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1

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Absolute cavity pyrgeometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

Reda, Ibrahim

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Uncertainty Estimates for SIRS, SKYRAD, & GNDRAD Data and Reprocessing the Pyrgeometer Data (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility work together in providing data from strategically located in situ measurement observatories around the world. Both work together in improving and developing new technologies that assist in acquiring high quality radiometric data. In this presentation we summarize the uncertainty estimates of the ARM data collected at the ARM Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS), Sky Radiometers on Stand for Downwelling Radiation (SKYRAD), and Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation (GNDRAD), which ultimately improve the existing radiometric data. Three studies are also included to show the difference between calibrating pyrgeometers (e.g., Eppley PIR) using the manufacturer blackbody versus the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG), a pyrgeometer aging study, and the sampling rate effect of correcting historical data.

Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.; Habte, A.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrf instrumentation status Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that measure solar and terrestrial... in April 2002. 4. INSTRUMENT AND SITE MAINTENANCE ACRF field technicians, under the guidance of site opera... all ACRF sites; its...

7

ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSLAEMSL341AACEii ABSTRACT6 ACRF

8

Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program Using NREL Method (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program, Science Team Meeting, 15-19 March 2010, Bethesda, Maryland. The presentation: Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research program using NREL Method - was presented by Ibrahim Reda and Tom Stoffel on March 15, 2010 at the 2010 ASR Science Team Meeting. March 15-19, 2010, Bethesda, Maryland.

Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September – October 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

JW Voyles

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

Lamb, Peter J.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Blackbody radiation in ?-Minkowski spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have computed the black body radiation spectra in $\\kappa-$Minkowski space-time, using the quantum mechanical picture of massless scalar particles as well as effective quantum field theory picture. The black body radiation depends on how the field theory (and thus how the $\\kappa-$Poincar\\'e algebra) handles the ordering effect of the noncommutative space-time. In addition, there exists a natural momentum cut-off of the order $\\kappa$, beyond which a new real mode takes its shape from a complex mode and the old real mode flows out to be a new complex mode. However, the new high momentum real mode should not be physical since its contributions to the black-body radiation spoils the commutative limit.

Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Numerical Models of Blackbody-Dominated GRBs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blackbody-dominated (BBD) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are events characterized by the absence of a typical afterglow, long durations and the presence of a significant thermal component following the prompt gamma-ray emission. GRB 101225A (the `Christmas burst') is a prototype of this class. A plausible progenitor system for it, and for the BBD-GRBs, is the merger of a neutron star (NS) and a helium core of an evolved, massive star. Using relativistic hydrodynamic simulations we model the propagation of an ultrarelativistic jet through the enviroment created by such a merger and we compute the whole radiative signature, both thermal and non-thermal, of the jet dynamical evolution. We find that the thermal emission originates from the interaction between the jet and the hydrogen envelope ejected during the NS/He merger.

Cuesta-Martínez, Carlos F; Mimica, Petar; Thöne, Christina C; de Ugarte-Postigo, Antonio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

ORNL, ACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri Palanisamy, Karen Gibson, W. Christopher Lenhardt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms ControlChris Samoray Communications 865.241.0709ACRF Archive:

18

Radiation of the blackbody in the external field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The blackbody is considered in the external general field. The additional coefficients of stimulated emission and absorption are introduced into the Einstein mechanism. Then, the generalized Planck formula is derived. The Einstein and Debye formula for the specific heat is possible to generalize. The application of the theory to the sonoluminescence, the relic radiation and solar spectrum is discussed.

Miroslav Pardy

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

An electronic radiation of blackbody: Cosmic electron background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe owns the electronic radiation of blackbody at temperature 2.725 K, which we call the cosmic electron background. We calculate its radiation spectrum. The energy distribution of number density of electrons in the cosmic electron background becomes zero as energy goes to both zero and infinity. It has one maximum peak near the energy level of 10**(-23) J.

Jian-Miin Liu

2008-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tackling the blackbody shift in a strontium optical lattice clock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major obstacle for optical clocks is the frequency shift due to black body radiation. We discuss how one can tackle this problem in an optical lattice clock; in our case 87-Sr: firstly, by a measurement of the dc Stark shift of the clock transition and, secondly, by interrogating the atoms in a cryogenic environment. Both approaches rely on transporting ultracold atoms over several cm within a probe cycle. We evaluate this approach of mechanically moving the optical lattice and conclude that it is feasible to transport the atoms over 50 mm within 300 ms. With this transport a dc Stark shift measurement will allow to reduce the contribution of the blackbody radiation to the fractional uncertainty below 2 Ã? 10^â??17 at room temperature by improving the shift coefficient known only from atomic structure calculations up to now. We propose a cryogenic environment at 77 K that will reduce this contribution to few parts in 10^â??18.

Middelmann, Thomas; Falke, Stephan; Winfred, Joseph S R Vellore; Riehle, Fritz; Sterr, Uwe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tackling the blackbody shift in a strontium optical lattice clock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major obstacle for optical clocks is the frequency shift due to black body radiation. We discuss how one can tackle this problem in an optical lattice clock; in our case 87-Sr: firstly, by a measurement of the dc Stark shift of the clock transition and, secondly, by interrogating the atoms in a cryogenic environment. Both approaches rely on transporting ultracold atoms over several cm within a probe cycle. We evaluate this approach of mechanically moving the optical lattice and conclude that it is feasible to transport the atoms over 50 mm within 300 ms. With this transport a dc Stark shift measurement will allow to reduce the contribution of the blackbody radiation to the fractional uncertainty below 2 * 10^-17 at room temperature by improving the shift coefficient known only from atomic structure calculations up to now. We propose a cryogenic environment at 77 K that will reduce this contribution to few parts in 10^-18.

Thomas Middelmann; Christian Lisdat; Stephan Falke; Joseph S. R. Vellore Winfred; Fritz Riehle; Uwe Sterr

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aqueous blackbody calibration source for millimeter-wave/terahertz metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a calibrated broadband emitter for the millimeter-wave through terahertz frequency regime, called the aqueous blackbody calibration source. Due to its extremely high absorption, liquid water is chosen as the emitter on the basis of reciprocity. The water is constrained to a specific shape (an optical trap geometry) in an expanded polystyrene (EPS) container and maintained at a selected, uniform temperature. Uncertainty in the selected radiometric temperature due to the undesirable reflectance present at a water interface is minimized by the trap geometry, ensuring that radiation incident on the entrance aperture encounters a pair of s and a pair of p reflections at 45 deg. . For water reflectance Rw of 40% at 45 deg. in W-band, this implies a theoretical effective aperture emissivity of (1-R{sup 2}wsR{sup 2}wp)>98.8%. From W-band to 450 GHz, the maximum radiometric temperature uncertainty is {+-}0.40 K, independent of water temperature. Uncertainty from 450 GHz to 1 THz is increased due to EPS scattering and absorption, resulting in a maximum uncertainty of -3 K at 1 THz.

Dietlein, Charles; Popovic, Zoya; Grossman, Erich N

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates millimeter wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several climatological regimes. The MMCRs, are the primary observing tool for quantifying the properties of nearly all radiatively important clouds over the ACRF sites. The first MMCR was installed at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site nine years ago and its original design can be traced to the early 90s. Since then, several MMCRs have been deployed at the ACRF sites, while no significant hardware upgrades have been performed. Recently, a two-stage upgrade (first C-40 Digital Signal Processors [DSP]-based, and later the PC-Integrated Radar AcQuisition System [PIRAQ-III] digital receiver) of the MMCR signal-processing units was completed. Our future MMCR related goals are: 1) to have a cloud radar system that continues to have high reliability and uptime and 2) to suggest potential improvements that will address increased sensitivity needs, superior sampling and low cost maintenance of the MMCRs. The Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) technology, the frequency (35-GHz), the radio frequency (RF) layout, antenna, the calibration and radar control procedure and the environmental enclosure of the MMCR remain assets for our ability to detect the profile of hydrometeors at all heights in the troposphere at the ACRF sites.

P Kollias; MA Miller; KB Widener; RT Marchand; TP Ackerman

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1 accuracy. © 2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 350.5610, 290.6815, 280.6780, 280.5475. Trivalent, and optical amplifiers in fiber optics. [1,2]. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest

Cao, Wenwu

25

Entropy and complexity properties of the d-dimensional blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space dimensionality is a crucial variable in the analysis of the structure and dynamics of natural systems and phenomena. The dimensionality effects of the blackbody radiation has been the subject of considerable research activity in recent years. These studies are still somewhat fragmentary, pos- ing formidable qualitative and quantitative problems for various scientific and technological areas. In this work we carry out an information-theoretical analysis of the spectral energy density of a d-dimensional blackbody at temperature T by means of various entropy-like quantities (disequilibrium, Shannon entropy, Fisher information) as well as by three (dimensionless) complexity measures (Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC). All these frequency-functional quantities are calculated and discussed in terms of temperature and dimensionality. It is shown that all three measures of complexity have an universal character in the sense that they depend neither on temperature nor on the Planck and Boltzmann constants, b...

Toranzo, I V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Entropy and complexity properties of the d-dimensional blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space dimensionality is a crucial variable in the analysis of the structure and dynamics of natural systems and phenomena. The dimensionality effects of the blackbody radiation has been the subject of considerable research activity in recent years. These studies are still somewhat fragmentary, pos- ing formidable qualitative and quantitative problems for various scientific and technological areas. In this work we carry out an information-theoretical analysis of the spectral energy density of a d-dimensional blackbody at temperature T by means of various entropy-like quantities (disequilibrium, Shannon entropy, Fisher information) as well as by three (dimensionless) complexity measures (Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC). All these frequency-functional quantities are calculated and discussed in terms of temperature and dimensionality. It is shown that all three measures of complexity have an universal character in the sense that they depend neither on temperature nor on the Planck and Boltzmann constants, but only on the the space dimensionality d. Moreover, they decrease when d is increasing; in particular, the values 2.28415, 1.90979 and 1.17685 are found for the Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC measures of complexity of the 3-dimensional blackbody radiation, respectively. In addition, beyond the frequency at which the spectral density is maximum (which follows the well-known Wien displacement law), three further characteristic frequencies are defined in terms of the previous entropy quantities; they are shown to obey Wien-like laws. The potential usefulness of these distinctive features of the blackbody spectrum is physically discussed.

I. V. Toranzo; J. S. Dehesa

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Blackbody material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light emitting article comprises a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light emitting composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Trivelpiece, Alvin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Blackbody Radiation Laws in the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the footsteps of our previous work \\cite{RamatonBoschi} we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ spacetime, the background of the AdS/CFT correspondence foremost realization. Our results take into account the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ full dimensionality in the electromagnetic field $A^{\\mu}$ wave equation, which yields the higher-dimensional blackbody characteristic features suggested in literature. In particular, the total radiated power and the spectral radiancy match the original Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws in the low-energy regime up to available experimental data.

Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi Filho

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

ACRF-Newsletter.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07) (See4AJ01)59AJ76)74AJ01)BROWNE,8 -For centuries,

30

Radiometric characterization of a high temperature blackbody in the visible and near infrared  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt the radiance temperature in the range from 962 °C to 3000 °C is disseminated by applying a high temperature blackbody (HTBB) with a directly heated pyrolytic graphite cavity. The thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB was measured in the temperature range from 1000 °C to 3000 °C by applying almost simultaneously absolutely calibrated silicon photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 476 nm, 676 nm, 800 nm, 900 nm and 1000 nm and InGaAs photodiode based filter radiometers with centre wavelengths at 1300 nm, 1550 nm and 1595 nm. The results demonstrate that, expressed in terms of irradiance, within an uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) in a broad wavelength range the thermodynamic radiance temperature of the HTBB is wavelength independent in the investigated temperature interval.

Taubert, R. D.; Hollandt, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

A New Blackbody Radiation Law Based on Fractional Calculus and its Application to NASA COBE Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA COBE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter $(q-1)$, a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter $(\\alpha-1)$, and our new formula including a parameter $(p-1)$, as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential $\\mu$. It can be said that one role of the fractional parameter $(p-1)$ is almost the same as that of chemical potential $(\\mu)$ as well as that of the parameter $(q-1)$ in the non-extensive approach.

Biyajima, Minoru; Suzuki, Naomichi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Global warming and its implications for conservation. 2. How does it work? Part one: greenhouse gasses and blackbody  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasses and blackbody radiation. A quick review of: · Fossil fuels · Carbon cycles · Anthropogenic effects of fossil fuel oxidation on carbon cycles Fossil Fuels The primary driver of anthropogenic climate change fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) to produce energy. Almost all energy on earth ultimately comes from

Creel, Scott

33

ARM - Field Campaign - International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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34

Evaluation of Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100 ton StanatAccepted|the

35

Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (?{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ?{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ?{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ?{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)] [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258 PrintSOLIAMERICA'SnewsFlashAMIE

37

ACRF Newsletter_May_FINAL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07) (See4AJ01)59AJ76)74AJ01)BROWNE,8 -

38

Blackbody Distribution for Wormholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By assuming that only (i) bilocal vertex operators which are diagonal with respect to the basis for local field operators, and (ii) the convergent elements with nonzero positive energy of the density matrix representing the quantum state of multiply-connected wormholes, contribute the path integral that describes the effects of wormholes on ordinary matter fields at low energy, it is obtained that the probability measure for multiply connected wormholes with nondegenerate energy spectrum is given in terms of a Planckian probability distribution for the momenta of a quantum field $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^ {2}$, where the $\\alpha$'s are the Coleman parameters, rather than a classical gaussian distribution law, and that an observable classical universe can exist if, and only if, such multiply connected wormholes are allowed to occur.

P. F. González-Díaz

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_pyrgeometer.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1PlanARM andConstraints inARM

40

One-Loop Dominance in the Imaginary Part of the Polarizability: Application to Blackbody and Non-Contact van der Waals Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenologically important quantum dissipative processes include black-body friction (an atom absorbs counterpropagating blue-shifted photons and spontaneously emits them in all directions, losing kinetic energy) and non-contact van der Waals friction (in the vicinity of a dielectric surface, the mirror charges of the constituent particles inside the surface experience drag, slowing the atom). The theoretical predictions for these processes are modified upon a rigorous quantum electrodynamic (QED) treatment, which shows that the one-loop "correction" yields the dominant contribution to the off-resonant, gauge-invariant, imaginary part of the atom's polarizability at room temperature, for typical atom-surface interactions. The tree-level contribution to the polarizability dominates at high temperature.

U. D. Jentschura; G. Lach; M. De Kieviet; K. Pachucki

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information July 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

44

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information April 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information August 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information May 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Near-Blackbody Enclosed Particle Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

flexibility to different power cycles. Fluidized-Bed Heat Exchanger Design TES Incident solar flux on tubular absorber openings Confidential, NREL Protected Information 1. Use...

48

Near-Blackbody Enclosed Particle Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

49

Study of AC/RF properties of SRF ingot niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to correlate the performance of superconducting radiofrequency cavities made of niobium with the superconducting properties, we present the results of the magnetization and ac susceptibility of the niobium used in the superconducting radiofrequency cavity fabrication. The samples were subjected to buffer chemical polishing (BCP) surface and high temperature heat treatments, typically applied to the cavities fabrications. The analysis of the results show the different surface and bulk ac conductivity for the samples subjected to BCP and heat treatment. Furthermore, the RF surface impedance is measured on the sample using a TE011 microwave cavity for a comparison to the low frequency measurements.

Dhakal, Pashupati; Tsindlekht, Menachem I.; Genkin, Valery M.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

JC Liljegren

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

JC Liljegren

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

JC Liljegren

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November – December 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

JC Liljegren

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

ARM - Field Campaign - AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment):  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30,JuneMayIII ARM Data DiscoveryIVObservations

76

Radiative Closure Studies at the NSA ACRF Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.docW.RadiationFilms.

77

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers

78

The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a $D$-dimensional manifold composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and $D-4$ compact dimensions, $ R^{1,3}$ x $T^{D-4} $. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes $ R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) \\, T^D $, where $a$ is the size of the compact extra dimensions. For $D=10$, predicted from String Theory, and $D=11$, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for $a$ as high as 2 x $10^{-7}$m.

Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

EK101 Engineering Light Blackbody Radiation and Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nm Space: 1.07e-3 m= 1.07 mm (microwave) 4. Make a night-light with your Arduino Kit: Read the Comments in Exercise 6 in the Vilros Ultimate Starter Kit. Download those Arduino Sketches

Bifano, Thomas

80

George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshort version)UnveilsGeorge Crabtree,George

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November-December 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JC Liljegren

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrf millimeter wave Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

millimeter-wave fre- quencies and above. Most parasitic elements can usually be ig- nored Source: Sarabandi, Kamal - Radiation Laboratory & Department of Electrical Engineering and...

84

Use of Long Time-series ACRF Measurements to Improve Data Quality Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM withSecurityUranium(VI)ARM/NSAUse of

85

Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)ScienceScientists InSearchsuperconduct*

86

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6099 ARM2313

87

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.7 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6099 ARM23137

88

Finite Cloud Effects at the ACRF TWP Site Patrick Taylor and Robert G. Ellingson  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office FinalFinancingFingerprintingFinite Cloud

89

Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land Surface Emissivity in the Vicinity ofTorecrystallizationMeeting,

90

Microsoft Word - ACRF4thQuarterFY09 draft_nb__sal.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTbelow). U.S.Western8MarchA100926

91

Microsoft Word - ACRF3rdQuarterFY09_DOE_SC_ARM_P_09_011.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTbelow). U.S.Western8MarchA10092

92

Emission and absorption of photons and the black-body spectra in Lorentz-odd Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a number of issues related to the emission and absorption radiation by non-relativistic electrons within the framework of a Lorentz-breaking electrodynamics in (3+1) dimensions. Our main results concern how Planck-like spectrum law is sensitive to terms that violate Lorentz symmetry. We have realized that Planck law acquires extra terms proportional to the violating parameters: for the CPT-odd model, the leading extra terms appear to be linear or quadratic in these violating parameters according to the background vector is parallel or perpendicular to the photon wave-vector. In the CPT-even case a linear `correction' shows up. Among other possible ways to probe for these violations, by means of the present results, we may quote the direct observation of the extra contributions or an unbalancing in the mean occupation number of photon modes in a given thermal bath.

J. M. Fonseca; A. H. Gomes; W. A. Moura-Melo

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Field comparisons of direct and component measurements of net radiation under clear skies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which prompted this investigation of their cause. The instruments involved were an all-black single-dome Fritschen-type net pyrradiometer, two Eppley model 8-48 pyranometers, and an Eppley model PIR pyrgeometer. Each had recently been calibrated. The accuracy of the component instruments was considered first. Comparisons of about one hour on each of three nights between the pyrgeometer and five empirical formulas showed that the average departure over all formulas from the pyrgeometer average was {minus}1%. Other comparisons between the pyrgeometer and an infrared thermometer viewing the surface yielded similar results. Alternate shading and unshading of the pyrgeometer looking upward during daytime resulted in a formula that was used to correct the downward longwave radiation under clear skies. The correction is dependent on wind speed, in contrast to a recent paper showing negligible dependence, but is in accord with earlier findings. Based on manufacturer`s specifications, the pyranometer calibrations were considered to be within 2% of the World Radiation Reference. Thus a series of experiments was carried out using what were believed to be reasonably accurate component measurements of net radiation and measurements from the net pyrradiometer.

