Sample records for acrf pyrgeometer blackbody

  1. Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

  2. Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

  3. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  4. Uncertainty Estimates for SIRS, SKYRAD, & GNDRAD Data and Reprocessing the Pyrgeometer Data (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.; Habte, A.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility work together in providing data from strategically located in situ measurement observatories around the world. Both work together in improving and developing new technologies that assist in acquiring high quality radiometric data. In this presentation we summarize the uncertainty estimates of the ARM data collected at the ARM Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS), Sky Radiometers on Stand for Downwelling Radiation (SKYRAD), and Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation (GNDRAD), which ultimately improve the existing radiometric data. Three studies are also included to show the difference between calibrating pyrgeometers (e.g., Eppley PIR) using the manufacturer blackbody versus the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG), a pyrgeometer aging study, and the sampling rate effect of correcting historical data.

  5. Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program Using NREL Method (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the DOE-Atmospheric System Research Program, Science Team Meeting, 15-19 March 2010, Bethesda, Maryland. The presentation: Pyrgeometer Calibration for DOE-Atmospheric System Research program using NREL Method - was presented by Ibrahim Reda and Tom Stoffel on March 15, 2010 at the 2010 ASR Science Team Meeting. March 15-19, 2010, Bethesda, Maryland.

  6. Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

  7. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into four sections: (1) news about ingests currently under development, (2) current production ingests, (3) future ingest development plans, and (4) information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  8. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (November 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD: Gaustad, KL

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  9. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  11. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; N N Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  12. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  13. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future (September 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, AS; Choudhury, S; Ermold, BD; Gaustad, KL

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  14. Blackbody comparator for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, M.; Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M. [Centre for Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES), P.O.Box 9, FI-02151 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    MIKES is developing a measurement set-up for calibrating thermocouples in the temperature range 960 °C - 1500 °C. The calibration method is based on direct comparison of thermocouples and radiation thermometers. We have designed a graphite blackbody comparator cell, which is operated in a horizontal single-zone tube furnace. The cell includes two blackbody cavities for radiation temperature measurements. The cavities have openings on opposite sides of the cell, allowing simultaneous measurement with two radiation thermometers. The design of the comparator allows three thermocouples to be calibrated simultaneously. The thermocouples to be calibrated are inserted in thermometer wells around one of the measurement cavities. We characterize the blackbody comparator in terms of repeatability, temperature distribution and emissivity. Finally, we validate the uncertainty analysis by comparing calibration results obtained for type B and S thermocouples to the calibration results reported by Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP), and MIKES. The agreement in the temperature range 1000 °C - 1500 °C is within 0.90 °C, the average deviation being 0.17 °C.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September – October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  17. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October – November 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  19. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  20. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  1. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  2. An Analysis of Universality in Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the formulation of his law of thermal emission, Kirchhoff conferred upon blackbody radiation the quality of universality [G.Kirchhoff, Annalen der Physik 109, 275 (1860)]. Consequently, modern physics holds that such radiation is independent of the nature and shape of the emitted object. Recently, Kirchhoff's experimental work and theoretical conclusions have been reconsidered [P.M.L. Robitaille, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science 31(6), 1263 (2003). In this work, Einstein's derivation of the Planckian relation is reexamined. It is demonstrated that claims of universality in blackbody radiation are invalid.

  3. Mass and temperature limits for blackbody radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Pesci

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetric distribution of classical blackbody radiation is considered, at conditions in which gravitational self-interaction effects become not negligible. Static solutions to Einstein field equations are searched for, for each choice of the assumed central energy density. Spherical cavities at thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. filled with blackbody radiation, are then studied, in particular for what concerns the relation among the mass M of the ball of radiation contained in them and their temperature at center and at the boundary. For these cavities it is shown, in particular, that: i) there is no absolute limit to M as well to their central and boundary temperatures; ii) when radius R is fixed, however, limits exist both for mass and for boundary energy density rho_B: M temperature) of the ball of radiation.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  5. UPDATED AND IMPROVED ACRF GIS DATA AND MAPS A. Cialella and R. Wagener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and improvements to the ACRF geographic information system (GIS) database will be presented, including land use/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Updates of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy

  6. Numerical Models of Blackbody-Dominated GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta-Martínez, Carlos F; Mimica, Petar; Thöne, Christina C; de Ugarte-Postigo, Antonio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blackbody-dominated (BBD) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are events characterized by the absence of a typical afterglow, long durations and the presence of a significant thermal component following the prompt gamma-ray emission. GRB 101225A (the `Christmas burst') is a prototype of this class. A plausible progenitor system for it, and for the BBD-GRBs, is the merger of a neutron star (NS) and a helium core of an evolved, massive star. Using relativistic hydrodynamic simulations we model the propagation of an ultrarelativistic jet through the enviroment created by such a merger and we compute the whole radiative signature, both thermal and non-thermal, of the jet dynamical evolution. We find that the thermal emission originates from the interaction between the jet and the hydrogen envelope ejected during the NS/He merger.

  7. ORNL, ACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri Palanisamy, Karen Gibson, W. Christopher Lenhardt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri Palanisamy,

  8. An interpretation of the black-body radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shun-ichiro Koh

    2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The black-body radiation is reinterpreted in terms of the photon's many-body wave functions in analogy with the condensed matter physics. This interpretation has implications on the wave-particle duality, and on the difference between the photon and the matter wave.

  9. An electronic radiation of blackbody: Cosmic electron background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2008-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Universe owns the electronic radiation of blackbody at temperature 2.725 K, which we call the cosmic electron background. We calculate its radiation spectrum. The energy distribution of number density of electrons in the cosmic electron background becomes zero as energy goes to both zero and infinity. It has one maximum peak near the energy level of 10**(-23) J.

  10. Measurements of Martin-Puplett Interferometer Limitations using Blackbody Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Klopf, John M. [JLAB

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency domain measurements with Martin-Puplett interferometer is one of a few techniques capable of bunch length measurements at the level of ~ 100 fs. As the bunch length becomes shorter, it is important to know and be able to measure the limitations of the instrument in terms of shortest measurable bunch length. In this paper we describe an experiment using a blackbody source with the modified Martin-Puplett interferometer that is routine- ly used for bunch length measurements at the JLab FEL, as a way to estimate the shortest, measurable bunch length. The limitation comes from high frequency cut-off of the wire-grid polarizer currently used and is estimated to be 50 fs RMS. The measurements are made with the same Golay cell detector that is used for beam measure- ments. We demonstrate that, even though the blackbody source is many orders of magnitude less bright than the coherent transition or synchrotron radiation, it can be used for the measurements and gives a very good signal to noise ratio in combination with lock-in detection. We also compare the measurements made in air and in vacuum to characterize the very strong effect of the atmospheric absorption.

  11. Neutron star blackbody contraction during flaring in X1624-490

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Balucinska-Church; R. Barnard; M. J. Church; A. P. Smale

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of an investigation of the physical changes taking place in the emission regions of the LMXB X1624-490 during strong flaring in RXTE observations. Based on the detailed light curve, we propose that the flaring consists of a superposition of X-ray bursts. It is shown that major changes take place in the blackbody emission component, the temperature kT_BB increasing to ~2.2 keV in flaring. Remarkably, the blackbody area decreases by a factor of ~5 in flaring. During flare evolution, the blackbody luminosity remains approximately constant, constituting a previously unknown Eddington limiting effect which we propose is due to radiation pressure of the blackbody as kT_BB increases affecting the inner disk or accretion flow resulting in a decreased emitting area on the star. We argue that the large decrease in area cannot be explained in terms of modification of the blackbody spectrum by electron scattering in the atmosphere of the neutron star. The height of the emitting region on the non-flaring neutron star is shown to agree with the height of the inner radiatively-supported disk as found for sources in the ASCA survey of LMXB of Church & Balucinska-Church (2001). The decrease in height during flaring is discussed in terms of possible models, including radial accretion flow onto the stellar surface and the theory of accretion flow spreading on the neutron star surface of Inogamov & Sunyaev (1999). We demonstrate that the intensity of the broad iron line at 6.4 keV is strongly correlated with the luminosity of the blackbody emission from the neutron star, and discuss the probable origin of this line in the ADC. Finally, possible reasons for non-detection of a reflection component in this source, and LMXB in general, are discussed.

  12. The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. V. Prigara

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law.

  13. A Possible Anisotropy in Blackbody Radiation Viewed through Non-uniform Gaseous Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray-Dastidar, T K

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-local gauge symmetry of a complex scalar field, which can be trivially extended to spinor fields, was demonstrated in a recent paper (Mod.Phys.Lett. A13, 1265 (1998) ; hep-th/9902020). The corresponding covariant Lagrangian density yielded a new, non-local Quantum Electrodynamics. In the present paper it is shown that as a consequence of this new QED, a blackbody radiation viewed through gaseous matter appears to show a slight deviation from the Planck formula, and we propose an experimental test to check this effect. We also show that a non-uniformity in this gaseous matter distribution leads to an (apparent) spatial anisotropy in the blackbody radiation.

  14. Entropy and complexity properties of the d-dimensional blackbody radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Toranzo; J. S. Dehesa

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Space dimensionality is a crucial variable in the analysis of the structure and dynamics of natural systems and phenomena. The dimensionality effects of the blackbody radiation has been the subject of considerable research activity in recent years. These studies are still somewhat fragmentary, pos- ing formidable qualitative and quantitative problems for various scientific and technological areas. In this work we carry out an information-theoretical analysis of the spectral energy density of a d-dimensional blackbody at temperature T by means of various entropy-like quantities (disequilibrium, Shannon entropy, Fisher information) as well as by three (dimensionless) complexity measures (Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC). All these frequency-functional quantities are calculated and discussed in terms of temperature and dimensionality. It is shown that all three measures of complexity have an universal character in the sense that they depend neither on temperature nor on the Planck and Boltzmann constants, but only on the the space dimensionality d. Moreover, they decrease when d is increasing; in particular, the values 2.28415, 1.90979 and 1.17685 are found for the Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC measures of complexity of the 3-dimensional blackbody radiation, respectively. In addition, beyond the frequency at which the spectral density is maximum (which follows the well-known Wien displacement law), three further characteristic frequencies are defined in terms of the previous entropy quantities; they are shown to obey Wien-like laws. The potential usefulness of these distinctive features of the blackbody spectrum is physically discussed.

  15. High temperature blackbody BB2000/40 for calibration of radiation thermometers and thermocouple

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogarev, S. A.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Samoylov, M. L.; Puzanov, A. V. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), Moscow (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The cavity-type high temperature blackbody (HTBB) models of BB3200/3500 series are the most spread among metrological institutes worldwide as sources for radiometry and radiation thermometry, due to their ultra high working temperatures, high emissivity and stability. The materials of radiating cavities are graphite, pyrolytic graphite (PG) and their combination. The paper describes BB2000/40 blackbody with graphite-tube cavity that was developed for calibration of radiation thermometers at SCEI (Singapore). The peculiarity of BB2000/40 is a possibility to use it, besides calibration of pyrometers, as an instrument for thermocouples calibration. Operating within the temperature range from 900 °C to 2000 °C, the blackbody has a wide cavity opening of 40 mm. Emissivity of the cavity, with PG heater rings replaced partly by graphite elements, was estimated as 0.998 ± 0.0015 in the spectral range from 350 nm to 2000 nm. The uniformity along the cavity axis, accounting for 10 °C, was measured using a B-type thermocouple at 1500 °C. The BB2000/40, if necessary, can be easily modified, by replacing the graphite radiator with a set of PG rings, to be able to reach temperatures as high as 3200 °C. The HTBB utilizes an optical feedback system which allows temperature stabilization within 0.1 °C. This rear-view feedback allows the whole HTBB aperture to be used for measurements.

  16. Blackbody material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Trivelpiece, Alvin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting article comprises a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light emitting composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  17. The Blackbody Radiation Laws in the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi Filho

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the footsteps of our previous work \\cite{RamatonBoschi} we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ spacetime, the background of the AdS/CFT correspondence foremost realization. Our results take into account the $ \\textrm{AdS}_5 \\times {\\cal S}^5 $ full dimensionality in the electromagnetic field $A^{\\mu}$ wave equation, which yields the higher-dimensional blackbody characteristic features suggested in literature. In particular, the total radiated power and the spectral radiancy match the original Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws in the low-energy regime up to available experimental data.

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall-

  19. Evaluation of Improved Pyrgeometer Calibration Method

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation EmergencyCloudSat,

  20. A New Blackbody Radiation Law Based on Fractional Calculus and its Application to NASA COBE Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biyajima, Minoru; Suzuki, Naomichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA COBE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter $(q-1)$, a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter $(\\alpha-1)$, and our new formula including a parameter $(p-1)$, as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential $\\mu$. It can be said that one role of the fractional parameter $(p-1)$ is almost the same as that of chemical potential $(\\mu)$ as well as that of the parameter $(q-1)$ in the non-extensive approach.

  1. ACRF-Newsletter.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL. A Multilevel

  2. Global warming and its implications for conservation. 2. How does it work? Part one: greenhouse gasses and blackbody

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    gasses and blackbody radiation. A quick review of: · Fossil fuels · Carbon cycles · Anthropogenic effects of fossil fuel oxidation on carbon cycles Fossil Fuels The primary driver of anthropogenic climate change fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) to produce energy. Almost all energy on earth ultimately comes from

  3. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)] [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (?{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ?{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ?{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ?{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  4. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Safronova; U. I. Safronova

    2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n = 7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly-excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in accuracy of the 3d_{5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3) a.u., in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007)]. The blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s - 3d_{5/2} clock transition in Ca+ is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300K. Electric-quadrupole 4s -nd and electric-octupole 4s -nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 43Ca+ ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca+ atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

  5. ACRF Newsletter_May_FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL. A Multilevel Method3CHANGE

  6. AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral20ALSNews Vol.AMERICA'SWhatsnew AMH

  7. Blackbody Distribution for Wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. González-Díaz

    1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    By assuming that only (i) bilocal vertex operators which are diagonal with respect to the basis for local field operators, and (ii) the convergent elements with nonzero positive energy of the density matrix representing the quantum state of multiply-connected wormholes, contribute the path integral that describes the effects of wormholes on ordinary matter fields at low energy, it is obtained that the probability measure for multiply connected wormholes with nondegenerate energy spectrum is given in terms of a Planckian probability distribution for the momenta of a quantum field $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^ {2}$, where the $\\alpha$'s are the Coleman parameters, rather than a classical gaussian distribution law, and that an observable classical universe can exist if, and only if, such multiply connected wormholes are allowed to occur.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_pyrgeometer.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess usedGELustreMeasures ofof CloudARM

  9. One-Loop Dominance in the Imaginary Part of the Polarizability: Application to Blackbody and Non-Contact van der Waals Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. D. Jentschura; G. Lach; M. De Kieviet; K. Pachucki

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenologically important quantum dissipative processes include black-body friction (an atom absorbs counterpropagating blue-shifted photons and spontaneously emits them in all directions, losing kinetic energy) and non-contact van der Waals friction (in the vicinity of a dielectric surface, the mirror charges of the constituent particles inside the surface experience drag, slowing the atom). The theoretical predictions for these processes are modified upon a rigorous quantum electrodynamic (QED) treatment, which shows that the one-loop "correction" yields the dominant contribution to the off-resonant, gauge-invariant, imaginary part of the atom's polarizability at room temperature, for typical atom-surface interactions. The tree-level contribution to the polarizability dominates at high temperature.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information - June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information July 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information April 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information August 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status and Information May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1 TEMPERATUREii ABSTRACT ThisACACML6

  17. Near-Blackbody Enclosed Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  18. Near-Blackbody Enclosed Particle Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    radiative principles. Innovative Receiver Design 7 2. Transform 2-D panel heat absorption to 3-D volumetric heat transfer by using arrayed absorber tubes. Aperture flux Wall...

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - August 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November – December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - July 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development. New information is highlighted in blue text.

  17. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - June 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - January 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. acrf instrumentation status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    224 DIRECT EXPERIMENTAL TESTS AND COMPARISON BETWEEN SUB-MINIATURE FISSION CHAMBERS AND SPND FOR FIXED IN-CORE INSTRUMENTATION OF LWR CiteSeer Summary: A fixed in-core...

  5. acrf millimeter wave: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 63 Horn antenna design for BAN millimeter wave on-body...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden Julian Oscillation

  7. Radiative Closure Studies at the NSA ACRF Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal

  8. The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a $D$-dimensional manifold composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and $D-4$ compact dimensions, $ R^{1,3}$ x $T^{D-4} $. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes $ R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) \\, T^D $, where $a$ is the size of the compact extra dimensions. For $D=10$, predicted from String Theory, and $D=11$, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for $a$ as high as 2 x $10^{-7}$m.

  9. George Smoot, Blackbody, and Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options GaryandEnergy,science, and technology

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. Use of Long Time-series ACRF Measurements to Improve Data Quality Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4. Uranium purchasedUrbanHerbivores -Use

  13. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.3 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-15022 Sonde313

  14. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-002.7 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-15022 Sonde3137

  15. Finite Cloud Effects at the ACRF TWP Site Patrick Taylor and Robert G. Ellingson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing Opportunities forFinishing the job

  16. Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermal PhenomenaInitial Assessment

  17. Microsoft Word - ACRF4thQuarterFY09 draft_nb__sal.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8 3. EFFECTIVE DATE (M/D/Y) See

  18. Seasonal And Decadal Variation of the Mixed Layer Across the ACRF Using RWP Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics LabwildfiresScotttheSwitchSeasonal And

  19. Microsoft Word - ACRF3rdQuarterFY09_DOE_SC_ARM_P_09_011.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8 3. EFFECTIVE DATE (M/D/Y) See Block1

  20. Emission and absorption of photons and the black-body spectra in Lorentz-odd Electrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Fonseca; A. H. Gomes; W. A. Moura-Melo

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a number of issues related to the emission and absorption radiation by non-relativistic electrons within the framework of a Lorentz-breaking electrodynamics in (3+1) dimensions. Our main results concern how Planck-like spectrum law is sensitive to terms that violate Lorentz symmetry. We have realized that Planck law acquires extra terms proportional to the violating parameters: for the CPT-odd model, the leading extra terms appear to be linear or quadratic in these violating parameters according to the background vector is parallel or perpendicular to the photon wave-vector. In the CPT-even case a linear `correction' shows up. Among other possible ways to probe for these violations, by means of the present results, we may quote the direct observation of the extra contributions or an unbalancing in the mean occupation number of photon modes in a given thermal bath.

  1. Photon Spin, Zero-point Energy and Black-body radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Tiwari

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical review of the obscure nature of the contribution of spin energy to the energy of the electromagnetic field is presented. It is proposed that the total energy of photon h\

  2. Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered a blackbody radiator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    . 1 Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered frequency is that of infrared electromagnetic radiation, the light bulb radiates more energy in the infrared

  3. Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy H. Boyer

    2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

  4. Field comparisons of direct and component measurements of net radiation under clear skies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchon, C.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wilk, G.E. [National Weather Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which prompted this investigation of their cause. The instruments involved were an all-black single-dome Fritschen-type net pyrradiometer, two Eppley model 8-48 pyranometers, and an Eppley model PIR pyrgeometer. Each had recently been calibrated. The accuracy of the component instruments was considered first. Comparisons of about one hour on each of three nights between the pyrgeometer and five empirical formulas showed that the average departure over all formulas from the pyrgeometer average was {minus}1%. Other comparisons between the pyrgeometer and an infrared thermometer viewing the surface yielded similar results. Alternate shading and unshading of the pyrgeometer looking upward during daytime resulted in a formula that was used to correct the downward longwave radiation under clear skies. The correction is dependent on wind speed, in contrast to a recent paper showing negligible dependence, but is in accord with earlier findings. Based on manufacturer`s specifications, the pyranometer calibrations were considered to be within 2% of the World Radiation Reference. Thus a series of experiments was carried out using what were believed to be reasonably accurate component measurements of net radiation and measurements from the net pyrradiometer.

  5. Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, K; Long, CN

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

  6. alkane molecular ions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1977-01-01 25 Blackbody thermometry with cold molecular ions and application to ion-based frequency standards Physics Websites Summary: Blackbody thermometry with cold...

  7. Trip Report: March 14-18, 2011 1. Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Assunção Silva Dias (USP), Beat Schmid (DOE PNNL AAF), Gilberto Fisch (CTA), Jian Wang (DOE BNL), Kim. Courtesy visit to USA embassy by Beat Schmid (DOE PNNL AAF), Kim Nitschke (DOE LANL ACRF), and Scot Martin

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. DATA META FILE 2011 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and analyses were supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 Year 2 Day 3 Hour 4 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 5 Reflected Solar Radiation W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Incoming longwave radiation W/m2 Eppley Pyrgeometer 7

  16. DATA META FILE 2012 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and analyses were supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 Year 2 Day 3 Hour 4 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 5 Reflected Solar Radiation W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Incoming longwave radiation W/m2 Eppley Pyrgeometer 7

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data, A New Data Product for Climate Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); McCoy, Renata B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Klein, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Cederwall, Richard T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Wiscombe, Warren J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Gaustad, Krista L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Golaz, Jean-Christophe [NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ; Shamblin, Stefanie H [ORNL; Jensen, Michael P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Johnson, Karen L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Lin, Yanluan [NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ; Long, Charles N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Mather, James H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); McCord, Raymond A [ORNL; McFarlane, Sally A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Palanisamy, Giri [ORNL; Shi, Yan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Turner, David D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) was created in 1989 to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. A central activity is the acquisition of detailed observations of clouds and radiation, as well as related atmospheric variables for climate model evaluation and improvement. Since 1992, ARM has established six permanent ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and deployed an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in diverse climate regimes around the world (Fig. 1) to perform long-term continuous field measurements. The time record of ACRF data now exceeds a decade at most ACRF fixed sites and ranges from several months to one year for AMF deployments. Billions of measurements are currently stored in millions of data files in the ACRF Data Archive. The long-term continuous ACRF data provide invaluable information to improve our understanding of the interaction between clouds and radiation, and an observational basis for model validation and improvement and climate studies. Given the huge number of data files and current diversity of archived ACRF data structures, however, it can be difficult for an outside user such as a climate modeler to quickly find the ACRF data product(s) that best meets their research needs. The required geophysical quantities may exist in multiple data streams, and over the history of ACRF operations, the measurements could be obtained by a variety of instruments, reviewed with different levels of data quality assurance, or derived using different algorithms. In addition, most ACRF data are stored in daily-based files with a temporal resolution that ranges from a few seconds to a few minutes, which is much finer than that sought by some users. Therefore, it is not as convenient for data users to perform quick comparisons over large spans of data, and this can hamper the use of ACRF data by the climate community. To make ACRF data better serve the needs of climate studies and model development, ARM has developed a data product specifically tailored for use by the climate community. The new data product, named the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, assembles those quantities that are both well observed by ACRF over many years and are often used in model evaluation into one single dataset. The CMBE product consists of hourly averages and thus has temporal resolution comparable to a typical resolution used in climate model output. It also includes standard deviations within the averaged hour and quality control flags for the selected quantities to indicate the temporal variability and data quality. Since its initial release in February 2008, the new data product has quickly drawn the attention of the climate modeling community. It is being used for model evaluation by two major U.S. climate modeling centers, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of CMBE data and a few examples that demonstrate the potential value of CMBE data for climate modeling and in studies of cloud processes and climate variability and change.

  18. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  19. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  20. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF3 ACRF

  1. Microsoft Word - 2009-04 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P=09.004.4.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4 ACRF

  2. Microsoft Word - 2009-05 Instrument Report DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.5.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4 ACRF5

  3. Microsoft Word - 2009-06 Instrument Report_DOE_SC_ARM_P_09_004.6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4 ACRF56

  4. Microsoft Word - 2009-08 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.8.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation48 ACRF

  5. Microsoft Word - 2009-09 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.9.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation48 ACRF9

  6. NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-blackbody enclosed particle receiver can support high-temperature thermal energy storage and high-efficiency power cycles.

  7. Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of large dust particles in the atmosphere around Niamey.

