice constant can be adjusted more or less independently, to match requirements. Quarternary cells, with band-gaps in the 0.5 to 0.72 eV range, have been fabricated and tested. For 0.54 eV devices the authors obtained V{sub oc} = 0.3 V and I{sub sc} = 1.5 amperes/cm{sup 2} under infrared illumination of a 1200 K blackbody. Under high illumination levels the V{sub oc} and I{sub sc} ranged from 0.5 V at 3 amperes/cm{sup 2} for 0.72 eV devices to 0.31 V at 1.2 amperes/cm{sup 2} for 0.5 eV devices, indicating good photovoltaic device characteristics over the range of bandgaps. The diode ideality factor for 0.54 eV devices ranged from 2.45 at low illumination indicating tunneling-dominated dark current, to 1.7 at high illumination intensity indicating recombination-generation dominated dark currents.

Uppal, P.N. [Lockheed Martin Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Charache, G.; Baldasaro, P.; Campbell, B. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States); Loughin, S. [Lockheed Martin Astro Space, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Svensson, S. [ARL, Adelphi, MD (United States); Gill, D. [National Semiconductor, Annapolis Junction, MD (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Three XMM-Newton observations of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937: long term variations in spectrum and pulsed fraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of a recent (July 2004) XMM-Newton Target of Opportunity observation of the Anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937, together with a detailed re-analysis of previous observations carried out in 2000 and 2003. In July 2004 the source had a 2-10 keV flux of 6.2$\\times10^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and a pulsed fraction P$_F$=0.68. The comparison of the three data sets shows the presence of an anti-correlation between flux and pulsed fraction, implying that previous estimates of the source energetics based on the assumption of a large and constant pulsed fraction might be significantly underestimated. The source spectrum is well described by a power law plus blackbody model (kT~0.63 keV, photon index $\\Gamma$~2.7-3.5) or, alternatively, by the sum of two blackbodies of which the hotter is Comptonized by relativistic electrons. In this case the temperatures are kT${_1}$~0.2-0.3 keV and kT${_2}$~0.4-0.5 keV and the emitting area of the cooler component is consistent with the whole neutron star surface. The long term luminosity variation of a factor >~2 is accompanied by relatively small variations in the spectral shape. Phase resolved spectroscopy indicates a harder spectrum in correspondence of the pulse maximum. No spectral features have been detected with 4$\\sigma$ limits on the equivalent width in the range ~10-220 eV, depending on line energy and width.

A. Tiengo; S. Mereghetti; R. Turolla; S. Zane; N. Rea; L. Stella; G. L. Israel

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

CMB Observational Techniques and Recent Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) consists of photons that were last created about 2 months after the Big Bang, and last scattered about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The spectrum of the CMB is very close to a blackbody at 2.725 K and upper limits on any deviations of the CMB from a blackbody place strong constraints on energy transfer between the CMB and matter at all redshifts less than 2,000,000. The CMB is very nearly isotropic, but a dipole anisotropy of +/-3.346(17) mK shows that the Solar System barycenter is moving at 368+/-2 km/sec relative to the observable Universe. The dipole corresponds to a spherical harmonic index l=1. The higher indices l geq 2 indicate intrinsic inhomogeneities in the Universe that existed at the time of last scattering. While the photons have traveled freely only since the time of last scattering, the inhomogeneities traced by the CMB photons have been in place since the inflationary epoch only 10^{-35} sec after the Big Bang. These intrinsic anisotropies are much smaller in amplitude than the dipole anisotropy, with Delta T leq 100 microK. Electron scattering of the anisotropic radiation field produces an anisotropic linear polarization in the CMB with amplitudes less than 5 microK. Detailed studies of the angular power spectrum of the temperature and linear polarization anisotropies have yielded precise values for many cosmological parameters. This paper will discuss the techniques necessary to measure signals that are 100 million times smaller than the emission from the instrument and briefly describe results from experiments up to WMAP.