Duchon, C.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wilk, G.E. [National Weather Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

96

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

97

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

98

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

99

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

100

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

102

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

103

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

104

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

105

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

106

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

107

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

108

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

109

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

110

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

116

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

117

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

118

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

119

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

120

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

122

Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

Younkin, K; Long, CN

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

alkane molecular ions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1977-01-01 25 Blackbody thermometry with cold molecular ions and application to ion-based frequency standards Physics Websites Summary: Blackbody thermometry with cold...

124

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

Long, Chuck

126

NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-blackbody enclosed particle receiver can support high-temperature thermal energy storage and high-efficiency power cycles.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ARM Quick-looks Database for North Slope Alaska (NSA) sites  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From these pages one can monitor parts of the data acquisition process and access daily data visualizations from the different instruments. These data visualizations are produced in near real time automatically and are called Quick-Looks (QLs). The quick-looks contains unofficial data of unknown quality. Once data is released one can obtain the full data-set from any instrument available, and along with that, a statement about the data quality from the ARM archive. The database provides Quick-looks for the Barrow ACRF site (NSA C1), the Atqasuk ACRF site (NSA C2), or the SHEBA ice campaign of 1997 and 1998. As of 12-17-08, the database had more than 528,000 quick-looks available as data figures and data plots. No password is required for Quick-look access. (Specialized Interface)

Stamnes, Knut (NSA Site Scientist)

129

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

reda(1)-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULECorrective Actions3Images. .Pyrgeometer

131

Why do some intermediate polars show soft X-ray emission? A survey of XMM-Newton spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We make a systematic analysis of the XMM-Newton X-ray spectra of intermediate polars (IPs) and find that, contrary to the traditional picture, most show a soft blackbody component. We compare the results with those from AM Her stars and deduce that the blackbody emission arises from reprocessing of hard X-rays, rather than from the blobby accretion sometimes seen in AM Hers. Whether an IP shows a blackbody component appears to depend primarily on geometric factors: a blackbody is not seen in those that have accretion footprints that are always obscured by accretion curtains or are only visible when foreshortened on the white-dwarf limb. Thus we argue against previous suggestions that the blackbody emission characterises a separate sub-group of IPs which are more akin to AM Hers, and develop a unified picture of the blackbody emission in these stars.

P. A. Evans; Coel Hellier

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

132

Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

Wang, Zhien

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

rigorous NREL and recipient subcontracting processes. Goal: This project will develop a near-blackbody particle receiver and an integrated fluidized-bed heat exchanger to achieve...

134

Instrumentation selection, installation, verification and calibration at the passive cooling experimental facility for a hot/arid climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Passive Cooling Experimental Facility is to acquire data and perform experiments regarding different passive cooling techniques and strategies. In order to adequately explain the cooling techniques employed, sufficient instrumentation and data logging equipment was installed. Sensors were selected based on their accuracy, cost effectiveness, and ability to calibrate consistently and with ease. The sensors and instrumentation and the basis for their selection, installation, verification and calibration are described. Installation and calibration details are provided for certain selected critical sensors, i.e., heat flux meters, pyrgeometers, etc. The following list summarizes the critical sensors and instruments selected and installed. Heat flux: Hy-Cal Engineering BI-7 thermoelectric sensors; Temperature (wet and dry bulb): Copper-constantine thermocouples, Hewlett Packard reference junction; Pyranometers: Eppley PSP, LICOR photovoltaic pyranometers and Eppley Shadow Band 8 to 48 pyranometer; Infrared Radiometer: Eppley PIR pyrgeometer; Ambient Wind Velocity: Gill Propeller Vane Anemometer by R.M. Young; Air Flow: EII Air Flow Meters; and Infiltration: SF/sub 6/ gas chromatography.

Peck, J.F.; Mignon, G.V.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

ARM TR-008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARM Participation in SuomiNet The ARM SGP10 Atmospheric1 ACRF

136

ARM TR-008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARM Participation in SuomiNet The ARM SGP10 Atmospheric4 ACRF

137

Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substances I chemically as salts. Ocean water contains rimately 3 percent salts, or 40 tons of salts .-foot of water. Waters used for irriga- ~erally contain .1 to 5 tons of salt per acre- water. . -er acrf +ion gen 'pot of ,.. ,enera1 terms, salt... and rock materials through which .he water must seep before becoming available inr irrigation. Mountain streams often contain less than one-tenth ton of salt per acre-foot of .rater. Drainage waters and ground waters in lesert valleys may contain...

Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF

139

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF8

140

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF89

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF892

142

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF

143

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF0

144

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07 ACRF01

145

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072 ACRF

146

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072 ACRF3

147

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725 ACRF

148

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF

149

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0 A

150

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0

151

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC60993 ACRF

152

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC60993 ACRF1

153

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC60993 ACRF12

154

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC60993 ACRF123

155

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC609935 ACRF

156

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-005.1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC609935 ACRF1

157

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC609935 ACRF13

158

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-079 Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC609935 ACRF13

159

ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms ControlChris Samoray Communications 865.241.0709ACRF

160

CLASIC OUTLINE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13) Exhibit2ACRF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microsoft Word - 2009-02 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09.004.2.doc  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,2 ACRF

162

Microsoft Word - 2009-03 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.3.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,2 ACRF3

163

Microsoft Word - 2009-04 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P=09.004.4.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,2 ACRF34

164

Microsoft Word - 2009-05 Instrument Report DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.5.doc  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,2 ACRF345

165

Microsoft Word - 2009-07 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.7.doc  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,27 ACRF

166

Microsoft Word - 2009-08 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.8.doc  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,27 ACRF8

167

Microsoft Word - 2009-09 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.9.doc  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping RichlandScatteringWater308:UFC 2300.00 DepartmentMay 12,27 ACRF89

168

Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - February 2007 formatted_P-07-002.2.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruary 2004TH/P3-18EFCOG ELECTRICAL2 ACRF

169

Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - January 2007 formatted.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruary 2004TH/P3-18EFCOG ELECTRICAL2 ACRF

170

Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall average downwelling longwave (LW) measured at the Niamey supplementary facility (S1) is 6-8 Wm-2 less than that measured by the two instruments located at the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) main (N1) site. Examination of all other data available at both sites does not reveal any overarching differences that suggest this should be the case. However, examination of the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures do suggest that the S1 values are also anomalously low, which in turn would explain the downwelling LW anomaly since the LW is calculated using these temperatures. Our recommendation then is to normalize the S1 data to the average N1 value by applying an adjustment factor to the S1 downwelling pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures (in Kelvin), then recalculating the downwelling LW values. The adjustment factor (0.00305) has been determined as that factor that brings the overall average S1 LWdn to agree with the overall average of the two N1 LWdn data series. We note that there is no reason to expect that the two site averages would actually be exactly equal to one another, and thus our recommendation is viewed as likely moving the S1 data in the right direction and by normalizing to the N1 average will help facilitate more meaningful temporal variability studies at least. It is also strongly recommended that for all future AMF deployments where supplementary sites will also be deployed, that the supplementary instrument systems (complete) be assembled as they will be operated in the field and run for at least a few days beside the corresponding AMF main site instruments, both at the beginning and end of the AMF field campaign. This is absolutely crucial so that all the measurements can be compared pre- and post-experiment to properly relate these measurements and systems, and to detect measurement anomalies such as those discussed in this report.

CN Long; P Gotseff; EG Dutton

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Optical Spectroscopy: Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science,...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

633nm, 785nm, 1064nm, visible argon-ion lines, various NIR diode lines Xe lamp and tungsten blackbody lamp Acton 300i, 500i spectrometers Princeton Instruments backthinned...

172

Laser Diodes www.laser-components.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

blackbody radiation and a large quantity of molecular and intermo- lecular resonances are located example, if we used the technique to take a picture of a sailboat on the ocean, our anamorphic stretch

Jalali. Bahram

173

Defects, thermal phenomena and design in photonic crystal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physics of blackbodies has been an ongoing source of fascination and scientific research for over a hundred years. Kirchhoff's law states that emissivity and absorptivity are equal for an object in thermal equilibrium. ...

Chan, David Lik Chin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

averaged fermi holes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

afterglow observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). Here we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission has a blackbody spectrum, making this the second such burst observed by...

175

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Coupling between Solid 3He on Aerogel and Superfluid 3He in the Low Temperature Limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have cooled liquid 3He contained in a 98% open aerogel sample surrounded by bulk superfluid 3He-B at zero pressure to below 120 {mu}K. The aerogel sample is placed in a quasiparticle blackbody radiator cooled by a Lancaster-style nuclear cooling stage to {approx}200 {mu}K. We monitor the temperature of the 3He inside the blackbody radiator using a vibrating wire resonator. We find that reducing the magnetic field on the aerogel sample causes substantial cooling of all the superfluid inside the blackbody radiator. We believe this is due to the demagnetization of the solid 3He layers on the aerogel strands. This system has potential for achieving extremely low temperatures in the confined fluid.

Bradley, D. I.; Fisher, S. N.; Guenault, A. M.; Haley, R. P.; Pickett, G. R.; Tsepelin, V.; Whitehead, R. C. V. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Skyba, P. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Institute of Experimental Physics, Watsonova 47, 04353 Kosice (Slovakia)

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

Aleksey Ilyin

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ultraviolet radiation in the southern seas in early spring 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Science Foundation research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer carried out a cruise to Antarctica in early spring of 1993. It left Punta Arenas, Chile, close to the tip of South America on 11 August 1993. sailed south for 3 days to the tip of The Antarctic Peninsula, stopping at O`Higgens and Palmer Stations, and from there went southwest and into the Bellingshausen sea. On 10 September, it reached the most southerly position, 71{degrees}S, some distance north of the Thurston Island. From there, it went as far as 110{degrees}W before returning to Punta Arenas. The main purpose of the cruise was to investigate the snow- and sea-ice thickness, properties, and structures in this part of the southern oceans. It also allowed us to carry out continuous radiation measurements. We measured the following fluxes: global radiation (Eppley PSP), infrared incoming radiation (Eppley Pyrgeometer PIR), ultraviolet-A radiation (Eppley UV meter), ultraviolet-B radiation (Yankee Environmental Systems), and pitch and roll of the ship (Lucas Sensing Systems, Inc.). All instruments were sampled twice per second (Campbell Scientific, Model 21 X), and a notebook computer (ASI Patriot) stored 1-minute averages of the radiation data and 1-minute standard deviation of the ship`s pitch and roll. Visual observations of cloud cover were also recorded. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Wendler, G.; Quakenbush, T. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

15.1 Preliminaries: Wave Motion and Light 15.2 Experimental Basis of Energy Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;15.1 Preliminaries: Wave Motion and Light #12;#12;#12;15.2 Experimental Basis of Energy the radical concept of energy quantization to explain two of these results. #12;Blackbody Radiation · Every object emits energy through thermal radiation from its surface. · This energy is carried

Ihee, Hyotcherl

185

DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET David Charbonneau,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on models of the thermal emission of hot Jupiters. Assuming that the planet emits as a blackbody, we is unlikely to provide a significant source of energy interior to the planet. Subject headinggs: binariesDETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET David Charbonneau,1 Lori E. Allen,1 S

186

Casimir energy of a spherical shell in $?-$Minkowski spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Casimir energy of a spherical shell of radius $a$ in $\\kappa$-Minkowski spacetime for a complex field with an asymmetric ordering and obtain the energy up to $O(1/\\kappa^2)$. We show that the vacuum breaks particle and anti-particle symmetry if one requires the spectra to be consistent with the blackbody radiation at the commutative limit.

Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Echo of the Big Bang Anisotropies in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Some Facts 7) CMB highly (impressively) Isotropic: - in each direction on the sky the radiation has Microwave Radiometer Cosmic Microwave Background #12;7/1/2009 6 Spectrum Blackbody Radiation John Mather: - photon energy 4) Energy Density Radiation evolves: Cosmic Radiation 44 )1()( ztarad 3 )(tanrad 1 )(tarad

Weijgaert, Rien van de

188

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiometric Modeling of Cavernous Targets to Assist in the Determination of Absolute Temperature108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT Determining the temperature of an internal surface within cavernous of these internal surfaces. The cavernous target has often been assumed to be a blackbody, but in field experiments

Salvaggio, Carl

189

Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

VR Morris

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

ENGO 431 AYMAN HABIB ENGO 431 Sample Questions: Chapters 1-4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is meant by a "Blackbody"? What are the factors that affect its conversion of absorbed heat into radiant examples of such systems used in remote sensing applications. What type of EM radiation each system (in your examples) uses? 25. What are the main uses of Radio waves in remote sensing? 26. What do

Habib, Ayman

191

This journal is c the Owner Societies 2011 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Cite this: DOI: 10.1039/c1cp21204d  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ , D+ 2 , HT+ , etc.) are the simplest naturally occurring molecules. As such they are amenable to high to the blackbody radiation (BBR) electric field encountered in experimental high-resolution laser spectroscopy­Dicke spectroscopy of narrow vibrational optical lines (B10 Hz natural linewidth) in HD+ will become affected by BBR

192

In the Laboratory 1702 Journal of Chemical Education Vol. 76 No. 12 December 1999 JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's blackbody spectrum that are not already absorbed by naturally occurring gases such as CO2, H2O, and O3 (the on the strength with which a given species absorbs infrared radiation, the spectral location of its absorb- ing gases, and GHGs are qualita- tively identified according to whether they absorb radiation

Elrod, Matthew J.

193

Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John and Rongzhou Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John occur 3,4 . Tra- ditionally incandescent lighting filaments, despite being driven from equilibrium the blackbody spectrum. This suggests the pos- sibility of higher efficiency incandescent lighting, through

John, Sajeev

194

J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification Physics Abstracts 05) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non

Boyer, Edmond

195

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppldment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZZet 1979, page C7-803 THE USEOF GAS DISCHARGESAS LLTRAVIOLETRADIOMETRIC STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated: 1) a hydrogen wall-stabilized arc; 2) a blackbody- 1imi ted 1ine thermal arc plasma; 3) an argon "mini-arc"; 4) an argon "maxi-arc"; 5) a deuterium lamp; 6) a krypton dimer rf discharge lamp undertaken. The use of a hydrogen arc plasma as an absolute primary standard of uv spectral radiance has been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Astronomy 45 problem set 2 Spring 1997 Astronomy 45. Introduction to Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can assume that the Sun is a blackbody of temperature T fi = 5700 K and radius 7 \\Theta 10 10 cm. 3 on the average, you actually get a value drawn from a statistical distribution with a mean of N and a standard g spacecraft is launched from Earth and is to be accelerated radially away from the Sun using

Press, William H.

197

Two-Photon 2s1s Transitions during Recombination of Hydrogen in the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the standard cosmological model, we calculate the correction to the rate of two-photon 2s1s transitions in the hydrogen atom under primordial hydrogen plasma recombination conditions that arises when the induced transitions under equilibrium background radiation with a blackbody spectrum and plasma recombination radiation are taken into account.

E. E. Kholupenko; A. V. Ivanchik

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

RAPID DETAILED BALANCE CALCULATIONS FOR MULTIPLE ENERGY GAP SOLAR CELLS S. P. Bremner, M. Y. Levy, C. B. Honsberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a particular solar cell design providing a framework for assessing novel device designs [5,6] and a guide. This method uses Incomplete Riemann Zeta Integrals as a replacement for the Bose-Einstein integral when as blackbodies with the fluxes given by the so called Bose-Einstein integral. The calculation of these fluxes

Honsberg, Christiana

199

CHARACTERIZING THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERES AND NEAR-INFRARED EXCESSES IN ACCRETING T TAURI SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using NASA Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 {mu}m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the T Tauri stars and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.

McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); D'Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Sargent, B., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve, E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

Long, Charles N.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EUVE Spectroscopy of Polars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An admittedly pedantic but hopefully useful and informative analysis is presented of the EUVE 70--180 Angstrom spectra of nine polars. These spectra are fit with three different models---a blackbody, a pure-H stellar atmosphere, and a solar abundance stellar atmosphere---to reveal the presence of spectral features such as absorption lines and edges, and to investigate the sensitivity of the derived (kT, N_H, solid angle) and inferred (fractional emitting area, bolometric luminosity) parameters to the model assumptions. Among the models tested, the blackbody model best describes the observed spectra, although the untested irradiated solar abundance stellar atmosphere model is likely a better overall description of the EUV/soft X-ray spectra of polars.

Christopher W. Mauche

1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Critical Analysis of Universality and Kirchhoff's Law: A Return to Stewart's Law of Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been advanced, on experimental (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2003, v. 31(6), 1263-1267) and theoretical (P.M. Robitaille, Progr. Phys. 2006, v.2, 22-23) grounds, that blackbody radiation is not universal and remains closely linked to the emission of graphite and soot. In order to strengthen such claims, a conceptual analysis of the proofs for universality is presented. This treatment reveals that Gustav Robert Kirchhoff has not properly considered the combined effects of absorption, reflection, and the directional nature of emission in real materials. In one instance, this leads to an unintended movement away from thermal equilibrium within cavities. Using equilibrium arguments, it is demonstrated that the radiation within perfectly reflecting or arbitrary cavities does not necessarily correspond to that emitted by a blackbody.

Pierre-Marie Robitaille

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Redshifting of cosmological black bodies in BSBM varying-alpha theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the behaviour of black-body radiation in theories of electromagnetism which allow the electron charge and the fine structure constant to vary in space and time. We show that such theories can be expressed as relativistic generalizations of a conventional dielectric. By making the appropriate definition of the vector potential and associated gauge transformations, we can identify the equivalent of the electric and displacement fields, $\\mathbf{E}$ and $\\mathbf{D}$, as well as the magnetic $ \\mathbf{B}$ and $\\mathbf{H}$ fields. We study the impact of such dielectrics on the propagation of light in the so-called BSBM theory and conclude that no changes are created to the standard cosmological evolution of the temperature and energy-density of black-body radiation.

John D. Barrow; Joao Magueijo

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Exact microscopic theory of electromagnetic heat transfer between a dielectric sphere and plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-field electromagnetic heat transfer holds great potential for the advancement of nanotechnology. Whereas far-field electromagnetic heat transfer is constrained by Planck's blackbody limit, the increased density of states in the near-field enhances heat transfer rates by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional limit. Such enhancement opens new possibilities in numerous applications, including thermal-photo-voltaics, nano-patterning, and imaging. The advancement in this area, however, has been hampered by the lack of rigorous theoretical treatment, especially for geometries that are of direct experimental relevance. Here we introduce an efficient computational strategy, and present the first rigorous calculation of electromagnetic heat transfer in a sphere-plate geometry, the only geometry where transfer rate beyond blackbody limit has been quantitatively probed at room temperature. Our approach results in a definitive picture unifying various approximations previously used to treat this problem, ...

Otey, Clayton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Exact microscopic theory of electromagnetic heat transfer between a dielectric sphere and plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-field electromagnetic heat transfer holds great potential for the advancement of nanotechnology. Whereas far-field electromagnetic heat transfer is constrained by Planck's blackbody limit, the increased density of states in the near-field enhances heat transfer rates by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional limit. Such enhancement opens new possibilities in numerous applications, including thermal-photo-voltaics, nano-patterning, and imaging. The advancement in this area, however, has been hampered by the lack of rigorous theoretical treatment, especially for geometries that are of direct experimental relevance. Here we introduce an efficient computational strategy, and present the first rigorous calculation of electromagnetic heat transfer in a sphere-plate geometry, the only geometry where transfer rate beyond blackbody limit has been quantitatively probed at room temperature. Our approach results in a definitive picture unifying various approximations previously used to treat this problem, and provides new physical insights for designing experiments aiming to explore enhanced thermal transfer.