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometer Calibrations for

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometer Calibrations

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometer

  11. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometerLinking

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometerLinkingWave Cloud

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometerLinkingWave

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometerLinkingWaveon the

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) - EnergySpectralAspectDustActive CloudPyrgeometerLinkingWaveon

  16. Why do some intermediate polars show soft X-ray emission? A survey of XMM-Newton spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Evans; Coel Hellier

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a systematic analysis of the XMM-Newton X-ray spectra of intermediate polars (IPs) and find that, contrary to the traditional picture, most show a soft blackbody component. We compare the results with those from AM Her stars and deduce that the blackbody emission arises from reprocessing of hard X-rays, rather than from the blobby accretion sometimes seen in AM Hers. Whether an IP shows a blackbody component appears to depend primarily on geometric factors: a blackbody is not seen in those that have accretion footprints that are always obscured by accretion curtains or are only visible when foreshortened on the white-dwarf limb. Thus we argue against previous suggestions that the blackbody emission characterises a separate sub-group of IPs which are more akin to AM Hers, and develop a unified picture of the blackbody emission in these stars.

  17. advanced turbine cooling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water methods. This approach reduces water... Boffardi, B. P. 466 Blackbody-radiation-assisted molecular laser cooling Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: The translational motion of...

  18. International Journal of Thermophysics, Vol. 20, No. 5, 1999 Laser infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) was used to measure the ther-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    for monitoring the modulated thermal (blackbody) radiation emitted from a material surface after photothermal to the diffusion length, u(f)m i n , Fig. 1. Sch

  19. ARM Quick-looks Database for North Slope Alaska (NSA) sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stamnes, Knut (NSA Site Scientist)

    From these pages one can monitor parts of the data acquisition process and access daily data visualizations from the different instruments. These data visualizations are produced in near real time automatically and are called Quick-Looks (QLs). The quick-looks contains unofficial data of unknown quality. Once data is released one can obtain the full data-set from any instrument available, and along with that, a statement about the data quality from the ARM archive. The database provides Quick-looks for the Barrow ACRF site (NSA C1), the Atqasuk ACRF site (NSA C2), or the SHEBA ice campaign of 1997 and 1998. As of 12-17-08, the database had more than 528,000 quick-looks available as data figures and data plots. No password is required for Quick-look access. (Specialized Interface)

  20. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data then are sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by 1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and 2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  4. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  5. Instrumentation selection, installation, verification and calibration at the passive cooling experimental facility for a hot/arid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peck, J.F.; Mignon, G.V.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Passive Cooling Experimental Facility is to acquire data and perform experiments regarding different passive cooling techniques and strategies. In order to adequately explain the cooling techniques employed, sufficient instrumentation and data logging equipment was installed. Sensors were selected based on their accuracy, cost effectiveness, and ability to calibrate consistently and with ease. The sensors and instrumentation and the basis for their selection, installation, verification and calibration are described. Installation and calibration details are provided for certain selected critical sensors, i.e., heat flux meters, pyrgeometers, etc. The following list summarizes the critical sensors and instruments selected and installed. Heat flux: Hy-Cal Engineering BI-7 thermoelectric sensors; Temperature (wet and dry bulb): Copper-constantine thermocouples, Hewlett Packard reference junction; Pyranometers: Eppley PSP, LICOR photovoltaic pyranometers and Eppley Shadow Band 8 to 48 pyranometer; Infrared Radiometer: Eppley PIR pyrgeometer; Ambient Wind Velocity: Gill Propeller Vane Anemometer by R.M. Young; Air Flow: EII Air Flow Meters; and Infiltration: SF/sub 6/ gas chromatography.

  6. ORNL/TM-11184

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,

  7. ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/

  8. ORO-2012-01892-F_SLESIN_LOUIS_NEWS_MEDIA_09-17-2012[1].pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/

  9. OST opens new logistics support site | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond

  10. OSTI Communications - ICSTI 2010 Annual Conference, Helsinki, Finland,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalter Warnick -

  11. OSTI Milestones, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, USDOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalter Warnick

  12. OSTI Widgets | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalter

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalterEnergy,

  14. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access to

  16. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding

  18. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding access

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding

  20. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeedingSpeeding

  1. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF

  2. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  3. Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CN Long; P Gotseff; EG Dutton

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall average downwelling longwave (LW) measured at the Niamey supplementary facility (S1) is 6-8 Wm-2 less than that measured by the two instruments located at the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) main (N1) site. Examination of all other data available at both sites does not reveal any overarching differences that suggest this should be the case. However, examination of the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures do suggest that the S1 values are also anomalously low, which in turn would explain the downwelling LW anomaly since the LW is calculated using these temperatures. Our recommendation then is to normalize the S1 data to the average N1 value by applying an adjustment factor to the S1 downwelling pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures (in Kelvin), then recalculating the downwelling LW values. The adjustment factor (0.00305) has been determined as that factor that brings the overall average S1 LWdn to agree with the overall average of the two N1 LWdn data series. We note that there is no reason to expect that the two site averages would actually be exactly equal to one another, and thus our recommendation is viewed as likely moving the S1 data in the right direction and by normalizing to the N1 average will help facilitate more meaningful temporal variability studies at least. It is also strongly recommended that for all future AMF deployments where supplementary sites will also be deployed, that the supplementary instrument systems (complete) be assembled as they will be operated in the field and run for at least a few days beside the corresponding AMF main site instruments, both at the beginning and end of the AMF field campaign. This is absolutely crucial so that all the measurements can be compared pre- and post-experiment to properly relate these measurements and systems, and to detect measurement anomalies such as those discussed in this report.

  4. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substances I chemically as salts. Ocean water contains rimately 3 percent salts, or 40 tons of salts .-foot of water. Waters used for irriga- ~erally contain .1 to 5 tons of salt per acre- water. . -er acrf +ion gen 'pot of ,.. ,enera1 terms, salt... and rock materials through which .he water must seep before becoming available inr irrigation. Mountain streams often contain less than one-tenth ton of salt per acre-foot of .rater. Drainage waters and ground waters in lesert valleys may contain...

  5. Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - February 2007 formatted_P-07-002.2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6AboutEFCOG ELECTRICAL SAFETY2 ACRF

  6. Microsoft Word - Instrument Status - January 2007 formatted.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6AboutEFCOG ELECTRICAL SAFETY2 ACRF

  7. ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri

  8. ORNL, Da Vinci Sign Licensing Agreement | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, GiriDa Vinci Sign

  9. ORNL, Industry Collaboration Puts Spotlight on Solar T DOING BUSINESS WITH ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, GiriDa Vinci

  10. ORNL, Industry to Collaborate in Advanced Battery Research | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, GiriDa

  11. ORNL-Dow Evaluation of Advanced Energy-Saving Sealant for Buildings |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, GiriDaornl.gov

  12. ORNL/TM-13360 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LAB0 RAT0 R Y L O C K W E E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ d ORNL/TM-13360

  13. ORNL/TM-2012/196

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ d

  14. ORNL/TM-2014/59

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ d4/59 Emissions

  15. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ d4/59

  16. ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ d4/59Control

  17. ORP Update on Status of Double Shell Tank AY-102

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORP Update on

  18. OR_Knox_AirportMap_2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORP Update

  19. OR_Knox_area_2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORP

  20. OR_map_2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORPTO I-75, EXIT

  1. OSCARS Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORPTO I-75,

  2. OSCARS Collaborative Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORPTO I-75,OSCARS

  3. OSCARS Extends JGI Network Capacity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORPTO I-75,OSCARS

  4. OSDBU Hosts FY 2015 Small Business Kickoff | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord,/ORPTO

  5. OSTI History, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, USDOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalter Warnick -OSTI

  6. OSTI and DataCite - Easing Access and Reuse of Data | OSTI, US Dept of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalterEnergy, Office of

  7. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalterEnergy, Office

  8. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: RaymondWalterEnergy,Speeding

  9. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access to science

  10. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access to scienceSpeeding

  11. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access toSpeeding access

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access toSpeeding

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding

  14. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding accessSpeeding access to

  15. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding accessSpeeding access

  16. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding accessSpeeding

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:Speeding accessSpeedingSpeeding

  18. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding access to science

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding access to

  20. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding access toSpeeding

  1. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeeding accessSpeeding

  2. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeedingSpeeding access to

  3. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeedingSpeeding access

  4. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive:SpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeeding

  5. CLASIC OUTLINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o'IUHopper3CHOS2,2,CIMEL2ACRF

  6. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF

  7. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF3

  8. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF35

  9. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-005.1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF351

  10. DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF3513

  11. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-079 Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF3513

  12. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-087 Merged Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222 ACRF35137

  13. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF

  14. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF8

  15. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF89

  16. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF892

  17. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF8922

  18. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF

  19. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF0

  20. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF01

  1. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF012

  2. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT0 ACRF0122

  3. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT04 ACRF

  4. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT04 ACRF5

  5. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT04 ACRF56

  6. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT04 ACRF567

  7. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT049 ACRF

  8. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT049 ACRF6

  9. Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVultureBehavior ofDESERT049 ACRF67

  10. ARM TR-008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new,Scanning Radar Azores1 ARM7101 ACRF

  11. ARM TR-008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new,Scanning Radar Azores1 ARM7101 ACRF2

  12. ARM TR-008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new,Scanning Radar Azores1 ARM71014 ACRF

  13. Microsoft Word - 2009-02 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09.004.2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation Status:

  14. Microsoft Word - 2009-03 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.3.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation

  15. Microsoft Word - 2009-07 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-P-09-004.7.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4

  16. Microsoft Word - 2009-10 Instrument Report_DOE_SC_ARM_09-004-10_FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation48

  17. Microsoft Word - 2009-12 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-09-004.11t.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation481 ARM

  18. Microsoft Word - 2010 06.01 FOIA for sruvelliances.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation481 ARM,

  19. Microsoft Word - 2010 MSU_compressed with SANDno1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation481

  20. Microsoft Word - 2010-01 Instrument Report_DOE-SC-ARM-10-006.1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4811 ARM

  1. Microsoft Word - 2010-03 Instrument Monthly_ARM_10_006.3.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF Instrumentation4811

  2. Microsoft Word - 2010-10-08_ESI Fact Sheet for Utilities.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF

  3. Microsoft Word - 2010_0309_RAP_MeetingSummary_FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINAL MEETING

  4. Microsoft Word - 2010_0413_RAP_MeetingSummary_FINAL.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINAL MEETING3,

  5. Microsoft Word - 2010_1209_RAP_Meeting_Summary_final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINAL

  6. Microsoft Word - 2011 March 11 ROD - Central Ferry-Lower Monumental.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINALFerry-Lower

  7. Microsoft Word - 2011-05-27_ESI Program FAQ.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010

  8. Microsoft Word - 20111012_RAP Dec_Mtg_Topics.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010October12, 2011

  9. Microsoft Word - 2011HydropowerCouncilAgenda051211.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010October12,

  10. Microsoft Word - 2011_0330_PIC_Meeting_Summary_final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010October12,Public

  11. Microsoft Word - 2011_1012_RAP_SixMonth_WorkPlan.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,

  12. Microsoft Word - 2011_1205_Engstrom_RAP_100-K-comments.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided to the RAP

  13. Microsoft Word - 2011_1215_BPAI5_BattleGroundMeetingSummary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided to the

  14. Microsoft Word - 2012 Abstract Book FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided to Cover

  15. Microsoft Word - 2012 RCRA CRP comment table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided to

  16. Microsoft Word - 2012 Research Day Winners.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided toResearch

  17. Microsoft Word - 2012-01-27 JAD Natural Gas Pipeline.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided toResearch835

  18. Microsoft Word - 2012_0301_BPAI5_SupplementalCommentReport_CommunicationIndex.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,Provided

  19. Microsoft Word - 2012_0302_BPAI5_SupplementalCommentReport_FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch 2012 i

  20. Microsoft Word - 2012_0307_RAP_flipcharts.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch 2012 i

  1. Microsoft Word - 2012_1206_BPAI5_MapRequestForm_DEISPublicMeetings.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch 2012 i

  2. Microsoft Word - 2012_1206_BPA_Guidetofindingyourpropertyonline_revFINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch 2012

  3. Microsoft Word - 2012_1219_BPAI5_S4_SupplementalCommentReport_AppendixB.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch

  4. Microsoft Word - 2012_BPAI5_OutreachEventSummary_Summer2012_public.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch- Summer

  5. Microsoft Word - 2013 Public Comment Responses Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9,ProvidedMarch-Change1

  6. averaged fermi holes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    afterglow observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). Here we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission has a blackbody spectrum, making this the second such burst observed by...

  7. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Cosmic Background Radiation with the Cambridge CosmicCosmic Microwave Background Radiation arXiv:astro-ph/0004404Roma, Italy,. The blackbody radiation left over from the Big

  8. Thermal emission measurement and calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Susannah (Susannah R.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details a measurement setup and experimental procedures for emittance measurements using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. We calibrate the FTIR measurement system using measurements of a blackbody ...

  9. ccsd00001341 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and coherent sources respectively made of a resistor and a radiofrequency generator are measured down deviate from the superpoisso- nian black-body radiation. As shown below there is also a direct relation

  10. ccsd-00001341(version1):23Mar2004 Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations to probe the population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    made of a resistor and a radiofrequency generator are measured down to the quantum regime at milli from the superpoissonian black-body radiation. As shown below there is also a direct relation between

  11. Optical Spectroscopy: Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    633nm, 785nm, 1064nm, visible argon-ion lines, various NIR diode lines Xe lamp and tungsten blackbody lamp Acton 300i, 500i spectrometers Princeton Instruments backthinned...

  12. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and cloud with a low optical depth are prevalent; the radiative closure studies using Microbase demonstrated significant residuals. As an alternative to Microbase at NSA, the Shupe-Turner cloud property retrieval algorithm, aimed at improving the partitioning of cloud phase and incorporating more constrained, conditional microphysics retrievals, also has been evaluated using the BBHRP data set.

  13. Radiation from condensed surface of magnetic neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew van Adelsberg; Dong Lai; Alexander Y. Potekhin; Phil Arras

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations show that the thermal X-ray spectra of many isolated neutron stars are featureless and in some cases (e.g., RX J1856.5-3754) well fit by a blackbody. Such a perfect blackbody spectrum is puzzling since radiative transport through typical neutron star atmospheres causes noticeable deviation from blackbody. Previous studies have shown that in a strong magnetic field, the outermost layer of the neutron star may be in a condensed solid or liquid form because of the greatly enhanced cohesive energy of the condensed matter. The critical temperature of condensation increases with the magnetic field strength, and can be as high as 10^6 K (for Fe surface at B \\sim 10^{13} G or H surface at B \\sim a few times 10^{14} G). Thus the thermal radiation can directly emerge from the degenerate metallic condensed surface, without going through a gaseous atmosphere. Here we calculate the emission properties (spectrum and polarization) of the condensed Fe and H surfaces of magnetic neutron stars in the regimes where such condensation may be possible. For a smooth condensed surface, the overall emission is reduced from the blackbody by less than a factor of 2. The spectrum exhibits modest deviation from blackbody across a wide energy range, and shows mild absorption features associated with the ion cyclotron frequency and the electron plasma frequency in the condensed matter. The roughness of the solid condensate (in the Fe case) tends to decrease the reflectivity of the surface, and make the emission spectrum even closer to blackbody. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of dim, isolated neutron stars and magnetars.

  14. Induced radiation processes in single-bubble sonoluminescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigara, F V

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the recent revision of the theory of thermal radiation, thermal black-body radiation has an induced origin. We show that in single-bubble sonoluminescence thermal radiation is emitted by a spherical resonator, coincident with the sonoluminescing bubble itself, instead of the ensemble of elementary resonators emitting thermal black-body radiation in the case of open gaseous media. For a given wavelength, the diameter of the resonator is fixed, and this explains the very high constancy in phase of light flashes from the sonoluminesing bubble, which is better than the constancy of period of a driving acoustic wave.

  15. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  16. Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation in the southern seas in early spring 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendler, G.; Quakenbush, T. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Science Foundation research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer carried out a cruise to Antarctica in early spring of 1993. It left Punta Arenas, Chile, close to the tip of South America on 11 August 1993. sailed south for 3 days to the tip of The Antarctic Peninsula, stopping at O`Higgens and Palmer Stations, and from there went southwest and into the Bellingshausen sea. On 10 September, it reached the most southerly position, 71{degrees}S, some distance north of the Thurston Island. From there, it went as far as 110{degrees}W before returning to Punta Arenas. The main purpose of the cruise was to investigate the snow- and sea-ice thickness, properties, and structures in this part of the southern oceans. It also allowed us to carry out continuous radiation measurements. We measured the following fluxes: global radiation (Eppley PSP), infrared incoming radiation (Eppley Pyrgeometer PIR), ultraviolet-A radiation (Eppley UV meter), ultraviolet-B radiation (Yankee Environmental Systems), and pitch and roll of the ship (Lucas Sensing Systems, Inc.). All instruments were sampled twice per second (Campbell Scientific, Model 21 X), and a notebook computer (ASI Patriot) stored 1-minute averages of the radiation data and 1-minute standard deviation of the ship`s pitch and roll. Visual observations of cloud cover were also recorded. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  19. J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. III France 2 (1992) 1925-1941 OCTOBER 1992, PAGE 1925 Classification Physics Abstracts 05) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non

  20. Infrared Thermometer (IRT) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VR Morris

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Infrared Thermometer (IRT) is a ground-based radiation pyrometer that provides measurements of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature of the scene in its field of view. The downwelling version has a narrow field of view for measuring sky temperature and for detecting clouds. The upwelling version has a wide field of view for measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface.

  1. Calibration of the Joint European Torus energetic ion and alpha particle collective Thomson scattering diagnostic receiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    Calibration of the Joint European Torus energetic ion and alpha particle collective Thomson is calibrated assuming blackbody emission from the torus vacuum vessel ~VV! and using electron cyclotron emission ~ECE!. The 32 receiver channels are absolutely calibrated with a mechanical chopper

  2. Two-Photon 2s1s Transitions during Recombination of Hydrogen in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. E. Kholupenko; A. V. Ivanchik

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the standard cosmological model, we calculate the correction to the rate of two-photon 2s1s transitions in the hydrogen atom under primordial hydrogen plasma recombination conditions that arises when the induced transitions under equilibrium background radiation with a blackbody spectrum and plasma recombination radiation are taken into account.

  3. DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET David Charbonneau,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on models of the thermal emission of hot Jupiters. Assuming that the planet emits as a blackbody, we is unlikely to provide a significant source of energy interior to the planet. Subject headinggs: binariesDETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET David Charbonneau,1 Lori E. Allen,1 S

  4. Casimir energy of a spherical shell in $?-$Minkowski spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyeong-Chan Kim; Chaiho Rim; Jae Hyung Yee

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Casimir energy of a spherical shell of radius $a$ in $\\kappa$-Minkowski spacetime for a complex field with an asymmetric ordering and obtain the energy up to $O(1/\\kappa^2)$. We show that the vacuum breaks particle and anti-particle symmetry if one requires the spectra to be consistent with the blackbody radiation at the commutative limit.

  5. Echo of the Big Bang Anisotropies in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    : Some Facts 7) CMB highly (impressively) Isotropic: - in each direction on the sky the radiation has Microwave Radiometer Cosmic Microwave Background #12;7/1/2009 6 Spectrum Blackbody Radiation John Mather: - photon energy 4) Energy Density Radiation evolves: Cosmic Radiation 44 )1()( ztarad 3 )(tanrad 1 )(tarad

  6. Comptonization signatures in the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frontera, F.; Farinelli, R.; Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Titarchuk, L. [Dipartimento di Fisicae Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Amati, L.; Landi, R., E-mail: frontera@fe.infn.it [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a systematic study of the broadband (2-2000 keV) time-resolved prompt emission spectra of a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with both Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on board the BeppoSAX satellite and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The main goal of this paper is to test spectral models of the GRB prompt emission that have recently been proposed. In particular, we test a recent photospheric model proposed, i.e., blackbody plus power law, the addition of a blackbody emission to the Band function in the cases in which this function does not fit the data, and a recent Comptonization model. By considering the few spectra for which the simple Band function does not provide a fully acceptable fit to the data, we find a statistically significant better fit by adding a blackbody to this function only in one case. We confirm earlier results found fitting the BATSE spectra alone with a blackbody plus power law. Instead, when the BATSE GRB spectra are joined to those obtained with WFCs (2-28 keV), this model becomes unacceptable in most time intervals in which we subdivide the GRB light curves. We find instead that the Comptonization model is always acceptable, even in the few cases in which the Band function is inconsistent with the data. We discuss the implications of these results.

  7. Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric dark energy problem Stuart D. Bale and Solar Wind · There are very few collisions in the solar wind · Not in thermal equilibrium · Large' Photospheric blackbody ~5000-6000K Sunspots and `active regions' #12;Impulsive Solar Activity - `Carrington

  8. Astronomy 45 problem set 2 Spring 1997 Astronomy 45. Introduction to Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, William H.

    can assume that the Sun is a blackbody of temperature T fi = 5700 K and radius 7 \\Theta 10 10 cm. 3 on the average, you actually get a value drawn from a statistical distribution with a mean of N and a standard g spacecraft is launched from Earth and is to be accelerated radially away from the Sun using

  9. SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comparison with a conventional approach by using a blackbody Sun's brightness temperature exhibits Experiment (SORCE) satellite are used to examine the magnitude and spectral distribution of the Earth radiation received at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is the same as that radiated at the Sun's surface

  10. ENGO 431 AYMAN HABIB ENGO 431 Sample Questions: Chapters 1-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    is meant by a "Blackbody"? What are the factors that affect its conversion of absorbed heat into radiant examples of such systems used in remote sensing applications. What type of EM radiation each system (in your examples) uses? 25. What are the main uses of Radio waves in remote sensing? 26. What do

  11. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 065106 (2011) A general approach to low noise readout of terahertz imaging arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and design of an ultra-low noise electronic readout circuit for use with room temperature video mitigation are examined, and a corresponding low- noise readout circuit is designed, built, and tested-sensitive low-noise amplifiers,6,7 as illustrated in Fig. 1. Radiation from a blackbody target, characterized

  12. arXiv:astroph/0011099 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000{000 (0000) Printed 7 November 2000 (MN L A T E X style le v1.4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsay, Gavin

    January; in original form 7 November 2000 ABSTRACT Using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the Nordic into the system, which is most likely evolved, par- tially degenerate and hydrogen depleted (Nelson, Rap- paport contribution from each of two components (point-like blackbody and more spatially extended cut-o#11; power law

  13. JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Vol. 11, No. 3, July September 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    and is weakly nonideal. Two electrogun shots involving different cathode materials (aluminum and titanium.602 10 19 C es = charge state of heavy species s f = fraction of blackbody radiant energy incident­ electron scattering ion,s = lowering of ionization energy of heavy species s, J ion,s = ionization energy

  14. Optical analysis of the ablation processes in pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    spectral lines. #12;3 II. Introduction Pulsed laser deposition, or PLD, is a technique by which material be studied and controlled, a greater overall command of the deposition process could be achieved.2 to see very clear plumes, #12;4 significant blackbody emission, and evidence of spectral lines

  15. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); McGlynn, S. [Exzellence Cluster "Universe," Technische Universitt Mnchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Meegan, C. A. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Dermer, C. D. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Iyyani, S. [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kocevski, D., E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov, E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: shabuiyyani@gmail.com, E-mail: baring@rice.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index ? is consistent with a synchrotron component with ? = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of ? = –2/3 and ? = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  16. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  17. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Markham, James R. (Middlefield, CT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  18. Characterization of near-terahertz complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuits using a Fourier-transform interferometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Arenas, D. J. [Univ. of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Shim, Dongha [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Koukis, D. I. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Seok, Eunyoung [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX (United States); Tanner, D. B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); O, Kenneth K. [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical methods for measuring of the emission spectra of oscillator circuits operating in the 400-600 GHz range are described. The emitted power from patch antennas included in the circuits is measured by placing the circuit in the source chamber of a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. The results show that this optical technique is useful for measuring circuits pushing the frontier in operating frequency. The technique also allows the characterization of the circuit by measuring the power radiated in the fundamental and in the harmonics. This capability is useful for oscillator architectures designed to cancel the fundamental and use higher harmonics. The radiated power was measured using two techniques: direct measurement of the power by placing the device in front of a bolometer of known responsivity, and by comparison to the estimated power from blackbody sources. The latter technique showed that these circuits have higher emission than blackbody sources at the operating frequencies, and, therefore, offer potential spectroscopy applications.