E. L. Wright

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008  

SciTech Connect

The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); O`Brian, T.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NML), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Radiometric Physics Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of X-ray data from ROSAT, ASCA, XMM and RXTE for the asynchronous polar V1432 Aql along with Stokes polarimetry data from SAAO, is presented. Power spectra from long-baseline ROSAT data show a spin period of 12150s along with several system related frequency components. However, the second harmonic of the spin period dominates power spectrum in the XMM data. For the optical circular polarization, the dominant period corresponds to half the spin period. The ROSAT data can be explained as due to accretion onto two hot spots that are not anti-podal. The variations seen in the optical polarization and the ASCA and XMM data suggest the presence of at least three accretion foot prints on the white dwarf surface. Two spectral models, a multi-temperature plasma and a photo-ionized plasma model, are used for spectral study. The RXTE PCA data are used to constrain the white dwarf mass to 1.2$\\pm$0.1 M_odot using the multi-temperature plasma model. A strong soft X-ray excess (<0.8 keV) in the XMM MOS data is well modeled by a blackbody component having a temperature of 80-90 eV. The plasma emission lines seen at 6.7 and 7.0 keV are well fitted using the multi-temperature plasma model, however an additional Gaussian is needed for the 6.4 keV line. The multi-temperature plasma model requires a homogeneous absorber fully covering the source and a partial absorber covering 65% of the source. The photo-ionized plasma model, with a range of Fe column densities, gives a slightly better overall fit and fits all emission lines. The presence of a strong blackbody component, a spin period of 12150s, modulation of the 6.4 keV line flux with spin period, and a very hard X-ray component suggest that V1432 Aql is a polar with X-ray spectral properties similar to that of a soft intermediate polar.

V. R. Rana; K. P. Singh; P. E. Barrett; D. A. H. Buckley

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

PSR J1840-1419: A VERY COOL NEUTRON STAR  

SciTech Connect

We present upper limits on the X-ray emission for three neutron stars. For PSR J1840-1419, with a characteristic age of 16.5 Myr, we calculate a blackbody temperature upper limit (at 99% confidence) of kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 24{sup +17} {sub -10} eV, making this one of the coolest neutron stars known. PSRs J1814-1744 and J1847-0130 are both high magnetic field pulsars, with inferred surface dipole magnetic field strengths of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 9.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, respectively. Our temperature upper limits for these stars are kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 123{sup +20} {sub -33} eV and kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 115{sup +16} {sub -33} eV, showing that these high magnetic field pulsars are not significantly hotter than those with lower magnetic fields. Finally, we put these limits into context by summarizing all temperature measurements and limits for rotation-driven neutron stars.

Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Purver, M. B.; Weltevrede, P. [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition in laser-cooled fermionic isotopes of neutral mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed for the first time direct laser spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition at 265.6 nm in fermionic isotopes of neutral mercury laser-cooled in a magneto-optical trap. Spectroscopy is performed by measuring the depletion of the magneto-optical trap induced by the excitation of the long-lived 3P0 state by a probe at 265.6 nm. Measurements resolve the Doppler-free recoil doublet allowing for a determination of the transition frequency to an uncer- tainty well below the Doppler-broadened linewidth. We have performed absolute measurement of the frequency with respect to an ultra-stable reference monitored by LNE-SYRTE fountain pri- mary frequency standards using a femtosecond laser frequency comb. The measured frequency is 1128575290808 +/- 5.6 kHz in 199Hg and 1128569561140 +/- 5.3 kHz in 201Hg, more than 4 orders of magnitude better than previous indirect determinations. Owing to a low sensitivity to blackbody radiation, mercury is a promising candidate for reaching the ultimate performance of optical lattice clocks.

M. Petersen; R. Chicireanu; S. T. Dawkins; D. V. Magalhães; C. Mandache; Y. Lecoq; A. Clairon; S. Bize

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

477

Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect

This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

Ian Ferguson

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. A collage of Concentrating Solar Power photographs. The first photo shows a dish-engine solar system. The second is of a SAIC Stirling dish collector. And the third photo shows a SkyTrough solar concentrator located on a mesa top. NREL collaborates with industry to further the research and development (R&D) of concentrating solar power (CSP) plant and solar thermal technologies. NREL's projects in concentrating solar power focus on components R&D and systems analysis related to power tower and parabolic trough technologies: Collectors Receivers Power block Thermal energy storage Analysis. In addition, NREL has received funding through the following competitively awarded projects: 10-megawatt supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) turbine test Near-blackbody, enclosed-particle receiver integrated with a