Clayton Otey; Shanhui Fan

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

On the ionizing continuum in active galactic nuclei: clues from ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ISO coronal line spectrum of the brightest Seyfert galaxies from the CfA sample is presented and modeled. ISO observations of [O IV] 25.9 $\\mu$, [Ne V] 14.3 $\\mu$, [Mg VIII] 3.02 $\\mu$ and [Si IX] 2.58 $\\mu$ lines are presented; their relationship with the soft part of the ionizing spectrum from 50 to 300 eV is investigated. Pure photoionization models reproduce the line ratios, setting ranges for the ionization parameter and the optical depth of the emitting clouds. On the basis of the available data alone it is not possible to distinguish between a power-law or a blackbody distribution as the intrinsic shape of the UV ionizing spectrum. However, for the brightest Seyferts analyzed, namely, NGC 1068, Circinus and NGC 4151, a black-body UV continuum is favored.

M. Almudena Prieto; Sueli M. Viegas

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

Markham, James R. (Middlefield, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Characterization of near-terahertz complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuits using a Fourier-transform interferometer  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Optical methods for measuring of the emission spectra of oscillator circuits operating in the 400–600 GHz range are described. The emitted power from patch antennas included in the circuits is measured by placing the circuit in the source chamber of a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. The results show that this optical technique is useful for measuring circuits pushing the frontier in operating frequency. The technique also allows the characterization of the circuit by measuring the power radiated in the fundamental and in the harmonics. This capability is useful for oscillator architectures designed to cancel the fundamental and use higher harmonics. The radiated power was measured using two techniques: direct measurement of the power by placing the device in front of a bolometer of known responsivity, and by comparison to the estimated power from blackbody sources. The latter technique showed that these circuits have higher emission than blackbody sources at the operating frequencies, and, therefore, offer potential spectroscopy applications.

Arenas, D. J. [Univ. of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Shim, Dongha [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Koukis, D. I. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Seok, Eunyoung [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL and Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX (United States); Tanner, D. B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); O, Kenneth K. [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Supplementary Material The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 2008, Volume 2 i Supplementary Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sun, which is ~240 W/m2 . A blackbody temperature of ~255°K yields a heat flux of 240 W/m2 . Indeed in the calculated 3.5 W/m2 forcing due to surface changes (ice sheet area, vegetation distribution, shoreline with that approach is that, unlike long-lived GHGs, aerosols are distributed heterogeneously, so it is difficult

Royer, Dana

214

Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. http://bccp.lbl.gov/

Smoot, George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

George Smoot

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

On parton distributions in a photon gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

I. Alikhanov

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A NEW METHOD OF PULSE-WISE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-resolved spectral analysis, though a very promising method to understand the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is difficult to implement in practice because of poor statistics. We present a new method for pulse-wise time-resolved spectral study of the individual pulses of GRBs, using the fact that many spectral parameters are either constants or smooth functions of time. We use this method for the two pulses of GRB 081221, the brightest GRB with separable pulses. We choose, from the literature, a set of possible models that includes the Band model, blackbody with a power law (BBPL), and a collection of blackbodies with a smoothly varying temperature profile, along with a power law (mBBPL), and two blackbodies with a power law (2BBPL). First, we perform a time-resolved study to confirm the spectral parameter variations, and then we construct the new model to perform a joint spectral fit. We find that any photospheric emission in terms of blackbodies is required mainly in the rising parts of the pulses and the falling part can be adequately explained in terms of the Band model, with the low-energy photon index within the regime of synchrotron model. Interestingly, we find that 2BBPL is comparable or sometimes even better, though marginally, than the Band model, in all episodes. Consistent results are also obtained for the brightest GRB of Fermi era-GRB 090618. We point out that the method is generic enough to test any spectral model with well-defined parameter variations.

Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

George Smoot

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

XMM-Newton EPIC observations of Her X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spin-resolved X-ray data of the neutron star binary Her X-1. We find evidence that the Iron line at 6.4 keV originates from the same location as the blackbody X-ray component. The line width and energy varies over both the spin period and the 35 day precession period. We also find that the correlation between the soft and hard X-ray light curves varies over the 35 day period.

G. Ramsay; S. Zane; M. A. Jimenez-Garate; J. W. den Herder; C. J. Hailey

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Airborne Infrared Target Tracking with the Nintendo Wii Remote Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to target. 3.2 Design Rather than design for a particular distance, the highest-output available infrared source was selected for the beacon: a 500 W quartz tungsten halogen incandescent lamp. Determining the radiant power in the detectable spectrum...://terpconnect.umd.edu/ toh/models/Blackbody.html. [17] Forsythe, W. and Worthing, A., \\The Properties of Tungsten and the Character- istics of Tungsten Lamps," Astrophysics Journal , Vol. 61, April 1925, pp. 146{ 185. 34 ...

Beckett, Andrew 1984-

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 10, 381160 Braunschweig (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spectral Evolution of the Continuum and Disc Line in Dipping in GRO J1655-40  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery is reported of emission features in the X-ray spectrum of GRO J1655-40 obtained using Rossi-XTE on 1997, Feb 26. The features have been fitted firstly by two Gaussian lines, which in four spectra have average energies of 5.85+/-0.08 keV and 7.32+/-0.13 keV, strongly suggestive that these are the red- and blueshifted wings of an iron disc line from material with velocity ~0.33 c. The blue wing is apparently less bright than expected for a disc line subject to Doppler boosting, however, known absorption in the spectrum of GRO J1655-40 at energies between ~7 and 8 keV can reduce the apparent brightness of the blue wing. The spectra have also been fitted well using the full relativistic disc line model of Laor, plus an absorption line. This gives a restframe energy between 6.4 and 6.8 keV indicating that the line is from highly ionized iron K_alpha. The Laor model also shows that the line originates at radii extending from ~10 Schwarzschild radii (r_S) outwards. The line is direct evidence for the black hole nature of the compact object. The continuum is well described by dominant disc blackbody emission plus Comptonized emission. During dipping, spectral evolution is well modelled by allowing progressive covering of the disc blackbody and simple absorption of the Comptonized emission showing that the thermal emission is more extended. Acceptable fits are only obtained by including the disc line in the covering term, indicating that it originates in the same inner disc region as the thermal continuum. Dip ingress times and durations are used to provide the radius of the disc blackbody emitter as 170-370 r_S, and the radius of the absorber.

M. Balucinska-Church

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

Timing the Nearby Isolated Neutron Star RX J1856.5-3754  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RX J1856.5-3754 is the X-ray brightest among the nearby isolated neutron stars. Its X-ray spectrum is thermal, and is reproduced remarkably well by a black-body, but its interpretation has remained puzzling. One reason is that the source did not exhibit pulsations, and hence a magnetic field strength--vital input to atmosphere models--could not be estimated. Recently, however, very weak pulsations were discovered. Here, we analyze these in detail, using all available data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observatories. From frequency measurements, we set a 2-sigma upper limit to the frequency derivative of \\dot\

Van Kerkwijk, M H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

227

Fully QED/relativistic theory of light pressure on free electrons by isotropic radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A relativistic/QED theory of light pressure on electrons by an isotropic, in particular blackbody radiation predicts thermalization rates of free electrons over entire span of energies available in the lab and the nature. The calculations based on the QED Klein-Nishina theory of electron-photon scattering and relativistic Fokker-Planck equation, show that the transition from classical (Thompson) to QED (Compton) thermalization determined by the product of electron energy and radiation temperature, is reachable under conditions for controlled nuclear fusion, and predicts large acceleration of electron thermalization in the Compton domain.

A. E. Kaplan

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

On horizons and the cosmic landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Susskind claims in his recent book The Cosmic Landscape that evidence for the existence and nature of `pocket universes' in a multiverse would be available in the detailed nature of the Cosmic Blackbody Background Radiation that constantly bathes all parts of our observable universe. I point out that acceptance of the complex chain of argument involved does not imply possible experimental verification of multiverses at the present time. Rather this claim relates only to theoretically possible observations in the very far future of the universe.

George F R Ellis

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Study of Supernovae Important for Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dense shell method for the determination of distances to type IIn supernovae has been briefly reviewed. Applying our method to SN 2006gy, SN 2009ip, and SN 2010jl supernovae, we have obtained distances in excellent agreement with the previously known distances to the parent galaxies. The dense shell method is based on the radiation hydrodynamic model of a supernova. The method of the blackbody model, as well as the correctness of its application for simple estimates of distances from observation data, has been justified.

Baklanov, P V; Potashov, M Sh; Dolgov, A D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Planck's Radiation Law in the Quantized Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical research looks for clues to quantum properties of the gravitational field. On the basis of the common Schr\\"odinger theory, a simple model of the quantization of a Friedmann universe comprising dust and radiation is investigated. With regard to energy quantization, the result suggests a universal limitation of the energy spacing between neighbouring quantum states by the Planck energy. Applied to black-body radiation, a modified Planck radiation law follows. If this could be verified in the laboratory, it would provide a direct hint at quantum properties of the space-time manifold.

Rainer Collier

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fusion and Advanced Electromagnetic Technology Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration of

236

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration ofAOD under

237

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration ofAOD

238

Slide 1  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration ofAODSite for

239

Slide 1  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration ofAODSite

240

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibration

242

Slide 1  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody Calibrationand Ground-based

243

Slide 1  

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244

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245

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the Blackbody

246

Slide 1  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARM Climate Research

247

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARM Climate

248

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARM ClimateSWS

249

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARM

250

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARMHis Excellency,

251

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARMHis

252

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Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)SharingTiO2(110).in the BlackbodyOverview ARMHisDr. Ellen

253

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260

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small IV, Ward; Celliers, Peter

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

REVISITING PUTATIVE COOL ACCRETION DISKS IN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soft, potentially thermal spectral components observed in some ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) can be fit with models for emission from cool, optically thick accretion disks. If that description is correct, the low temperatures that are observed imply accretion onto 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Subsequent work has found that these components may follow an inverse relationship between luminosity and temperature, implying a non-blackbody origin for this emission. We have re-analyzed numerous XMM-Newton spectra of extreme ULXs. Crucially, observations wherein the source fell on a chip gap were excluded owing to their uncertain flux calibration, and the neutral column density along the line of sight to a given source was jointly determined by multiple spectra. The luminosity of the soft component is found to be positively correlated with temperature, and to be broadly consistent with L?T {sup 4} in the measured band pass, as per blackbody emission from a standard thin disk. These results are nominally consistent with accretion onto black holes with masses above the range currently known in Galactic X-ray binaries, though there are important caveats. Emission from inhomogeneous or super-Eddington disks may also be consistent with the data.

Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Reynolds, M. T.; Reis, R. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Walton, D. J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Miller, M. C., E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The dusty nuclear torus in NGC4151: constraints from Gemini NIFS observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used a near-infrared nuclear spectrum (covering the Z, J, H and K bands) of the nucleus of NGC 4151 obtained with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) and adaptive optics, to isolate and constrain the properties of a near-IR unresolved nuclear source whose spectral signature is clearly present in our data. The near-IR spectrum was combined with an optical spectrum obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph which was used to constrain the contribution of a power-law component. After subtraction of the power-law component, the near-IR continuum is well fitted by a blackbody function, with $T=1285\\pm50 $K, which dominates the nuclear spectrum -- within an aperture of radius 0$\\farcs$3 -- in the near-IR. We attribute the blackbody component to emission by a dusty structure, with hot dust mass $M_{\\rm HD}=(6.9\\pm 1.5) \\times10^{-4} {\\rm M_\\odot}$, not resolved by our observations, which provide only an upper limit for its distance from the nucleus of 4 pc. If the reddenin...

Riffel, Rogemar A; Mcgregor, Peter J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsars: Bulk Comptonization in the Accretion Shock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy. However, despite decades of theoretical and observational work since their discovery, no satisfactory model for the formation of the observed X-ray spectra has emerged. In particular, the previously available theories are unable to reproduce the power-law variation observed at high energies in many sources. In this paper, we present the first self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a pulsar accretion column that includes an explicit treatment of the energization occurring in the shock. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method based on the exact dynamical solution for the velocity profile in the column, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at the top of the thermal mound, near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to calculate the radiation spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons emitted by the thermal mound. We demonstrate that the energization of the photons in the shock naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with many observations of accreting X-ray pulsars.

Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result.

Yong-Sung Kim

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED AND SUBMILLIMETER PHOTOMETRY FOR THE KINGFISH SAMPLE OF NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New far-infrared and submillimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500 {mu}m emission shows evidence for a submillimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photodissociation regions is found to be (21 {+-} 4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine and Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.

Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. L.; Montiel, E. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Krause, O.; Groves, B. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Roussel, H. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Armus, L.; Beirao, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hao, C.-N., E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); and others

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

Goff, David R. (Star City, WV); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interfering blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

Goff, D.R.; Notestein, J.E.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

269

Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

X-ray observations during a Her X-1 anomalous low-state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of a 1999 July 8-10 BeppoSAX observation during an anomalous low-state of Her X-1 are presented. The standard on-state power-law and blackbody continuum model is excluded at high confidence unless partial covering is included. This gives a power-law photon index of 0.63 +/- 0.02 and implies that 0.28 +/- 0.03 of the flux undergoes additional absorption of (27 +/- 7) 10^22 atom/cm2. 11% of the observed 0.1-10 keV flux is from the 0.068 +/- 0.015 keV blackbody. 1.237747(2) s pulses with a semi-amplitude of 2.1 +/- 0.8% are detected at >99.5% confidence and confirmed by RXTE measurements. This implies that Her X-1 underwent substantial spin-down close to the start of the anomalous low-state. The spectral and temporal changes are similar to those recently reported from 4U1626-67. These may result from a strongly warped disk that produces a spin-down torque. The X-ray source is then mostly viewed through the inner regions of the accretion disk. A similar mechanism could be responsible for the Her X-1 anomalous low-states. Shadowing by such an unusually warped disk could produce observable effects in the optical and UV emission from the companion star.

A. N. Parmar; T. Oosterbroek; D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto; S. Del Sordo

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Low-Mass X-Ray Binary MAXI J1421-613 Observed by MAXI GSC and Swift XRT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitor of All sky X-ray Image (MAXI) discovered a new outburst of an X-ray transient source named MAXI J1421-613. Because of the detection of three X-ray bursts from the source, it was identified as a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The results of data analyses of the MAXI GSC and the Swift XRT follow-up observations suggest that the spectral hardness remained unchanged during the first two weeks of the outburst. All the XRT spectra in the 0.5-10 keV band can be well explained by thermal Comptonization of multi-color disk blackbody emission. The photon index of the Comptonized component is $\\approx$ 2, which is typical of low-mass X-ray binaries in the low/hard state. Since X-ray bursts have a maximum peak luminosity, it is possible to estimate the (maximum) distance from its observed peak flux. The peak flux of the second X-ray burst, which was observed by the GSC, is about 5 photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. By assuming a blackbody spectrum of 2.5 keV, the maximum distance to the source is estimated as 7 kpc...

Serino, Motoko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Kennea, Jamie A; Fukushima, Kosuke; Nagayama, Takahiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A NEUTRON STAR STIFF EQUATION OF STATE DERIVED FROM COOLING PHASES OF THE X-RAY BURSTER 4U 1724-307  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal emission during X-ray bursts is a powerful tool for determining neutron star (NS) masses and radii if the Eddington flux and the apparent radius in the cooling tail can be measured accurately and distances to the sources are known. We propose here an improved method of determining the basic stellar parameters using the data from the cooling phase of photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts covering a large range of luminosities. Because at that phase the blackbody apparent radius depends only on the spectral hardening factor (color correction), we suggest fitting the theoretical dependences of the color correction versus flux in Eddington units to the observed variations of the inverse square root of the apparent blackbody radius with the flux. For that we use a large set of atmosphere models for burst luminosities varying by three orders of magnitude and for various chemical compositions and surface gravities. We show that spectral variations observed during a long PRE burst from 4U 1724-307 are entirely consistent with the theoretical expectations for the passively cooling NS atmospheres. Our method allows us to more reliably determine both the Eddington flux (which is found to be smaller than the touchdown flux by 15%) and the ratio of the stellar apparent radius to the distance. We then find a lower limit on the NS radius of 14 km for masses below 2.3 M{sub Sun }, independently of the chemical composition. These results suggest that the matter inside NSs is characterized by a stiff equation of state. We also find evidence in favor of hydrogen-rich accreting matter and obtain an upper limit to the distance of 7 kpc. We finally show that the apparent blackbody emitting area in the cooling tails of the short bursts from 4U 1724-307 is two times smaller than that for the long burst and their evolution does not follow the theory. This makes their usage for determining the NS parameters questionable and casts serious doubt on the results of previous works that used similar bursts from other sources for analysis.

Suleimanov, Valery; Werner, Klaus [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Poutanen, Juri [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Revnivtsev, Mikhail, E-mail: suleimanov@astro.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: werner@astro.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: juri.poutanen@oulu.fi [Space Research Institute (IKI), Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A refined ephemeris and phase resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the Geminga pulsar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a refined phase-connected post-glitch ephemeris for the Geminga pulsar that is a good fit to all the post-glitch data from EGRET, ASCA, and XMM. We also present the results of phase-resolved spectroscopy of two XMM X-ray observations of the Geminga pulsar obtained in 2002 and 2004. An investigation is made into a previously claimed existence of a small hot spot on the neutron star surface. We conclude that that interpretation was more likely an artifact of an overly restrictive assumption used to fit the phase-resolved spectra, namely, that the spectral index of the non-thermal component is constant. When we allow the spectral index to vary as a function of rotation phase, we find systematic variations in spectral index, and such fits do not require an additional, hot blackbody component.

M. S. Jackson; J. P. Halpern

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573?K (1300?°C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P., E-mail: pbermel@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 1205 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Single-crystal sapphire tubes as economical probes for optical pyrometry in harsh environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One-end-sealed single-crystal sapphire tubes are presented as a simple, robust, and economical alternative for bulky lightpipe probes. Thermal radiation from a blackbody cavity created at the inner surface of the sealed end is gathered by a simple lens-based collecting system and transmitted via optical fiber to the remote detection unit. Simplicity and applicability of the concept are demonstrated by the combination of commercially available sapphire tubes with a common optical pyrometer. Radiation thermometers with sapphire tubes as invasive probes can be useful for applications requiring immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to harsh environments, simple replacement in the case of failure, and enhanced mechanical firmness, enabling wider range probe positioning inside the medium of interest.

Ruzicka, Jakub; Houzvicka, Jindrich; Bok, Jiri; Praus, Petr; Mojzes, Peter

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Importance of Compton scattering to radiation spectra of isolated neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model atmospheres of isolated neutron stars with low magnetic field are calculated with Compton scattering taking into account. Models with effective temperatures 1, 3 and 5 MK, with two values of surface gravity log(g)g = 13.9 and 14.3), and different chemical compositions are calculated. Radiation spectra computed with Compton scattering are softer than the computed with Thomson scattering at high energies (E > 5 keV) for hot (T_eff > 1 MK) atmospheres with hydrogen-helium composition. Compton scattering is more significant to hydrogen models with low surface gravity. The emergent spectra of the hottest (T_eff > 3 MK) model atmospheres can be described by diluted blackbody spectra with hardness factors ~ 1.6 - 1.9. Compton scattering is less important for models with solar abundance of heavy elements.