  19. The ARCADE 2 Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singal, J; Kogut, A; Levin, S; Limon, M; Lubin, P; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second generation Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the radiometric temperature of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic and extra-Galactic emission at six frequencies from 3 to 90 GHz. ARCADE 2 utilizes a double-nulled design where emission from the sky is compared to that from an external cryogenic full-aperture blackbody calibrator by cryogenic switching radiometers containing internal blackbody reference loads. In order to further minimize sources of systematic error, ARCADE 2 features a cold fully open aperture with all radiometrically active components maintained at near 2.7 K without windows or other warm objects, achieved through a novel thermal design. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE 2 instrument in its 2005 and 2006 flights.

  20. EUVE Spectroscopy of Polars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An admittedly pedantic but hopefully useful and informative analysis is presented of the EUVE 70--180 Angstrom spectra of nine polars. These spectra are fit with three different models---a blackbody, a pure-H stellar atmosphere, and a solar abundance stellar atmosphere---to reveal the presence of spectral features such as absorption lines and edges, and to investigate the sensitivity of the derived (kT, N_H, solid angle) and inferred (fractional emitting area, bolometric luminosity) parameters to the model assumptions. Among the models tested, the blackbody model best describes the observed spectra, although the untested irradiated solar abundance stellar atmosphere model is likely a better overall description of the EUV/soft X-ray spectra of polars.

  1. A Critical Analysis of Universality and Kirchhoff's Law: A Return to Stewart's Law of Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been advanced, on experimental (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2003, v. 31(6), 1263-1267) and theoretical (P.M. Robitaille, Progr. Phys. 2006, v.2, 22-23) grounds, that blackbody radiation is not universal and remains closely linked to the emission of graphite and soot. In order to strengthen such claims, a conceptual analysis of the proofs for universality is presented. This treatment reveals that Gustav Robert Kirchhoff has not properly considered the combined effects of absorption, reflection, and the directional nature of emission in real materials. In one instance, this leads to an unintended movement away from thermal equilibrium within cavities. Using equilibrium arguments, it is demonstrated that the radiation within perfectly reflecting or arbitrary cavities does not necessarily correspond to that emitted by a blackbody.

  2. Redshifting of cosmological black bodies in BSBM varying-alpha theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Barrow; Joao Magueijo

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the behaviour of black-body radiation in theories of electromagnetism which allow the electron charge and the fine structure constant to vary in space and time. We show that such theories can be expressed as relativistic generalizations of a conventional dielectric. By making the appropriate definition of the vector potential and associated gauge transformations, we can identify the equivalent of the electric and displacement fields, $\\mathbf{E}$ and $\\mathbf{D}$, as well as the magnetic $ \\mathbf{B}$ and $\\mathbf{H}$ fields. We study the impact of such dielectrics on the propagation of light in the so-called BSBM theory and conclude that no changes are created to the standard cosmological evolution of the temperature and energy-density of black-body radiation.

  3. A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter D. Ditlevsen

    2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

  4. On the ionizing continuum in active galactic nuclei: clues from ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Almudena Prieto; Sueli M. Viegas

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ISO coronal line spectrum of the brightest Seyfert galaxies from the CfA sample is presented and modeled. ISO observations of [O IV] 25.9 $\\mu$, [Ne V] 14.3 $\\mu$, [Mg VIII] 3.02 $\\mu$ and [Si IX] 2.58 $\\mu$ lines are presented; their relationship with the soft part of the ionizing spectrum from 50 to 300 eV is investigated. Pure photoionization models reproduce the line ratios, setting ranges for the ionization parameter and the optical depth of the emitting clouds. On the basis of the available data alone it is not possible to distinguish between a power-law or a blackbody distribution as the intrinsic shape of the UV ionizing spectrum. However, for the brightest Seyferts analyzed, namely, NGC 1068, Circinus and NGC 4151, a black-body UV continuum is favored.

  5. A NEW METHOD OF PULSE-WISE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved spectral analysis, though a very promising method to understand the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is difficult to implement in practice because of poor statistics. We present a new method for pulse-wise time-resolved spectral study of the individual pulses of GRBs, using the fact that many spectral parameters are either constants or smooth functions of time. We use this method for the two pulses of GRB 081221, the brightest GRB with separable pulses. We choose, from the literature, a set of possible models that includes the Band model, blackbody with a power law (BBPL), and a collection of blackbodies with a smoothly varying temperature profile, along with a power law (mBBPL), and two blackbodies with a power law (2BBPL). First, we perform a time-resolved study to confirm the spectral parameter variations, and then we construct the new model to perform a joint spectral fit. We find that any photospheric emission in terms of blackbodies is required mainly in the rising parts of the pulses and the falling part can be adequately explained in terms of the Band model, with the low-energy photon index within the regime of synchrotron model. Interestingly, we find that 2BBPL is comparable or sometimes even better, though marginally, than the Band model, in all episodes. Consistent results are also obtained for the brightest GRB of Fermi era-GRB 090618. We point out that the method is generic enough to test any spectral model with well-defined parameter variations.

  6. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  7. On parton distributions in a photon gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Alikhanov

    2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

  8. On an Improvement of the Planck radiation Energy Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Saa

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability distribution function for thermodynamics and econophysics is obtained by solving an equilibrium equation. This approach is different from the common one of optimizing the entropy of the system or obtaining the state of maximum probability, which usually obtains as a result the Boltzmann distribution. The Gamma distribution is proposed as a better equation to describe the blackbody radiation in substitution of Planck's radiation equation. Also, a new form of entropy is proposed, that maintains the correct relation with the Clausius' formula.

  9. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, George

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. http://bccp.lbl.gov/

  10. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  11. Retrieval of water vapor profiles over ocean using SSM/I and SSM/T-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blankenship, Clay Bruce

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface. Intrsred retrievals also suffer because clouds are opaque at these fiequencies, making retrievals impossible below cloud layers. Since clouds are largely transparent to microwaves, microwave radiance measurements are well-suited to global...B footprint size, along-track by cross-track CHAPTER IH PHYSICS OF MICROWAVE RADIATIVE TRANSFER 3. 1 Microwave Radiative Transfer in the Atmosphere The radiance at a given wavelength X of a blackbody (perfect emitter) of temperature T is given...

  12. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. NuSTAR observations of magnetar 1E 1841–045

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Dufour, François; Archibald, Robert [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Greffenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kitaguchi, Takao [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Markwardt, Craig B. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Vogel, Julia K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new spectral and temporal observations of the magnetar 1E 1841–045 in the Kes 73 supernova remnant obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. Combined with new Swift and archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, the phase-averaged spectrum is well characterized by a blackbody plus double power law, in agreement with previous multimission X-ray results. However, we are unable to reproduce the spectral results reported based on Suzaku observations. The pulsed fraction of the source is found to increase with photon energy. The measured rms pulsed fractions are ?12% and ?17% at ?20 and ?50 keV, respectively. We detect a new feature in the 24-35 keV band pulse profile that is uniquely double peaked. This feature may be associated with a possible absorption or emission feature in the phase-resolved spectrum. We fit the X-ray data using the recently developed electron-positron outflow model by Beloborodov for the hard X-ray emission from magnetars. This produces a satisfactory fit, allowing a constraint on the angle between the rotation and magnetic axes of the neutron star of ?20° and on the angle between the rotation axis and line of sight of ?50°. In this model, the soft X-ray component is inconsistent with a single blackbody; adding a second blackbody or a power-law component fits the data. The two-blackbody interpretation suggests a hot spot of temperature kT ? 0.9 keV occupying ?1% of the stellar surface.

  14. Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  15. Publisher: Clancy Marshall Senior Acquisitions Editor: Jessica Fiorillo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    1-4 Time Dilation and Length Contraction 29 1-5 The Doppler Effect 41 Transverse Doppler Effect 44 1-2 Blackbody Radiation 119 3-3 The Photoelectric Effect 127 3-4 X Rays and the Compton Effect 133 Derivation Momentum and theSpin-Orbit Effect 291 7-6 TheSchrödinger Equation forTwo (or More) Particles 295 7-7 Ground

  16. XMM-Newton EPIC observations of Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ramsay; S. Zane; M. A. Jimenez-Garate; J. W. den Herder; C. J. Hailey

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spin-resolved X-ray data of the neutron star binary Her X-1. We find evidence that the Iron line at 6.4 keV originates from the same location as the blackbody X-ray component. The line width and energy varies over both the spin period and the 35 day precession period. We also find that the correlation between the soft and hard X-ray light curves varies over the 35 day period.

  17. Fine-scale Horizontal Structure of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambukkange,M.; Verlinde, J.; Elorante, E.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.; Shupe, M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent in situ observations in stratiform clouds suggest that mixed phase regimes, here defined as limited cloud volumes containing both liquid and solid water, are constrained to narrow layers (order 100 m) separating all-liquid and fully glaciated volumes (Hallett and Viddaurre, 2005). The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (DOE-ARM, Ackerman and Stokes, 2003) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) recently started collecting routine measurement of radar Doppler velocity power spectra from the Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR). Shupe et al. (2004) showed that Doppler spectra has potential to separate the contributions to the total reflectivity of the liquid and solid water in the radar volume, and thus to investigate further Hallett and Viddaurre's findings. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) was conducted along the NSA to investigate the properties of Arctic mixed phase clouds (Verlinde et al., 2006). We present surface based remote sensing data from MPACE to discuss the fine-scale structure of the mixed-phase clouds observed during this experiment.

  18. Laser induced rovibrational cooling of the linear polyatomic ion C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, Nabanita; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P., E-mail: tim.softley@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser-induced blackbody-assisted rotational cooling of a linear polyatomic ion, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +}, in its {sup 2}? ground electronic state in the presence of the blackbody radiation field at 300 K and 77 K is investigated theoretically using a rate-equations model. Although pure rotational transitions are forbidden in this non-polar species, the ?{sub 5} cis-bending mode is infrared active and the (1-0) band of this mode strongly overlaps the 300 K blackbody spectrum. Hence the lifetimes of state-selected rotational levels are found to be short compared to the typical timescale of ion trapping experiments. The ?{sub 5} (1-0) transition is split by the Renner-Teller coupling of vibrational and electronic angular momentum, and by the spin-orbit coupling, into six principal components and these effects are included in the calculations. In this paper, a rotational-cooling scheme is proposed that involves simultaneous pumping of a set of closely spaced Q-branch transitions on the {sup 2}?{sub 5/2} ? {sup 2}?{sub 3/2} band together with two Q-branch lines in the {sup 2}?{sup +} ? {sup 2}?{sub 1/2} band. It is shown that this should lead to >70% of total population in the lowest rotational level at 300 K and over 99% at 77 K. In principle, the multiple Q-branch lines could be pumped with just two broad-band (??? = 0.4–3 cm{sup ?1}) infrared lasers.

  19. Spectral Evolution of the Continuum and Disc Line in Dipping in GRO J1655-40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Balucinska-Church

    2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery is reported of emission features in the X-ray spectrum of GRO J1655-40 obtained using Rossi-XTE on 1997, Feb 26. The features have been fitted firstly by two Gaussian lines, which in four spectra have average energies of 5.85+/-0.08 keV and 7.32+/-0.13 keV, strongly suggestive that these are the red- and blueshifted wings of an iron disc line from material with velocity ~0.33 c. The blue wing is apparently less bright than expected for a disc line subject to Doppler boosting, however, known absorption in the spectrum of GRO J1655-40 at energies between ~7 and 8 keV can reduce the apparent brightness of the blue wing. The spectra have also been fitted well using the full relativistic disc line model of Laor, plus an absorption line. This gives a restframe energy between 6.4 and 6.8 keV indicating that the line is from highly ionized iron K_alpha. The Laor model also shows that the line originates at radii extending from ~10 Schwarzschild radii (r_S) outwards. The line is direct evidence for the black hole nature of the compact object. The continuum is well described by dominant disc blackbody emission plus Comptonized emission. During dipping, spectral evolution is well modelled by allowing progressive covering of the disc blackbody and simple absorption of the Comptonized emission showing that the thermal emission is more extended. Acceptable fits are only obtained by including the disc line in the covering term, indicating that it originates in the same inner disc region as the thermal continuum. Dip ingress times and durations are used to provide the radius of the disc blackbody emitter as 170-370 r_S, and the radius of the absorber.

  20. Fourier resolved spectroscopy of 4U 1728-34: New Insights into Spectral and Temporal Properties of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Shrader; P. Reig; D. Kazanas

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using archival RXTE data we derive the 2-16 keV Fourier-resolved spectra of the Atoll source 4U 1728-34 in a sequence of its timing states as its low QPO frequency spans the range between 6 and 94 Hz. The increase in the QPO frequency accompanies a spectral transition of the source from its island to its banana states. The banana-states' Fourier-resolved spectra are well fitted by a single blackbody component with $kT \\sim 2-3$ keV depending on the source position in the color -- color diagram and the Fourier frequency, thus indicating that this spectral component is responsible for the source variability on these timescales. This result is in approximate agreement with similar behavior exhibited by the Z sources, suggesting that, as in that case, the boundary layer -- the likely source of the thermal component -- is supported by radiation pressure. Furthermore, it is found that the iron line at $\\sim$6.6 keV, clearly present in the averaged spectra, not apparent within the limitations of our measurements in the frequency-resolved spectra irrespective of the frequency range. This would indicate that this spectral component exhibits little variability on time scales comprising the interval $10^{-2}-10^2$ seconds. In the island state the single blackbody model proved inadequate, particularly notable in our lowest frequency band ($0.008-0.8$ Hz). An absorbed powerlaw or an additive blackbody plus hard powerlaw model was required to obtain a satisfactory fit. Statistics do not allow unambiguous discrimination between these possible scenarios.

  1. Quantum fields with noncommutative target spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, A. P.; Queiroz, A. R.; Marques, A. M.; Teotonio-Sobrinho, P. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130 (United States); Centro Internacional de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Brasilia, C.P. 04667, Brasilia, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, Sao Paulo, SP, 05315-970 (Brazil)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum field theories (QFT's) on noncommutative spacetimes are currently under intensive study. Usually such theories have world sheet noncommutativity. In the present work, instead, we study QFT's with commutative world sheet and noncommutative target space. Such noncommutativity can be interpreted in terms of twisted statistics and is related to earlier work of Oeckl [R. Oeckl, Commun. Math. Phys. 217, 451 (2001).], and others [A. P. Balachandran, G. Mangano, A. Pinzul, and S. Vaidya, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 21, 3111 (2006); A. P. Balachandran, A. Pinzul, and B. A. Qureshi, Phys. Lett. B 634, 434 (2006); A. P. Balachandran, A. Pinzul, B. A. Qureshi, and S. Vaidya, arXiv:hep-th/0608138; A. P. Balachandran, T. R. Govindarajan, G. Mangano, A. Pinzul, B. A. Qureshi, and S. Vaidya, Phys. Rev. D 75, 045009 (2007); A. Pinzul, Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 20, 6268 (2005); G. Fiore and J. Wess, Phys. Rev. D 75, 105022 (2007); Y. Sasai and N. Sasakura, Prog. Theor. Phys. 118, 785 (2007)]. The twisted spectra of their free Hamiltonians has been found earlier by Carmona et al. [J. M. Carmona, J. L. Cortes, J. Gamboa, and F. Mendez, Phys. Lett. B 565, 222 (2003); J. M. Carmona, J. L. Cortes, J. Gamboa, and F. Mendez, J. High Energy Phys. 03 (2003) 058]. We review their derivation and then compute the partition function of one such typical theory. It leads to a deformed blackbody spectrum, which is analyzed in detail. The difference between the usual and the deformed blackbody spectrum appears in the region of high frequencies. Therefore we expect that the deformed blackbody radiation may potentially be used to compute a Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff which will depend on the noncommutative parameter {theta}.

  2. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

  3. On fermionic vacuum energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She-Sheng Xue

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We quantitatively compute the rate and spectrum of spontaneous photon emissions, caused by the vacuum decaying when an external magnetic field is introduced. The spectrum of spontaneous photon emissions shows the energy-momentum-dependency in the low-energy region and in the high energy region, is respectively similar to the Rayleigh-Jeans part and the Wien part of the spectrum of the black-body radiation. However, the energy-momentum of spontaneous photon emissions is quantized, analogous to the Wigner spectrum. This provides quantitative results for experimental testes.

  4. Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

  5. Fully QED/relativistic theory of light pressure on free electrons by isotropic radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Kaplan

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic/QED theory of light pressure on electrons by an isotropic, in particular blackbody radiation predicts thermalization rates of free electrons over entire span of energies available in the lab and the nature. The calculations based on the QED Klein-Nishina theory of electron-photon scattering and relativistic Fokker-Planck equation, show that the transition from classical (Thompson) to QED (Compton) thermalization determined by the product of electron energy and radiation temperature, is reachable under conditions for controlled nuclear fusion, and predicts large acceleration of electron thermalization in the Compton domain.

  6. Timing the Nearby Isolated Neutron Star RX J1856.5-3754

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Kerkwijk, M H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RX J1856.5-3754 is the X-ray brightest among the nearby isolated neutron stars. Its X-ray spectrum is thermal, and is reproduced remarkably well by a black-body, but its interpretation has remained puzzling. One reason is that the source did not exhibit pulsations, and hence a magnetic field strength--vital input to atmosphere models--could not be estimated. Recently, however, very weak pulsations were discovered. Here, we analyze these in detail, using all available data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observatories. From frequency measurements, we set a 2-sigma upper limit to the frequency derivative of \\dot\

  7. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  8. Fully QED/relativistic theory of light pressure on free electrons by isotropic radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Kaplan

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic/QED theory of light pressure on electrons by an isotropic, in particular blackbody radiation predicts thermalization rates of free electrons over entire span of energies available in the lab and the nature. The calculations based on the QED Klein-Nishina theory of electron-photon scattering and relativistic Fokker-Planck equation, show that the transition from classical (Thompson) to QED (Compton) thermalization determined by the product of electron energy and radiation temperature, is reachable under conditions for controlled nuclear fusion, and predicts large acceleration of electron thermalization in the Compton domain and strong damping of plasma oscillations at the temperatures near plasma nuclear fusion.

  9. Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

  10. Study of Supernovae Important for Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baklanov, P V; Potashov, M Sh; Dolgov, A D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense shell method for the determination of distances to type IIn supernovae has been briefly reviewed. Applying our method to SN 2006gy, SN 2009ip, and SN 2010jl supernovae, we have obtained distances in excellent agreement with the previously known distances to the parent galaxies. The dense shell method is based on the radiation hydrodynamic model of a supernova. The method of the blackbody model, as well as the correctness of its application for simple estimates of distances from observation data, has been justified.

  11. Planck's Radiation Law in the Quantized Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Collier

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical research looks for clues to quantum properties of the gravitational field. On the basis of the common Schr\\"odinger theory, a simple model of the quantization of a Friedmann universe comprising dust and radiation is investigated. With regard to energy quantization, the result suggests a universal limitation of the energy spacing between neighbouring quantum states by the Planck energy. Applied to black-body radiation, a modified Planck radiation law follows. If this could be verified in the laboratory, it would provide a direct hint at quantum properties of the space-time manifold.

  12. HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED AND SUBMILLIMETER PHOTOMETRY FOR THE KINGFISH SAMPLE OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. L.; Montiel, E. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Krause, O.; Groves, B. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Roussel, H. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Armus, L.; Beirao, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hao, C.-N., E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); and others

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    New far-infrared and submillimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500 {mu}m emission shows evidence for a submillimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photodissociation regions is found to be (21 {+-} 4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine and Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.

  13. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goff, David R. (Star City, WV); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  14. Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, IV, Ward; Celliers, Peter

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

  15. Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

  16. Einstein's fluctuation formula. A historical overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandor Varro

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A historical overview is given on the basic results which appeared by the year 1926 concerning Einstein's fluctuation formula of black-body radiation, in the context of light-quanta and wave-particle duality. On the basis of the original publications (from Planck's derivation of the black-body spectrum and Einstein's introduction of the photons up to the results of Born, Heisenberg and Jordan on the quantization of a continuum) a comparative study is presented on the first line of thoughts that led to the concept of quanta. The nature of the particle-like fluctuations and the wave-like fluctuations are analysed by using several approaches. With the help of the classical probability theory, it is shown that the infinite divisibility of the Bose distribution leads to the new concept of classical poissonian photo-multiplets or to the binary photo-multiplets of fermionic character. As an application, Einstein's fluctuation formula is derived as a sum of fermion type fluctuations of the binary photo-multiplets.

  17. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  18. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE MAGNETAR 1E 2259+586

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, Julia K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hascoët, Romain [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kaspi, Victoria M. [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada); An, Hongjun [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Archibald, Robert [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Beloborodov, Andrei M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Boggs, Steven E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Craig, William W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gotthelf, Eric V. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Kennea, Jamie A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Madsen, Kristin K. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Daniel [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on new broad band spectral and temporal observations of the magnetar 1E 2259+586, which is located in the supernova remnant CTB 109. Our data were obtained simultaneously with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Swift, and cover the energy range from 0.5-79 keV. We present pulse profiles in various energy bands and compare them to previous RXTE results. The NuSTAR data show pulsations above 20 keV for the first time and we report evidence that one of the pulses in the double-peaked pulse profile shifts position with energy. The pulsed fraction of the magnetar is shown to increase strongly with energy. Our spectral analysis reveals that the soft X-ray spectrum is well characterized by an absorbed double blackbody or blackbody plus power-law model in agreement with previous reports. Our new hard X-ray data, however, suggest that an additional component, such as a power law, is needed to describe the NuSTAR and Swift spectrum. We also fit the data with the recently developed coronal outflow model by Beloborodov for hard X-ray emission from magnetars. The outflow from a ring on the magnetar surface is statistically preferred over outflow from a polar cap.

  19. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsars: Bulk Comptonization in the Accretion Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy. However, despite decades of theoretical and observational work since their discovery, no satisfactory model for the formation of the observed X-ray spectra has emerged. In particular, the previously available theories are unable to reproduce the power-law variation observed at high energies in many sources. In this paper, we present the first self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a pulsar accretion column that includes an explicit treatment of the energization occurring in the shock. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method based on the exact dynamical solution for the velocity profile in the column, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at the top of the thermal mound, near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to calculate the radiation spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons emitted by the thermal mound. We demonstrate that the energization of the photons in the shock naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with many observations of accreting X-ray pulsars.

  20. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  1. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goff, D.R.; Notestein, J.E.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interfering blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  2. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer : towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jeremie; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see, that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO2 that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68{\\textdegree}C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. F...

  3. Characterization of near-terahertz complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuits using a Fourier-transform interferometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Arenas, D. J.; Shim, Dongha; Koukis, D. I.; Seok, Eunyoung; Tanner, D. B.; O, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical methods for measuring of the emission spectra of oscillator circuits operating in the 400-600 GHz range are described. The emitted power from patch antennas included in the circuits is measured by placing the circuit in the source chamber of a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. The results show that this optical technique is useful for measuring circuits pushing the frontier in operating frequency. The technique also allows the characterization of the circuit by measuring the power radiated in the fundamental and in the harmonics. This capability is useful for oscillator architectures designed to cancel the fundamental and use higher harmonics. Themore »radiated power was measured using two techniques: direct measurement of the power by placing the device in front of a bolometer of known responsivity, and by comparison to the estimated power from blackbody sources. The latter technique showed that these circuits have higher emission than blackbody sources at the operating frequencies, and, therefore, offer potential spectroscopy applications.« less

  4. Low-Mass X-Ray Binary MAXI J1421-613 Observed by MAXI GSC and Swift XRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serino, Motoko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Kennea, Jamie A; Fukushima, Kosuke; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitor of All sky X-ray Image (MAXI) discovered a new outburst of an X-ray transient source named MAXI J1421-613. Because of the detection of three X-ray bursts from the source, it was identified as a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The results of data analyses of the MAXI GSC and the Swift XRT follow-up observations suggest that the spectral hardness remained unchanged during the first two weeks of the outburst. All the XRT spectra in the 0.5-10 keV band can be well explained by thermal Comptonization of multi-color disk blackbody emission. The photon index of the Comptonized component is $\\approx$ 2, which is typical of low-mass X-ray binaries in the low/hard state. Since X-ray bursts have a maximum peak luminosity, it is possible to estimate the (maximum) distance from its observed peak flux. The peak flux of the second X-ray burst, which was observed by the GSC, is about 5 photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. By assuming a blackbody spectrum of 2.5 keV, the maximum distance to the source is estimated as 7 kpc...