479

ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements  

SciTech Connect

The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

Sebastien Biraud

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

480

An incomplete model of RRATs and of nulls mode-changes and subpulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for pulsars with polar-cap magnetic flux density B antiparallel with rotational spin is described. It recognizes the significance of two elementary processes, proton production in electromagnetic showers and photoelectric transitions in ions accelerated through the blackbody radiation field, which must be present at the polar cap in the antiparallel case, but not for pulsars of the opposite spin direction. The two populations are likely to be indistinguishable observationally until curvature radiation pair creation ceases to be possible. The model generates, and provides a physically realistic framework for, the polar-cap potential fluctuations and their time-scales that can produce mode-changes and nulls. The RRATs are then no more than an extreme case of the more commonly observed nulls. The model is also able to support the basic features of subpulse drift and to some extent the null-memory phenomenon that is associated with it. Unfortunately, it appears that the most important neutron-star paramet...

Jones, P B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Investigation of ac-Stark shifts in excited states of dysprosium relevant to testing fundamental symmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on measurements of the differential polarizability between the nearly degenerate, opposite parity states in atomic dysprosium at 19797.96 cm$^{-1}$. The differential scalar and tensor polarizabilities due to additional states were measured for the $|M| = 7,...,10$ sublevels in $^{164}$Dy and $^{162}$Dy and determined to be $\\bar{\\balpha}_{\\sss BA}^{(0)} = 180\\,(45)_\\text{stat}\\,(8)_\\text{sys}$ $\\text{mHz}/(\\mathrm{V}/\\mathrm{cm})^2$ and $\\bar{\\balpha}_{\\sss BA}^{(2)} = -163\\,(65)_\\text{stat}\\,(5)_\\text{sys}$ $\\text{mHz}/(\\mathrm{V}/\\mathrm{cm})^2$, respectively. The average blackbody radiation induced Stark shift of the Zeeman spectrum was measured around 300 K and found to be $-34(4)$ mHz/K and $+29(4)$ mHz/K for $^{164}$Dy and $^{162}$Dy, respectively. We conclude that ac-Stark related systematics will not limit a search for variation of the fine-structure constant, using dysprosium, down to the level of $|\\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha|=2.6\\times10^{-17}$ yr$^{-1}$, for two measurements of the transition fr...

Weber, C T M; Budker, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Dijet production as a centrality trigger for p-p collisions at CERN LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a trigger on hard dijet production at small rapidities allows to establish a quantitative distinction between central and peripheral collisions in pbar-p and p-p collisions at Tevatron and LHC energies. Such a trigger strongly reduces the effective impact parameters as compared to minimum bias events. This happens because the transverse spatial distribution of hard partons (x >~ 10^{-2}) in the proton is considerably narrower than that of soft partons, whose collisions dominate the total cross section. In the central collisions selected by the trigger, most of the partons with x >~ 10^{-2} interact with a gluon field whose strength rapidly increases with energy. At LHC (and to some extent already at Tevatron) energies the strength of this interaction approaches the unitarity ('black-body') limit. This leads to specific modifications of the final state, such as a higher probability of multijet events at small rapidities, a strong increase of the transverse momenta and depletion of the longitudinal momenta at large rapidities, and the appearance of long-range correlations in rapidity between the forward/backward fragmentation regions. The same pattern is expected for events with production of new heavy particles (Higgs, SUSY). Studies of these phenomena would be feasible with the CMS-TOTEM detector setup, and would have considerable impact on the exploration of the physics of strong gluon fields in QCD, as well as the search for new particles at LHC.