V. Suleimanov; K. Werner

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

A comparison of irradiance responsivity and thermodynamic temperature measurement between PTB and NIM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a comparison between PTB and NIM in the field of absolute spectral-band radiometry and thermodynamic temperature measurement. For the comparison a NIM made interference filter radiometer with a centre wavelength of 633 nm was taken to PTB. The filter radiometer was calibrated at NIM and PTB with respect to spectral irradiance responsivity. For the integral value in the band-pass range an agreement of 0.1% was observed in both calibrations. In a next step, the 633 nm filter radiometer was used to measure the temperature of a high-temperature blackbody in comparison to an 800 nm filter radiometer of PTB in the temperature range between 1400 K and 2750 K. The thermodynamic temperature measured by the two filter radiometers agreed to within 0.2 K to 0.5 K with an estimated measurement uncertainty ranging between 0.1 K and 0.4 K (k=1)

Lu, X.; Yuan, Z. [National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China); Anhalt, K.; Taubert, R. D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Characterization, propagation, and simulation of infrared scenes; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 16-20, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various papers on the characterization, propagation, and simulation of IR scenes are presented. Individual topics addressed include: total radiant exitance measurements, absolute measurement of diffuse and specular reflectance using an FTIR spectrometer with an integrating sphere, fundamental limits in temperature estimation, incorporating the BRDF into an IR scene-generation system, characterizing IR dynamic response for foliage backgrounds, modeling sea surface effects in FLIR performance codes, automated imaging IR seeker performance evaluation system, generation of signature data bases with fast codes, background measurements using the NPS-IRST system. Also discussed are: naval ocean IR background analysis, camouflage simulation and effectiveness assessment for the individual soldier, discussion of IR scene generators, multiwavelength Scophony IR scene projector, LBIR target generator and calibrator for preflight seeker tests, dual-mode hardware-in-the-loop simulation facility, development of the IR blackbody source of gravity-type heat pipe and study of its characteristic.

Watkins, W.R.; Zegel, F.H.; Triplett, M.J.; (U.S. Army, Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory, White Sands Missile Range, NM; U.S. Army, Night Vision and Electro-Optics Laboratory, Fort Belvoir, VA; Nichols Research Corp., Huntsville, AL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sr lattice clock at 1x10^{-16} fractional uncertainty by remote optical evaluation with a Ca clock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical atomic clocks promise timekeeping at the highest precision and accuracy, owing to their high operating frequencies. Rigorous evaluations of these clocks require direct comparisons between them. We have realized a high-performance remote comparison of optical clocks over km-scale urban distances, a key step for development, dissemination, and application of these optical standards. Through this remote comparison and a proper design of lattice-confined neutral atoms for clock operation, we evaluate the uncertainty of a strontium (Sr) optical lattice clock at the 1x10-16 fractional level, surpassing the best current evaluations of cesium (Cs) primary standards. We also report on the observation of density-dependent effects in the spin-polarized fermionic sample and discuss the current limiting effect of blackbody radiation-induced frequency shifts.

A. D. Ludlow; T. Zelevinsky; G. K. Campbell; S. Blatt; M. M. Boyd; M. H. G. de Miranda; M. J. Martin; J. W. Thomsen; S. M. Foreman; Jun Ye; T. M. Fortier; J. E. Stalnaker; S. A. Diddams; Y. Le Coq; Z. W. Barber; N. Poli; N. D. Lemke; K. M. Beck; C. W. Oates

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Proposal for a second-generation, lattice matched, multiple junction Ga{sub 2}AsSb TPV converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First order device modeling is used to show that spontaneously ordered Ga{sub 2}AsSb may prove useful in the newly-active field of thermophotovoltaic power generation. Optimal band gaps for single-, double- and triple-junction III-V devices are presented for a range of blackbody emitter temperatures (1000--2000 K), and it is shown that monolithic, current-matched devices may be constructed that are lattice-matched throughout the stack to an underlying InP substrate. Device efficiency, short-circuit current, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage calculations are presented. The power generation capabilities are expected to be substantial due to the proximity of the devices to the thermal radiators. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Horner, G.S. [Keithley Instruments, Solon Ohio (United States); Coutts, T.J.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado (United States)

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Spectral resolution for a five-element, filtered, x-ray detector array using the method of Backus and Gilbert  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining the spectrum from a five-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors. This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({approx}100-2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with a classical unfold method, based on a histogram representation of the source spectrum. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV blackbody) and the unfolded spectrum. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics. (c)

Fehl, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Chandler, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Stygar, W. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Temperature Profiles and the Effect of AGN on Submillimeter Emission from BLAST Observations of Resolved Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (BLAST05), BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the December 2006 flight from Antarctica (BLAST06), BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the the galaxies with Spitzer data. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a "core fraction", an upper limit on the "AGN fraction" of submillimeter detected galaxies. Fin...

Wiebe, Donald V; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 11, March 1, 1989--May 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our results on photophoresis reveal significant transport effects, mainly for particles which are carbonaceous (char-like, soot-like) rather than ash-like. Figure 2 shows the predicted dimensionless transport coefficient (proportional to the ordinary Stanton number for mass transfer) as a function of radiation/convective flux ratio and carbonaceous particle radius for laminar boundary layer flow past a wall cooled to 70% of the mainstream temperature, subjected to a radiative energy spectrum appropriate to a black-body source at ca. 1800K. One sees that large effects on the particle deposition rate are produced if the radiative flux is comparable to or exceeds the ordinary (Fourier) energy flux. We are now extending this work to include the effects of inevitable particle asymmetries, including agglomerate (shape) effects, and the role that energy transfer (eg. radiative cooling of larger particles in a population) might play in the coagulation dynamics and deposition dynamics of such aerosol populations.

Rosner, D.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our results on photophoresis reveal significant transport effects, mainly for particles which are carbonaceous (char-like, soot-like) rather than ash-like. Figure 2 shows the predicted dimensionless transport coefficient (proportional to the ordinary Stanton number for mass transfer) as a function of radiation/convective flux ratio and carbonaceous particle radius for laminar boundary layer flow past a wall cooled to 70% of the mainstream temperature, subjected to a radiative energy spectrum appropriate to a black-body source at ca. 1800K. One sees that large effects on the particle deposition rate are produced if the radiative flux is comparable to or exceeds the ordinary (Fourier) energy flux. We are now extending this work to include the effects of inevitable particle asymmetries, including agglomerate (shape) effects, and the role that energy transfer (eg. radiative cooling of larger particles in a population) might play in the coagulation dynamics and deposition dynamics of such aerosol populations.

Rosner, D.E.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cosmologies with Photon Creation and the 3K Relic Radiation Spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new Planckian distribution for cosmologies with photon creation is derived using thermodynamics and semiclassical considerations. This spectrum is preserved during the evolution of the universe and compatible with the present spectral shape of the cosmic microwave background radiation(CMBR). Accordingly, the widely spread feeling that cosmologies with continuous photon creation are definitely ruled out by the COBE limits on deviation of the CMBR spectrum from blackbody shape should be reconsidered. It is argued that a crucial test for this kind of cosmologies is provided by measurements of the CMBR temperature at high redshifts. For a given redshift $z$ greater than zero, the temperature is smaller than the one predicted by the standard FRW model.

J. A. S. Lima

1996-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings (SCSs). SCS loops emit strong bursts of electromagnetic waves, which might affect various cosmological and astrophysical observations. We take into account the effect on the CMB anisotropy, CMB blackbody spectrum, BBN, observational implications on radio wave burst and X-ray or ?-ray events, and stochastic gravitational wave background measured by pulsar timing experiments. We then derive constraints on the parameters of SCS from current observations and estimate prospects for detecting SCS signatures in on-going observations. As a result, we find that these constraints exclude broad parameter regions, and also that on-going radio wave observations can probe large parameter space.

Miyamoto, Koichi [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazunori, E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

Smoot, George

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Low-Energy X-ray Emission from Young Isolated Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A young neutron star with large spin-down power is expected to be closely surrounded by an e+/- pair plasma maintained by the conversion of gamma-rays associated with the star's polar-cap and/or outer-gap accelerators. Cyclotron-resonance scattering by the e- and e+ within several radii of such neutron stars prevents direct observations of thermal X-rays from the stellar surface. Estimates are presented for the parameters of the Planck-like X-radiation which ultimately diffuses out through this region. Comparisons with observations, especially of apparent blackbody emission areas as a function of neutron star age, support the proposition that we are learning about a neutron star's magnetosphere rather than about its surface from observations of young neutron star thermal X-rays.

M. Ruderman

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Magnetized Atmospheres around Accreting Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed investigation of atmospheres around accreting neutron stars with high magnetic field ($B\\gtrsim 10^{12}$ G) and low luminosity ($L\\lesssim 10^{33}$ erg/s). We compute the atmospheric structure, intensity and emergent spectrum for a plane-parallel, pure hydrogen medium by solving the transfer equations for the normal modes coupled to the hydrostatic and energy balance equations. The hard tail found in previous investigations for accreting, non-magnetic neutron stars with comparable luminosity is suppressed and the X-ray spectrum, although still harder than a blackbody at the star effective temperature, is nearly planckian in shape. Spectra from accreting atmospheres, both with high and low fields, are found to exhibit a significant excess at optical wavelengths above the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the X-ray continuum.

S. Zane; R. Turolla; A. Treves

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A RESOLVED DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE CANDIDATE PLANET-HOSTING STAR HD 95086  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, ? Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ?6.''0 × 5.''4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of ?25°. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)] [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kóspál, Á. [European Space Agency (ESA/ESTEC, SRE-SA), P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands)] [European Space Agency (ESA/ESTEC, SRE-SA), P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Apai, D.; Pascucci, I. [Department of Astronomy and Department of Planetary Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Department of Planetary Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Balog, Z.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Csengeri, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Grady, C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Juhász, A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Szulágyi, J. [Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS UMR 7293, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France)] [Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS UMR 7293, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Vavrek, R., E-mail: moor@konkoly.hu [Herschel Science Centre, ESA/ESAC, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

Broad band X-ray spectrum of KS 1947+300 with BeppoSAX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results obtained from three BeppoSAX observations of the accretion-powered transient X-ray pulsar KS 1947+300 carried out during the declining phase of its 2000 November -- 2001 June outburst. A detailed spectral study of KS 1947+300 across a wide X-ray band (0.1--100.0 keV) is attempted for the first time here. Timing analysis of the data clearly shows a 18.7 s pulsation in the X-ray light curves in the above energy band. The pulse profile of KS 1947+300 is characterized by a broad peak with sharp rise followed by a narrow dip. The dip in the pulse profile shows a very strong energy dependence. Broad-band pulse-phase-averaged spectroscopy obtained with three of the BeppoSAX instruments shows that the energy spectrum in the 0.1--100 keV energy band has three components, a Comptonized component, a ~0.6 keV blackbody component, and a narrow and weak iron emission line at 6.7 keV with a low column density of material in the line of sight. We place an upper limit on the equivalent width of the iron K_\\alpha line at 6.4 keV of ~13 eV (for a width of 100 eV). Assuming a spherical blackbody emitting region and the distance of the source to be 10 kpc, the radius of the emitting region is found to be in the range of 14--22 km, which rules out the inner accretion disk as the soft X-ray emitting region.

S. Naik; P. J. Callanan; B. Paul; T. Dotani

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A new Comptonization model for low-magnetized accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting \\xspec package which takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e. bulk) Comptonization. The model consists of two components: one is the direct blackbody-like emission due to seed photons which are not subjected to effective Compton scattering, while the other one is a convolution of the Green's function of the energy operator with a blackbody-like seed photon spectrum. When combined thermal and bulk effects are considered, the analytic form of the Green's function may be obtained as a solution of the diffusion Comptonization equation. Using data from the BeppoSAX, INTEGRAL and RXTE satellites, we test our model on the spectra of a sample of six persistently low magnetic field bright neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binaries, covering three different spectral states. Particular attention is given to the transient powerlaw-like hard X-ray (> 30 keV) tails that we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process. We show that the values of the best-fit delta-parameter, which represents the importance of bulk with respect to thermal Comptonization, can be physically meaningful and can at least qualitatively describe the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system. Moreover, we show that in fitting the thermal Comptonization spectra to the X-ray spectra of these systems, the best-fit parameters of our model are in excellent agreement with those of COMPTT, a broadly used and well established XSPEC model.

R. Farinelli; L. Titarchuk; A. Paizis; F. Frontera

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High energy emission and polarisation limits for the INTEGRAL burst GRB 061122  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) GRB 061122 is one of the brightest GRBs detected within INTEGRAL's field of view to date. The two gamma-ray detectors on INTEGRAL were used to investigate the spectral characteristics of GRB 061122. A search for linear polarisation in the prompt emission was carried out using the SPI multiple event data in the energy range 100 keV-1 MeV. The prompt spectrum was best fit by a combination of a blackbody and a power--law model (the quasithermal model), with evidence for high energy emission continuing above 8 MeV. A pseudo-redshift value of pz = 0.95 +/- 0.18 was determined using the spectral fit parameters. The isotropic energy at this pseudo-redshift is 8.5 x 10^{52} erg. The jet opening angle was estimated to be smaller than 2.8 deg or larger than 11.9 deg from the X-ray lightcurve. An upper limit of 60% polarisation was determined for the prompt emission of GRB 061122, using the multiple event data. The high energy emission observed in the spectrum may be due to the reverse shock interacting with ...

McGlynn, S; McBreen, B; Hanlon, L; McBreen, S; Clark, D J; Dean, A J; Martin-Carrillo, A; O'Connor, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pulse spectral evolution of GRBs: implication as standard candle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using an \\emph{empirical} description of a prompt GRB pulse, we analyze the individual pulses of all Fermi/GBM GRBs with known redshifts, till July 2009. This description is simultaneous in time and energy and allows one to determine the peak energy of Band spectrum at zero fluence ($E_{peak,0}$). We demonstrate, for the first time, that the $E_{peak,0}$ bears a very strong correlation with the isotropic energy of the individual pulses, and hence, each pulse can be used as a luminosity indicator. As a physical description is needed in order to use GRB pulses for cosmological purposes, we explore other physical spectral models. As pulses are the building blocks of a GRB, we choose another sample of Fermi/GBM GRBs having bright, long and single/ separable pulse(s) and fit the time-resolved spectra of the individual pulses with the Band model and a model consisting of a blackbody and a power-law. Both these models give acceptable fits. We find that the peak energy/ temperature always decreases exponentially with...

Basak, Rupal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Revisit emission spectrum and entropy quantum of the Reissner-Nordström black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Banerjee and Majhi's recent work shows that black hole's emission spectrum could be fully reproduced in the tunneling picture, where, as an intriguing technique, the Kruskal extension was introduced to connect the left and right modes inside and outside the horizon. Some attempt, as an extension, was focused on producing the Hawking emission spectrum of the (charged) Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole in the Banerjee-Majhi's treatment. Unfortunately, the Kruskal extension in their observation was so badly defined that the ingoing mode was classically forbidden traveling towards the center of black hole, but could quantum tunnel across the horizon with the probability $\\Gamma=e^{-\\pi \\omega_0/\\kappa_+}$. This tunneling picture is unphysical. With this point as a central motivation, in this paper we first introduce such a suitable Kruskal extension for the (charged) Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole that a perfect tunneling picture can be provided during the charged particle's emission. Then, under the new Kruskal extension, we revisit the Hawking emission spectrum and entropy spectroscopy as tunneling from the charged black hole. The result shows that the tunneling method is so universally robust that the Hawking blackbody emission spectrum from a charged black hole can be well reproduced in the tunneling mechanism, and its induced entropy quantum is a much better approximation for the forthcoming quantum gravity theory.

Qing-Quan Jiang

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quantum Optomechanical Heat Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate theoretically a quantum optomechanical realization of a heat engine. In a generic optomechanical arrangement the optomechanical coupling between the cavity field and the oscillating end-mirror results in polariton normal mode excitations whose character depends on the pump detuning and the coupling strength. By varying that detuning it is possible to transform their character from phonon-like to photon-like, so that they are predominantly coupled to the thermal reservoir of phonons or photons, respectively. We exploit the fact that the effective temperatures of these two reservoirs are different to produce a Otto cycle along one of the polariton branches. We discuss the basic properties of the system in two different regimes: in the optical domain it is possible to extract work from the thermal energy of a mechanical resonator at finite temperature, while in the microwave range one can in principle exploit the cycle to extract work from the blackbody radiation background coupled to an ultra-cold atomic ensemble.

Keye Zhang; Francesco Bariani; Pierre Meystre

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

GaSb based ternary and quaternary diffused junction devices for TPV applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we report the characteristics of ternary, GaInSb (Eg=0.70eV) and quarternary, GaInAsSb (Eg=0.5eV) diffused junction photovoltaic devices. The unique feature of the quarternary device is the extended long-wavelength response to 2.1 microns enabling the efficient use of the blackbody-like thermal sources operating at 1373 K in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion systems. The ternary device was fabricated by diffusing zinc into a n-type (100) oriented GaInSb substrate. For the quarternary, a four micron thick Te doped GaInAsSb layer grown by LPE on a n-type GaSb(100) wafer was used as the starting substrate for zinc diffusion. The ternary device exhibits an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V, Fill Factor of 0.63 and a short circuit current of 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, while the corresponding values for the quarternary device are 0.25 V, 0.58 and 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The peak internal quantum efficiency for the ternary is over 90{percent} and that of the quarternary is above 75{percent}. Process optimization should improve the performance charcateristics of the quarternary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Sundaram, V.S.; Saban, S.B.; Morgan, M.D.; Horne, W.E.; Evans, B.D.; Ketterl, J.R. [EDTEK Inc. 7082 S. 220th Street Kent, Washington 98032 (United States); Morosini, M.B.; Patel, N.B. [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil (Brazil); Field, H. [NREL, Golden, Colorado (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Testing Loop Quantum Gravity and Electromagnetic Dark Energy in Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1989 Cabrera and Tate reported an anomalous excess of mass of the Cooper pairs in rotating thin Niobium rings. So far, this experimental result never received a proper theoretical explanation in the context of superconductor's physics. In the present work we argue that what Cabrera and Tate interpreted as an anomalous excess of mass can also be associated with a deviation from the classical gravitomagnetic Larmor theorem due to the presence of dark energy in the superconductor, as well as with the discrete structure of the area of the superconducting Niobium ring as predicted by Loop Quantum Gravity. From Cabrera and Tate measurements we deduce that the quantization of spacetime in superconducting circular rings occurs at the Planck-Einstein scale $l_{PE} = (\\hbar G/c^3 \\Lambda)^{1/4}\\sim 3.77\\times 10 ^{-5} m$, instead of the Planck scale $l_{P} =(\\hbar G / c^3)^{1/2}=1.61 \\times 10 ^{-35} m$, with an Immirzi parameter which depends on the specific critical temperature of the superconducting material and on the area of the ring. The stephan-Boltzmann law for quantized areas delimited by superconducting rings is predicted, and an experimental concept based on the electromagnetic black-body radiation emitted by this surfaces, is proposed to test loop quantum gravity and electromagnetic dark energy in superconductors.