  5. X-ray observations during a Her X-1 anomalous low-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Parmar; T. Oosterbroek; D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto; S. Del Sordo

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a 1999 July 8-10 BeppoSAX observation during an anomalous low-state of Her X-1 are presented. The standard on-state power-law and blackbody continuum model is excluded at high confidence unless partial covering is included. This gives a power-law photon index of 0.63 +/- 0.02 and implies that 0.28 +/- 0.03 of the flux undergoes additional absorption of (27 +/- 7) 10^22 atom/cm2. 11% of the observed 0.1-10 keV flux is from the 0.068 +/- 0.015 keV blackbody. 1.237747(2) s pulses with a semi-amplitude of 2.1 +/- 0.8% are detected at >99.5% confidence and confirmed by RXTE measurements. This implies that Her X-1 underwent substantial spin-down close to the start of the anomalous low-state. The spectral and temporal changes are similar to those recently reported from 4U1626-67. These may result from a strongly warped disk that produces a spin-down torque. The X-ray source is then mostly viewed through the inner regions of the accretion disk. A similar mechanism could be responsible for the Her X-1 anomalous low-states. Shadowing by such an unusually warped disk could produce observable effects in the optical and UV emission from the companion star.

  6. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

  7. Proposal for a second-generation, lattice matched, multiple junction Ga{sub 2}AsSb TPV converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, G.S. [Keithley Instruments, Solon Ohio (United States); Coutts, T.J.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado (United States)

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    First order device modeling is used to show that spontaneously ordered Ga{sub 2}AsSb may prove useful in the newly-active field of thermophotovoltaic power generation. Optimal band gaps for single-, double- and triple-junction III-V devices are presented for a range of blackbody emitter temperatures (1000--2000 K), and it is shown that monolithic, current-matched devices may be constructed that are lattice-matched throughout the stack to an underlying InP substrate. Device efficiency, short-circuit current, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage calculations are presented. The power generation capabilities are expected to be substantial due to the proximity of the devices to the thermal radiators. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smoot, George

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

  9. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 11, March 1, 1989--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results on photophoresis reveal significant transport effects, mainly for particles which are carbonaceous (char-like, soot-like) rather than ash-like. Figure 2 shows the predicted dimensionless transport coefficient (proportional to the ordinary Stanton number for mass transfer) as a function of radiation/convective flux ratio and carbonaceous particle radius for laminar boundary layer flow past a wall cooled to 70% of the mainstream temperature, subjected to a radiative energy spectrum appropriate to a black-body source at ca. 1800K. One sees that large effects on the particle deposition rate are produced if the radiative flux is comparable to or exceeds the ordinary (Fourier) energy flux. We are now extending this work to include the effects of inevitable particle asymmetries, including agglomerate (shape) effects, and the role that energy transfer (eg. radiative cooling of larger particles in a population) might play in the coagulation dynamics and deposition dynamics of such aerosol populations.

  10. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosner, D.E.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results on photophoresis reveal significant transport effects, mainly for particles which are carbonaceous (char-like, soot-like) rather than ash-like. Figure 2 shows the predicted dimensionless transport coefficient (proportional to the ordinary Stanton number for mass transfer) as a function of radiation/convective flux ratio and carbonaceous particle radius for laminar boundary layer flow past a wall cooled to 70% of the mainstream temperature, subjected to a radiative energy spectrum appropriate to a black-body source at ca. 1800K. One sees that large effects on the particle deposition rate are produced if the radiative flux is comparable to or exceeds the ordinary (Fourier) energy flux. We are now extending this work to include the effects of inevitable particle asymmetries, including agglomerate (shape) effects, and the role that energy transfer (eg. radiative cooling of larger particles in a population) might play in the coagulation dynamics and deposition dynamics of such aerosol populations.

  11. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  12. Cosmologies with Photon Creation and the 3K Relic Radiation Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima

    1996-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Planckian distribution for cosmologies with photon creation is derived using thermodynamics and semiclassical considerations. This spectrum is preserved during the evolution of the universe and compatible with the present spectral shape of the cosmic microwave background radiation(CMBR). Accordingly, the widely spread feeling that cosmologies with continuous photon creation are definitely ruled out by the COBE limits on deviation of the CMBR spectrum from blackbody shape should be reconsidered. It is argued that a crucial test for this kind of cosmologies is provided by measurements of the CMBR temperature at high redshifts. For a given redshift $z$ greater than zero, the temperature is smaller than the one predicted by the standard FRW model.

  13. Magnetized Atmospheres around Accreting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zane; R. Turolla; A. Treves

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation of atmospheres around accreting neutron stars with high magnetic field ($B\\gtrsim 10^{12}$ G) and low luminosity ($L\\lesssim 10^{33}$ erg/s). We compute the atmospheric structure, intensity and emergent spectrum for a plane-parallel, pure hydrogen medium by solving the transfer equations for the normal modes coupled to the hydrostatic and energy balance equations. The hard tail found in previous investigations for accreting, non-magnetic neutron stars with comparable luminosity is suppressed and the X-ray spectrum, although still harder than a blackbody at the star effective temperature, is nearly planckian in shape. Spectra from accreting atmospheres, both with high and low fields, are found to exhibit a significant excess at optical wavelengths above the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the X-ray continuum.

  14. A comparison of irradiance responsivity and thermodynamic temperature measurement between PTB and NIM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.; Yuan, Z. [National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China); Anhalt, K.; Taubert, R. D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a comparison between PTB and NIM in the field of absolute spectral-band radiometry and thermodynamic temperature measurement. For the comparison a NIM made interference filter radiometer with a centre wavelength of 633 nm was taken to PTB. The filter radiometer was calibrated at NIM and PTB with respect to spectral irradiance responsivity. For the integral value in the band-pass range an agreement of 0.1% was observed in both calibrations. In a next step, the 633 nm filter radiometer was used to measure the temperature of a high-temperature blackbody in comparison to an 800 nm filter radiometer of PTB in the temperature range between 1400 K and 2750 K. The thermodynamic temperature measured by the two filter radiometers agreed to within 0.2 K to 0.5 K with an estimated measurement uncertainty ranging between 0.1 K and 0.4 K (k=1)

  15. Confronting GRB prompt emission with a model for subphotospheric dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlgren, Björn; Nymark, Tanja; Ryde, Felix; Pe'er, Asaf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM ($\\textit{Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model}$), a table model for ${\\scriptsize XSPEC}$. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipatio...

  16. Our distorted view of magnetars: application of the Resonant Cyclotron Scattering model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Rea; S. Zane; M. Lyutikov; R. Turolla

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray spectra of the magnetar candidates are customarily fitted with an empirical, two component model: an absorbed blackbody and a power-law. However, the physical interpretation of these two spectral components is rarely discussed. It has been recently proposed that the presence of a hot plasma in the magnetosphere of highly magnetized neutron stars might distort, through efficient resonant cyclotron scattering, the thermal emission from the neutron star surface, resulting in the production of non-thermal spectra. Here we discuss the Resonant Cyclotron Scattering (RCS) model, and present its XSPEC implementation, as well as preliminary results of its application to Anomalous X-ray Pulsars and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters.

  17. Low-Energy X-ray Emission from Young Isolated Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ruderman

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A young neutron star with large spin-down power is expected to be closely surrounded by an e+/- pair plasma maintained by the conversion of gamma-rays associated with the star's polar-cap and/or outer-gap accelerators. Cyclotron-resonance scattering by the e- and e+ within several radii of such neutron stars prevents direct observations of thermal X-rays from the stellar surface. Estimates are presented for the parameters of the Planck-like X-radiation which ultimately diffuses out through this region. Comparisons with observations, especially of apparent blackbody emission areas as a function of neutron star age, support the proposition that we are learning about a neutron star's magnetosphere rather than about its surface from observations of young neutron star thermal X-rays.

  18. Importance of Compton scattering to radiation spectra of isolated neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Suleimanov; K. Werner

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Model atmospheres of isolated neutron stars with low magnetic field are calculated with Compton scattering taking into account. Models with effective temperatures 1, 3 and 5 MK, with two values of surface gravity log(g)g = 13.9 and 14.3), and different chemical compositions are calculated. Radiation spectra computed with Compton scattering are softer than the computed with Thomson scattering at high energies (E > 5 keV) for hot (T_eff > 1 MK) atmospheres with hydrogen-helium composition. Compton scattering is more significant to hydrogen models with low surface gravity. The emergent spectra of the hottest (T_eff > 3 MK) model atmospheres can be described by diluted blackbody spectra with hardness factors ~ 1.6 - 1.9. Compton scattering is less important for models with solar abundance of heavy elements.

  19. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P., E-mail: aravikum@princeton.edu; Gmachl, Claire F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C. [Department of Chemistry, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Jesus, Joel De [Department of Physics, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5?×?10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  20. Distance determination to eight galaxies using expanding photosphere method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh, E-mail: email@subhashbose.com, E-mail: bose@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital 263002 (India)

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe) are recognized as independent extragalactic distance indicators; however, keeping in mind the diverse nature of their observed properties as well as the availability of good quality data, more and newer events need to be tested for their applicability as reliable distance indicators. We use early photometric and spectroscopic data of eight Type IIP SNe to derive distances to their host galaxies by using the expanding photosphere method (EPM). For five of these, the EPM is applied for the first time. In this work, we improved EPM application by using SYNOW estimated velocities and by semi-deconvolving the broadband filter responses while deriving color temperatures and blackbody angular radii. We find that the derived EPM distances are consistent with that derived using other redshift-independent methods.

  1. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P., E-mail: pbermel@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 1205 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573?K (1300?°C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  2. Spectral resolution for a five-element, filtered, x-ray detector array using the method of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Chandler, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States); Stygar, W. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining the spectrum from a five-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors. This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({approx}100-2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with a classical unfold method, based on a histogram representation of the source spectrum. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV blackbody) and the unfolded spectrum. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.(c) 2000 American Institute of Physics. (c)

  3. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  4. Temperature Profiles and the Effect of AGN on Submillimeter Emission from BLAST Observations of Resolved Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebe, Donald V; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (BLAST05), BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the December 2006 flight from Antarctica (BLAST06), BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the the galaxies with Spitzer data. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a "core fraction", an upper limit on the "AGN fraction" of submillimeter detected galaxies. Fin...

  5. Sensitivity of Biosignatures on Earth-like Planets orbiting in the Habitable Zone of Cool M-Dwarf Stars to varying Stellar UV Radiation and Surface Biomass Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenfell, John Lee; von Paris, Philip; Godolt, Mareike; Rauer, Heike

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that variations in the UV emissions of cool M-dwarf stars have a potentially large impact upon atmospheric biosignatures in simulations of Earth-like exoplanets i.e. planets with Earths development, and biomass and a molecular nitrogen-oxygen dominated atmosphere. Starting with an assumed black-body stellar emission for an M7 class dwarf star, the stellar UV irradiation was increased stepwise and the resulting climate-photochemical response of the planetary atmosphere was calculated. Results suggest a Goldilocks effect with respect to the spectral detection of ozone. At weak UV levels, the ozone column was weak (due to weaker production from the Chapman mechanism) hence its spectral detection was challenging. At strong UV levels, ozone formation is stronger but its associated stratospheric heating leads to a weakening in temperature gradients between the stratosphere and troposphere, which results in weakened spectral bands. Also, increased UV levels can lead to enhanced abundances of hydrogen oxides ...

  6. Broad band X-ray spectrum of KS 1947+300 with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Naik; P. J. Callanan; B. Paul; T. Dotani

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results obtained from three BeppoSAX observations of the accretion-powered transient X-ray pulsar KS 1947+300 carried out during the declining phase of its 2000 November -- 2001 June outburst. A detailed spectral study of KS 1947+300 across a wide X-ray band (0.1--100.0 keV) is attempted for the first time here. Timing analysis of the data clearly shows a 18.7 s pulsation in the X-ray light curves in the above energy band. The pulse profile of KS 1947+300 is characterized by a broad peak with sharp rise followed by a narrow dip. The dip in the pulse profile shows a very strong energy dependence. Broad-band pulse-phase-averaged spectroscopy obtained with three of the BeppoSAX instruments shows that the energy spectrum in the 0.1--100 keV energy band has three components, a Comptonized component, a ~0.6 keV blackbody component, and a narrow and weak iron emission line at 6.7 keV with a low column density of material in the line of sight. We place an upper limit on the equivalent width of the iron K_\\alpha line at 6.4 keV of ~13 eV (for a width of 100 eV). Assuming a spherical blackbody emitting region and the distance of the source to be 10 kpc, the radius of the emitting region is found to be in the range of 14--22 km, which rules out the inner accretion disk as the soft X-ray emitting region.

  7. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

  8. Soft X-ray spectral variability of AM Herculis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Beuermann; E. El Kholy; K. Reinsch

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Polars (AM Herculis binaries) are a prominent class of bright soft X-ray sources, many of which were discovered with ROSAT. We present a homogenous analysis of all the pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of polars subdivided into two papers that discuss the prototype polar AM Her in detail and summarize the class properties of all other polars. We derive the high-state soft X-ray flux and short-term spectral variability of AM Her using a new detector response matrix and a confirmed flux calibration of the ROSAT PSPC below 0.28 keV. The best-fit mean single-blackbody temperature and integrated bright-phase energy flux of AM Her in its April 1991 high state are 27.2 +/- 1.0 eV and (2.6 +/- 0.6) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1, respectively. The total blackbody flux of a multi-temperature model that fits both the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components is Fbb = (4.5 +/- 1.5) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1. The total accretion luminosity at a distance of 80 pc, Lbb = (2.1 +/- 0.7) x 10^33 erg s-1, implies an accretion rate of Mdot = (2.4 +/- 0.8) x 10^-10 Msun yr^-1 for an 0.78 Msun white dwarf. The soft X-ray flux displays significant variability on time scales down to 200 ms. Correlated spectral and count-rate variations are seen in flares on time scales down to 1 s, demonstrating the heating and cooling associated with individual accretion events. Our spectral and temporal analysis provides direct evidence for the blobby accretion model and suggests a connection between the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components.

  9. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anibal Garcia-Hernandez, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Kameswara Rao, N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer/infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra from 5 to 37 {mu}m for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates are made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 {mu}m and 25 {mu}m are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar environment containing puffs subtending a larger solid angle at the star and a quasi-constant infrared flux. Yet, the estimated subtended solid angles and the blackbody temperatures of the dust show a systematic evolution to lower solid angles and cooler temperatures in the interval between IRAS and Spitzer. Dust emission by these RCBs and those in the LMC is similar in terms of total 24 {mu}m luminosity and [8.0]-[24.0] color index.

  10. A RESOLVED DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE CANDIDATE PLANET-HOSTING STAR HD 95086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)] [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kóspál, Á. [European Space Agency (ESA/ESTEC, SRE-SA), P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands)] [European Space Agency (ESA/ESTEC, SRE-SA), P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Apai, D.; Pascucci, I. [Department of Astronomy and Department of Planetary Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Department of Planetary Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Balog, Z.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Csengeri, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Grady, C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Juhász, A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Szulágyi, J. [Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS UMR 7293, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France)] [Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS UMR 7293, F-06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Vavrek, R., E-mail: moor@konkoly.hu [Herschel Science Centre, ESA/ESAC, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, ? Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ?6.''0 × 5.''4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of ?25°. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  11. A new Comptonization model for low-magnetized accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Farinelli; L. Titarchuk; A. Paizis; F. Frontera

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting \\xspec package which takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e. bulk) Comptonization. The model consists of two components: one is the direct blackbody-like emission due to seed photons which are not subjected to effective Compton scattering, while the other one is a convolution of the Green's function of the energy operator with a blackbody-like seed photon spectrum. When combined thermal and bulk effects are considered, the analytic form of the Green's function may be obtained as a solution of the diffusion Comptonization equation. Using data from the BeppoSAX, INTEGRAL and RXTE satellites, we test our model on the spectra of a sample of six persistently low magnetic field bright neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binaries, covering three different spectral states. Particular attention is given to the transient powerlaw-like hard X-ray (> 30 keV) tails that we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process. We show that the values of the best-fit delta-parameter, which represents the importance of bulk with respect to thermal Comptonization, can be physically meaningful and can at least qualitatively describe the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system. Moreover, we show that in fitting the thermal Comptonization spectra to the X-ray spectra of these systems, the best-fit parameters of our model are in excellent agreement with those of COMPTT, a broadly used and well established XSPEC model.

  12. Point X-ray sources in the SNR G 315.4-2.30 (MSH 14-63, RCW 86)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Gvaramadze; A. A. Vikhlinin

    2002-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for a point X-ray source (stellar remnant) in the southwest protrusion of the supernova remnant G 315.4-2.30 (MSH 14-63, RCW 86) using the archival data of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The search was motivated by a hypothesis that G 315.4-2.30 is the result of an off-centered cavity supernova explosion of a moving massive star, which ended its evolution just near the edge of the main-sequence wind-driven bubble. This hypothesis implies that the southwest protrusion in G 315.4-2.30 is the remainder of a pre-existing bow shock-like structure created by the interaction of the supernova progenitor's wind with the interstellar medium and that the actual location of the supernova blast center is near the center of this hemispherical structure. We have discovered two point X-ray sources in the "proper" place. One of the sources has an optical counterpart with the photographic magnitude $13.38\\pm0.40$, while the spectrum of the source can be fitted with an optically thin plasma model. We interpret this source as a foreground active star of late spectral type. The second source has no optical counterpart to a limiting magnitude $\\sim 21$. The spectrum of this source can be fitted almost equally well with several simple models (power law: photon index $=1.87$; two-temperature blackbody: $kT_1 =0.11$ keV, $R_1 =2.34 $ km and $kT_2 =0.71$ keV, $R_2 =0.06$ km; blackbody plus power law: $kT =0.07$ keV, photon index $=2.3$). We interpret this source as a candidate stellar remnant (neutron star), while the photon index and non-thermal luminosity of the source (almost the same as those of the Vela pulsar and the recently discovered pulsar PSR J 0205+6449 in the supernova remnant 3C 58) suggest that it can be a young "ordinary" pulsar.

  13. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

  14. BER Science Network Requirements Workshop -- July 26-27,2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, Brian L.; Dart, Eli

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In July 2007, ESnet and the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the BER Program Office. These included several large programs and facilities, including Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), Bioinformatics and Life Sciences Programs, Climate Sciences Programs, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) also participated in the workshop and contributed a section to this report due to the fact that a large distributed data repository for climate data will be established at NERSC, ORNL and NCAR, and this will have an effect on ESnet. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in a 'case study' format, which summarizes the instruments and facilities necessary for the science and the process by which the science is done, with emphasis on the network services needed and the way in which the network is used. Participants were asked to consider three time scales in their case studies--the near term (immediately and up to 12 months in the future), the medium term (3-5 years in the future), and the long term (greater than 5 years in the future). In addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing the network requirements of the science endeavors funded by the BER Program Office, the workshop emphasized some additional points. These included the need for a future ESnet presence in the Denver area, a desire for ESnet to continue support of collaboration services, and the need for ESnet to support dedicated bandwidth or 'virtual circuit' services. In addition, it is clear that the BER facilities are going to experience significant growth in data production over the next 5 years. The reasons for this vary (model resolution and supercomputer allocations for climate, detector upgrades for EMSL and ARM, sequencing hardware upgrades for JGI), but all indicators point to significant growth in data volumes over the near to medium term. This growth in data volume, combined with the ever-expanding scope of scientific collaboration, will continue to demand ever-increasing bandwidth, reliability and service richness from the networks that support DOE science.

  15. ARM Airborne Continuous carbon dioxide measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Biraud, Sebastien

    The heart of the AOS CO2 Airborne Rack Mounted Analyzer System is the AOS Manifold. The AOS Manifold is a nickel coated aluminum analyzer and gas processor designed around two identical nickel-plated gas cells, one for reference gas and one for sample gas. The sample and reference cells are uniquely designed to provide optimal flushing efficiency. These cells are situated between a black-body radiation source and a photo-diode detection system. The AOS manifold also houses flow meters, pressure sensors and control valves. The exhaust from the analyzer flows into a buffer volume which allows for precise pressure control of the analyzer. The final piece of the analyzer is the demodulator board which is used to convert the DC signal generated by the analyzer into an AC response. The resulting output from the demodulator board is an averaged count of CO2 over a specified hertz cycle reported in volts and a corresponding temperature reading. The system computer is responsible for the input of commands and therefore works to control the unit functions such as flow rate, pressure, and valve control.The remainder of the system consists of compressors, reference gases, air drier, electrical cables, and the necessary connecting plumbing to provide a dry sample air stream and reference air streams to the AOS manifold.

  16. HR 5907: Discovery of the most rapidly rotating magnetic B-type star by the MiMeS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunhut, J H; Wade, G A; Townsend, R H D; Marcolino, W L F; Bohlender, D A; Szeifert, Th; Petit, V; Matthews, J M; Rowe, J F; Moffat, A F J; Kallinger, T; Kuschnig, R; Guenther, B D; Rucinski, S M; Sasselov, D; Weiss, W W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery and analysis of a very strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating early B-type star HR 5907, based on observations obtained as part of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project. We infer a rotation period of 0.508276 +0.000015/-0.000012 d from photometric and H{\\alpha} EW measurements, making this the shortest period, non-degenerate, magnetic massive star known to date. From the comparison of IUE UV and optical spectroscopy with LTE BRUCE/KYLIE models we find a solid-angle integrated, uniform black-body temperature of 17 000 \\pm 1000 K, a projected rotational velocity of 290 \\pm 10 km/s, an equatorial radius of 3.1 \\pm 0.2 R_sun, a stellar mass of 5.5 \\pm 0.5 M_sun, and an inclination angle of the rotation axis to our line-of-sight of 70 \\pm 10\\circ. Our measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, which vary between -500 and -2000 G, phase coherently with the rotation period and imply a surface dipole field strength of \\sim15.7 kG. On the other hand, from fits to mean Leas...

  17. PACS photometry of the Herschel Reference Survey - Far-infrared/sub-millimeter colours as tracers of dust properties in nearby galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortese, L; Bianchi, S; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Bendo, G J; Boquien, M; Roussel, H; Baes, M; Buat, V; Clemens, M; Cooray, A; Cormier, D; Davies, J I; De Looze, I; Eales, S A; Fuller, C; Hunt, L K; Madden, S; Munoz-Mateos, J; Pappalardo, C; Pierini, D; Remy-Ruyer, A; Sauvage, M; Alighieri, S di Serego; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Vaccari, M; Vlahakis, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron integrated photometry for the 323 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), a K-band-, volume-limited sample of galaxies in the local Universe. Once combined with the Herschel/SPIRE observations already available, these data make the HRS the largest representative sample of nearby galaxies with homogeneous coverage across the 100-500 micron wavelength range. In this paper, we take advantage of this unique dataset to investigate the properties and shape of the far-infrared/sub-millimeter spectral energy distribution in nearby galaxies. We show that, in the stellar mass range covered by the HRS (8black-body having the same dust emissivity index beta for all galaxies. In particular, either beta decreases, or multiple temperature components are needed, when moving from metal-rich/gas-poor to metal-poor/gas-rich galaxies. We thus investigate how the dust temper...