L. Frankfurt; M. Strikman; C. Weiss

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

483

Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

484

Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors  

SciTech Connect

This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

Nabeel Riza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Entropy driven multi-photon frequency up-conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency up-conversion of few low-energy photons into a single high-energy photon, greatly contributes to imaging, light sources, detection and other fields of research. However, it offers negligible efficiency when up-converting many photons. This is because coherent process are fundamentally limited due to momentum conservation requirements, while in incoherent up-conversion the finite intermediate states lifetime requires huge intensities. Thermodynamically, conventional incoherent up-conversion is driven by the internal energy of the incoming photons. However, a system can also drive work through change in its collective properties such as entropy. Here we experimentally demonstrate entropy driven ten-fold up-conversion from 10.6{\\mu} to 1{\\mu}m at internal efficiency above 27% and total efficiency above 10%. In addition, the emitted radiance at 1{\\mu}m exceeds the maximal possible Black-Body radiance of our device, indicating emitter's effective-temperature that is considerably above the bulk-temperatur...

Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Free-Free Emission at Low Radio Frequencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss free-free radio emission from ionized gas in the intergalactic medium. Because the emissivity is proportional to the square of the electron density, the mean background is strongly sensitive to the spatial clumping of free electrons. Using several existing models for the clumping of ionized gas, we find that the expected free-free distortion to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) blackbody spectrum is at a level detectable with upcoming experiments such as the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE). However, the dominant contribution to the distortion comes from clumpy gas at z free-free background and the extent to which these anisotropies confuse the search for fluctuations in 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen during and prior to reionization. This background is smooth in frequency space and hence can be removed through frequency differencing, but only so long as the 21 cm signal and the free-free emission are uncorrelated. We show that, because the free-free background is generated primarily at low redshifts, the cross-correlation between the two fields is smaller than a few percent. Thus, multifrequency cleaning should be an effective way to eliminate the free-free confusion.

Asantha Cooray; Steven Furlanetto

2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermalisation of a two-dimensional photonic gas in a 'white-wall' photon box  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bose-Einstein condensation, the macroscopic accumulation of bosonic particles in the energetic ground state below a critical temperature, has been demonstrated in several physical systems. The perhaps best known example of a bosonic gas, blackbody radiation, however exhibits no Bose-Einstein condensation at low temperatures. Instead of collectively occupying the lowest energy mode, the photons disappear in the cavity walls when the temperature is lowered - corresponding to a vanishing chemical potential. Here we report on evidence for a thermalised two-dimensional photon gas with freely adjustable chemical potential. Our experiment is based on a dye filled optical microresonator, acting as a 'white-wall' box for photons. Thermalisation is achieved in a photon number-conserving way by photon scattering off the dye-molecules, and the cavity mirrors both provide an effective photon mass and a confining potential - key prerequisites for the Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. As a striking example for the unusual system properties, we demonstrate a yet unobserved light concentration effect into the centre of the confining potential, an effect with prospects for increasing the efficiency of diffuse solar light collection.

Jan Klaers; Frank Vewinger; Martin Weitz

2010-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

488

RXTE Observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of all known persistent stellar-mass black hole candidates, only LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 consistently show spectra that are dominated by a soft, thermal component. We present results from long (170ksec) Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of LMC X-1 and LMC X-3 made in 1996 December. The spectra can be described by a multicolor disk blackbody plus an additional high-energy power-law. Even though the spectra are very soft (Gamma is about 2.5), RXTE detected a significant signal from LMC X-3 up to energies of 50keV, the hardest energy at which the object was ever detected. Focusing on LMC X-3, we present results from the first year of an ongoing monitoring campaign with RXTE which started in 1997 January. We show that the appearance of the object changes considerably over its ~200d long cycle. This variability can either be explained by periodic changes in the mass transfer rate or by a precessing accretion disk analogous to Her X-1.

J. Wilms; M. A. Nowak; J. B. Dove; K. Pottschmidt; W. A. Heindl; M. C. Begelman; R. Staubert

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

489

Prompt thermal emission in gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GRB spectra appear non-thermal, but recent observations of a few bursts with Fermi GBM have confirmed previous indications from BATSE of the presence of an underlying thermal component. Photospheric emission is indeed expected when the relativistic outflow emerging from the central engine becomes transparent to its own radiation, with a quasi-blackbody spectrum in absence of additional sub-photospheric dissipation. However, its intensity strongly depends on the acceleration mechanism - thermal or magnetic - of the flow. We aim to compute the thermal and non-thermal emissions produced by an outflow with a variable Lorentz factor, where the power injected at the origin is partially thermal (fraction epsilon_th) and partially magnetic (fraction 1-epsilon_th). The thermal emission is produced at the photosphere, and the non-thermal emission in the optically thin regime. Apart from the value of epsilon_th, we want to test how the other model parameters affect the observed ratio of the thermal to non-thermal emissi...