Clovis Jacinto de Matos

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Importance of Compton scattering for radiation spectra of isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergent model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are widely used to fit the observed soft X-ray spectra of different types of isolated neutron stars. We investigate the effect of Compton scattering on the emergent spectra of hot (T_eff > 10^6 K) isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields. In order to compute model atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium we solve the radiation transfer equation with the Kompaneets operator. We calculate a set of models with effective temperatures in the range 1 - 5 * 10^6 K, with two values of surface gravity (log g = 13.9 and 14.3) and different chemical compositions. Radiation spectra computed with Compton scattering are softer than those computed without Compton scattering at high energies (E > 5 keV) for light elements (H or He) model atmospheres. The Compton effect is more significant in H model atmospheres and models with low surface gravity. The emergent spectra of the hottest (T_eff > 3 * 10^6 K) model atmospheres can be described by diluted blackbody spectra with hardness factors ~ 1.6 - 1.9. Compton scattering is less important in models with solar abundance of heavy elements.

V. Suleimanov; K. Werner

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Hybrid Design of Project-X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project-X is a leading candidate of the next major accelerator construction project at Fermilab. The mission need of Project-X is to establish an intensity frontier for particle physics research, or more precisely, to build a multi-MW proton source for neutrino and other particle studies. Coupled with an upgraded Main Injector (MI) and Recycler, an 8 GeV superconducting RF (SRF) H-minus linac meets this need [1]. However, a more cost effective approach would be a hybrid design, namely, a combination of a 2 GeV SRF linac and an 8 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) in lieu of an 8 GeV SRF linac. This alternative design also meets the mission need but at a lower cost since a synchrotron is cheaper than a SRF linac. It retains the ability to use a 2 GeV SRF linac for ILC technology development. It reuses the existing Debuncher enclosure and Booster RF. The transport line of 2 GeV H-minus particles is shorter than the present 8 GeV design since stronger bending magnets can be used. The blackbody radiation strippi...

Chou, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Fast Evolution of SN 2010bh associated with XRF 100316D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About a decade ago the first observational evidence of the connection between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts was found. Since then, only half a dozen spectroscopically confirmed associations have been discovered and XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh lies among the latest. Starting observations at 12 hr and continuing until 80 days after the burst, GROND provided excellent photometric data of XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh in six filter bands from the optical to the near-infrared, significantly expanding the existing data set for this event. Combining GROND and Swift/UVOT+XRT data, the early SED is modelled with a blackbody and afterglow component attenuated by dust and gas absorption. The best-fit models imply a moderate host-galaxy extinction (A_V=1.2\\pm0.1 mag). Furthermore, temperature and radius evolution of the thermal component are combined with earlier measurements available from the literature. The analysis reveals a cooling envelope at an apparent initial radius of 7\\times10^11 cm, compatible with a dense wind surroundi...

E., Felipe Olivares; Schady, Patricia; Rau, Arne; Klose, Sylvio; Krühler, Thomas; Afonso, Paulo M J; Updike, Adria C; Nardini, Marco; Filgas, Robert; Guelbenzu, Ana Nicuesa; Clemens, Christian; Elliott, Jonny; Kann, D Alexander; Rossi, Andrea; Sudilovsky, Vladimir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal Emission from a Hot Cocoon Surrounding the Jet of XRF 060218  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is long speculated that long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originate froma relativistic jet emerging from a collapsing massive star progenitor. Although associations of core-collapsing supernovae with long GRB afterglows have been identified in a number of systems, including the latest X-ray flash (XRF) 060218/SN 2006aj connection detected by Swift, direct evidence of a relativistic jet emerging from a collapsing star is still lacking. Here we report the detection of a thermal emission component (high-T component) accompanying the prompt X-ray emission of XRF 060218, with temperature kT_H=1.21+0.22/-0.24 keV and effective blackbody radius R_H~ 5\\times 10^{9} cm. This high-T component co-exists with another low-T thermal component as reported by Campana et al. 2006 for at least 2700 seconds, but evolves independently with respect to the low-T component by tracing the lightcurve of the non-thermal component. We identify this high-T thermal component as the emission of a hot cocoon surrounding the relativi...

Liang, E; Zhang, B B; Dai, Z G; Liang, Enwei; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Bin-Bin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Shock Breakout Emission from a Type Ib/c Supernova: XRF 080109/SN 2008D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray flash 080109, associated with SN 2008D, can be attributed to the shock breakout emission from a normal Type Ib/c supernova. If the observed emission is interpreted as blackbody emission, the temperature and radiated energy are close to expectations, considering that scattering dominates absorption processes so that spectrum formation occurs deep within the photosphere. The X-ray emission observed at ~10 days is attributed to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric photons with relativistic electrons produced in the interaction of the supernova with the progenitor wind. A simple model for the optical/ultraviolet emission from shock breakout is developed and applied to SN 1987A, SN 1999ex, SN 2008D, and SN 2006aj, all of which have optical emission observed at t~1 day. The emission from the first three can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout emission. The photospheric temperature is most sensitive to the radius of the progenitor star core and the radii in these cases are in line with expectat...

Chevalier, Roger A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Near infra-red spectroscopy of V838 Monocerotis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near IR, multi-epoch, spectroscopic and photometric observations of the enigmatic, eruptive variable V838 Mon in JHK bands are reported. One of the unusual features is the detection of several strong neutral TiI lines in emission in the K band. From the strength of these lines, the mass of the ejected envelope is estimated to be in the range 10e-7 to 10e-5 M(sun). The spectra also show the strong presence of the first and second overtones of 12CO bands seen in the K and H bands. The CO bands show a complex evolution. Deep water bands at 1.4 and 1.9 micron are also seen later in the object's evolution. Blackbody fits to the JHK photometric data show that V838 Mon has evolved to temperatures between 2400 - 2600 K by approximately 130 days after outburst. The spectra at this stage have the general characteristics of a very cool M giant.

D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok

2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

The X-ray Behavior of Two CVs: TT Ari and DP Leo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ROSAT PSPC observations of the nova-like, or intermediate polar, TT Ari and the eclipsing polar DP Leo. Observations of TT Ari were performed as part of a simultaneous multiwavelength campaign. The X-ray spectrum of TT Ari from ROSAT was combined with Ginga observations to suggest the presence of three distinct emission components: an optically thin plasma, a dominating bremsstrahlung continuum and one or more iron emission lines. Simultaneous and later IUE observations show modulation in the absorption component of the P Cygni-like CIV line on the spectroscopic period indicating a complex wind structure. Three eclipses were observed from the DP Leo system with intensity dips, not previously observed, occurring prior to each eclipse. The dips are interpreted as the eclipse of the main emission region by an accretion stream varying in impact position or stream shape with time. The DP Leo spectrum is well fit by either a 25 eV blackbody or a soft power law. No evidence exists for accretion onto the stronger magnetic pole and severe limits were placed upon the flux from any hard bremsstrahlung component. We constrained distances to this system based upon model fits to the data.

Craig R. Robinson; France A. Cordova

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Resonant Cyclotron Scattering and Comptonization in Neutron Star Magnetospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant cyclotron scattering of the surface radiation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars may considerably modify the emergent spectra and impede efforts to constraint neutron star properties. Resonant cyclotron scattering by a non-relativistic warm plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field has a number of unusual characteristics: (i) in the limit of high resonant optical depth, the cyclotron resonant layer is half opaque, in sharp contrast to the case of non-resonant scattering. (ii) The transmitted flux is on average Compton up-scattered by ~ $1+ 2 beta_T$, where $\\beta_T$ is the typical thermal velocity in units of the velocity of light; the reflected flux has on average the initial frequency. (iii) For both the transmitted and reflected fluxes the dispersion of intensity decreases with increasing optical depth. (iv) The emergent spectrum is appreciably non-Plankian while narrow spectral features produced at the surface may be erased. We derive semi-analytically modification of the surface Plankian emission due to multiple scattering between the resonant layers and apply the model to anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1--5937. Our simple model fits just as well as the ``canonical'' magnetar spectra model of a blackbody plus power-law.

Maxim Lyutikov; Fotis P. Gavriil

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Spectrum and Accurate Location of GRS 1758-258  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETGS observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. The accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA= 18 01 12.40, Dec= -25 44 36.0 (90% confidence radius = 0".6), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. The March spectrum is well-fit with a multi-color disk-blackbody with an inner temperature of 0.50+/-0.01 keV, interstellar absorption of nH = (1.59 +/- 0.05)x10^22 cm^-2, and (un-absorbed) 1-10 keV luminosity of (4.5x10^36)(D/8.5kpc)^2 ergs/sec. No narrow emission lines are apparent in the spectrum and upper limits to line equivalent widths are given.

W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ks-band detection of thermal emission and color constraints to CoRoT-1b: A low-albedo planet with inefficient atmospheric energy redistribution and a temperature inversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b, from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336+/-0.042 percent and is centered at phase 0.5022 (+0.0023,-0.0027), consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit ecos{\\omega} = 0.0035 (+0.0036,-0.0042). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 micron secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al. (2009), Gillon et al. (2009), and Alonso et al. (2009a). Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2454 (+84,-170) K, a very low Bond albedo A_B...

Rogers, Justin C; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K; Burrows, Adam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A resolved debris disk around the candidate planet-hosting star HD95086  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similarly to HR8799, {\\ss} Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ~6.0x5.4 arcsec (540x490 AU) and disk inclination of ~25 degree. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its re-projected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to th...

Moór, A; Kóspál, Á; Szabó, Gy M; Apai, D; Balog, Z; Csengeri, T; Grady, C; Henning, Th; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Szulágyi, J; Vavrek, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Long Term Spectral Evolution of Tidal Disruption Candidates Selected by Strong Coronal Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of follow-up optical spectroscopic observations of seven rare, extreme coronal line emitting galaxies reported by Wang et al. (2012) with Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT). Large variations in coronal lines are found in four objects, making them strong candidates of tidal disruption events (TDE). For the four TDE candidates, all the coronal lines with ionization status higher than [Fe VII] disappear within 5-9 years. The [Fe VII] faded by a factor of about five in one object (J0952+2143) within 4 years, whereas emerged in other two without them previously. A strong increment in the [O III] flux is observed, shifting the line ratios towards the loci of active galactic nucleus on the BPT diagrams. Surprisingly, we detect a non-canonical [O III]5007/[O III]4959 2 in two objects, indicating a large column density of O$^{2+}$ and thus probably optical thick gas. This also requires a very large ionization parameter and relatively soft ionizing spectral energy distribution (e.g. blackbody with $T < ...

Yang, Chenwei; Ferland, Gary; Yuan, Weimin; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Compact Central Object in the Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We observed the compact central object CXOU J085201.4--461753 in the supernova remnant G266.2--1.2 (RX J0852.0--4622) with the Chandra ACIS detector in timing mode. The spectrum of this object can be described by a blackbody model with the temperature kT=404 eV and radius of the emitting region R=0.28 km, at a distance of 1 kpc. Power-law and thermal plasma models do not fit the source spectrum. The spectrum shows a marginally significant feature at 1.68 keV. Search for periodicity yields two candidate periods, about 301 ms and 33 ms, both significant at a 2.1 sigma level; the corresponding pulsed fractions are 13% and 9%, respectively. We find no evidence for long-term variability of the source flux, nor do we find extended emission around the central object. We suggest that CXOU J085201.4--461753 is similar to CXOU J232327.9+584842, the central source of the supernova remnant Cas A. It could be either a neutron star with a low or regular magnetic field, slowly accreting from a fossil disk, or, more likely, an isolated neutron star with a superstrong magnetic field. In either case, a conservative upper limit on surface temperature of a 10 km radius neutron star is about 90 eV, which suggests accelerated cooling for a reasonable age of a few thousand years.

Oleg Kargaltsev; George G. Pavlov; Divas Sanwal; Gordon P. Garmire

2002-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

V819 TAU: A RARE WEAK-LINED T TAURI STAR WITH A WEAK INFRARED EXCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Spitzer data to infer that the small infrared excess of V819 Tau, a weak-lined T Tauri star in Taurus, is real and not attributable to a 'companion' 10'' to the south. We do not confirm the mid-infrared excess in HBC 427 and V410 X-ray 3, which are also non-accreting T Tauri stars in the same region; instead, for the former object, the excess arises from a red companion 9'' to the east. A single-temperature blackbody fit to the continuum excess of V819 Tau implies a dust temperature of 143 K; however, a better fit is achieved when the weak 10 and 20 mum silicate emission features are also included. We infer a disk of sub-mum silicate grains between about 1 AU and several 100 AU with a constant surface density distribution. The mid-infrared excess of V819 Tau can be successfully modeled with dust composed mostly of small amorphous olivine grains at a temperature of 85 K, and most of the excess emission is optically thin. The disk could still be primordial, but gas-poor and therefore short-lived, or already at the debris disk stage, which would make it one of the youngest debris disk systems known.

Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-767, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Forrest, W. J.; Manoj, P.; Kim, K. H.; Watson, Dan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Sargent, B. A., E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.go, E-mail: forrest@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: khkim@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: sargent@stsci.ed [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

WASP-80b has a dayside within the T-dwarf range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASP-80b is a missing link in the study of exo-atmospheres. It falls between the warm Neptunes and the hot Jupiters and is amenable for characterisation, thanks to its host star's properties. We observed the planet through transit and during occultation with Warm Spitzer. Combining our mid-infrared transits with optical time series, we find that the planet presents a transmission spectrum indistinguishable from a horizontal line. In emission, WASP-80b is the intrinsically faintest planet whose dayside flux has been detected in both the 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m Spitzer channels. The depths of the occultations reveal that WASP-80b is as bright and as red as a T4 dwarf, but that its temperature is cooler. If planets go through the equivalent of an L-T transition, our results would imply this happens at cooler temperatures than for brown dwarfs. Placing WASP-80b's dayside into a colour-magnitude diagram, it falls exactly at the junction between a blackbody model and the T-dwarf sequence; we cannot discern which of thos...

Triaud, Amaury H M J; Ehrenreich, David; Herrero, Enrique; Lendl, Monika; Anderson, David R; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Delrez, Laetitia; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Hellier, Coel; Heng, Keving; Jehin, Emmanuel; Maxted, Pierre F L; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Ribas, Ignasi; Smalley, Barry; Smith, Alexis M S; Udry, Stephane

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Effects of the stellar wind on X-ray spectra of Cygnus X-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study X-ray spectra of Cyg X-3 from BeppoSAX, taking into account absorption and emission in the strong stellar wind of its companion. We find the intrinsic X-ray spectra are well modelled by disc blackbody emission, its upscattering by hot electrons with a hybrid distribution, and by Compton reflection. These spectra are strongly modified by absorption and reprocessing in the stellar wind, which we model using the photoionization code cloudy. The form of the observed spectra implies the wind is composed of two phases. A hot tenuous plasma containing most of the wind mass is required to account for the observed features of very strongly ionized Fe. Small dense cool clumps filling <0.01 of the volume are required to absorb the soft X-ray excess, which is emitted by the hot phase but not present in the data. The total mass-loss rate is found to be (0.6--1.6) x 10^-5 solar masses per year. We also discuss the feasibility of the continuum model dominated by Compton reflection, which we find to best describe our data. The intrinsic luminosities of our models suggest that the compact object is a black hole.

A. Szostek; A. A. Zdziarski

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Verification of unfold error estimates in the UFO code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation which attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of tabulated response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the UFO (UnFold Operator) code. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, UFO also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). 100 random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetemined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-Pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums.

Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measurements of Conversion Efficiency for a Flat Plate Thermophotovoltaic System Using a Photonic Cavity Test System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a 1 cm{sup 2} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) module was recently measured in a photonic cavity test system. A conversion efficiency of 11.7% was measured at a radiator temperature of 1076 C and a module temperature of 29.9 C. This experiment achieved the highest direct measurement of efficiency for an integrated TPV system. Efficiency was calculated from the ratio of the peak (load matched) electrical power output and the heat absorption rate. Measurements of these two parameters were made simultaneously to assure the validity of the measured efficiency value. This test was conducted in a photonic cavity which mimicked a typical flat-plate TPV system. The radiator was a large, flat graphite surface. The module was affixed to the top of a copper pedestal for heat absorption measurements. The heat absorption rate was proportional to the axial temperature gradient in the pedestal under steady-state conditions. The test was run in a vacuum to eliminate conductive and convective heat transfer mechanisms. The photonic cavity provides the optimal test environment for TPV efficiency measurements because it incorporates all important physical phenomena found in an integrated TPV system: high radiator emissivity and blackbody spectral shape, photon recycling, Lambertian distribution of incident radiation and complex geometric effects. Furthermore, the large aspect ratio between radiating surface area and radiator/module spacing produces a view factor approaching unity with minimal photon leakage.

E.J. Brown; C.T. Ballinger; S.R. Burger; G.W. Charache; L.R. Danielson; D.M. DePoy; T.J. Donovan; M. LoCascio

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

Nabeel Riza

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica, Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Martin, Peter G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [Istituto di Radioastronomia, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

Biraud, Sebastien

332

Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

Ian Ferguson

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermal management in large Bi2212 mesas used for terahertz sources.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a thermal analysis of a patterned mesa on a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi2212) single crystal that is based on tunneling characteristics of the c-axis stack of {approx}800 intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa. Despite the large mesa volume (e.g., 40 times 300 times 1.2 mum{sup 3}) and power dissipation that result in self-heating and backbending of the current-voltage curve (I-V), there are accessible bias conditions for which significant polarized THz-wave emission can be observed. We estimate the mesa temperature by equating the quasiparticle resistance, R{sub qp}(T), to the ratio V/I over the entire I-V including the backbending region. These temperatures are used to predict the unpolarized black-body radiation reaching our bolometer and there is substantial agreement over the entire I-V. As such, backbending results from the particular R{sub qp}(T) for Bi2212, as first discussed by Fenton, rather than a significant suppression of the energy gap. This model also correctly predicts the observed disappearance of backbending above {approx}60 K.

Kurter, C.; Gray, K. E.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Ozyuzer, L.; Koshelev, A. E.; Li, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.; Kwok, W.-K.; Tachiki, M.; Welp, U.; Materials Science Division; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Tsukuba; Univ. Tokyo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal and Bulk Comptonization in Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a new theoretical model for the spectral formation process in accretion-powered X-ray pulsars based on a detailed treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in the accreting, shocked gas. A rigorous eigenfunction expansion method is employed to obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the scattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at an arbitrary height above the stellar surface. The emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the Green's function with source terms corresponding to bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody emission. The energization of the photons in the shock, combined with cyclotron absorption, naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum shape and a high-energy quasi-exponential cutoff. We demonstrate that the new theory successfully reproduces the phase-averaged spectra of the bright pulsars Her X-1, LMC X-4, and Cen X-3. In these luminous sources, it is shown that the emergent spectra are dominated by Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission.

Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Comptonization and the Spectra of Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy. However, despite decades of theoretical and observational work since their discovery, no satisfactory model for the formation of the observed X-ray spectra has emerged. In this paper, we report on a self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a pulsar accretion column that includes an explicit treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in the radiation-dominated shocks that form in the accretion flows. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column. The Green's function is convolved with bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody source terms to calculate the emergent photon spectrum. We show that energization of photons in the shock naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum and a high-energy exponential cutoff. Finally, we demonstrate that our model yields good agreement with the spectra of the bright pulsar Her X-1 and the low luminosity pulsar X Per.

Michael T. Wolff; Peter A. Becker; Kenneth D. Wolfram

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

PSR J1840-1419: A VERY COOL NEUTRON STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present upper limits on the X-ray emission for three neutron stars. For PSR J1840-1419, with a characteristic age of 16.5 Myr, we calculate a blackbody temperature upper limit (at 99% confidence) of kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 24{sup +17} {sub -10} eV, making this one of the coolest neutron stars known. PSRs J1814-1744 and J1847-0130 are both high magnetic field pulsars, with inferred surface dipole magnetic field strengths of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 9.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, respectively. Our temperature upper limits for these stars are kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 123{sup +20} {sub -33} eV and kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 115{sup +16} {sub -33} eV, showing that these high magnetic field pulsars are not significantly hotter than those with lower magnetic fields. Finally, we put these limits into context by summarizing all temperature measurements and limits for rotation-driven neutron stars.

Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Purver, M. B.; Weltevrede, P. [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATING RADIO TRANSIENT J1819-1458  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819–1458. Our 94 ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field (?5 × 10{sup 13} G) pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT ? 130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ?1.0 and ?1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hr of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.

Miller, J. J.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rea, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) Campus UAB, Fac. de Ciències, Torre C5, parell, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaridis, K.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

The width of gamma-ray burst spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the $EF_E$ spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/GBM and CGRO/BATSE. The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability $<10^{-6}$). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes -- synchrotron and blackbody radiation -- the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78% of long GRBs and 85% of short GRBs are incompatible wi...

Axelsson, Magnus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

The influence of accretion geometry on the spectral evolution during thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron star (NS) masses and radii can be estimated from observations of photospheric radius-expansion X-ray bursts, provided the chemical composition of the photosphere, the spectral colour-correction factors in the observed luminosity range, and the emission area during the bursts are known. By analysing 246 X-ray bursts observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from 11 low-mass X-ray binaries, we find a dependence between the persistent spectral properties and the time evolution of the black body normalisation during the bursts. All NS atmosphere models predict that the colour-correction factor decreases in the early cooling phase when the luminosity first drops below the limiting Eddington value, leading to a characteristic pattern of variability in the measured blackbody normalisation. However, the model predictions agree with the observations for most bursts occurring in hard, low-luminosity, 'island' spectral states, but rarely during soft, high-luminosity, 'banana' states. The observed behaviour may...

Kajava, Jari J E; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Pursiainen, Miika; Poutanen, Juri; Suleimanov, Valery F; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G; Kuulkers, Erik; Galloway, Duncan K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A grid of synthetic ionizing spectra for very hot compact stars from NLTE model atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precise analysis of properties of planetary nebulae is strongly dependent on good models for the stellar ionizing spectrum. Observations in the UV - X-ray wavelength range as well as NLTE model atmosphere calculations of spectra of their exciting stars have shown that neither blackbody fluxes nor "standard" NLTE atmosphere models which are composed out of hydrogen and helium only are good approximations. Strong differences between synthetic spectra from these compared to observed spectra at energies higher than 54 eV (He II ground state) can be ascribed to the neglect of metal-line blanketing. Realistic modeling of the emergent fluxes of hot stars in the UV - X-ray wavelength range requires metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres which include all elements from hydrogen up to the iron-group. For this purpose, we present a grid (solar and halo abundance ratios) of metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmosphere fluxes which covers the parameter range of central stars of planetary nebulae.

Thomas Rauch

2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

Non-LTE modeling of supernova-fallback disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a first detailed spectrum synthesis calculation of a supernova-fallback disk composed of iron. We assume a geometrically thin disk with a radial structure described by the classical alpha-disk model. The disk is represented by concentric rings radiating as plane-parallel slabs. The vertical structure and emission spectrum of each ring is computed in a fully self-consistent manner by solving the structure equations simultaneously with the radiation transfer equations under non-LTE conditions. We describe the properties of a specific disk model and discuss various effects on the emergent UV/optical spectrum. We find that strong iron-line blanketing causes broad absorption features over the whole spectral range. Limb darkening changes the spectral distribution up to a factor of four depending on the inclination angle. Consequently, such differences also occur between a blackbody spectrum and our model. The overall spectral shape is independent of the exact chemical composition as long as iron is the dominant species. A pure iron composition cannot be distinguished from silicon-burning ash. Non-LTE effects are small and restricted to few spectral features.

K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy-dependent evolution in IC10 X-1: hard evidence for an extended corona, and implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed a ~130 ks XMM-Newton observation of the dynamically confirmed black hole + Wolf-Rayet (BH+WR) X-ray binary (XB) IC10 X-1, covering ~1 orbital cycle. This system experiences periodic intensity dips every ~35 hours. We find that energy-independent evolution is rejected at a >5 sigma level. The spectral and timing evolution of IC10 X-1 are best explained by a compact disk blackbody and an extended Comptonized component, where the thermal component is completely absorbed and the Comptonized component is partially covered during the dip. We consider three possibilities for the absorber: cold material in the outer accretion disk, as is well documented for Galactic neutron star (NS) XBs at high inclination; a stream of stellar wind that is enhanced by traveling through the L1 point; and a spherical wind. We estimated the corona radius (r_ADC) for IC10 X-1 from the dip ingress to be ~1 E+6 km, assuming absorption from the outer disk, and found it to be consistent with the relation between r_m ADC and...

Barnard, R; Prestwich, A F; Stevens, I R; Clark, J S; Kolb, U C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Doppler-free spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition in laser-cooled fermionic isotopes of neutral mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed for the first time direct laser spectroscopy of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition at 265.6 nm in fermionic isotopes of neutral mercury laser-cooled in a magneto-optical trap. Spectroscopy is performed by measuring the depletion of the magneto-optical trap induced by the excitation of the long-lived 3P0 state by a probe at 265.6 nm. Measurements resolve the Doppler-free recoil doublet allowing for a determination of the transition frequency to an uncer- tainty well below the Doppler-broadened linewidth. We have performed absolute measurement of the frequency with respect to an ultra-stable reference monitored by LNE-SYRTE fountain pri- mary frequency standards using a femtosecond laser frequency comb. The measured frequency is 1128575290808 +/- 5.6 kHz in 199Hg and 1128569561140 +/- 5.3 kHz in 201Hg, more than 4 orders of magnitude better than previous indirect determinations. Owing to a low sensitivity to blackbody radiation, mercury is a promising candidate for reaching the ultimate performance of optical lattice clocks.

M. Petersen; R. Chicireanu; S. T. Dawkins; D. V. Magalhães; C. Mandache; Y. Lecoq; A. Clairon; S. Bize

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST 111209A: THE COLLAPSE OF A BLUE SUPERGIANT?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of GRB 111209A, observed at a redshift of z = 0.677. We show that this event was active in its prompt phase for about 25000 s, making it the longest burst ever observed. This rare event could have been detected up to z {approx} 1.4 in gamma-rays. Compared to other long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 111209A is a clear outlier in the energy-fluence and duration plane. The high-energy prompt emission shows no sign of a strong blackbody component, the signature of a tidal disruption event, or a supernova shock breakout. Given the extreme longevity of this event, and lack of any significant observed supernova signature, we propose that GRB 111209A resulted from the core-collapse of a low-metallicity blue supergiant star. This scenario is favored because of the necessity to supply enough mass to the central engine over a duration of thousands of seconds. Hence, we suggest that GRB 111209A could have more in common with population III stellar explosions, rather than those associated with normal long GRBs.

Gendre, B.; Cutini, S.; D'Elia, V. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)] [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Stratta, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, OAR-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy)] [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, OAR-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Atteia, J. L.; Klotz, A. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Basa, S. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France)] [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Boeer, M. [CNRS, ARTEMIS, UMR 7250, Boulevard de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS, ARTEMIS, UMR 7250, Boulevard de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J [University of Western Australia, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)] [University of Western Australia, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Piro, L., E-mail: bruce.gendre@gmail.com [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma, INAF, via fosso del cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

ON THE X-RAY EMISSION MECHANISMS OF THE PERSISTENT SOURCE AND VERY LOW FLUENCE BURSTS OF SGR J0501+4516  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission of the persistent source and the low-fluence bursts of SGR J0501+4516 observed during a deep XMM-Newton observation near the peak of its 2008 outburst. For the persistent emission, we employ a physically motivated continuum emission model and spectroscopically determine important source properties such as the surface magnetic field strength and the magnetospheric scattering optical depth. We find that the magnetar surface temperature near the peak of its activity is 0.38 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 131 km{sup 2} at a distance of 2 kpc. The surface magnetic field strength determined spectroscopically, B = 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G, is consistent with the dipole field strength inferred from the source spin and spin-down rate. We fit the stacked spectra of 129 very faint bursts with a modified blackbody model and find a temperature of 1.16 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 93 km{sup 2}. We also find evidence for cooling during the burst decay phase.

Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Guever, Tolga [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Kouveliotou, Chryssa, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Complete Census of 70-um-Bright Debris Disks within the FEPS (Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems) Spitzer Legacy Survey of Sun-like Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abbreviated) We report detection with the Spitzer Space Telescope of cool dust surrounding solar type stars. The observations were performed as part of the Legacy Science Program, ``Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems'' (FEPS). From the overall FEPS sample (Meyer et al. 2006) of 328 stars having ages ~0.003-3 Gyr we have selected sources with 70 um flux densities indicating excess in their spectral energy distributions above expected photospheric emission........ .....The rising spectral energy distributions towards - and perhaps beyond - 70 um imply dust temperatures T_dust temperature, location, fractional luminosity, and mass of the dust from fitted single temperature blackbody models. For >1/3 of the debris sources we find that multiple temperature components are suggested, implying a spatial distribution of dust extending over many tens of AU. Because the disks are dominated by collisional processes, the parent body (planetesimal) belts may be extended as well. Preliminary assessment of the statistics of cold debris around sun-like stars shows that ~10% of FEPS targets with masses between 0.6 and 1.8 Msun and ages between 30 Myr and 3 Gyr exhibit 70 um emission in excess of the expected photospheric flux density. We find that fractional excess amplitudes appear higher for younger stars and that there may be a trend in 70 um excess frequency with stellar mass.

Lynne A. Hillenbrand; John M. Carpenter; Jinyoung Serena Kim; Michael R. Meyer; Dana E. Backman; Amaya Moro-Martin; David J. Hollenbach; Dean C. Hines; Ilaria Pascucci; Jeroen Bouwman

2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

X-Ray Searches for Solar Axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Axions generated thermally in the solar core can convert nearly directly to X-rays as they pass through the solar atmosphere via interaction with the magnetic field. The result of this conversion process would be a diffuse centrally-concentrated source of few-keV X-rays at disk center; it would have a known dimension, of order 10% of the solar diameter, and a spectral distribution resembling the blackbody spectrum of the solar core. Its spatial structure in detail would depend on the distribution of mass and field in the solar atmosphere. The brightness of the source depends upon these factors as well as the unknown coupling constant and the unknown mass of the axion; this particle is hypothetical and no firm evidence for its existence has been found yet. We describe the solar magnetic environment as an axion/photon converter and discuss the upper limits obtained by existing and dedicated observations from three solar X-ray observatories: Yohkoh, RHESSI, and Hinode

Hugh S. Hudson; L. W. Acton; E. DeLuca; I. G. Hannah; K. Reardon; K. Van Bibber

2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Detailed ROSAT X-ray Analysis of the AM Her Cataclysmic Variable VV Pup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VV Pup is typical system of AM Her stars, where the main accreting pole rotates in and out of view during the orbital cycle. In the present paper we present ROSAT data analysis for the magnetic cataclysmic variable VV Pup. We obtained the X-ray light curves of VV Pup in high state, the PSPC count rate 0.1-2.0 keV is plotted as a function of time with bins of 10 sec and the count rate is folded over the orbital period of 100.4 min with bin size of 100 sec for individual observations. We calculate the mean best-fit PSPC spectrum, with a three-component spectral fit including a soft X-ray blackbody, hard X-ray bremsstrahlung, and Gaussian line covers the phase intervals, for a bright phase (phi_orb=0.9-1.1), the dip data (phi_orb=0.18-0.7), the egress from the dip (phi_orb=0.7-0.8), the phase interval phi = 0.1-0.18 and the mean best-fit spectrum for all data (phi_orb=0.0-1.0). We calculate spectral parameters, the hardness ratios, count rate and total integrated black body flux.

Nouh, M I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

High-speed, energy-resolved, STJ observations of the AM Her system V2301 Oph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high time-resolution optical energy-resolved photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable V2301 Oph made using the ESA S-Cam detector, an array of photon counting super-conducting tunnel junction (STJ) devices with intrinsic energy resolution. Three eclipses were observed, revealing considerable variation in the eclipse shape, particularly during ingress. The eclipse shape is shown to be understood in terms of AM Her accretion via a bright stream, with very little contribution from the white dwarf photosphere and/or hotspot. About two thirds of the eclipsed light arises in the threading region. Variation in the extent of the threading region can account for most of the variations observed between cycles. Spectral fits to the data reveal a 10,000K blackbody continuum with strong, time-varying emission lines of hydrogen and helium. This is the first time that stellar emission lines have been detected in the optical band using a non-dispersive photon-counting system.

A. P. Reynolds; G. Ramsay; J. H. J. de Bruijne; M. A. C. Perryman; M. Cropper; C. M. Bridge; A. Peacock

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A0620-00 IN QUIESCENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the black hole binary system, A0620-00, acquired in 2010 March. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained the first FUV spectrum of A0620-00 as well as NUV observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The observed spectrum is flat in the FUV and very faint (with continuum fluxes {approx_equal} 1e - 17 erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}). The UV spectra also show strong, broad (FWHM {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}) emission lines of Si IV, C IV, He II, Fe II, and Mg II. The C IV doublet is anomalously weak compared to the other lines, which is consistent with the low carbon abundance seen in NIR spectra of the source. Comparison of these observations with previous NUV spectra of A0620-00 shows that the UV flux has varied by factors of 2-8 over several years. We compiled the dereddened, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00 and compared it to previous SEDs as well as theoretical models. The SEDs show that the source varies at all wavelengths for which we have multiple samples. Contrary to previous observations, the optical-UV spectrum does not continue to drop to shorter wavelengths, but instead shows a recovery and an increasingly blue spectrum in the FUV. We created an optical-UV spectrum of A0620-00 with the donor star contribution removed. The non-stellar spectrum peaks at {approx_equal}3000 A. The peak can be fit with a T = 10,000 K blackbody with a small emitting area, probably originating in the hot spot where the accretion stream impacts the outer disk. However, one or more components in addition to the blackbody are needed to fit the FUV upturn and the red optical fluxes in the optical-UV spectrum. By comparing the mass accretion rate determined from the hot spot luminosity to the mean accretion rate inferred from the outburst history, we find that the latter is an order of magnitude smaller than the former, indicating that {approx}90% of the accreted mass must be lost from the system if the predictions of the disk instability model and the estimated interoutburst interval are correct. The mass accretion rate at the hot spot is 10{sup 5} the accretion rate at the black hole inferred from the X-ray luminosity. To reconcile these requires that outflows carry away virtually all of the accreted mass, a very low rate of mass transfer from the outer cold disk into the inner hot region, and/or radiatively inefficient accretion. We compared our broadband SED to two models of A0620-00 in quiescence: the advection-dominated accretion flow model and the maximally jet-dominated model. The comparison suggests that strong outflows may be present in the system, indicated by the discrepancies in accretion rates and the FUV upturn in flux in the SED.

Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Khargharia, Juthika [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Deceleration of a Relativistic, Photon-Rich Shell: End of Preacceleration, Damping of MHD Turbulence, and the Emission Mechanism of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) We consider the interaction of a relativistically-moving shell, composed of thermal photons, a reversing magnetic field and a small admixture of charged particles, with a dense Wolf-Rayet wind. A thin outer layer of Wolf-Rayet material is entrained by the jet head; it cools and becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, thereby providing an additional source of inertia and variability. Pair creation in the wind material, and the associated pre-acceleration, defines a characteristic radiative compactness at the point where the reverse shock has completed its passage back through the shell. We argue that the prompt gamma-ray emission is triggered by this external braking, at an optical depth ~1 to electron scattering. Torsional waves, excited by the forced reconnection of the reversing magnetic field, carry a fluctuating current, and are damped at high frequencies by the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons. We show that inverse Compton radiation by the accelerated charges is stronger than their synchrotron emission, and is beamed along the magnetic field. Thermal radiation that is advected out from the base of the jet cools the particles. The observed relation between peak energy and isotropic luminosity is reproduced if the blackbody seeds are generated in a relativistic jet core that is subject to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the Wolf-Rayet envelope. This relation is predicted to soften to E_peak ~ L_iso^{1/4} below an isotropic luminosity L_iso ~ 3x10^{50} ergs/s. The duration of spikes in the inverse-Compton emission is narrower at higher frequencies, in agreement with the observed relation. The transition from prompt gamma-ray emission to afterglow can be explained by the termination of the thermal X-ray seed and the onset of synchrotron-self-Compton emission.

Christopher Thompson

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

EFFECT OF A HIGH OPACITY ON THE LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED TRANSIENTS FROM COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coalescence of compact objects is a promising astrophysical source of detectable gravitational wave signals. The ejection of r-process material from such mergers may lead to a radioactively powered electromagnetic counterpart signal which, if discovered, would enhance the science returns. As very little is known about the optical properties of heavy r-process elements, previous light-curve models have adopted opacities similar to those of iron group elements. Here we consider the effect of heavier elements, particularly the lanthanides, which increase the ejecta opacity by several orders of magnitude. We include these higher opacities in time-dependent, multi-wavelength radiative transport calculations to predict the broadband light curves of one-dimensional models over a range of parameters (ejecta masses {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and velocities {approx}0.1-0.3 c). We find that the higher opacities lead to much longer duration light curves which can last a week or more. The emission is shifted toward the infrared bands due to strong optical line blanketing, and the colors at later times are representative of a blackbody near the recombination temperature of the lanthanides (T {approx} 2500 K). We further consider the case in which a second mass outflow, composed of {sup 56}Ni, is ejected from a disk wind, and show that the net result is a distinctive two component spectral energy distribution, with a bright optical peak due to {sup 56}Ni and an infrared peak due to r-process ejecta. We briefly consider the prospects for detection and identification of these transients.

Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, 366 LeConte Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High efficiency radioisotope thermophotovoltaic prototype generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator space power system (RTPV) is lightweight, low-cost alternative to the present radioisotope thermoelectric generator system (RTG). The fabrication of such an RTPV generator has recently become feasible as the result of the invention of the GaSb infrared sensitive photovoltaic cell. Herein, the authors present the results of a parametric study of emitters and optical filters in conjuction with existing data on gallium antimonide cells. They compare a polished tungsten emitter with an Erbia selective emitter for use in combination with a simple dielectric filter and a gallium antimonide cell array. They find that the polished tungsten emitter is by itself a very selective emitter with low emissivity beyond 4 microns. Given a gallium antimonide cell and a tungsten emitter, a simple dielectric filter can be designed to transmit radiant energy below 1.7 microns and to reflect radiant energy between 1.7 and 4 microns back to the emitter. Because of the low long wavelength emissivity associated with the polished tungsten emitter, this simple dielectric filter then yields very respectable system performance. Also as a result of the longer wavelength fall-off in the tungsten emissivity curve, the radiation energy peak for a polished tungsten emitter operating at 1300 K shifts to shorter wavelengths relative to the blackbody spectrum so that the radiated energy peak falls right at the gallium antimonide cell bandedge. The result is that the response of the gallium antimonide cell is well matched to a polished tungsten emitter. The authors propose, therefore, to fabricate an operating prototype of a near term radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator design consisting of a polished tungsten emitter, standard gallium antimonide cells, and a near-term dielectric filter.