  18. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

  19. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA); Jones, Roger W. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

  20. RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Thomas G., E-mail: moran@grace.nascom.nasa.gov [Physics Department, Catholic University of America, 200 Hannan Hall, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

  1. 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m Phase Curves of the Highly-Irradiated Eccentric Hot Jupiter WASP-14b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian; Lewis, Nikole K; Kataria, Tiffany; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J; Schwartz, Joel; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B; Deming, Drake; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fulton, Benjamin J; Howard, Andrew W; Langton, Jonathan; Laughlin, Gregory; Showman, Adam P; Todorov, Kamen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present full-orbit phase curve observations of the eccentric ($e$~0.08) transiting hot Jupiter WASP-14b obtained in the 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m bands using the $\\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope}$. We use two different methods for removing the intrapixel sensitivity effect and compare their efficacy in decoupling the instrumental noise. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.1857%$\\pm$0.0104% and 0.2241%$\\pm$0.0087% at 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m, respectively, are both consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2379$\\pm$55 K. We place a $2\\sigma$ upper limit on the nightside flux at 3.6 $\\mu$m and find it to be 10%$\\pm$1% of the dayside flux, corresponding to a 1322$\\pm$212 K difference in brightness temperature. At 4.5 $\\mu$m, the minimum planet flux is 30%$\\pm$3% of the maximum flux, corresponding to a 1016$\\pm$99 K difference in brightness temperature. We compare our measured phase curves to the predictions of one-dimensional radiative transfer and three-dimensional general circulation models. We find that WASP-14...

  2. The first two transient supersoft X-ray sources in M 31 globular clusters and the connection to classical novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Henze; W. Pietsch; F. Haberl; G. Sala; R. Quimby; M. Hernanz; M. Della Valle; P. Milne; G. G. Williams; V. Burwitz; J. Greiner; H. Stiele; D. H. Hartmann; A. K. H. Kong; K. Hornoch

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical novae (CNe) have been found to represent the major class of supersoft X-ray sources (SSS) in our neighbour galaxy M 31. We determine properties and evolution of the two first SSSs ever discovered in the M 31 globular cluster (GC) system. We have used XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift observations of the centre region of M 31 to discover both SSS and to determine their X-ray light curves and spectra. We performed detailed analysis of XMM-Newton EPIC PN spectra of the source in Bol 111 (SS1) using blackbody and NLTE white dwarf (WD) atmosphere models. For the SSS in Bol 194 (SS2) we used optical monitoring data to search for an optical counterpart. Both GC X-ray sources were classified as SSS. We identify SS1 with the CN M31N 2007-06b recently discovered in the M 31 GC Bol 111. For SS2 we did not find evidence for a recent nova outburst and can only provide useful constraints on the time of the outburst of a hypothetical nova. The only known CN in a M 31 GC can be identified with the first SSS found in a M31 GC. We discuss the impact of our observations on the nova rate for the M 31 GC system.

  3. Observational Properties of Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In several recent observational studies on Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c), the inferred ejecta masses have a peak value of 2.0 -- 4.0 $M_\\odot$, in favor of the binary scenario for their progenitors rather than the Wolf-Rayet star scenario. To investigate the observational properties of relatively low-mass helium stars in binary systems as SN Ib/c progenitors, we constructed atmospheric models with the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN, using binary star evolution models. We find that these helium stars can be characterized by relatively narrow helium emission lines if the mass-loss rate during the final evolutionary phase is significantly enhanced as implied by many SN Ib/c observations. The optical brightness of helium star progenitors can be meaningfully enhanced with a strong wind for $M \\gtrsim 4.4 M_\\odot$, but hardly affected or slightly weakened for relatively low-mass of $\\sim 3.0 M_\\odot$, compared to the simple estimate using blackbody approximation. We further confirm the previous suggestion...

  4. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of ultra-precise optical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yudin; A. V. Taichenachev; A. Derevianko

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the $10^{-20}-10^{-21}$ level for all common systematic effects, such as black-body radiation, Zeeman, AC-Stark and quadrupolar shifts. Notice that usually-employed hyperfine clock transitions lie in the microwave spectral region. Our proposal moves such transitions to the optical domain. As the hyperfine transition frequencies depend on the fine-structure constant, electron-to-proton mass ratio, and nuclear magnetic moment, our proposal expands the range of experimental schemes for probing space and time variations of fundamental constants.

  5. Dust temperature and CO-to-H2 conversion factor variations in the SFR-M* plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnelli, B; Lutz, D; Tacconi, L J; Berta, S; Bournaud, F; Charmandaris, V; Dannerbauer, H; Elbaz, D; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Graciá-Carpio, J; Ivison, R; Maiolino, R; Nordon, R; Popesso, P; Rodighiero, G; Santini, P; Wuyts, S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep Herschel imaging and 12CO(2-1) line luminosities from the IRAM PdBI are combined for a sample of 17 galaxies at z>1 from the GOODS-N field. The sample includes galaxies both on and above the main sequence (MS) traced by star-forming galaxies in the SFR-M* plane. The far-infrared data are used to derive dust masses, Mdust. Combined with an empirical prescription for the dependence of the gas-to-dust ratio on metallicity (GDR), the CO luminosities and Mdust values are used to derive for each galaxy the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, alpha_co. Like in the local Universe, the value of alpha_co is a factor of ~5 smaller in starbursts compared to normal star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We also uncover a relation between alpha_co and dust temperature (Tdust; alpha_co decreasing with increasing Tdust) as obtained from modified blackbody fits to the far-infrared data. While the absolute normalization of the alpha_co(Tdust) relation is uncertain, the global trend is robust against possible systematic biases in the deter...

  6. Models of neutron star atmospheres enriched with nuclear burning ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J E; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-mass X-ray binaries hosting neutron stars (NS) exhibit thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, which are powered by unstable nuclear burning of helium and/or hydrogen into heavier elements deep in the NS "ocean". In some cases the burning ashes may rise from the burning depths up to the NS photosphere by convection, leading to the appearance of the metal absorption edges in the spectra, which then force the emergent X-ray burst spectra to shift toward lower energies. These effects may have a substantial impact on the color correction factor $f_c$ and the dilution factor $w$, the parameters of the diluted blackbody model $F_E \\approx w B_E(f_c T_{eff})$ that is commonly used to describe the emergent spectra from NSs. The aim of this paper is to quantify how much the metal enrichment can change these factors. We have developed a new NS atmosphere modeling code, which has a few important improvements compared to our previous code required by inclusion of the metals. The opacities and the internal partition func...

  7. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

  8. PSR J1840-1419: A VERY COOL NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Purver, M. B.; Weltevrede, P. [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present upper limits on the X-ray emission for three neutron stars. For PSR J1840-1419, with a characteristic age of 16.5 Myr, we calculate a blackbody temperature upper limit (at 99% confidence) of kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 24{sup +17} {sub -10} eV, making this one of the coolest neutron stars known. PSRs J1814-1744 and J1847-0130 are both high magnetic field pulsars, with inferred surface dipole magnetic field strengths of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 9.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, respectively. Our temperature upper limits for these stars are kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 123{sup +20} {sub -33} eV and kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 115{sup +16} {sub -33} eV, showing that these high magnetic field pulsars are not significantly hotter than those with lower magnetic fields. Finally, we put these limits into context by summarizing all temperature measurements and limits for rotation-driven neutron stars.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATING RADIO TRANSIENT J1819-1458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. J.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rea, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) Campus UAB, Fac. de Ciències, Torre C5, parell, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaridis, K.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819–1458. Our 94 ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field (?5 × 10{sup 13} G) pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT ? 130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ?1.0 and ?1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hr of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.

  10. ON THE X-RAY EMISSION MECHANISMS OF THE PERSISTENT SOURCE AND VERY LOW FLUENCE BURSTS OF SGR J0501+4516

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Guever, Tolga [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Kouveliotou, Chryssa, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission of the persistent source and the low-fluence bursts of SGR J0501+4516 observed during a deep XMM-Newton observation near the peak of its 2008 outburst. For the persistent emission, we employ a physically motivated continuum emission model and spectroscopically determine important source properties such as the surface magnetic field strength and the magnetospheric scattering optical depth. We find that the magnetar surface temperature near the peak of its activity is 0.38 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 131 km{sup 2} at a distance of 2 kpc. The surface magnetic field strength determined spectroscopically, B = 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G, is consistent with the dipole field strength inferred from the source spin and spin-down rate. We fit the stacked spectra of 129 very faint bursts with a modified blackbody model and find a temperature of 1.16 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 93 km{sup 2}. We also find evidence for cooling during the burst decay phase.

  11. Energy-dependent evolution in IC10 X-1: hard evidence for an extended corona, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, R; Prestwich, A F; Stevens, I R; Clark, J S; Kolb, U C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed a ~130 ks XMM-Newton observation of the dynamically confirmed black hole + Wolf-Rayet (BH+WR) X-ray binary (XB) IC10 X-1, covering ~1 orbital cycle. This system experiences periodic intensity dips every ~35 hours. We find that energy-independent evolution is rejected at a >5 sigma level. The spectral and timing evolution of IC10 X-1 are best explained by a compact disk blackbody and an extended Comptonized component, where the thermal component is completely absorbed and the Comptonized component is partially covered during the dip. We consider three possibilities for the absorber: cold material in the outer accretion disk, as is well documented for Galactic neutron star (NS) XBs at high inclination; a stream of stellar wind that is enhanced by traveling through the L1 point; and a spherical wind. We estimated the corona radius (r_ADC) for IC10 X-1 from the dip ingress to be ~1 E+6 km, assuming absorption from the outer disk, and found it to be consistent with the relation between r_m ADC and...

  12. Six Months of Multi-Wavelength Follow-up of the Tidal Disruption Candidate ASASSN-14li and Implied TDE Rates from ASAS-SN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holoien, T W -S; Prieto, J L; Stanek, K Z; Dong, Subo; Shappee, B J; Grupe, D; Brown, J S; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Guo, Z; Jose, J; Herczeg, G J; Long, F; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Szczygiel, D M; Thompson, T A; Thorstensen, J R; Wozniak, P R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14li, found at the center of PGC 043234 ($d\\simeq90$~Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source had a peak bolometric luminosity of $L\\simeq10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ and a total integrated energy of $E\\simeq7\\times10^{50}$ ergs radiated over the $\\sim6$ months of observations presented. The UV/optical emission of the source is well-fit by a blackbody with roughly constant temperature of $T\\sim35,000$ K, while the luminosity declines by roughly a factor of 16 over this time. The optical/UV luminosity decline is broadly consistent with an exponential decline, $L\\propto e^{-t/t_0}$, with $t_0\\simeq60$ days. ASASSN-14li also exhibits soft X-ray emission comparable in luminosity to the optical and UV emission but declining at a slower rate, and the X-ray emission now dominates. Spectra of the source show broad Balmer and helium lines in emission as well as st...

  13. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  14. Cooling of the crust in the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward M. Cackett; Rudy Wijnands; Jon M. Miller; Edward F. Brown; Nathalie Degenaar

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In quasi-persistent neutron star transients, long outbursts cause the neutron star crust to be heated out of thermal equilibrium with the rest of the star. During quiescence, the crust then cools back down. Such crustal cooling has been observed in two quasi-persistent sources: KS 1731-260 and MXB 1659-29. Here we present an additional Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 in quiescence, which extends the baseline of monitoring to 6.6 yr after the end of the outburst. This new observation strongly suggests that the crust has thermally relaxed, with the temperature remaining consistent over 1000 days. Fitting the temperature cooling curve with an exponential plus constant model we determine an e-folding timescale of 465 +/- 25 days, with the crust cooling to a constant surface temperature of kT = 54 +/- 2 eV (assuming D=10 kpc). From this, we infer a core temperature in the range 3.5E7-8.3E7 K (assuming D=10 kpc), with the uncertainty due to the surface composition. Importantly, we tested two neutron star atmosphere models as well as a blackbody model, and found that the thermal relaxation time of the crust is independent of the chosen model and the assumed distance.

  15. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  16. The influence of the spectral emissivity of flat-plate calibrators on the calibration of IR thermometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E. [Centro Nacional de Metrología, CENAM Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cués, El Marqués, Querétaro, 76246 (Mexico)] [Centro Nacional de Metrología, CENAM Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cués, El Marqués, Querétaro, 76246 (Mexico)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat Calibrators (FC) are an option for calibration of infrared thermometers (IT) with a fixed large target. FCs are neither blackbodies, nor gray-bodies; their spectral emissivity is lower than one and depends on wavelength. Nevertheless they are used as gray-bodies with a nominal emissivity value. FCs can be calibrated radiometrically using as reference a calibrated IR thermometer (RT). If an FC will be used to calibrate ITs that work in the same spectral range as the RT then its calibration is straightforward: the actual FC spectral emissivity is not required. This result is valid for any given fixed emissivity assessed to the FC. On the other hand, when the RT working spectral range does not match with that of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC then it is required to know the FC spectral emissivity as part of the calibration process. For this purpose, at CENAM, we developed an experimental setup to measure spectral emissivity in the infrared spectral range, based on a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Not all laboratories have emissivity measurement capability in the appropriate wavelength and temperature ranges to obtain the spectral emissivity. Thus, we present an estimation of the error introduced when the spectral range of the RT used to calibrate an FC and the spectral ranges of the ITs to be calibrated with the FC do not match. Some examples are developed for the cases when RT and IT spectral ranges are [8,13] ?m and [8,14] ?m respectively.

  17. Multi-epoch Analysis of Pulse Shapes from the Neutron Star SAX J1808.4-3658

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharon M. Morsink; Denis A. Leahy

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse shapes detected during multiple outbursts of SAX J1808 are analyzed in order to constrain the neutron star's mass and radius. We use a hot-spot model with a small scattered-light component to jointly fit data from two different epochs, under the restriction that the star's mass and radius and the binary's inclination do not change from epoch to epoch. All other parameters describing the spot location, emissivity, and relative fractions of blackbody to Comptonized radiation are allowed to vary with time. The joint fit of data from the 1998 "slow decay" and the 2002 "end of outburst maximum" epochs using the constraint ineutron star mass 0.8 M_sun 1.0 M_sun from joint fits of the 1998 data with data from other epochs of the 2002 and 2005 outbursts also fall within the same 3 sigma confidence region. This 3 sigma confidence region allows a wide variety of hadronic equations of state, in contrast with an earlier analysis (Leahy et al 2008) of only the 1998 outburst data that only allowed for extremely small stars.

  18. Shock Breakout Emission from a Type Ib/c Supernova: XRT 080109/SN 2008D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger A. Chevalier; Claes Fransson

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray flash 080109, associated with SN 2008D, can be attributed to the shock breakout emission from a normal Type Ib/c supernova. If the observed emission is interpreted as blackbody emission, the temperature and radiated energy are close to expectations, considering that scattering dominates absorption processes so that spectrum formation occurs deep within the photosphere. The X-ray emission observed at ~10 days is attributed to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric photons with relativistic electrons produced in the interaction of the supernova with the progenitor wind. A simple model for the optical/ultraviolet emission from shock breakout is developed and applied to SN 1987A, SN 1999ex, SN 2008D, and SN 2006aj, all of which have optical emission observed at t~1 day. The emission from the first three can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout emission. The photospheric temperature is most sensitive to the radius of the progenitor star core and the radii in these cases are in line with expectations from stellar evolution. The early optical/ultraviolet observations of SN 2006aj cannot be accommodated by a shock breakout model in a straightforward way.

  19. Ks-band detection of thermal emission and color constraints to CoRoT-1b: A low-albedo planet with inefficient atmospheric energy redistribution and a temperature inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Justin C; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K; Burrows, Adam

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b, from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336+/-0.042 percent and is centered at phase 0.5022 (+0.0023,-0.0027), consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit ecos{\\omega} = 0.0035 (+0.0036,-0.0042). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 micron secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al. (2009), Gillon et al. (2009), and Alonso et al. (2009a). Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2454 (+84,-170) K, a very low Bond albedo A_B...

  20. A resolved debris disk around the candidate planet-hosting star HD95086

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moór, A; Kóspál, Á; Szabó, Gy M; Apai, D; Balog, Z; Csengeri, T; Grady, C; Henning, Th; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Szulágyi, J; Vavrek, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similarly to HR8799, {\\ss} Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ~6.0x5.4 arcsec (540x490 AU) and disk inclination of ~25 degree. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its re-projected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to th...

  1. A new bursting X-ray transient: SAX J1750.8-2900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Natalucci; R. Cornelisse; A. Bazzano; M. Cocchi; P. Ubertini; J. Heise; J. J. M. in 't Zand; E. Kuulkers

    1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analysed in detail the discovery measurements of the X-ray burster SAX J1750.8-2900 by the Wide Field Cameras on board BeppoSAX in spring 1997, at a position ~1.2 degrees off the Galactic Centre. The source was in outburst on March 13th when the first observation started and showed X-ray emission for ~ 2 weeks. A total of 9 bursts were detected, with peak intensities varying from ~ 0.4 to 1.0 Crab in the 2-10 keV range. Most bursts showed a fast rise time (~ 1s), an exponential decay profile with e-folding time of ~ 5s, spectral softening during decay, and a spectrum which is consistent with few keV blackbody radiation. These features identify them as type-I X-ray bursts of thermonuclear origin. The presence of type-I bursts and the source position close to the Galactic Centre favours the classification of this object as a neutron star low mass X-ray binary. X-ray emission from SAX J1750.8-2900 was not detected in the previous and subsequent Galactic bulge monitoring, and the source was never seen bursting again.

  2. X-Ray spectra from protons illuminating a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Deufel; C. P. Dullemond; H. C. Spruit

    2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the interaction of a slowly rotating unmagnetized neutron star with a hot (ion supported, ADAF) accretion flow. The virialized protons of the ADAF penetrate into the neutron star atmosphere, heating a surface layer. Detailed calculations are presented of the equilibrium between heating by the protons, electron thermal conduction, bremsstrahlung and multiple Compton scattering in this layer. Its temperature is of the order 40-70 keV. Its optical depth increases with the incident proton energy flux, and is of the order unity for accretion at $10^{-2}$--$10^{-1}$ of the Eddington rate. At these rates, the X-ray spectrum produced by the layer has a hard tail extending to 100 keV, and is similar to the observed spectra of accreting neutron stars in their hard states. The steep gradient at the base of the heated layer gives rise to an excess of photons at the soft end of the spectrum (compared to a blackbody) through an `inverse photosphere effect'. The differences with respect to previous studies of similar problems are discussed, they are due mostly to a more accurate treatment of the proton penetration process and the vertical structure of the heated layer.

  3. The Compact Central Object in the Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Kargaltsev; George G. Pavlov; Divas Sanwal; Gordon P. Garmire

    2002-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the compact central object CXOU J085201.4--461753 in the supernova remnant G266.2--1.2 (RX J0852.0--4622) with the Chandra ACIS detector in timing mode. The spectrum of this object can be described by a blackbody model with the temperature kT=404 eV and radius of the emitting region R=0.28 km, at a distance of 1 kpc. Power-law and thermal plasma models do not fit the source spectrum. The spectrum shows a marginally significant feature at 1.68 keV. Search for periodicity yields two candidate periods, about 301 ms and 33 ms, both significant at a 2.1 sigma level; the corresponding pulsed fractions are 13% and 9%, respectively. We find no evidence for long-term variability of the source flux, nor do we find extended emission around the central object. We suggest that CXOU J085201.4--461753 is similar to CXOU J232327.9+584842, the central source of the supernova remnant Cas A. It could be either a neutron star with a low or regular magnetic field, slowly accreting from a fossil disk, or, more likely, an isolated neutron star with a superstrong magnetic field. In either case, a conservative upper limit on surface temperature of a 10 km radius neutron star is about 90 eV, which suggests accelerated cooling for a reasonable age of a few thousand years.

  4. Suzaku X-Ray Spectroscopy of a Peculiar Hot Star in the Galactic Center Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Hyodo; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama; Shogo Nishiyama; Tetsuya Nagata; Itsuki Sakon; Hiroshi Murakami; Hironori Matsumoto

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a Suzaku study of a bright point-like source in the 6.7 keV intensity map of the Galactic center region. We detected an intense FeXXV 6.7 keV line with an equivalent width of ~1 keV as well as emission lines of highly ionized Ar and Ca from a spectrum obtained by the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer. The overall spectrum is described very well by a heavily absorbed (~2x10^{23}cm^{-2}) thin thermal plasma model with a temperature of 3.8+/-0.6 keV and a luminosity of ~3x10^{34} erg s^{-1} (2.0--8.0 keV) at 8 kpc. The absorption, temperature, luminosity, and the 6.7 keV line intensity were confirmed with the archived XMM-Newton data. The source has a very red (J-Ks=8.2 mag) infrared spectral energy distribution (SED), which was fitted by a blackbody emission of ~1000 K attenuated by a visual extinction of ~31 mag. The high plasma temperature and the large X-ray luminosity are consistent with a wind-wind colliding Wolf-Rayet binary. The similarity of the SED to those of the eponymous Quintuplet cluster members suggests that the source is a WC-type source.

  5. Resonant Cyclotron Scattering and Comptonization in Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Lyutikov; Fotis P. Gavriil

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant cyclotron scattering of the surface radiation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars may considerably modify the emergent spectra and impede efforts to constraint neutron star properties. Resonant cyclotron scattering by a non-relativistic warm plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field has a number of unusual characteristics: (i) in the limit of high resonant optical depth, the cyclotron resonant layer is half opaque, in sharp contrast to the case of non-resonant scattering. (ii) The transmitted flux is on average Compton up-scattered by ~ $1+ 2 beta_T$, where $\\beta_T$ is the typical thermal velocity in units of the velocity of light; the reflected flux has on average the initial frequency. (iii) For both the transmitted and reflected fluxes the dispersion of intensity decreases with increasing optical depth. (iv) The emergent spectrum is appreciably non-Plankian while narrow spectral features produced at the surface may be erased. We derive semi-analytically modification of the surface Plankian emission due to multiple scattering between the resonant layers and apply the model to anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1--5937. Our simple model fits just as well as the ``canonical'' magnetar spectra model of a blackbody plus power-law.

  6. Importance of Compton scattering for radiation spectra of isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Suleimanov; K. Werner

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergent model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are widely used to fit the observed soft X-ray spectra of different types of isolated neutron stars. We investigate the effect of Compton scattering on the emergent spectra of hot (T_eff > 10^6 K) isolated neutron stars with weak magnetic fields. In order to compute model atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium we solve the radiation transfer equation with the Kompaneets operator. We calculate a set of models with effective temperatures in the range 1 - 5 * 10^6 K, with two values of surface gravity (log g = 13.9 and 14.3) and different chemical compositions. Radiation spectra computed with Compton scattering are softer than those computed without Compton scattering at high energies (E > 5 keV) for light elements (H or He) model atmospheres. The Compton effect is more significant in H model atmospheres and models with low surface gravity. The emergent spectra of the hottest (T_eff > 3 * 10^6 K) model atmospheres can be described by diluted blackbody spectra with hardness factors ~ 1.6 - 1.9. Compton scattering is less important in models with solar abundance of heavy elements.

  7. On the sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1,113 spectra being analysed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrot...

  8. XMM-Newton view of a hard X-ray transient IGR J17497-2821

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Md Shah; Mondal, Aditya S; Dewangan, Gulab C; Jhingan, Sanjay; Raychaudhuri, Biplab

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectral and energy dependent timing characteristics of the hard X-ray transient IGR J17497-2821 based on XMM-Newton observations performed five and nine days after its outburst on 2006 September 17. We find that the source spectra can be well described by a hard (Gamma ~ 1.50) powerlaw and a weak multicolour disk blackbody with inner disk temperature kT_{in} ~ 0.2 KeV. A broad iron K - alpha line with FWHM ~ 27000 Km/s, consistent with that arising from an accretion disk truncated at large radius, was also detected. The power density spectra of IGR J17497 - 2821, derived from the high resolution (30 micro second) timing mode XMM-Newton observations, are characterised by broadband noise components that are well modelled by three Lorentzians. The shallow power law slope, low disk luminosity and the shape of the broadband power density spectrum indicate that the source was in the hard state. The rms variability in the softer energy bands (0.3-2 KeV) found to be ~ 1.3 times that in 2-5 and 5-10 KeV en...