Hascoët, R; Mochkovitch, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

491

Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

492

High planarity x-ray drive for ultra-fast shockless-compression experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spatially-planar ({Delta}time/time {approx} 0.2%) longitudinal stress drive extending over millimeter scale lengths is used to shocklessly compress an aluminum sample to a peak stress of 210 GPa over nanosecond timescales. Direct laser irradiation onto the inner wall of an Au halfraum creates an x ray distribution with a near-uniform blackbody temperature of up to 137eV. The x rays ablate material from a low-Z foil in a region of planarity closely matched to the diameter of the halfraum. The resultant ablatively-driven shock is converted into a ramp-stress-wave in a secondary aluminum target through unloading across an intermediate vacuum-gap. Higher peak ramp stresses and shorter associated rise-times result from increasing input laser energy. Ramp-compression experiments can provide single shot equation-of-state data close to the isentrope, information on the kinetics of phase transformations and material strength at high pressures.

Smith, R; Pollaine, S; Moon, S; Lorenz, K T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Park, H; Collins, G

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

493

RADIATIVE PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF OXY-FUEL FLAMES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Existing Plants, Emissions and Capture (EPEC) program, oxy-combustion is being investigated as a method to simplify carbon capture and reduce the parasitic energy penalties associated with separating CO2 from a dilute flue gas. Gas-phase radiation heat transfer in boilers becomes significant when shifting from air-firing to oxycombustion, and must be accurately represented in models. Currently, radiative property data are not widely available in the literature for conditions appropriate to this environment. In order to facilitate the development and validation of accurate oxy-combustion models, NETL conducted a series of studies to measure radiation properties of oxy-fuel flames at adiabatic flame temperatures of 1750 - 1950K, and product molar concentrations ranging from 95% CO2 to 100% steam, determined by equilibrium calculations. Transmission coefficients were measured as a function of wavelength using a mid-IR imaging spectrometer and a blackbody radiation source. Additionally, flame temperatures were calculated using data collected within CO2 and H2O absorption bands. Experimental results were compared to two statistical narrowband models and experimental data from literature sources. These comparisons showed good overall agreement, although differences between the models and experimental results were noted, particularly for the R branch of the 2.7 ?m H2O band.

Clinton R. Bedick; Stephen K. Beer; Kent H. Casleton; Benjamin T. Chorpening; David W. Shaw; M. Joseph Yip

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Keck II spectroscopy of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations in Hercules X-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present Keck II spectroscopy of an optical mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the lightcurve of the X-ray pulsar binary Her X-1. In the power spectrum it appears as `peaked noise', with a coherency $\\sim$2, a central frequency of 35 mHz and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5%. However, the dynamic power spectrum shows it to be an intermittent QPO, with a lifetime of $\\sim$hundred seconds, as expected if the lifetime of the orbiting material is equal to the thermal timescale of the inner disk. We have decomposed the spectral time series into constant and variable components and used blackbody fits to the resulting spectra to characterise the spectrum of the QPO variability and constrain possible production sites. We find that the spectrum of the QPO is best-fit by a small hot region, possibly the inner regions of the accretion disk, where the ballistic accretion stream impacts onto the disk. The lack of any excess power around the QPO frequency in the X-ray power spectrum, created using simultaneous lightcurves from XTE, implies that the QPO is not simply reprocessed X-ray variability.