Avery, J.E.; Samaras, J.E.; Fraas, L.M.; Ewell, R. [JX Crystals, Inc., Issaquah, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Byler, Darrin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

A CENSUS OF AM CVn STARS: THREE NEW CANDIDATES AND ONE CONFIRMED 48.3-MINUTE BINARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present three new candidate AM CVn binaries, and one confirmed new system, from a spectroscopic survey of color-selected objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All four systems were found from their helium emission lines in low-resolution spectra taken on the Hale telescope at Palomar, the Nordic Optical Telescope, and the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The ultra-compact binary nature of SDSS J090221.35+381941.9 was confirmed using phase-resolved spectroscopy at the Keck-I telescope. From the characteristic radial velocity 'S-wave' observed in the helium emission lines, we measure an orbital period of 48.31 +- 0.08 minutes. The continuum emission can be described with a blackbody or a helium white dwarf atmosphere of T{sub eff} approx 15,000 K, in agreement with theoretical cooling models for relatively massive accretors and/or donors. The absence in the spectrum of broad helium absorption lines from the accreting white dwarf suggests that the accreting white dwarf cannot be much hotter than 15,000 K, or that an additional component such as the accretion disk contributes substantially to the optical flux. Two of the candidate systems, SDSS J152509.57+360054.5 and SDSS J172102.48+273301.2, do show helium absorption in the blue part of their spectra in addition to the characteristic helium emission lines. This in combination with the high effective temperatures of approx18,000 K and approx16,000 K suggests both to be at orbital periods below approx40 minutes. The third candidate, SDSS J164228.06+193410.0, exhibits remarkably strong helium emission on top of a relatively cool (T{sub eff} approx 12,000 K) continuum, indicating an orbital period above approx50 minutes.

Rau, A. [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, Garching 85748 (Germany); Roelofs, G. H. A.; Steeghs, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Groot, P. J.; Nelemans, G. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marsh, T. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7Al (United Kingdom); Salvato, M.; Kasliwal, M. M., E-mail: arau@mpe.mpg.d [Caltech Optical Observatories, MS 105-24, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

A TRANSIENT SUB-EDDINGTON BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE DUST LANES OF CENTAURUS A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a bright X-ray transient CXOU J132527.6-430023 in the nearby early-type galaxy NGC 5128. The source was first detected over the course of five Chandra observations in 2007, reaching an unabsorbed outburst luminosity of (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-7.0 keV band before returning to quiescence. Such luminosities are possible for both stellar-mass black hole and neutron star (NS) X-ray binary transients. Here, we attempt to characterize the nature of the compact object. No counterpart has been detected in the optical or radio sky, but the proximity of the source to the dust lanes allows for the possibility of an obscured companion. The brightness of the source after a >100-fold increase in X-ray flux makes it either the first confirmed transient non-ultraluminous X-ray black hole system in outburst to be subject to detailed spectral modeling outside the Local Group, or a bright (>10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}) transient NS X-ray binary, which are very rare. Such a large increase in flux would appear to lend weight to the view that this is a black hole transient. X-ray spectral fitting of an absorbed power law yielded unphysical photon indices, while the parameters of the best-fit absorbed disk blackbody model are typical of an accreting {approx}10 M{sub Sun} black hole in the thermally dominant state.

Burke, Mark J.; Raychaudhury, Somak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kraft, Ralph P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Evans, Daniel A.; Jordan, Andres [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brassington, Nicola J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Goodger, Joanna L. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Sivakoff, Gregory R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Woodley, Kristin A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kainulainen, Jouni [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M. [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Croston, Judith H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gilfanov, Marat [Max Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Sarazin, Craig L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Voss, Rasmus, E-mail: mburke@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud, University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); and others

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

EFFECTS OF LOCAL DISSIPATION PROFILES ON MAGNETIZED ACCRETION DISK SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present spectral calculations of non-LTE accretion disk models appropriate for high-luminosity stellar mass black hole X-ray binary systems. We first use a dissipation profile based on scaling the results of shearing box simulations of Hirose et al. to a range of annuli parameters. We simultaneously scale the effective temperature, orbital frequency, and surface density with luminosity and radius according to the standard {alpha}-model. This naturally brings increased dissipation to the disk surface layers (around the photospheres) at small radii and high luminosities. We find that the local spectrum transitions directly from a modified blackbody to a saturated Compton scattering spectrum as we increase the effective temperature and orbital frequency while decreasing midplane surface density. Next, we construct annuli models based on the parameters of a L/L{sub Edd} = 0.8 disk orbiting a 6.62 solar mass black hole using two modified dissipation profiles that explicitly put more dissipation per unit mass near the disk surface. The new dissipation profiles are qualitatively similar to the one found by Hirose et al., but produce strong near power-law spectral tails. Our models also include physically motivated magnetic acceleration support based once again on scaling the Hirose et al. results. We present three full-disk spectra, each based on one of the dissipation prescriptions. Our most aggressive dissipation profile results in a disk spectrum that is in approximate quantitative agreement with certain observations of the steep power-law spectral states from some black hole X-ray binaries.

Tao, Ted [Department of Physics, St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's City, MD 20686 (United States); Blaes, Omer [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Chandra X-ray Study of NGC 1068: II. The Luminous X-ray Source Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert~2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with Chandra. We find a total of 84 compact sources, of which 66 are projected onto the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra of the brightest sources have been modeled with both multi-color disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for most of these sources. Five sources have 0.4-8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10^{39} erg/s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as Intermediate Luminosity X-ray Objects (IXOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are >7 solar masses, and so they are inferred to be black holes. The brightest source has a much harder spectrum (Gamma = 0.9\\pm0.1) than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other IXOs. It also shows large-amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10^{38} erg/s in the 0.4-8 keV band to the rate of massive star formation is the same, to within a factor of two, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests that the rate of production of X-ray binaries per massive star is approximately the same for galaxies with currently active star formation, including ``starbursts''.

David A. Smith; Andrew S. Wilson

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Detection of Thermal Emission from an Extrasolar Planet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometric time series of the transiting extrasolar planet system TrES-1. The data span a predicted time of secondary eclipse, corresponding to the passage of the planet behind the star. In both bands of our observations, we detect a flux decrement with a timing, amplitude, and duration as predicted by published parameters of the system. This signal represents the first direct detection of (i.e. the observation of photons emitted by) a planet orbiting another star. The observed eclipse depths (in units of relative flux) are 0.00066 +/- 0.00013 at 4.5um and 0.00225 +/- 0.00036 at 8.0um. These estimates provide the first observational constraints on models of the thermal emission of hot Jupiters. Assuming that the planet emits as a blackbody, we estimate an effective temperature of T_p=1060 +/- 50 K. Under the additional assumptions that the planet is in thermal equilibrium with the radiation from the star and emits isotropically, we find a Bond albedo of A = 0.31 +/- 0.14. This would imply that the planet absorbs the majority of stellar radiation incident upon it, a conclusion of significant impact to atmospheric models of these objects. We compare our data to a previously-published model of the planetary thermal emission, which predicts prominent spectral features in our observational bands due to water and carbon monoxide. Based on the time of secondary eclipse, we present an upper limit on the orbital eccentricity that is sufficiently small that we conclude that tidal dissipation is unlikely to provide a significant source of energy interior to the planet.(abridged)

David Charbonneau; Lori E. Allen; S. Thomas Megeath; Guillermo Torres; Roi Alonso; Timothy M. Brown; Ronald L. Gilliland; David W. Latham; Georgi Mandushev; Francis T. O'Donovan; Alessandro Sozzetti

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

365

X-ray emission from the planet pulsar B1257+12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of the millisecond pulsar B1257+12 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In a 20 ks exposure we detected 25 photons from the pulsar, with energies between 0.4 and 2.0 keV, corresponding to the flux F_X=(4.4+/- 0.9)*10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in this energy range. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power-law model with photon index Gamma = 2.8 and luminosity L_X \\approx 2.5*10^{29} ergs s^{-1} in the 0.3--8 keV band, for a plausible distance of 500 pc and hydrogen column density N_H=3*10^{20} cm^{-2}. Alternatively, the spectrum can be fitted by a blackbody model with kT ~ 0.22 keV and projected emitting area ~2000 m^2. If the thermal X-rays are emitted from two symmetric polar caps, the bolometric luminosity of the two caps is 2 L_bol ~ 3*10^{29} ergs s^{-1}. We compared our results with the data on other 30 millisecond pulsars observed in X-rays and found that the apparent X-ray efficiency of PSR B1257+12, L_X/Edot ~ 3*10^{-5} for d=500 pc, is lower than those of most of millisecond pulsars. This might be explained by an unfavorable orientation of the X-ray pulsar beam if the radiation is magnetospheric, or by strong asymmetry of polar caps if the radiation is thermal (e.g., one of the polar caps is much brighter than the other and remains invisible for most part of the pulsar period). Alternatively, it could be attributed to absorption of X-rays in circumpulsar matter, such as a flaring debris disk left over after formation of the planetary system around the pulsar.

G. G. Pavlov; O. Kargaltsev; G. P. Garmire; A. Wolszczan

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Near-UV Pulse Profile and Spectrum of the Pulsar PSR B0656+14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14 with the prism and the NUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to measure the pulsar spectrum and periodic pulsations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). The pulsations are clearly detected, double-peaked and very similar to the optical pulse profile. The NUV pulsed fraction is 70 +/- 12%. The spectral slope of the dereddened phase-integrated spectrum in the 1800 - 3200 A range is 0.35 +/- 0.5 which together with the high pulse fraction indicates a non-thermal origin for the NUV emission. The total flux in the range 1700-3400 A is estimated to be 3.4 +/- 0.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 when corrected for E(B-V)=0.03. At a distance of 288 pc this corresponds to a luminosity 3.4e28 erg/s assuming isotropy of the emission. We compare the NUV pulse profile with observations from radio to gamma-rays. The first NUV sub-pulse is in phase with the gamma-ray pulse marginally detected with the EGRET, while the second NUV sub-pulse is similar both in shape and in phase with the non- thermal pulse in hard X-rays. This indicates a single origin of the non-thermal emission in the optical-NUV and in the X-rays. This is also supported by the observed NUV spectral slope, which is compatible with a blackbody plus power-law fit extended from the X-ray range, but dominated by the power-law component in most of the NUV range.

Yu. A. Shibanov; J. Sollerman; P. Lundqvist; T. Gull; D. Lindler

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Causal Set Phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central to the development of any new theory is the investigation of the observable consequences of the theory. In the search for quantum gravity, research in phenomenology has been dominated by models violating Lorentz invariance (LI) -- despite there being, at present, no evidence that LI is violated. Causal set theory is a LI candidate theory of QG that seeks not to quantise gravity as such, but rather to develop a new understanding of the universe from which both GR and QM could arise separately. The key hypothesis is that spacetime is a discrete partial order: a set of events where the partial ordering is the physical causal ordering between the events. This thesis investigates Lorentz invariant QG phenomenology motivated by the causal set approach. Massive particles propagating in a discrete spacetime will experience diffusion in both position and momentum in proper time. This thesis considers this idea in more depth, providing a rigorous derivation of the diffusion equation in terms of observable cosmic time. The diffusion behaviour does not depend on any particular underlying particle model. Simulations of three different models are conducted, revealing behaviour that matches the diffusion equation despite limitations on the size of causal set simulated. The effect of spacetime discreteness on the behaviour of massless particles is also investigated. Diffusion equations in both affine time and cosmic time are derived, and it is found that massless particles undergo diffusion and drift in energy. Constraints are placed on the magnitudes of the drift and diffusion parameters by considering the blackbody nature of the CMB. Spacetime discreteness also has a potentially observable effect on photon polarisation. For linearly polarised photons, underlying discreteness is found to cause a rotation in polarisation angle and a suppression in overall polarisation.

Lydia Philpott

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. II. INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN AN H-POOR ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra for a sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are presented and discussed in terms of narrow emission features superimposed on the quasi-blackbody continuous infrared emission. A broad {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust emission complex is seen in the RCBs showing an extreme H-deficiency. A secondary and much weaker {approx}11.5-15 {mu}m broad emission feature is detected in a few RCBs with the strongest {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex. The Spitzer infrared spectra reveal for the first time the structure within the {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex, showing the presence of strong C-C stretching modes at {approx}6.3 and 8.1 {mu}m as well as of other dust features at {approx}5.9, 6.9, and 7.3 {mu}m, which are attributable to amorphous carbonaceous solids with little or no hydrogen. The few RCBs with only moderate H-deficiencies display the classical ''unidentified infrared bands (UIRs)'' and mid-infrared features from fullerene-related molecules. In general, the characteristics of the RCB infrared emission features are not correlated with the stellar and circumstellar properties, suggesting that the RCB dust features may not be dependent on the present physical conditions around RCB stars. The only exception seems to be the central wavelength of the 6.3 {mu}m feature, which is blueshifted in those RCBs showing also the UIRs, i.e., the RCBs with the smallest H deficiency.

Garcia-Hernandez, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Rao, N. Kameswara [543, 17th Main, IV Sector, HSR Layout, Bangalore 560102 and Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Lambert, D. L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Warm absorber, reflection and Fe K line in the X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results from the X-ray spectral analysis of the ASCA PV phase observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A are presented. We find that the 0.4 - 10 keV spectrum of IC 4329A is best described by the sum of a steep ($\\Gamma \\sim 1.98$) power-law spectrum passing through a warm absorber plus a strong reflection component and associated Fe K line, confirming recent results (Madejski et al. 1995, Mushotsky et al. 1995). Further cold absorption in excess of the Galactic value and covering the entire source is also required by the data, consistent with the edge-on galactic disk and previous X-ray measurements. The effect of the warm absorber at soft X-ray energies is best parameterized by two absorption edges, one consistent with OVI, OVII or NVII, the other consistent with OVIII. A description of the soft excess in terms of blackbody emission, as observed in some other Seyfert 1 galaxies, is ruled out by the data. A large amount of reflection is detected in both the GIS and SIS detectors, at similar intensities. We find a strong correlation between the amount of reflection and the photon index, but argue that the best solution with the present data is that given by the best statistical fit. The model dependence of the Fe K line parameters is also discussed. Our best fit gives a slightly broad ($\\sigma \\simeq 0.11 \\pm 0.08$ keV) and redshifted (E $\\simeq 6.20 \\pm 0.07$ keV) Fe K line, with equivalent width $\\simeq$ 89 $\\pm$ 33 eV. The presence of a weak Fe K line with a strong reflection can be reconciled if one assumes iron underabundances or ionized reflection. We also have modeled the line with a theoretical line profile produced by an accretion disk. This yields results in better agreement with the constraints obtained from the reflection component.

M. Cappi; T. Mihara; M. Matsuoka; K. Hayashida; K. A. Weaver; C. Otani

1995-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

MODELING THE SURFACE X-RAY EMISSION AND VIEWING GEOMETRY OF PSR J0821-4300 IN PUPPIS A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a model for the unusual X-ray pulse profiles of PSR J0821-4300, the compact central object in supernova remnant Puppis A. We show that a pair of thermal, antipodal hot spots on the neutron star (NS) surface is able to fully account for the pulsar's double blackbody spectrum and energy-dependent pulse profile, including the observed 180{sup 0} phase reversal at {approx}1.2 keV. By comparing the recorded pulse modulation and phase to the model predictions, we strongly constrain the hot-spot pole ({xi}) and the line-of-sight ({psi}) angles with respect to the spin axis. For a nominal radius of R = 12 km and distance D = 2.2 kpc, we find ({xi}, {psi}) = (86{sup 0}, 6{sup 0}), with 1{sigma} error ellipse of (2{sup 0}, 1{sup 0}); this solution is degenerate in the two angles. The best-fit spectral model for this geometry requires that the temperatures of the two emission spots differ by a factor of 2 and their areas by a factor of {approx}20. Including a cosine-beamed pattern for the emitted intensity modifies the result, decreasing the angles to (84{sup 0}, 3{sup 0}); however this model is not statistically distinguishable from the isotropic emission case. We also present a new upper limit on the period derivative of P-dot < 3.5x10{sup -16} (2{sigma}), which limits the global dipole magnetic field to B{sub s} < 2.0 x 10{sup 11} G, confirming PSR J0821-4300 as an 'anti-magnetar'. We discuss the results in the context of observations and theories of nonuniform surface temperature on isolated NSs of both weak and strong magnetic field. To explain the nonuniform temperature of PSR J0821-4300 may require a crustal field that is much stronger than the external, global dipole field.

Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Perna, R. [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

13th TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau} > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K{sub i}. This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0} {approx} 2 kG, {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e} {approx} 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {le} T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T{sub e}. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce}.

C. BARNES

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Detection of a Rare Supersoft Outburst Event during a Suzaku Observation of 1E0102.2-7219  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of a transient X-ray source toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku telescope. The source was detected at the edge of the XIS image during a routine observation of the calibration source 1E 0102.2-7219, a supernova remnant in the SMC. We constrained the source position using ray-tracing simulations. No such transient source was found at the position in the other Suzaku observations nor in all the available archived images of other X-ray missions for the last ~28 years. The XIS spectrum can be explained by a single blackbody with a temperature of ~72 eV, and an interstellar extinction of ~4.9x10^{20} H atoms cm^{-2} consistent with the value to the SMC. An additional absorption edge at ~0.74 keV was also confirmed, which is presumably due to the absorption by helium-like oxygen ions. Assuming that the source is at the distance of the SMC, the X-ray luminosity in the 0.2-2.0 keV band is ~10^{37} erg s^{-1} and the radius of the source is ~10^{8} cm. The XIS light curve shows about a two-fold decline in X-ray flux during the 24 ks observation. Together with the archived data, the X-ray flux in the burst is at least three orders of magnitude brighter than the undetected quiescent level. All these properties are often seen among supersoft sources (SSSs). We conclude that the transient source is another example of SSS in the SMC.

D. Takei; M. Tsujimoto; S. Kitamoto; M. Morii; K. Ebisawa; Y. Maeda; E. D. Miller

2007-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

G048.66-0.29: PHYSICAL STATE OF AN ISOLATED SITE OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present continuum observations of the infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G48.66-0.22 (G48) obtained with Herschel, Spitzer, and APEX, in addition to several molecular line observations. The Herschel maps are used to derive temperature and column density maps of G48 using a model based on a modified blackbody. We find that G48 has a relatively simple structure and is relatively isolated; thus, this IRDC provides an excellent target to study the collapse and fragmentation of a filamentary structure in the absence of complicating factors such as strong external feedback. The derived temperature structure of G48 is clearly non-isothermal from cloud to core scale. The column density peaks are spatially coincident with the lowest temperatures ({approx}17.5 K) in G48. A total cloud mass of {approx}390 M{sub Sun} is derived from the column density maps. By comparing the luminosity-to-mass ratio of 13 point sources detected in the Herschel/PACS bands to evolutionary models, we find that two cores are likely to evolve into high-mass stars (M{sub *} {>=} 8 M{sub Sun }). The derived mean projected separation of point sources is smaller than in other IRDCs but in good agreement with theoretical predications for cylindrical collapse. We detect several molecular species such as CO, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}. CO is depleted by a factor of {approx}3.5 compared to the expected interstellar abundance, from which we conclude that CO freezes out in the central region. Furthermore, the molecular clumps, associated with the submillimeter peaks in G48, appear to be gravitationally unbound or just pressure confined. The analysis of critical line masses in G48 shows that the entire filament is collapsing, overcoming any internal support.