  9. WASP-80b has a dayside within the T-dwarf range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triaud, Amaury H M J; Ehrenreich, David; Herrero, Enrique; Lendl, Monika; Anderson, David R; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Delrez, Laetitia; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Hellier, Coel; Heng, Keving; Jehin, Emmanuel; Maxted, Pierre F L; Pollacco, Don; Queloz, Didier; Ribas, Ignasi; Smalley, Barry; Smith, Alexis M S; Udry, Stephane

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WASP-80b is a missing link in the study of exo-atmospheres. It falls between the warm Neptunes and the hot Jupiters and is amenable for characterisation, thanks to its host star's properties. We observed the planet through transit and during occultation with Warm Spitzer. Combining our mid-infrared transits with optical time series, we find that the planet presents a transmission spectrum indistinguishable from a horizontal line. In emission, WASP-80b is the intrinsically faintest planet whose dayside flux has been detected in both the 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m Spitzer channels. The depths of the occultations reveal that WASP-80b is as bright and as red as a T4 dwarf, but that its temperature is cooler. If planets go through the equivalent of an L-T transition, our results would imply this happens at cooler temperatures than for brown dwarfs. Placing WASP-80b's dayside into a colour-magnitude diagram, it falls exactly at the junction between a blackbody model and the T-dwarf sequence; we cannot discern which of thos...

  10. Young Stars in the Camelopardalis Dust and Molecular Clouds. II. Infrared Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Straizys; V. Laugalys

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using infrared photometric data extracted from the 2MASS, IRAS and MSX databases, 142 suspected young stellar objects (YSOs) are selected from about 2 million stars in the Camelopardalis segment of the Milky Way limited by Galactic longitude 132-158 deg, latitude pm 12 deg. According to radial velocities of the associated CO clouds, the objects are attributed to three molecular and dust cloud layers at 150--300 pc, 900 pc and 2.2 kpc distances from the Sun. These objects concentrate into dust and molecular clouds and exhibit extremely large reddenings (A_V up to 25 mag) which can be caused by the dust in foreground clouds and circumstellar envelopes or disks. In the J-H vs. H-K diagram these objects lie above the intrinsic line of T Tauri variables, roughly along the black-body line. Among the identified objects, some already known YSOs are present, including the well investigated massive object GL 490. The spectral energy distributions between 700 nm and 100 mum suggest that the objects may be YSOs of classes I, II and III. However, we do not exclude the possibility that a small fraction of the objects, especially those without IRAS and MSX photometry, may be unrecognized heavily reddened OB-stars, late-type AGB stars or even galaxies.

  11. Dynamical evolution of neutrino--cooled accretion disks: detailed microphysics, lepton-driven convection, and global energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Lee; Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz; Dany Page

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed, two dimensional numerical study of the microphysical conditions and dynamical evolution of accretion disks around black holes when neutrino emission is the main source of cooling. Such structures are likely to form after the gravitational collapse of massive rotating stellar cores, or the coalescence of two compact objects in a binary (e.g., the Hulse--Taylor system). The physical composition is determined self consistently by considering two regimes: neutrino--opaque and neutrino--transparent, with a detailed equation of state which takes into account neutronization, nuclear statistical equilibrium of a gas of free nucleons and alpha particles, blackbody radiation and a relativistic Fermi gas of arbitrary degeneracy. Various neutrino emission processes are considered, with electron/positron capture onto free nucleons providing the dominant contribution to the cooling rate. We find that important temporal and spatial scales, related to the optically thin/optically thick transition are present in the disk, and manifest themselves clearly in the energy output in neutrinos. This transition produces an inversion of the lepton gradient in the innermost regions of the flow which drives convective motions, and affects the density and disk scale height radial profiles. The electron fraction remains low in the region close to the black hole, and if preserved in an outflow, could give rise to heavy element nucleosynthesis. Our specific initial conditions arise from the binary merger context, and so we explore the implications of our results for the production of gamma ray bursts.

  12. The Near-Infrared Structure and Spectra of the Bipolar Nebulae M 2--9 and Afgl 2688: The Role of UV-Pumping and Shocks in Molecular Hydrogen Excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph L. Hora; William B. Latter

    1994-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution near-infrared images and moderate resolution spectra were obtained of the bipolar nebulae M~2--9 and AFGL 2688. The ability to spatially and spectrally resolve the various components of the nebulae has proved to be important in determining their physical structure and characteristics. In M~2--9, the lobes are found to have a double-shell structure. Analysis of \\h2\\ line ratios indicates that the \\h2\\ emission is radiatively excited. A well-resolved photodissociation region is observed in the lobes. The spectrum of the central source is dominated by H recombination lines and a strong continuum rising towards longer wavelengths consistent with a $T = 795$ K blackbody. In AFGL 2688, the emission from the bright lobes is mainly continuum reflected from the central star. Several molecular features from C$_2$ and CN are present. In the extreme end of the N lobe and in the E equatorial region, the emission is dominated by lines of \\h2 in the 2--2.5 \\microns region. The observed \\h2 line ratios indicate that the emission is collisionally excited, with an excitation temperature $T_{ex} \\approx 1600\\pm 100$ K.

  13. THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST 111209A: THE COLLAPSE OF A BLUE SUPERGIANT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gendre, B.; Cutini, S.; D'Elia, V. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)] [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Stratta, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, OAR-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy)] [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, OAR-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Atteia, J. L.; Klotz, A. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Basa, S. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France)] [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Boeer, M. [CNRS, ARTEMIS, UMR 7250, Boulevard de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS, ARTEMIS, UMR 7250, Boulevard de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J [University of Western Australia, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)] [University of Western Australia, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Piro, L., E-mail: bruce.gendre@gmail.com [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma, INAF, via fosso del cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of GRB 111209A, observed at a redshift of z = 0.677. We show that this event was active in its prompt phase for about 25000 s, making it the longest burst ever observed. This rare event could have been detected up to z {approx} 1.4 in gamma-rays. Compared to other long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 111209A is a clear outlier in the energy-fluence and duration plane. The high-energy prompt emission shows no sign of a strong blackbody component, the signature of a tidal disruption event, or a supernova shock breakout. Given the extreme longevity of this event, and lack of any significant observed supernova signature, we propose that GRB 111209A resulted from the core-collapse of a low-metallicity blue supergiant star. This scenario is favored because of the necessity to supply enough mass to the central engine over a duration of thousands of seconds. Hence, we suggest that GRB 111209A could have more in common with population III stellar explosions, rather than those associated with normal long GRBs.

  14. Surface charge sensing by altering the phase transition in VO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: suhaskumar@stanford.edu, E-mail: rahimes@stanford.edu; Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Esfandyarpour, R., E-mail: suhaskumar@stanford.edu, E-mail: rahimes@stanford.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Davis, R. [Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of surface charges has various applications in medicine, electronics, biotechnology, etc. The source of surface charge induction may range from simple charge-polarized molecules like water to complicated proteins. It was recently discovered that surface charge accumulation can alter the temperature at which VO{sub 2} undergoes a Mott transition. Here, we deposited polar molecules onto the surface of two-terminal thin-film VO{sub 2} lateral devices and monitored the joule-heating-driven Mott transition, or conductance switching. We observed that the power required to induce the conductance switching reduced upon treatment with polar molecules and, using in-situ blackbody-emission direct measurement of local temperature, we show that this reduction in power was accompanied by reduction in the Mott transition temperature. Further evidence suggested that this effect has specificity to the nature of the species used to induce surface charges. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we also show that there is no detectable change in oxidation state of vanadium or structural phase in the bulk of the 40?nm VO{sub 2} thin-film even as the phase transition temperature is reduced by up to 20?K by the polar molecules. The ability to alter the phase transition parameters by depositing polar molecules suggests a potential application in sensing surface charges of different origins and this set of results also highlights interesting aspects of the phase transition in VO{sub 2}.

  15. The Spectrum and Accurate Location of GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETGS observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. The accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA= 18 01 12.40, Dec= -25 44 36.0 (90% confidence radius = 0".6), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. The March spectrum is well-fit with a multi-color disk-blackbody with an inner temperature of 0.50+/-0.01 keV, interstellar absorption of nH = (1.59 +/- 0.05)x10^22 cm^-2, and (un-absorbed) 1-10 keV luminosity of (4.5x10^36)(D/8.5kpc)^2 ergs/sec. No narrow emission lines are apparent in the spectrum and upper limits to line equivalent widths are given.

  16. A NEAR-INFRARED EXCESS IN THE CONTINUUM OF HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES: A TRACER OF STAR FORMATION AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mentuch, Erin; Abraham, Roberto G.; Carlberg, R. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Glazebrook, Karl [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, 1 Alfred St, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); McCarthy, Patrick J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Yan, Haojing [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, the Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); O'Donnell, Daniel V. [Department of Physics, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Le Borgne, Damien [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095, UPMC, Paris (France); Savaglio, Sandra [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Crampton, David; Murowinski, Richard [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Juneau, Stephanie [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Rm. N204, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Joergensen, Inger; Roth, Kathy [Gemini Observatory, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chen, H.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marzke, Ronald O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad continuum excess in the near-infrared, peaking in the rest frame at 2-5 mum, is detected in a spectroscopic sample of 88 galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.0 taken from the Gemini Deep Deep Survey. Line emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 3.3 mum alone cannot explain the excess, which can be fit by a spectral component consisting of a template of PAH emission lines superposed on a modified blackbody of temperature T approx 850 K. The luminosity of this near-infrared excess emission at 3 mum is found to be correlated with the star formation rate of the galaxy. The origin of the near-infrared excess is explored by examining similar excesses observed locally in massive star-forming regions, reflection and planetary nebulae, post-asymptotic giant branch stars, and in the galactic cirrus. We also consider the potential contribution from dust heated around low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. We conclude that the most likely explanation for the 2-5 mum excess is the contribution from circumstellar disks around massive young stellar objects seen in the integrated light of high-redshift galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses, as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  17. High energy emission and polarisation limits for the INTEGRAL burst GRB 061122

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGlynn, S; McBreen, B; Hanlon, L; McBreen, S; Clark, D J; Dean, A J; Martin-Carrillo, A; O'Connor, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) GRB 061122 is one of the brightest GRBs detected within INTEGRAL's field of view to date. The two gamma-ray detectors on INTEGRAL were used to investigate the spectral characteristics of GRB 061122. A search for linear polarisation in the prompt emission was carried out using the SPI multiple event data in the energy range 100 keV-1 MeV. The prompt spectrum was best fit by a combination of a blackbody and a power--law model (the quasithermal model), with evidence for high energy emission continuing above 8 MeV. A pseudo-redshift value of pz = 0.95 +/- 0.18 was determined using the spectral fit parameters. The isotropic energy at this pseudo-redshift is 8.5 x 10^{52} erg. The jet opening angle was estimated to be smaller than 2.8 deg or larger than 11.9 deg from the X-ray lightcurve. An upper limit of 60% polarisation was determined for the prompt emission of GRB 061122, using the multiple event data. The high energy emission observed in the spectrum may be due to the reverse shock interacting with ...

  18. Pulse spectral evolution of GRBs: implication as standard candle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basak, Rupal

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an \\emph{empirical} description of a prompt GRB pulse, we analyze the individual pulses of all Fermi/GBM GRBs with known redshifts, till July 2009. This description is simultaneous in time and energy and allows one to determine the peak energy of Band spectrum at zero fluence ($E_{peak,0}$). We demonstrate, for the first time, that the $E_{peak,0}$ bears a very strong correlation with the isotropic energy of the individual pulses, and hence, each pulse can be used as a luminosity indicator. As a physical description is needed in order to use GRB pulses for cosmological purposes, we explore other physical spectral models. As pulses are the building blocks of a GRB, we choose another sample of Fermi/GBM GRBs having bright, long and single/ separable pulse(s) and fit the time-resolved spectra of the individual pulses with the Band model and a model consisting of a blackbody and a power-law. Both these models give acceptable fits. We find that the peak energy/ temperature always decreases exponentially with...

  19. Testing Loop Quantum Gravity and Electromagnetic Dark Energy in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 Cabrera and Tate reported an anomalous excess of mass of the Cooper pairs in rotating thin Niobium rings. So far, this experimental result never received a proper theoretical explanation in the context of superconductor's physics. In the present work we argue that what Cabrera and Tate interpreted as an anomalous excess of mass can also be associated with a deviation from the classical gravitomagnetic Larmor theorem due to the presence of dark energy in the superconductor, as well as with the discrete structure of the area of the superconducting Niobium ring as predicted by Loop Quantum Gravity. From Cabrera and Tate measurements we deduce that the quantization of spacetime in superconducting circular rings occurs at the Planck-Einstein scale $l_{PE} = (\\hbar G/c^3 \\Lambda)^{1/4}\\sim 3.77\\times 10 ^{-5} m$, instead of the Planck scale $l_{P} =(\\hbar G / c^3)^{1/2}=1.61 \\times 10 ^{-35} m$, with an Immirzi parameter which depends on the specific critical temperature of the superconducting material and on the area of the ring. The stephan-Boltzmann law for quantized areas delimited by superconducting rings is predicted, and an experimental concept based on the electromagnetic black-body radiation emitted by this surfaces, is proposed to test loop quantum gravity and electromagnetic dark energy in superconductors.

  20. CONSTRAINING THE OPTICAL EMISSION FROM THE DOUBLE PULSAR SYSTEM J0737-3039

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Pallanca, C.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Mignani, R. P. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Pellizzoni, A.; Possenti, A.; Burgay, M.; D'Amico, N. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, localita Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Kramer, M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first optical observations of the unique system J0737-3039 (composed of two pulsars, hereafter PSR-A and PSR-B). Ultra-deep optical observations, performed with the High Resolution Camera of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, could not detect any optical emission from the system down to m{sub F435W} = 27.0 and m{sub F606W} = 28.3. The estimated optical flux limits are used to constrain the three-component (two thermal and one non-thermal) model recently proposed to reproduce the XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum. They suggest the presence of a break at low energies in the non-thermal power-law component of PSR-A and are compatible with the expected blackbody emission from the PSR-B surface. The corresponding efficiency of the optical emission from PSR-A's magnetosphere would be comparable to that of other Myr-old pulsars, thus suggesting that this parameter may not dramatically evolve over a timescale of a few Myr.

  1. GaSb based ternary and quaternary diffused junction devices for TPV applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, V.S.; Saban, S.B.; Morgan, M.D.; Horne, W.E.; Evans, B.D.; Ketterl, J.R. [EDTEK Inc. 7082 S. 220th Street Kent, Washington 98032 (United States); Morosini, M.B.; Patel, N.B. [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil (Brazil); Field, H. [NREL, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report the characteristics of ternary, GaInSb (Eg=0.70eV) and quarternary, GaInAsSb (Eg=0.5eV) diffused junction photovoltaic devices. The unique feature of the quarternary device is the extended long-wavelength response to 2.1 microns enabling the efficient use of the blackbody-like thermal sources operating at 1373 K in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion systems. The ternary device was fabricated by diffusing zinc into a n-type (100) oriented GaInSb substrate. For the quarternary, a four micron thick Te doped GaInAsSb layer grown by LPE on a n-type GaSb(100) wafer was used as the starting substrate for zinc diffusion. The ternary device exhibits an open circuit voltage of 0.38 V, Fill Factor of 0.63 and a short circuit current of 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, while the corresponding values for the quarternary device are 0.25 V, 0.58 and 0.8A/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The peak internal quantum efficiency for the ternary is over 90{percent} and that of the quarternary is above 75{percent}. Process optimization should improve the performance charcateristics of the quarternary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. A 2.4 - 12 microns spectrophotometric study with ISO of Cygnus X-3 in quiescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydie Koch-Miramond; P'eter 'Abrah'am; Ya"el Fuchs; Jean-Marc Bonnet-Bidaud; Arnaud Claret

    2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present mid-infrared spectrophotometric results obtained with the ISO on the peculiar X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 in quiescence, at orbital phases 0.83 to 1.04. The 2.4-12 microns continuum radiation observed with ISOPHOT-S can be explained by thermal free-free emission in an expanding wind with, above 6.5 microns, a possible additional black-body component with temperature T ~ 250 K and radius R ~ 5000 solar radii at 10 kpc, likely due to thermal emission by circumstellar dust. The observed brightness and continuum spectrum closely match that of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 147, a WN8+B0.5 binary system, when rescaled at the same 10 kpc distance as Cygnus X-3. A rough mass loss estimate assuming a WN wind gives ~ 1.2 10^{-4} M(sun)/yr. A line at ~ 4.3 microns with a more than 4.3 sigma detection level, and with a dereddened flux of 126 mJy, is interpreted as the expected He I 3p-3s line at 4.295 microns, a prominent line in the WR 147 spectrum. These results are consistent with a Wolf-Rayet-like companion to the compact object in Cygnus X-3 of WN8 type, a later type than suggested by earlier works.

  3. Revisit emission spectrum and entropy quantum of the Reissner-Nordström black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Quan Jiang

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Banerjee and Majhi's recent work shows that black hole's emission spectrum could be fully reproduced in the tunneling picture, where, as an intriguing technique, the Kruskal extension was introduced to connect the left and right modes inside and outside the horizon. Some attempt, as an extension, was focused on producing the Hawking emission spectrum of the (charged) Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole in the Banerjee-Majhi's treatment. Unfortunately, the Kruskal extension in their observation was so badly defined that the ingoing mode was classically forbidden traveling towards the center of black hole, but could quantum tunnel across the horizon with the probability $\\Gamma=e^{-\\pi \\omega_0/\\kappa_+}$. This tunneling picture is unphysical. With this point as a central motivation, in this paper we first introduce such a suitable Kruskal extension for the (charged) Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole that a perfect tunneling picture can be provided during the charged particle's emission. Then, under the new Kruskal extension, we revisit the Hawking emission spectrum and entropy spectroscopy as tunneling from the charged black hole. The result shows that the tunneling method is so universally robust that the Hawking blackbody emission spectrum from a charged black hole can be well reproduced in the tunneling mechanism, and its induced entropy quantum is a much better approximation for the forthcoming quantum gravity theory.

  4. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  5. A grid of synthetic ionizing spectra for very hot compact stars from NLTE model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Rauch

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise analysis of properties of planetary nebulae is strongly dependent on good models for the stellar ionizing spectrum. Observations in the UV - X-ray wavelength range as well as NLTE model atmosphere calculations of spectra of their exciting stars have shown that neither blackbody fluxes nor "standard" NLTE atmosphere models which are composed out of hydrogen and helium only are good approximations. Strong differences between synthetic spectra from these compared to observed spectra at energies higher than 54 eV (He II ground state) can be ascribed to the neglect of metal-line blanketing. Realistic modeling of the emergent fluxes of hot stars in the UV - X-ray wavelength range requires metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres which include all elements from hydrogen up to the iron-group. For this purpose, we present a grid (solar and halo abundance ratios) of metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmosphere fluxes which covers the parameter range of central stars of planetary nebulae.

  6. Non-LTE modeling of supernova-fallback disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first detailed spectrum synthesis calculation of a supernova-fallback disk composed of iron. We assume a geometrically thin disk with a radial structure described by the classical alpha-disk model. The disk is represented by concentric rings radiating as plane-parallel slabs. The vertical structure and emission spectrum of each ring is computed in a fully self-consistent manner by solving the structure equations simultaneously with the radiation transfer equations under non-LTE conditions. We describe the properties of a specific disk model and discuss various effects on the emergent UV/optical spectrum. We find that strong iron-line blanketing causes broad absorption features over the whole spectral range. Limb darkening changes the spectral distribution up to a factor of four depending on the inclination angle. Consequently, such differences also occur between a blackbody spectrum and our model. The overall spectral shape is independent of the exact chemical composition as long as iron is the dominant species. A pure iron composition cannot be distinguished from silicon-burning ash. Non-LTE effects are small and restricted to few spectral features.

  7. Revealing a hard X-ray spectral component reverberating within one light hour of the central Supermassive Black Hole in Ark 564

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giustini, M; Reeves, J N; Miller, L; Legg, E; Kraemer, S B; George, I M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ark 564 (z=0.0247) is an X-ray bright NLS1. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, Legg et al. (2012) discovered an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 seconds after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4-1 keV). We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Despite the large variability in flux, the broad band spectral shape of Ark 564 is not dramatically varying and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission, or by a Comptonized power law emission model. High resolution spectroscopy revealed the presence of ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density and a range of ioni...

  8. Near infra-red spectroscopy of V838 Monocerotis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok

    2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Near IR, multi-epoch, spectroscopic and photometric observations of the enigmatic, eruptive variable V838 Mon in JHK bands are reported. One of the unusual features is the detection of several strong neutral TiI lines in emission in the K band. From the strength of these lines, the mass of the ejected envelope is estimated to be in the range 10e-7 to 10e-5 M(sun). The spectra also show the strong presence of the first and second overtones of 12CO bands seen in the K and H bands. The CO bands show a complex evolution. Deep water bands at 1.4 and 1.9 micron are also seen later in the object's evolution. Blackbody fits to the JHK photometric data show that V838 Mon has evolved to temperatures between 2400 - 2600 K by approximately 130 days after outburst. The spectra at this stage have the general characteristics of a very cool M giant.

  9. The X-ray Behavior of Two CVs: TT Ari and DP Leo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig R. Robinson; France A. Cordova

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ROSAT PSPC observations of the nova-like, or intermediate polar, TT Ari and the eclipsing polar DP Leo. Observations of TT Ari were performed as part of a simultaneous multiwavelength campaign. The X-ray spectrum of TT Ari from ROSAT was combined with Ginga observations to suggest the presence of three distinct emission components: an optically thin plasma, a dominating bremsstrahlung continuum and one or more iron emission lines. Simultaneous and later IUE observations show modulation in the absorption component of the P Cygni-like CIV line on the spectroscopic period indicating a complex wind structure. Three eclipses were observed from the DP Leo system with intensity dips, not previously observed, occurring prior to each eclipse. The dips are interpreted as the eclipse of the main emission region by an accretion stream varying in impact position or stream shape with time. The DP Leo spectrum is well fit by either a 25 eV blackbody or a soft power law. No evidence exists for accretion onto the stronger magnetic pole and severe limits were placed upon the flux from any hard bremsstrahlung component. We constrained distances to this system based upon model fits to the data.

  10. HOT DEBRIS DUST AROUND HD 106797

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamashita, Takuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Hirao, Takanori; Enya, Keigo [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-0043, Osaka (Japan); Marshall, Jonathan P.; White, Glenn J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: fujiwara@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometry of the A0 V main-sequence star HD 106797 with AKARI and Gemini/T-ReCS is used to detect excess emission over the expected stellar photospheric emission between 10 and 20 {mu}m, which is best attributed to hot circumstellar debris dust surrounding the star. The temperature of the debris dust is derived as T {sub d} {approx} 190 K by assuming that the excess emission is approximated by a single temperature blackbody. The derived temperature suggests that the inner radius of the debris disk is {approx}14 AU. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is 1000 times brighter than that of our own zodiacal cloud. The existence of such a large amount of hot dust around HD 106797 cannot be accounted for by a simple model of the steady state evolution of a debris disk due to collisions, and it is likely that transient events play a significant role. Our data also show a narrow spectral feature between 11 and 12 {mu}m attributable to crystalline silicates, suggesting that dust heating has occurred during the formation and evolution of the debris disk of HD 106797.

  11. A new super-soft X-ray source in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Discovery of the first Be/white dwarf system in the SMC?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, R; Pietsch, W; Coe, M J; Mereghetti, S; La Palombara, N; Owen, R A; Udalski, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) hosts a large number of Be/X-ray binaries, however no Be/white dwarf system is known so far, although population synthesis calculations predict that they might be more frequent than Be/neutron star systems. XMMUJ010147.5-715550 was found as a new faint super-soft X-ray source (SSS) with a likely Be star optical counterpart. We investigate the nature of this system and search for further high-absorbed candidates in the SMC. We analysed the XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum and light curve, optical photometry, and the I-band OGLE III light curve. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by black-body and white dwarf atmosphere models with highly model-dependent temperature between 20 and 100 eV. The likely optical counterpart AzV 281 showed low near infrared emission during X-ray activity, followed by a brightening in the I-band afterwards. We find further candidates for high-absorbed SSSs with a blue star as counterpart. We discuss XMMUJ010147.5-715550 as the first candidate for a Be/whi...