K O'Brien; Keith Horne; B Boroson; M Still; R Gomer; JB Oke; P Boyd; S Vrtilek

2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

495

Testing Loop Quantum Gravity and Electromagnetic Dark Energy in Superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1989 Cabrera and Tate reported an anomalous excess of mass of the Cooper pairs in rotating thin Niobium rings. So far, this experimental result never received a proper theoretical explanation in the context of superconductor's physics. In the present work we argue that what Cabrera and Tate interpreted as an anomalous excess of mass can also be associated with a deviation from the classical gravitomagnetic Larmor theorem due to the presence of dark energy in the superconductor, as well as with the discrete structure of the area of the superconducting Niobium ring as predicted by Loop Quantum Gravity. From Cabrera and Tate measurements we deduce that the quantization of spacetime in superconducting circular rings occurs at the Planck-Einstein scale $l_{PE} = (\\hbar G/c^3 \\Lambda)^{1/4}\\sim 3.77\\times 10 ^{-5} m$, instead of the Planck scale $l_{P} =(\\hbar G / c^3)^{1/2}=1.61 \\times 10 ^{-35} m$, with an Immirzi parameter which depends on the specific critical temperature of the superconducting material and on the area of the ring. The stephan-Boltzmann law for quantized areas delimited by superconducting rings is predicted, and an experimental concept based on the electromagnetic black-body radiation emitted by this surfaces, is proposed to test loop quantum gravity and electromagnetic dark energy in superconductors.

Clovis Jacinto de Matos

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

497

Spectrographic temperature measurement of a high power breakdown arc in a high pressure gas switch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure for obtaining an approximate temperature value of conducting plasma generated during self-break closure of a RIMFIRE gas switch is described. The plasma is in the form of a breakdown arc which conducts approximately 12 kJ of energy in 1 {mu}s. A spectrographic analysis of the trigger-section of the 6-MV RIMFIRE laser triggered gas switch used in Sandia National Laboratory's ''Z-Machine'' has been made. It is assumed that the breakdown plasma has sufficiently approached local thermodynamic equilibrium allowing a black-body temperature model to be applied. This model allows the plasma temperature and radiated power to be approximated. The gas dielectric used in these tests was pressurized SF{sub 6}. The electrode gap is set at 4.59 cm for each test. The electrode material is stainless steel and insulator material is poly(methyl methacrylate). A spectrum range from 220 to 550 nanometers has been observed and calibrated using two spectral irradiance lamps and three spectrograph gratings. The approximate plasma temperature is reported.

Yeckel, Christopher; Curry, Randy [Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering, Center for Physical and Power Electronics, University of Missouri--Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Thermal management in large Bi2212 mesas used for terahertz sources.  

SciTech Connect

We present a thermal analysis of a patterned mesa on a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi2212) single crystal that is based on tunneling characteristics of the c-axis stack of {approx}800 intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa. Despite the large mesa volume (e.g., 40 times 300 times 1.2 mum{sup 3}) and power dissipation that result in self-heating and backbending of the current-voltage curve (I-V), there are accessible bias conditions for which significant polarized THz-wave emission can be observed. We estimate the mesa temperature by equating the quasiparticle resistance, R{sub qp}(T), to the ratio V/I over the entire I-V including the backbending region. These temperatures are used to predict the unpolarized black-body radiation reaching our bolometer and there is substantial agreement over the entire I-V. As such, backbending results from the particular R{sub qp}(T) for Bi2212, as first discussed by Fenton, rather than a significant suppression of the energy gap. This model also correctly predicts the observed disappearance of backbending above {approx}60 K.

Kurter, C.; Gray, K. E.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Ozyuzer, L.; Koshelev, A. E.; Li, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.; Kwok, W.-K.; Tachiki, M.; Welp, U.; Materials Science Division; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Tsukuba; Univ. Tokyo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

SELF-SHIELDING OF SOFT X-RAYS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS  

SciTech Connect

There are insufficient super-soft ({approx}0.1 keV) X-ray sources in either spiral or elliptical galaxies to account for the rate of explosion of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in either the single-degenerate or the double-degenerate scenarios. We quantify the amount of circumstellar matter that would be required to suppress the soft X-ray flux by yielding a column density in excess of 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We summarize evidence that appropriate quantities of matter are extant in SNe Ia and in recurrent novae that may be supernova precursors. The obscuring matter is likely to have a large, but not complete, covering factor and to be substantially non-spherically symmetric. Assuming that much of the absorbed X-ray flux is re-radiated as blackbody radiation in the UV, we estimate that {approx}<100 sources might be detectable in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-sky Survey.

Wheeler, J. Craig [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Pooley, D., E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

500

Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation o...

Arzoumanian, Z; Landecker, T L; Kothes, R; Camilo, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z