Pitann, J.; Linz, H.; Ragan, S.; Stutz, A. M.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Krause, O.; Launhardt, R.; Tackenberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmiedeke, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Schuller, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Vasyunina, T., E-mail: pitann@mpia.de [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Tsai, A. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Cheung, C. C. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Totani, T.; Makiya, R. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T., E-mail: kataoka.jun@waseda.jp [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 1024-1 Arakawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa, 907-0024 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

A LINGERING NON-THERMAL COMPONENT IN THE GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: PREDICTING GeV EMISSION FROM THE MeV SPECTRUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ? = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3?. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation.

Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

A COOL DUST FACTORY IN THE CRAB NEBULA: A HERSCHEL STUDY OF THE FILAMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether supernovae are major sources of dust in galaxies is a long-standing debate. We present infrared and submillimeter photometry and spectroscopy from the Herschel Space Observatory of the Crab Nebula between 51 and 670 {mu}m as part of the Mass Loss from Evolved StarS program. We compare the emission detected with Herschel with multiwavelength data including millimeter, radio, mid-infrared, and archive optical images. We carefully remove the synchrotron component using the Herschel and Planck fluxes measured in the same epoch. The contribution from line emission is removed using Herschel spectroscopy combined with Infrared Space Observatory archive data. Several forbidden lines of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are detected where multiple velocity components are resolved, deduced to be from the nitrogen-depleted, carbon-rich ejecta. No spectral lines are detected in the SPIRE wavebands; in the PACS bands, the line contribution is 5% and 10% at 70 and 100 {mu}m and negligible at 160 {mu}m. After subtracting the synchrotron and line emission, the remaining far-infrared continuum can be fit with two dust components. Assuming standard interstellar silicates, the mass of the cooler component is 0.24{sup +0.32} {sub -0.08} M {sub Sun} for T = 28.1{sup +5.5} {sub -3.2} K. Amorphous carbon grains require 0.11 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} of dust with T = 33.8{sup +2.3} {sub -1.8} K. A single temperature modified blackbody with 0.14 M {sub Sun} and 0.08 M {sub Sun} for silicate and carbon dust, respectively, provides an adequate fit to the far-infrared region of the spectral energy distribution but is a poor fit at 24-500 {mu}m. The Crab Nebula has condensed most of the relevant refractory elements into dust, suggesting the formation of dust in core-collapse supernova ejecta is efficient.

Gomez, H. L.; Clark, C. J. R.; Gomez, E. L.; Gear, W. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Krause, O.; Besel, M.-A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Matsuura, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Rho, J. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ivison, R. J.; Sibthorpe, B. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Polehampton, E. T. [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION AS DERIVED FROM EIS AND SUMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use UV and extreme-UV emission lines observed in quiet regions on the solar disk with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) instrument and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) to determine the electron temperature in solar transition region plasmas. Prominent emission lines of O IV and O VI are present in the solar spectrum, and the measured intensity line ratios provide electron temperatures in the range of log T = 5.6-6.1. We find that the theoretical O IV and O VI ion formation temperatures are considerably lower than our derived temperatures. The line ratios expected from a plasma in ionization equilibrium are larger by a factor of about 2-5 than the measured line ratios. A careful cross-calibration of SUMER and EIS has been carried out, which excludes errors in the relative calibration of the two instruments. We checked for other instrumental and observational effects, as well as line blending, and can exclude them as a possible source of the discrepancy between theoretical and observed line ratios. Using a multi-thermal quiet-Sun differential emission measure changes the theoretical line ratio by up to 28% which is not sufficient as an explanation. We also explored additional excitation mechanisms. Photoexcitation from photospheric blackbody radiation, self-absorption, and recombination into excited levels cannot be a possible solution. Adding a second Maxwellian to simulate the presence of non-thermal, high-energy electrons in the plasma distribution of velocities also did not solve the discrepancy.

Muglach, K.; Landi, E. [Also at Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States); Doschek, G. A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10

Parks, P. B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5688 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acrf pyrgeometer blackbody" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

UNVEILING THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years, several disks with inner holes that are relatively empty of small dust grains have been detected and are known as transitional disks. Recently, Spitzer has identified a new class of 'pre-transitional disks' with gaps based on near-infrared photometry and mid-infrared spectra; these objects have an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk by an optically thin disk gap. A near-infrared spectrum provided the first confirmation of a gap in the pre-transitional disk of LkCa 15 by verifying that the near-infrared excess emission in this object was due to an optically thick inner disk. Here, we investigate the difference between the nature of the inner regions of transitional and pre-transitional disks using the same veiling-based technique to extract the near-infrared excess emission above the stellar photosphere. However, in this work we use detailed disk models to fit the excess continua as opposed to the simple blackbody fits previously used. We show that the near-infrared excess emission of the previously identified pre-transitional disks of LkCa 15 and UX Tau A in the Taurus cloud as well as the newly identified pre-transitional disk of ROX 44 in Ophiuchus can be fit with an inner disk wall located at the dust destruction radius. We also present detailed modeling of the broadband spectral energy distributions of these objects, taking into account the effect of shadowing by the inner disk on the outer disk, but considering the finite size of the star, unlike other recent treatments. The near-infrared excess continua of these three pre-transitional disks, which can be explained by optically thick inner disks, are significantly different from that of the transitional disks of GM Aur, whose near-infrared excess continuum can be reproduced by emission from sub-micron-sized optically thin dust, and DM Tau, whose near-infrared spectrum is consistent with a disk hole that is relatively free of small dust. The structure of pre-transitional disks may be a sign of young planets forming in these disks and future studies of pre-transitional disks will provide constraints to aid in theoretical modeling of planet formation.

Espaillat, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); D'Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico 58089 (Mexico); Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Merida, 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Nagel, E. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Gto, Mexico 36240 (Mexico); Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Calvet, N.; McClure, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Muzerolle, J., E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.m, E-mail: jesush@cida.v, E-mail: erick@astro.ugto.m, E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.ed, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.ed, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.ed, E-mail: melisma@umich.ed, E-mail: muzerol@stsci.ed [Space Telescope Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Management of unconverted light for the National Ignition Facility target chamber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NIF target chamber beam dumps must survive high x-ray, laser, ion, and shrapnel exposures without excessive generation of vapors or particulate that will contaminate the final optics debris shields, thereby making the debris shields susceptible to subsequent laser damage. The beam dumps also must be compatible with attaining and maintaining the required target chamber vacuum and must not activate significantly under high neutron fluxes. Finally, they must be developed, fabricated, and maintained for a reasonable cost. The primary challenge for the beam dump is to survive up to 20 J/cm{sup 2} of lpm light and 1 - 2 J/cm{sup 2} of nominally 200 - 350 eV blackbody temperature x rays. Additional threats include target shrapnel, and other contamination issues. Designs which have been evaluated include louvered hot-pressed boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) or stainless steel (SS) panels, in some cases covered with transparent Teflon film, and various combinations of inexpensive low thermal expansion glasses backed by inexpensive absorbing glass. Louvered designs can recondense a significant amount of ablated material that would otherwise escape into the target chamber. Transparent Teflon was evaluated as an alternative way to capture ablated material. The thin Teflon sheet would need to be replaced after each shot since it exhibits both laser damage and considerable x- ray ablation with each shot. Uncontaminated B{sub 4}C, SS, and low thermal expansion glasses have reasonably small x-ray and laser ablation rates, although the glasses begin to fail catastrophically after 100 high fluence shots. Commercially available absorbing glasses require a pre-shield of either Teflon or low thermal expansion glass to prevent serious degradation by the x-ray fluence. Advantages of the hot-pressed B{sub 4}C and SS over glass are their performance against microshrapnel, their relative indifference to contamination, and their ability to be refurbished by aggressive cleaning using CO{sub 2} pellets, glass beads, high pressure water or ultrasonic tanks. In addition the expected replacement rate to avoid catastrophic failure makes the glass option more costly. SS is less expensive, more easily formed into a louver design with high capture efficiency, and otherwise equivalent to B{sub 4}C. Hence, it would be preferred as long as debris shield damage is not substantially greater for SS as compared to damage from an equivalent mass of contamination of B{sub 4}C. If debris shield damage is problematic, the escape of SS could be mitigated by use of a transparent Teflon film. The Teflon film would require increased target chamber pumping and cleaning capability to accommodate the x-ray decomposition products.

Anderson, A. T.; Bletzer, K.; Burnham, A. K.; Dixit, S; Genin, F. Y.; Hibbard, W.; Norton, J.; Scott, J. M.; Whitman, P. K.

1998-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE OLD PULSAR PSR B1451-68  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 35 ks Chandra ACIS observations of the 42 Myr old radio pulsar PSR B1451-68. A point source is detected 0.''32 {+-} 0.''73 from the expected radio pulsar position. It has {approx}200 counts in the 0.3-8 keV energy range. We identify this point source as the X-ray counterpart of the radio pulsar. PSR B1451-68 is located close to a Two Micron All Sky Survey point source for which we derive 7% as the upper limit on the flux contribution to the measured pulsar X-ray flux. The pulsar spectrum can be described by either a power-law model with photon index {Gamma} = 2.4{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3} and a unrealistically high absorbing column density N{sub H} = (2.5{sup +1.2}{sub -1.3}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, or by a combination of a kT = 0.35{sup +0.12}{sub -0.07} keV blackbody and a {Gamma} = 1.4 {+-} 0.5 power-law component for N{sup DM}{sub H} = 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}, estimated from the pulsar dispersion measure. At the parallactic, a Lutz-Kelker bias corrected distance of 480 pc, the non-thermal X-ray luminosities in the 0.3-8 keV energy band are either L{sup nonth}{sub 0.3-8keV} = (11.3 {+-} 1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} or L{sup nonth}{sub 0.3-8keV} = (5.9{sup +4.9}{sub -5.0}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1}, respectively. This corresponds to non-thermal X-ray efficiencies of either {eta}{sub 0.3-8keV}{sup north}=L{sub 0.3-8keV}{sup north}/E-dot{approx}5x10{sup -3} or 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, respectively.

Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Garmire, G. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Manchester, R. N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Kargaltsev, O., E-mail: posselt@psu.edu, E-mail: pavlov@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 205 Bryant Space Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal research that involves the interplay of metallic-PBG rejection and photonic band edge absorption. They propose that an absolute metallic-PBG may be used to suppress the infrared part of the blackbody emission and, emit its energy only through a sharp absorption band. Potential applications of this new PBG mechanism include highly efficient incandescent lamps and enhanced thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. The suggested lamp would be able to recycle the energy that would otherwise go into the unwanted heat associated with usual lamps, into light emitted in the visible spectrum. It is estimated this would increase the efficiency over conventional lamps by about 40%.

Ihab Fathy El-Kady

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Selective emission and luminescence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} under intense laser excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) layers was observed upon interaction of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 200 – 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength ? = 10.6 ?m) and resonant laser (? ? 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 400 – 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions formed under intense laser excitation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er{sup 3+} ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Marchenko, V M; Studenikin, M I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L D [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Student Internship Program Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the author's third summer working at Sandia National Laboratories in organization 5712. He is a physics major at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. His work at Sandia began during his senior year at Eldorado High School, when he worked part time and received school credit for participating in the internship program. During that time and two ensuing summers he worked on a variety of projects. These experiences included testing a number of optical-electronic systems, performing such tasks as determining the spectral responsivity of photodiodes and placing optical/electronic systems in front of a variety of light-sources in order to generate calibration curves. He also contributed to the computer generation of data to model a hypothetical satellite-mounted detection system using SSGM (Synthetic Scene Generation Model) and the Khoros visual programming software Cantata on a UNIX operating system. Other experiences included pre-flight satellite testing, and work in the field deploying a suite of sensors and data collection equipment in Nevada. This summer he is involved in image analysis using the software development tools of the Khoros programming environment. He is working on a project whose goal is to identify superimposed spectra obtained from remote-sensing equipment. The spectra to be identified are those of chemical warfare agents and precursor chemicals from the industrial processes used to manufacture them. Identifying these spectra is a challenge when they are mixed with each other and with incident light from the ground and atmosphere--photons that are both reflected from the sun and emitted as blackbody radiation. In order to model this process, he is working on a Khoros program that will add noise to laboratory-obtained spectra from a variety of chemicals. This altered data will mimic what a remote sensing device is likely to record in the field. Given this example of likely field results, developing an ideal sensor and a method to identify spectra from such data will continue for a number of years.

CASSIDY,TIMOTHY A.

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

SWIFT X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET MONITORING OF THE CLASSICAL NOVA V458 VUL (NOVA VUL 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the highly variable X-ray and UV emission of V458 Vul (Nova Vul 2007), observed by Swift between 1 and 422 days after outburst. Initially bright only in the UV, V458 Vul became a variable hard X-ray source due to optically thin thermal emission at kT = 0.64 keV with an X-ray band unabsorbed luminosity of 2.3 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} during days 71-140. The X-ray spectrum at this time requires a low Fe abundance (0.2{sup +0.3} {sub -0.1} solar), consistent with a Suzaku measurement around the same time. On day 315 we find a new X-ray spectral component which can be described by a blackbody with temperature of kT = 23{sup +9} {sub -5} eV, while the previous hard X-ray component has declined by a factor of 3.8. The spectrum of this soft X-ray component resembles those typically seen in the class of supersoft sources (SSS) which suggests that the nova ejecta were starting to clear and/or that the white dwarf photosphere is shrinking to the point at which its thermal emission reaches into the X-ray band. We find a high degree of variability in the soft component with a flare rising by an order of magnitude in count rate in 0.2 days. In the following observations on days 342.4-383.6, the soft component was not seen, only to emerge again on day 397. The hard component continued to evolve, and we found an anticorrelation between the hard X-ray emission and the UV emission, yielding a Spearman rank probability of 97%. After day 397, the hard component was still present, was variable, and continued to fade at an extremely slow rate but could not be analyzed owing to pile-up contamination from the bright SSS component.

Ness, J.-U. [European Space Astronomy Centre, P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Drake, J. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Boyd, D. [BAA VSS, 5 Silver Lane, West Challow, Wantage, OX12 9TX (United Kingdom); Bode, M. F. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Brady, S. [AAVSO, 5 Melba Drive, Hudson, NH 03051 (United States); Gaensicke, B. T.; Steeghs, D. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kitamoto, S.; Takei, D. [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Knigge, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Miller, I. [BAA VSS, Furzehill House, Ilston, Swansea SA2 7LE (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Gil, P. [Isaac Newton Group, PO Ap. de Correos 321, 38700 Sta. Cruz de la Palma (Spain); Schwarz, G. [Department of Geology and Astronomy, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Staels, B. [CBA Flanders, Alan Guth Observatory, Koningshofbaan 51, Hofstade, Aalst (Belgium); Tsujimoto, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wesson, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int (and others)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

LONG-TERM SPECTRAL VARIATIONS OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE INTERACTING GALAXY SYSTEMS M 51 AND NGC 4490/85  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), which are considered to be black hole binaries (BHBs), are known to show state transitions similar to Galactic BHBs. However, the relation between the ULX states and the Galactic BHB states is still unclear, primarily due to the less well-understood behaviors of ULXs in contrast to the Galactic BHBs. Here, we report a statistical X-ray spectral study of 34 energy spectra from seven bright ULXs in the interacting galaxy systems M 51 and NGC 4490/85, using archive data from multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations spanning a few years. In order to compare them with Galactic BHB states, we applied representative spectral models of BHBs-a power-law (PL), a multi-color disk blackbody (MCD), and a slim-disk model-to all the ULX spectra. We found a hint of a bimodal structure in the luminosity distribution of the samples, suggesting that ULXs have two states that respectively have typical luminosities of (3-6)x 10{sup 39} and (1.5-3)x 10{sup 39} ergs s{sup -1}. Most spectra in the brighter state are explained by the MCD or the slim-disk model, whereas those in the fainter state are explained by the PL model. In particular, the slim-disk model successfully explains the observed spectral variations of NGC 4490/85 ULX-6 and ULX-8 by changes of the mass accretion rate to a black hole of an estimated mass of <40 M{sub sun}. From the best-fit model parameters of each state, we speculate that the brighter state in these two ULXs corresponds to the brightest state of Galactic BHBs, which is often called the 'apparently standard state'. The fainter state of the ULXs has a PL-shaped spectrum, but the photon index range is much wider than that seen in any single state of Galactic BHBs. We thus speculate that it is a state unique to ULXs. Some sources show much fainter and steeper spectra than the faint state, which we identified as yet another state.

Yoshida, Tessei; Ebisawa, Ken; Tsujimoto, Masahiro [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Matsushita, Kyoko [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: yoshida.tessei@ac.jaxa.j [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multiwavelength Observations of the Powerful Gamma-ray Quasar PKS 1510-089: Clues on the Jet Composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results from a multiwavelength campaign conducted in August 2006 of the powerful {gamma}-ray quasar PKS 1510--089 (z = 0.361). This campaign commenced with a deep Suzaku observation lasting three days for a total exposure time of 120 ks, and continued with Swift monitoring over 18 days. Besides Swift observations, which sampled the optical/UV flux in all 6 UVOT filters as well as the X-ray spectrum in the 0.3--10 keV energy range, the campaign included ground-based optical and radio data, and yielded a quasi-simultaneous broad-band spectral energy distribution from 109 Hz to 1019 Hz. Thanks to its low instrumental background, the Suzaku observation provided a high S/N X-ray spectrum, which is well represented by an extremely hard power-law with photon index {Gamma}{approx_equal}1.2, augmented by a soft component apparent below 1 keV, which is well described by a black-body model with temperature kT {approx_equal}0.2 keV. Monitoring by Suzaku revealed temporal variability which is different between the low and high energy bands, again suggesting the presence of a second, variable component in addition to the primary power-law emission. We model the broadband spectrum of PKS 1510--089 assuming that the high energy spectral component results from Comptonization of infrared radiation produced by hot dust located in the surrounding molecular torus. In the adopted internal shock scenario, the derived model parameters imply that the power of the jet is dominated by protons but with a number of electrons/positrons exceeding a number of protons by a factor {approx} 10. We also find that inhomogeneities responsible for the shock formation, prior to the collision may produce bulk-Compton radiation which can explain the observed soft X-ray excess and possible excess at {approx} 18 keV. We note, however, that the bulk-Compton interpretation is not unique, and the observed soft excess could arise as well via some other processes discussed briefly in the text.

Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Sikora, M.; Roming, P.; Chester, M.M.; Grupe, D.; Tsubuku, Y.; Sato, R.; Kawai, N.; Tosti, G.; Impiombato, D.; Kovalev, Y.Y.; Kovalev, Y.A.; Edwards, Philip G.; Wagner, S.J.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temp

Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light fixture. During the third and final year of the project, the LRC team investigated alternate packaging methods for the white LED device to achieve at least 25 percent more luminous efficacy than traditional white LEDs; conducted optical ray-tracing analyses and human factors studies to determine the best form factor for the white light source under development, in terms of high luminous efficacy and greater acceptance by subjects; and developed a new die encapsulant using silicone-epoxy resins that showed less yellowing and slower degradation. At the conclusion of this project, the LRC demonstrated a new packaging method, called scattered photon extraction (SPE), that produced an average luminous flux and corresponding average efficacy of 90.7 lm and 36.3 lm/W, respectively, compared with 56.5 lm and 22.6 lm/W for a similar commercial white LED package. At low currents, the SPE package emitted white light with an efficacy of over 80 lm/W and had chromaticity values very close to the blackbody locus. The SPE package showed an overall improvement of 61% for this particular comparison, exceeding the LRC's third-year goal of 25% improvement.

Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

Sonsight Inc.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z