  12. Thermal and Bulk Comptonization in Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new theoretical model for the spectral formation process in accretion-powered X-ray pulsars based on a detailed treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in the accreting, shocked gas. A rigorous eigenfunction expansion method is employed to obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the scattering of radiation injected into the column from a monochromatic source located at an arbitrary height above the stellar surface. The emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the Green's function with source terms corresponding to bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody emission. The energization of the photons in the shock, combined with cyclotron absorption, naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum shape and a high-energy quasi-exponential cutoff. We demonstrate that the new theory successfully reproduces the phase-averaged spectra of the bright pulsars Her X-1, LMC X-4, and Cen X-3. In these luminous sources, it is shown that the emergent spectra are dominated by Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission.

  13. Comptonization and the Spectra of Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael T. Wolff; Peter A. Becker; Kenneth D. Wolfram

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy. However, despite decades of theoretical and observational work since their discovery, no satisfactory model for the formation of the observed X-ray spectra has emerged. In this paper, we report on a self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a pulsar accretion column that includes an explicit treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in the radiation-dominated shocks that form in the accretion flows. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column. The Green's function is convolved with bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody source terms to calculate the emergent photon spectrum. We show that energization of photons in the shock naturally produces an X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum and a high-energy exponential cutoff. Finally, we demonstrate that our model yields good agreement with the spectra of the bright pulsar Her X-1 and the low luminosity pulsar X Per.

  14. X-ray analysis of the proper motion and pulsar wind nebula for PSR J1741-2054

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auchettl, Katie; Romani, Roger W; Posselt, Bettina; Pavlov, George G; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Ng, C-Y; Temim, Tea; Weisskopf, Martin C; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtained six observations of PSR J1741-2054 using the $Chandra$ ACIS-S detector totaling $\\sim$300 ks. By registering this new epoch of observations to an archival observation taken 3.2 years earlier using X-ray point sources in the field of view, we have measured the pulsar proper motion at $\\mu =109 \\pm 10$ mas/yr. The spectrum of the pulsar can be described by an absorbed power law with photon index $\\Gamma$=2.68$\\pm$0.04, plus a blackbody with an emission radius of (4.5$^{+3.2}_{-2.5})d_{0.38}$ km, for a DM-estimated distance of $0.38d_{0.38}$ kpc and a temperature of $61.7\\pm3.0$ eV. Emission from the compact nebula is well described by an absorbed power law model with a photon index of $\\Gamma$ = 1.67$\\pm$0.06, while the diffuse emission seen as a trail extending northeast of the pulsar shows no evidence of synchrotron cooling. We also looked for extended features that might represent a jet or torus-like structure using image deconvolution and PSF-subtraction but we find no conclusive evidence of suc...

  15. A GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENT OF THE RELATIVISTIC BEAMING EFFECT IN A DETACHED DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shporer, Avi [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Steinfadt, Justin D. R.; Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Mazeh, Tsevi, E-mail: ashporer@lcogt.ne [Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass-ratio and low-luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during three nights at the 2.0 m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal, and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -3}, consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity (RV) amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic RV amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due to the ellipsoidal or reflection effects, consistent with their expected undetectable amplitude for this system. Low-mass, helium-core WDs are expected to reside in binary systems, where in some of those systems the binary companion is a faint C/O WD and the two stars are detached and non-interacting, as in the case of NLTT 11748. The beaming effect can be used to search for the faint binary companion in those systems using wide-band photometry.

  16. A ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect in a detached double WD binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shporer, Avi; Steinfadt, Justin D R; Bildsten, Lars; Howell, Steve B; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first ground-based measurement of the relativistic beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting). We observed the beaming effect in the detached, non-interacting eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) binary NLTT 11748. Our observations were motivated by the system's high mass ratio and low luminosity ratio, leading to a large beaming-induced variability amplitude at the orbital period of 5.6 hr. We observed the system during 3 nights at the 2.0m Faulkes Telescope North with the SDSS-g' filter, and fitted the data simultaneously for the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection effects. Our fitted relative beaming amplitude is (3.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^(-3), consistent with the expected amplitude from a blackbody spectrum given the photometric primary radial velocity amplitude and effective temperature. This result is a first step in testing the relation between the photometric beaming amplitude and the spectroscopic radial velocity amplitude in NLTT 11748 and similar systems. We did not identify any variability due t...

  17. The Fast Evolution of SN 2010bh associated with XRF 100316D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E., Felipe Olivares; Schady, Patricia; Rau, Arne; Klose, Sylvio; Krühler, Thomas; Afonso, Paulo M J; Updike, Adria C; Nardini, Marco; Filgas, Robert; Guelbenzu, Ana Nicuesa; Clemens, Christian; Elliott, Jonny; Kann, D Alexander; Rossi, Andrea; Sudilovsky, Vladimir

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About a decade ago the first observational evidence of the connection between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts was found. Since then, only half a dozen spectroscopically confirmed associations have been discovered and XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh lies among the latest. Starting observations at 12 hr and continuing until 80 days after the burst, GROND provided excellent photometric data of XRF 100316D/SN 2010bh in six filter bands from the optical to the near-infrared, significantly expanding the existing data set for this event. Combining GROND and Swift/UVOT+XRT data, the early SED is modelled with a blackbody and afterglow component attenuated by dust and gas absorption. The best-fit models imply a moderate host-galaxy extinction (A_V=1.2\\pm0.1 mag). Furthermore, temperature and radius evolution of the thermal component are combined with earlier measurements available from the literature. The analysis reveals a cooling envelope at an apparent initial radius of 7\\times10^11 cm, compatible with a dense wind surroundi...

  18. Thermal Emission from a Hot Cocoon Surrounding the Jet of XRF 060218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, E; Zhang, B B; Dai, Z G; Liang, Enwei; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Bin-Bin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is long speculated that long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originate froma relativistic jet emerging from a collapsing massive star progenitor. Although associations of core-collapsing supernovae with long GRB afterglows have been identified in a number of systems, including the latest X-ray flash (XRF) 060218/SN 2006aj connection detected by Swift, direct evidence of a relativistic jet emerging from a collapsing star is still lacking. Here we report the detection of a thermal emission component (high-T component) accompanying the prompt X-ray emission of XRF 060218, with temperature kT_H=1.21+0.22/-0.24 keV and effective blackbody radius R_H~ 5\\times 10^{9} cm. This high-T component co-exists with another low-T thermal component as reported by Campana et al. 2006 for at least 2700 seconds, but evolves independently with respect to the low-T component by tracing the lightcurve of the non-thermal component. We identify this high-T thermal component as the emission of a hot cocoon surrounding the relativi...

  19. Shock Breakout Emission from a Type Ib/c Supernova: XRF 080109/SN 2008D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevalier, Roger A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray flash 080109, associated with SN 2008D, can be attributed to the shock breakout emission from a normal Type Ib/c supernova. If the observed emission is interpreted as blackbody emission, the temperature and radiated energy are close to expectations, considering that scattering dominates absorption processes so that spectrum formation occurs deep within the photosphere. The X-ray emission observed at ~10 days is attributed to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric photons with relativistic electrons produced in the interaction of the supernova with the progenitor wind. A simple model for the optical/ultraviolet emission from shock breakout is developed and applied to SN 1987A, SN 1999ex, SN 2008D, and SN 2006aj, all of which have optical emission observed at t~1 day. The emission from the first three can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout emission. The photospheric temperature is most sensitive to the radius of the progenitor star core and the radii in these cases are in line with expectat...

  20. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  2. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Verification of unfold error estimates in the UFO code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation which attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of tabulated response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the UFO (UnFold Operator) code. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, UFO also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). 100 random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetemined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-Pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums.

  4. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica, Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Martin, Peter G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [Istituto di Radioastronomia, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

  5. Quantum Optomechanical Heat Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keye Zhang; Francesco Bariani; Pierre Meystre

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically a quantum optomechanical realization of a heat engine. In a generic optomechanical arrangement the optomechanical coupling between the cavity field and the oscillating end-mirror results in polariton normal mode excitations whose character depends on the pump detuning and the coupling strength. By varying that detuning it is possible to transform their character from phonon-like to photon-like, so that they are predominantly coupled to the thermal reservoir of phonons or photons, respectively. We exploit the fact that the effective temperatures of these two reservoirs are different to produce a Otto cycle along one of the polariton branches. We discuss the basic properties of the system in two different regimes: in the optical domain it is possible to extract work from the thermal energy of a mechanical resonator at finite temperature, while in the microwave range one can in principle exploit the cycle to extract work from the blackbody radiation background coupled to an ultra-cold atomic ensemble.

  6. Covert Optical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulat A. Bash; Andrei H. Gheorghe; Monika Patel; Jonathan Habif; Dennis Goeckel; Don Towsley; Saikat Guha

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Encryption prevents unauthorized decoding, but does not ensure stealth---a security demand that a mere presence of a message be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of covert communication that is secure against the most powerful physically-permissible adversary. We show that, although it is impossible over a pure-loss channel, covert communication is attainable in the presence of any excess noise, such as a $300$K thermal blackbody. In this case, $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{n})$ bits can be transmitted reliably and covertly in $n$ optical modes using standard optical communication equipment. The all-powerful adversary may intercept all transmitted photons not received by the intended receiver, and employ arbitrary quantum memory and measurements. Conversely, we show that this square root scaling cannot be outperformed. We corroborate our theory in a proof-of-concept experiment. We believe that our findings will enable practical realizations of covert communication and sensing, both for point-to-point and networked scenarios.

  7. Analysis of Off-Nuclear X-Ray Sources in Galaxy NGC 4945

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Sarah M.; /MIT /SLAC

    2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, X-ray astronomy has been used to investigate objects such as galaxies, clusters of galaxies, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), quasars, starburst superbubbles of hot gas, X-ray binary systems, stars, supernova remnants, and interstellar and intergalactic material. By studying the x-ray emission patterns of these objects, we can gain a greater understanding of their structure and evolution. We analyze X-ray emission from the galaxy NGC 4945 using data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations (CIAO) software package was used to extract and fit energy spectra and to extract light curves for the brightest off-nuclear sources in two different observations of NGC 4945 (January, 2000 and May, 2004). A majority of sources were closely fit by both absorbed power law and absorbed bremsstrahlung models, with a significantly poorer {chi}{sup 2}/dof for the absorbed blackbody model, and most sources had little variability. This indicates that the sources are accreting binary systems with either a neutron star or black hole as the compact object. The calculated luminosities were about 10{sup 38} erg/s, which implies that the mass of the accreting object is close to 10 solar masses and must be a black hole.

  8. Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

  9. The influence of accretion geometry on the spectral evolution during thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajava, Jari J E; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Pursiainen, Miika; Poutanen, Juri; Suleimanov, Valery F; Revnivtsev, Mikhail G; Kuulkers, Erik; Galloway, Duncan K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron star (NS) masses and radii can be estimated from observations of photospheric radius-expansion X-ray bursts, provided the chemical composition of the photosphere, the spectral colour-correction factors in the observed luminosity range, and the emission area during the bursts are known. By analysing 246 X-ray bursts observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from 11 low-mass X-ray binaries, we find a dependence between the persistent spectral properties and the time evolution of the black body normalisation during the bursts. All NS atmosphere models predict that the colour-correction factor decreases in the early cooling phase when the luminosity first drops below the limiting Eddington value, leading to a characteristic pattern of variability in the measured blackbody normalisation. However, the model predictions agree with the observations for most bursts occurring in hard, low-luminosity, 'island' spectral states, but rarely during soft, high-luminosity, 'banana' states. The observed behaviour may...

  10. Discovery of a cataclysmic variable with a sub-stellar companion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Mennickent; M. Diaz; W. Skidmore; C. Sterken

    2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that the ROSAT source 1RXS J105010.3-140431 is a cataclysmic variable with orbital period of 88.6 minutes and a spectrum closely resembling WZ Sge. In particular, emission lines are flanked by Stark-broadened absorption wings probably originating in the photosphere of a compact object. The Balmer absorption lines can be modeled by the spectrum of a DA white dwarf with 13 000 $< T_{eff} <$ 24 000 K. The strong absorption lines allowed us to obtain direct radial velocities of the white dwarf using the cross-correlation technique. We find an extremely low white dwarf radial velocity half amplitude, $K_{wd}$ = 4 $\\pm$ 1 km s$^{-1}$. This is consistent with the upper limit obtained from the H$\\alpha$ emission line wing K < 20 km s$^{-1}$. The corresponding mass function is incompatible with a main sequence secondary, but is compatible with a post orbital period minimum cataclysmic variable with a brown dwarf-like secondary. The formal solution gives a secondary mass of 10-20 jovian masses. Doppler maps for the emission lines and the hypothesis of black-body emission indicate a steady state (T $\\sim r^{-3/4}$) accretion disk mainly emitting in H$\\alpha$ and an optically thicker hotspot with a strong contribution to the higher order Balmer lines and \\ion{He}{I} 5875. As in other long cycle length dwarf novae, evidence for inner disk removal is found from the analysis of the emission lines.

  11. Krein Quantization Approach to Hawking Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pejhan; S. Rahbardehghan

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new version of canonical quantization method, in which the Fock space is built over a so-called Krein space, is considered in this paper. In this construction, interestingly, the Fock vacuum is unique. It is actually independent of Bogolubov transformations. Furthermore, no infinite term appears in the calculation of expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor, and in particular, corresponding value to the free field part of the theory on the vacuum state vanishes. Through the method, even in situations where the conventional approach fails, such as the de Sitter minimally coupled massless scalar field and massless spin-2 field, covariant quantization is accessible. Krein construction also has an interesting link to the vacuum energy issue in curved space-time. In this regard, however it seems that, a serious challenge threatens the theory; the risk of destroying black hole thermodynamics and Hawking radiation. In this paper, by proposing a model to simulate schwarzschild black holes, it is debated that Krein construction does not destroy black holes thermodynamics. More precisely, by applying the accelerated-mirror results to a black hole, it is shown that the hole produces black-body radiation which its temperature exactly coincides with the result obtained by Hawking for black hole radiation.

  12. Detailed ROSAT X-ray Analysis of the AM Her Cataclysmic Variable VV Pup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nouh, M I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VV Pup is typical system of AM Her stars, where the main accreting pole rotates in and out of view during the orbital cycle. In the present paper we present ROSAT data analysis for the magnetic cataclysmic variable VV Pup. We obtained the X-ray light curves of VV Pup in high state, the PSPC count rate 0.1-2.0 keV is plotted as a function of time with bins of 10 sec and the count rate is folded over the orbital period of 100.4 min with bin size of 100 sec for individual observations. We calculate the mean best-fit PSPC spectrum, with a three-component spectral fit including a soft X-ray blackbody, hard X-ray bremsstrahlung, and Gaussian line covers the phase intervals, for a bright phase (phi_orb=0.9-1.1), the dip data (phi_orb=0.18-0.7), the egress from the dip (phi_orb=0.7-0.8), the phase interval phi = 0.1-0.18 and the mean best-fit spectrum for all data (phi_orb=0.0-1.0). We calculate spectral parameters, the hardness ratios, count rate and total integrated black body flux.

  13. High-speed, energy-resolved, STJ observations of the AM Her system V2301 Oph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Reynolds; G. Ramsay; J. H. J. de Bruijne; M. A. C. Perryman; M. Cropper; C. M. Bridge; A. Peacock

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high time-resolution optical energy-resolved photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable V2301 Oph made using the ESA S-Cam detector, an array of photon counting super-conducting tunnel junction (STJ) devices with intrinsic energy resolution. Three eclipses were observed, revealing considerable variation in the eclipse shape, particularly during ingress. The eclipse shape is shown to be understood in terms of AM Her accretion via a bright stream, with very little contribution from the white dwarf photosphere and/or hotspot. About two thirds of the eclipsed light arises in the threading region. Variation in the extent of the threading region can account for most of the variations observed between cycles. Spectral fits to the data reveal a 10,000K blackbody continuum with strong, time-varying emission lines of hydrogen and helium. This is the first time that stellar emission lines have been detected in the optical band using a non-dispersive photon-counting system.

  14. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. II. INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN AN H-POOR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Rao, N. Kameswara [543, 17th Main, IV Sector, HSR Layout, Bangalore 560102 and Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Lambert, D. L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Residual Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra for a sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are presented and discussed in terms of narrow emission features superimposed on the quasi-blackbody continuous infrared emission. A broad {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust emission complex is seen in the RCBs showing an extreme H-deficiency. A secondary and much weaker {approx}11.5-15 {mu}m broad emission feature is detected in a few RCBs with the strongest {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex. The Spitzer infrared spectra reveal for the first time the structure within the {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex, showing the presence of strong C-C stretching modes at {approx}6.3 and 8.1 {mu}m as well as of other dust features at {approx}5.9, 6.9, and 7.3 {mu}m, which are attributable to amorphous carbonaceous solids with little or no hydrogen. The few RCBs with only moderate H-deficiencies display the classical ''unidentified infrared bands (UIRs)'' and mid-infrared features from fullerene-related molecules. In general, the characteristics of the RCB infrared emission features are not correlated with the stellar and circumstellar properties, suggesting that the RCB dust features may not be dependent on the present physical conditions around RCB stars. The only exception seems to be the central wavelength of the 6.3 {mu}m feature, which is blueshifted in those RCBs showing also the UIRs, i.e., the RCBs with the smallest H deficiency.

  15. High efficiency radioisotope thermophotovoltaic prototype generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, J.E.; Samaras, J.E.; Fraas, L.M.; Ewell, R. [JX Crystals, Inc., Issaquah, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator space power system (RTPV) is lightweight, low-cost alternative to the present radioisotope thermoelectric generator system (RTG). The fabrication of such an RTPV generator has recently become feasible as the result of the invention of the GaSb infrared sensitive photovoltaic cell. Herein, the authors present the results of a parametric study of emitters and optical filters in conjuction with existing data on gallium antimonide cells. They compare a polished tungsten emitter with an Erbia selective emitter for use in combination with a simple dielectric filter and a gallium antimonide cell array. They find that the polished tungsten emitter is by itself a very selective emitter with low emissivity beyond 4 microns. Given a gallium antimonide cell and a tungsten emitter, a simple dielectric filter can be designed to transmit radiant energy below 1.7 microns and to reflect radiant energy between 1.7 and 4 microns back to the emitter. Because of the low long wavelength emissivity associated with the polished tungsten emitter, this simple dielectric filter then yields very respectable system performance. Also as a result of the longer wavelength fall-off in the tungsten emissivity curve, the radiation energy peak for a polished tungsten emitter operating at 1300 K shifts to shorter wavelengths relative to the blackbody spectrum so that the radiated energy peak falls right at the gallium antimonide cell bandedge. The result is that the response of the gallium antimonide cell is well matched to a polished tungsten emitter. The authors propose, therefore, to fabricate an operating prototype of a near term radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator design consisting of a polished tungsten emitter, standard gallium antimonide cells, and a near-term dielectric filter.

  16. Warm absorber, reflection and Fe K line in the X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cappi; T. Mihara; M. Matsuoka; K. Hayashida; K. A. Weaver; C. Otani

    1995-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from the X-ray spectral analysis of the ASCA PV phase observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A are presented. We find that the 0.4 - 10 keV spectrum of IC 4329A is best described by the sum of a steep ($\\Gamma \\sim 1.98$) power-law spectrum passing through a warm absorber plus a strong reflection component and associated Fe K line, confirming recent results (Madejski et al. 1995, Mushotsky et al. 1995). Further cold absorption in excess of the Galactic value and covering the entire source is also required by the data, consistent with the edge-on galactic disk and previous X-ray measurements. The effect of the warm absorber at soft X-ray energies is best parameterized by two absorption edges, one consistent with OVI, OVII or NVII, the other consistent with OVIII. A description of the soft excess in terms of blackbody emission, as observed in some other Seyfert 1 galaxies, is ruled out by the data. A large amount of reflection is detected in both the GIS and SIS detectors, at similar intensities. We find a strong correlation between the amount of reflection and the photon index, but argue that the best solution with the present data is that given by the best statistical fit. The model dependence of the Fe K line parameters is also discussed. Our best fit gives a slightly broad ($\\sigma \\simeq 0.11 \\pm 0.08$ keV) and redshifted (E $\\simeq 6.20 \\pm 0.07$ keV) Fe K line, with equivalent width $\\simeq$ 89 $\\pm$ 33 eV. The presence of a weak Fe K line with a strong reflection can be reconciled if one assumes iron underabundances or ionized reflection. We also have modeled the line with a theoretical line profile produced by an accretion disk. This yields results in better agreement with the constraints obtained from the reflection component.

  17. MODELING THE SURFACE X-RAY EMISSION AND VIEWING GEOMETRY OF PSR J0821-4300 IN PUPPIS A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Perna, R. [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for the unusual X-ray pulse profiles of PSR J0821-4300, the compact central object in supernova remnant Puppis A. We show that a pair of thermal, antipodal hot spots on the neutron star (NS) surface is able to fully account for the pulsar's double blackbody spectrum and energy-dependent pulse profile, including the observed 180{sup 0} phase reversal at {approx}1.2 keV. By comparing the recorded pulse modulation and phase to the model predictions, we strongly constrain the hot-spot pole ({xi}) and the line-of-sight ({psi}) angles with respect to the spin axis. For a nominal radius of R = 12 km and distance D = 2.2 kpc, we find ({xi}, {psi}) = (86{sup 0}, 6{sup 0}), with 1{sigma} error ellipse of (2{sup 0}, 1{sup 0}); this solution is degenerate in the two angles. The best-fit spectral model for this geometry requires that the temperatures of the two emission spots differ by a factor of 2 and their areas by a factor of {approx}20. Including a cosine-beamed pattern for the emitted intensity modifies the result, decreasing the angles to (84{sup 0}, 3{sup 0}); however this model is not statistically distinguishable from the isotropic emission case. We also present a new upper limit on the period derivative of P-dot < 3.5x10{sup -16} (2{sigma}), which limits the global dipole magnetic field to B{sub s} < 2.0 x 10{sup 11} G, confirming PSR J0821-4300 as an 'anti-magnetar'. We discuss the results in the context of observations and theories of nonuniform surface temperature on isolated NSs of both weak and strong magnetic field. To explain the nonuniform temperature of PSR J0821-4300 may require a crustal field that is much stronger than the external, global dipole field.

  18. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  19. A LINGERING NON-THERMAL COMPONENT IN THE GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: PREDICTING GeV EMISSION FROM THE MeV SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ? = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3?. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation.

  20. A New Young Galactic Supernova Remnant Containing a Compact Object: G15.9+0.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Reynolds; K. J. Borkowski; U. Hwang; I. Harrus; R. Petre; G. Dubner

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify the radio-emitting shell-type supernova remnant G15.9+0.2 as a relatively young remnant containing an X-ray point source that may be its associated neutron star. The integrated spectrum of the remnant shell obtained from our 30 ks exploratory Chandra observation shows very strong lines that require elevated element abundances from ejecta, in particular of sulfur. A plane-shock model fit gives a temperature $kT = 0.9 (0.8, 1.0)$ keV, an ionization timescale $n_et = 6 (4, 9) \\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ s, and a sulfur abundance of 2.1 (1.7, 2.7) times solar (90% confidence limits). Two-component models with one solar and one enriched component are also plausible, but are not well constrained by the data. Various estimates give a remnant age of order $10^3$ yr, which would make G15.9+0.2 among the dozen or so youngest remnants in the Galaxy. The sparse point source spectrum is consistent with either a steep $\\Gamma \\sim$ 4 power law or a $kT \\sim$ 0.4 keV blackbody. The spectrum is absorbed by a H column density $N_H \\sim 4 \\times 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ similar to that required for the remnant shell. The implied 2--9.5 keV source luminosity is about $10^{33}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc consistent with the high absorption column. We suggest that the point source is either a rotation-powered pulsar or a compact central object (CCO).

  1. Detection of a Rare Supersoft Outburst Event during a Suzaku Observation of 1E0102.2-7219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Takei; M. Tsujimoto; S. Kitamoto; M. Morii; K. Ebisawa; Y. Maeda; E. D. Miller

    2007-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of a transient X-ray source toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku telescope. The source was detected at the edge of the XIS image during a routine observation of the calibration source 1E 0102.2-7219, a supernova remnant in the SMC. We constrained the source position using ray-tracing simulations. No such transient source was found at the position in the other Suzaku observations nor in all the available archived images of other X-ray missions for the last ~28 years. The XIS spectrum can be explained by a single blackbody with a temperature of ~72 eV, and an interstellar extinction of ~4.9x10^{20} H atoms cm^{-2} consistent with the value to the SMC. An additional absorption edge at ~0.74 keV was also confirmed, which is presumably due to the absorption by helium-like oxygen ions. Assuming that the source is at the distance of the SMC, the X-ray luminosity in the 0.2-2.0 keV band is ~10^{37} erg s^{-1} and the radius of the source is ~10^{8} cm. The XIS light curve shows about a two-fold decline in X-ray flux during the 24 ks observation. Together with the archived data, the X-ray flux in the burst is at least three orders of magnitude brighter than the undetected quiescent level. All these properties are often seen among supersoft sources (SSSs). We conclude that the transient source is another example of SSS in the SMC.

  2. 2007 OUTBURST OF 17P/HOLMES: THE ALBEDO AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE DUST GRAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Fukushima, Hideo [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sarugaku, Yuki; Mito, Hiroyuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Kenshi [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, NAOJ, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko [Faculty of Science, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Miyata, Takashi [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Narusawa, Shin-ya [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Akisawa, Hiroki, E-mail: ishiguro@astro.snu.ac.k [Himeji City Hoshinoko Yakata, Aoyama 1470-24, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2222 (Japan)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on optical and infrared observations, we study the albedo and the temperature of the dust grains associated with the spectacular 2007 outburst of Jupiter-family comet 17P/Holmes. We found that the albedo at the solar phase angle {approx}16{sup 0} was 0.03-0.12. While the color temperature around 3-4 {mu}m was 360 {+-} 40 K, the color temperature at 12.4 {mu}m and 24.5 {mu}m was {approx}200 K, which is consistent with that of a blackbody. We studied the equilibrium temperature of the dust grains at 2.44 AU and found that the big discrepancy in the temperature was caused by the heterogeneity in particle size, that is, hotter components consist of submicron absorbing grains whereas colder components consist of large ({approx_gt}1 {mu}m) grains. The contemporaneous optical and mid-infrared observations suggest that the albedo and the temperature could decrease within {approx} 3 days after the outburst and stabilized at typical values of the other comets. We estimated the total mass injected into the coma by the outburst on the basis of the derived albedo and the optical magnitude for the entire dust cloud, and found that at least 4 x 10{sup 10} kg (equivalent to a few meter surface layer) was removed by the initial outburst event. The derived mass suggests that the outburst is explainable by neither the exogenetic asteroidal impact nor water ice sublimation driven by solar irradiation, but by an endogenic energy source. We conclude that the outburst was triggered by the energy sources several meters or more below the nuclear surface.

  3. Detection of Thermal Emission from an Extrasolar Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Charbonneau; Lori E. Allen; S. Thomas Megeath; Guillermo Torres; Roi Alonso; Timothy M. Brown; Ronald L. Gilliland; David W. Latham; Georgi Mandushev; Francis T. O'Donovan; Alessandro Sozzetti

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope infrared photometric time series of the transiting extrasolar planet system TrES-1. The data span a predicted time of secondary eclipse, corresponding to the passage of the planet behind the star. In both bands of our observations, we detect a flux decrement with a timing, amplitude, and duration as predicted by published parameters of the system. This signal represents the first direct detection of (i.e. the observation of photons emitted by) a planet orbiting another star. The observed eclipse depths (in units of relative flux) are 0.00066 +/- 0.00013 at 4.5um and 0.00225 +/- 0.00036 at 8.0um. These estimates provide the first observational constraints on models of the thermal emission of hot Jupiters. Assuming that the planet emits as a blackbody, we estimate an effective temperature of T_p=1060 +/- 50 K. Under the additional assumptions that the planet is in thermal equilibrium with the radiation from the star and emits isotropically, we find a Bond albedo of A = 0.31 +/- 0.14. This would imply that the planet absorbs the majority of stellar radiation incident upon it, a conclusion of significant impact to atmospheric models of these objects. We compare our data to a previously-published model of the planetary thermal emission, which predicts prominent spectral features in our observational bands due to water and carbon monoxide. Based on the time of secondary eclipse, we present an upper limit on the orbital eccentricity that is sufficiently small that we conclude that tidal dissipation is unlikely to provide a significant source of energy interior to the planet.(abridged)

  4. X-ray emission from the planet pulsar B1257+12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Pavlov; O. Kargaltsev; G. P. Garmire; A. Wolszczan

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of the millisecond pulsar B1257+12 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In a 20 ks exposure we detected 25 photons from the pulsar, with energies between 0.4 and 2.0 keV, corresponding to the flux F_X=(4.4+/- 0.9)*10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in this energy range. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power-law model with photon index Gamma = 2.8 and luminosity L_X \\approx 2.5*10^{29} ergs s^{-1} in the 0.3--8 keV band, for a plausible distance of 500 pc and hydrogen column density N_H=3*10^{20} cm^{-2}. Alternatively, the spectrum can be fitted by a blackbody model with kT ~ 0.22 keV and projected emitting area ~2000 m^2. If the thermal X-rays are emitted from two symmetric polar caps, the bolometric luminosity of the two caps is 2 L_bol ~ 3*10^{29} ergs s^{-1}. We compared our results with the data on other 30 millisecond pulsars observed in X-rays and found that the apparent X-ray efficiency of PSR B1257+12, L_X/Edot ~ 3*10^{-5} for d=500 pc, is lower than those of most of millisecond pulsars. This might be explained by an unfavorable orientation of the X-ray pulsar beam if the radiation is magnetospheric, or by strong asymmetry of polar caps if the radiation is thermal (e.g., one of the polar caps is much brighter than the other and remains invisible for most part of the pulsar period). Alternatively, it could be attributed to absorption of X-rays in circumpulsar matter, such as a flaring debris disk left over after formation of the planetary system around the pulsar.

  5. The XMM-Newton view of radio-quiet and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Haberl

    2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (shortened) As part of the guaranteed time, guest observer and calibration programs, XMM-Newton extensively observed a group of six thermally emitting, isolated neutron stars which are neither connected with a supernova remnant nor show pulsed radio emission. Four of the six sources are now well established as X-ray pulsars: The 11.37 s period of RX J0806.4-4123 was confirmed in a second XMM-Newton observation. In the case of the X-ray faintest of the six stars, RX J0420.0-5022, the period marginally indicated in ROSAT data was not seen in the EPIC data, instead a 3.45 s pulse period was clearly detected. Spectral variations with pulse phase were discovered for the known 8.39 s pulsar RX J0720.4-3125 and also RBS1223. For the latter EPIC data revealed a double-peaked pulse profile for a neutron star spin period of 10.31 s. The X-ray continuum spectra of all six objects are consistent with a Planckian energy distribution with black-body temperatures kT between 40 eV and 100 eV. EPIC data of the pulsars RBS1223 and RX J0720.4-3125 revealed a broad absorption feature in their spectra at energies of 100-300 eV and ~260 eV, respectively. The depth of this feature varies with pulse phase and may be caused by cyclotron resonance scattering of protons or heavy ions in a strong magnetic field. In such a picture the inferred field strength exceeds 10^13 Gauss, in the case of RX J0720.4-3125 consistent with the value estimated from its pulse period derivative. A similar absorption feature in the RGS and EPIC spectra of RX J1605.3+3249 was reported recently.

  6. The Near-UV Pulse Profile and Spectrum of the Pulsar PSR B0656+14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Shibanov; J. Sollerman; P. Lundqvist; T. Gull; D. Lindler

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14 with the prism and the NUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to measure the pulsar spectrum and periodic pulsations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). The pulsations are clearly detected, double-peaked and very similar to the optical pulse profile. The NUV pulsed fraction is 70 +/- 12%. The spectral slope of the dereddened phase-integrated spectrum in the 1800 - 3200 A range is 0.35 +/- 0.5 which together with the high pulse fraction indicates a non-thermal origin for the NUV emission. The total flux in the range 1700-3400 A is estimated to be 3.4 +/- 0.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 when corrected for E(B-V)=0.03. At a distance of 288 pc this corresponds to a luminosity 3.4e28 erg/s assuming isotropy of the emission. We compare the NUV pulse profile with observations from radio to gamma-rays. The first NUV sub-pulse is in phase with the gamma-ray pulse marginally detected with the EGRET, while the second NUV sub-pulse is similar both in shape and in phase with the non- thermal pulse in hard X-rays. This indicates a single origin of the non-thermal emission in the optical-NUV and in the X-rays. This is also supported by the observed NUV spectral slope, which is compatible with a blackbody plus power-law fit extended from the X-ray range, but dominated by the power-law component in most of the NUV range.

  7. Low energy spectral index and E{sub p} evolution of quasi-thermal photosphere emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: deng@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations by the Fermi satellite suggest that a photosphere emission component is contributing to the observed spectrum of many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One important question is whether the photosphere component can interpret the typical 'Band' function of GRBs with a typical low energy photon spectral index ? ? –1. We perform a detailed study of the photosphere emission spectrum by progressively introducing several physical ingredients previously not fully incorporated, including the probability distribution of the location of a dynamically evolving photosphere, superposition of emission from an equal arrival time 'volume' in a continuous wind, the evolution of optical depth of a wind with finite but evolving outer boundary, as well as the effect of different top-hat wind luminosity (L{sub w} ) profiles. By assuming a comoving blackbody spectrum emerging from the photosphere, we find that for an outflow with a constant or increasing L{sub w} , the low-energy spectrum below the peak energy (E{sub p} ), can be modified to F {sub ?} ? ?{sup 1.5} (? ? +0.5). A softer (–1 < ? < +0.5) or flat (? = –1) spectrum can be obtained during the L{sub w} decreasing phase or high-latitude-emission-dominated phase. We also study the evolution of E{sub p} as a function of wind and photosphere luminosity in this photosphere model. An E{sub p} – L tracking pattern can be reproduced if a certain positive dependence between the dimensionless entropy ? and L{sub w} is introduced. However, the hard-to-soft evolution pattern cannot be reproduced unless a contrived condition is invoked. In order to interpret the Band spectrum, a more complicated photosphere model or a different energy dissipation and radiation mechanism is needed.

  8. A COOL DUST FACTORY IN THE CRAB NEBULA: A HERSCHEL STUDY OF THE FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, H. L.; Clark, C. J. R.; Gomez, E. L.; Gear, W. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Krause, O.; Besel, M.-A.; Bouwman, J.; Henning, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Matsuura, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Rho, J. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ivison, R. J.; Sibthorpe, B. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Polehampton, E. T. [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether supernovae are major sources of dust in galaxies is a long-standing debate. We present infrared and submillimeter photometry and spectroscopy from the Herschel Space Observatory of the Crab Nebula between 51 and 670 {mu}m as part of the Mass Loss from Evolved StarS program. We compare the emission detected with Herschel with multiwavelength data including millimeter, radio, mid-infrared, and archive optical images. We carefully remove the synchrotron component using the Herschel and Planck fluxes measured in the same epoch. The contribution from line emission is removed using Herschel spectroscopy combined with Infrared Space Observatory archive data. Several forbidden lines of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are detected where multiple velocity components are resolved, deduced to be from the nitrogen-depleted, carbon-rich ejecta. No spectral lines are detected in the SPIRE wavebands; in the PACS bands, the line contribution is 5% and 10% at 70 and 100 {mu}m and negligible at 160 {mu}m. After subtracting the synchrotron and line emission, the remaining far-infrared continuum can be fit with two dust components. Assuming standard interstellar silicates, the mass of the cooler component is 0.24{sup +0.32} {sub -0.08} M {sub Sun} for T = 28.1{sup +5.5} {sub -3.2} K. Amorphous carbon grains require 0.11 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} of dust with T = 33.8{sup +2.3} {sub -1.8} K. A single temperature modified blackbody with 0.14 M {sub Sun} and 0.08 M {sub Sun} for silicate and carbon dust, respectively, provides an adequate fit to the far-infrared region of the spectral energy distribution but is a poor fit at 24-500 {mu}m. The Crab Nebula has condensed most of the relevant refractory elements into dust, suggesting the formation of dust in core-collapse supernova ejecta is efficient.

  9. XMM-Newton discovery of 217 s pulsations in the brightest persistent supersoft X-ray source in M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Trudolyubov; William Priedhorsky

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery of a periodic modulation in the bright supersoft X-ray source XMMU J004252.5+411540 detected in the 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31. The source exhibits X-ray pulsations with a period P~217.7 s and a quasi-sinusoidal pulse shape and pulsed fraction ~7-11%. We did not detect statistically significant changes in the pulsation period on the time scale of 4 years. The X-ray spectra of XMMU J004252.5+411540 are extremely soft and can be approximated with an absorbed blackbody of temperature 62-77 eV and a weak power law tail of photon index ~1.7-3.1 in the 0.2-3.0 keV energy band. The X-ray properties of the source and the absence of an optical/UV counterpart brighter than 19 mag suggest that it belongs to M31. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the source varies between ~2e38 and ~8e38 ergs/s at 760 kpc, depending on the choice of spectral model. The X-ray pulsations and supersoft spectrum of XMMU J004252.5+411540 imply that it is almost certainly an accreting white dwarf, steadily burning hydrogen-rich material on its surface. We interpret X-ray pulsations as a signature of the strong magnetic field of the rotating white dwarf. Assuming that the X-ray source is powered by disk accretion, we estimate its surface field strength to be in the range 4e5 G

  10. The ultraviolet-bright, slowly declining transient PS1-11af as a partial tidal disruption event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Kamble, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Czekala, I.; Dittmann, J.; Drout, M.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gezari, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Rest, A.; Riess, A. G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chomiuk, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Huber, M. E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lawrence, A., E-mail: rchornock@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of the long-lived and blue transient PS1-11af, which was also detected by Galaxy Evolution Explorer with coordinated observations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. PS1-11af is associated with the nucleus of an early type galaxy at redshift z = 0.4046 that exhibits no evidence for star formation or active galactic nucleus activity. Four epochs of spectroscopy reveal a pair of transient broad absorption features in the UV on otherwise featureless spectra. Despite the superficial similarity of these features to P-Cygni absorptions of supernovae (SNe), we conclude that PS1-11af is not consistent with the properties of known types of SNe. Blackbody fits to the spectral energy distribution are inconsistent with the cooling, expanding ejecta of a SN, and the velocities of the absorption features are too high to represent material in homologous expansion near a SN photosphere. However, the constant blue colors and slow evolution of the luminosity are similar to previous optically selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The shape of the optical light curve is consistent with models for TDEs, but the minimum accreted mass necessary to power the observed luminosity is only ?0.002 M {sub ?}, which points to a partial disruption model. A full disruption model predicts higher bolometric luminosities, which would require most of the radiation to be emitted in a separate component at high energies where we lack observations. In addition, the observed temperature is lower than that predicted by pure accretion disk models for TDEs and requires reprocessing to a constant, lower temperature. Three deep non-detections in the radio with the Very Large Array over the first two years after the event set strict limits on the production of any relativistic outflow comparable to Swift J1644+57, even if off-axis.

  11. A Chandra X-ray Study of NGC 1068: II. The Luminous X-ray Source Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith; Andrew S. Wilson

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert~2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with Chandra. We find a total of 84 compact sources, of which 66 are projected onto the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra of the brightest sources have been modeled with both multi-color disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for most of these sources. Five sources have 0.4-8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10^{39} erg/s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as Intermediate Luminosity X-ray Objects (IXOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are >7 solar masses, and so they are inferred to be black holes. The brightest source has a much harder spectrum (Gamma = 0.9\\pm0.1) than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other IXOs. It also shows large-amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10^{38} erg/s in the 0.4-8 keV band to the rate of massive star formation is the same, to within a factor of two, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests that the rate of production of X-ray binaries per massive star is approximately the same for galaxies with currently active star formation, including ``starbursts''.

  12. Deceleration of a Relativistic, Photon-Rich Shell: End of Preacceleration, Damping of MHD Turbulence, and the Emission Mechanism of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We consider the interaction of a relativistically-moving shell, composed of thermal photons, a reversing magnetic field and a small admixture of charged particles, with a dense Wolf-Rayet wind. A thin outer layer of Wolf-Rayet material is entrained by the jet head; it cools and becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, thereby providing an additional source of inertia and variability. Pair creation in the wind material, and the associated pre-acceleration, defines a characteristic radiative compactness at the point where the reverse shock has completed its passage back through the shell. We argue that the prompt gamma-ray emission is triggered by this external braking, at an optical depth ~1 to electron scattering. Torsional waves, excited by the forced reconnection of the reversing magnetic field, carry a fluctuating current, and are damped at high frequencies by the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons. We show that inverse Compton radiation by the accelerated charges is stronger than their synchrotron emission, and is beamed along the magnetic field. Thermal radiation that is advected out from the base of the jet cools the particles. The observed relation between peak energy and isotropic luminosity is reproduced if the blackbody seeds are generated in a relativistic jet core that is subject to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the Wolf-Rayet envelope. This relation is predicted to soften to E_peak ~ L_iso^{1/4} below an isotropic luminosity L_iso ~ 3x10^{50} ergs/s. The duration of spikes in the inverse-Compton emission is narrower at higher frequencies, in agreement with the observed relation. The transition from prompt gamma-ray emission to afterglow can be explained by the termination of the thermal X-ray seed and the onset of synchrotron-self-Compton emission.

  13. Ultraviolet observations of Super-Chandrasekhar mass type Ia supernova candidates with swift UVOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang, Lifan [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Kuin, Paul; De Pasquale, Massimiliano [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Scalzo, Richard [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Holland, Stephen [Space Telescope Science Center 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Milne, Peter, E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a class of overluminous objects exist whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe—2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn—observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN 2011aa being among the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of 'normal' SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Å) are only half as bright as SN 2009dc, implying a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield. While it is not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and {sup 56}Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and to fully explain their high UV luminosities.

  14. The continued optical to mid-infrared evolution of V838 Monocerotis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loebman, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Wisniewski, J. P. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Schmidt, S. J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kowalski, A. F. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Barry, R. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bjorkman, K. S. [Ritter Observatory, MS #113, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Hammel, H. B. [AURA, 1212 New York Avenue NW, Suite 450, Washington, DC 20005 (United States); Hawley, S. L.; Szkody, P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, L. [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Kasliwal, M. M. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W. [The Aerospace Corporation, M2-266, P.O. Box 92957, Los Angeles, CA 90009-29257 (United States); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: sloebman@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati OH 45221 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-infrared (near-IR), and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Mon obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m, NASA IRTF 3 m, and Gemini South 8 m telescopes. We contemporaneously analyze the optical and IR spectroscopic properties of V838 Mon to arrive at a revised spectral type L3 supergiant and effective temperature T{sub eff}?2000–2200 K. Because there are no existing optical observational data for L supergiants, we speculate that V838 Mon may represent the prototype for L supergiants in this wavelength regime. We find a low level of H? emission present in the system, consistent with interaction between V838 Mon and its B3V binary; however, we cannot rule out a stellar collision as the genesis event, which could result in the observed H? activity. Based upon a two-component blackbody fit to all wavelengths of our data, we conclude that, as of 2009, a shell of ejecta surrounded V838 Mon at a radius of R=263±10 AU with a temperature of T=285±2 K. This result is consistent with IR interferometric observations from the same era and predictions from the Lynch et al. model of the expanding system, which provides a simple framework for understanding this complicated system.

  15. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON-STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. I. APPARENT RADII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guever, Tolga; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses and radii of low-magnetic field neutron stars can be measured by combining different observable quantities obtained from their X-ray spectra during thermonuclear X-ray bursts. One of these quantities is the apparent radius of each neutron star as inferred from the X-ray flux and spectral temperature measured during the cooling tails of bursts, when the thermonuclear flash is believed to have engulfed the entire star. In this paper, we analyze 13,095 X-ray spectra of 446 X-ray bursts observed from 12 sources in order to assess possible systematic effects in the measurements of the apparent radii of neutron stars. We first show that the vast majority of the observed X-ray spectra are consistent with blackbody functions to within a few percent. We find that most X-ray bursts follow a very well determined correlation between X-ray flux and temperature, which is consistent with the whole neutron-star surface emitting uniformly during the cooling tails. We develop a Bayesian Gaussian mixture algorithm to measure the apparent radii of the neutron stars in these sources, while detecting and excluding a small number of X-ray bursts that show irregular cooling behavior. This algorithm also provides us with a quantitative measure of the systematic uncertainties in the measurements. We find that those errors in the spectroscopic determination of neutron-star radii that are introduced by systematic effects in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts are in the range {approx_equal} 3%-8%. Such small errors are adequate to distinguish between different equations of state provided that uncertainties in the distance to each source and the absolute calibration of X-ray detectors do not dominate the error budget.

  16. EFFECT OF A HIGH OPACITY ON THE LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED TRANSIENTS FROM COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Kasen, Daniel [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, 366 LeConte Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The coalescence of compact objects is a promising astrophysical source of detectable gravitational wave signals. The ejection of r-process material from such mergers may lead to a radioactively powered electromagnetic counterpart signal which, if discovered, would enhance the science returns. As very little is known about the optical properties of heavy r-process elements, previous light-curve models have adopted opacities similar to those of iron group elements. Here we consider the effect of heavier elements, particularly the lanthanides, which increase the ejecta opacity by several orders of magnitude. We include these higher opacities in time-dependent, multi-wavelength radiative transport calculations to predict the broadband light curves of one-dimensional models over a range of parameters (ejecta masses {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} and velocities {approx}0.1-0.3 c). We find that the higher opacities lead to much longer duration light curves which can last a week or more. The emission is shifted toward the infrared bands due to strong optical line blanketing, and the colors at later times are representative of a blackbody near the recombination temperature of the lanthanides (T {approx} 2500 K). We further consider the case in which a second mass outflow, composed of {sup 56}Ni, is ejected from a disk wind, and show that the net result is a distinctive two component spectral energy distribution, with a bright optical peak due to {sup 56}Ni and an infrared peak due to r-process ejecta. We briefly consider the prospects for detection and identification of these transients.

  17. GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

  18. XMM-Newton View of the Multi-Phase Warm Absorber in Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yair Krongold; Elena Jimenez-Bailon; Maria Santos-Lleo; Fabrizio Nicastro; Martin Elvis; Nancy Brickhouse; Mercedes Andrade-Velazquez; Luc Binette; Smita Mathur

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 985. The EPIC spectra present strong residuals to a single power-law model, indicating the presence of ionized absorbing gas and a soft excess. A broad-band fit to the EPIC and RGS spectra shows that the continuum can be well fit with a power-law and a blackbody component. The RGS can be modeled either with two or three absorption components. In the two absorber model the low-ionization one, accounts for the presence of the Fe M-shell unresolved transition array (Fe VII-XIII), and the high ionization component is required by the presence of several Fe L-shell transitions. The data suggest the presence of a third ionized component with higher ionization, so that the Fe L-shell absorption features are produced by two different components (one producing absorption by Fe XVII-XX, and the other absorption by Fe XX-XXII). However, the presence of the third absorbing component cannot be detected by means of an isolated absorption line in a significant way, so we consider this detection only as tentative. Interestingly, all ionization components have similar kinematics. In addition, whether two or three absorbers are considered, the components appear to be in pressure balance. These results give further support to the idea that warm absorbers in AGN consist of a two or three-phase medium. We note that, while in the model with only two absorbers one of them (the high ionization component) lies on an unstable branch of the thermal equilibrium curve, in the model with three absorbers all of the components lie on stable branches of the curve. This gives further plausibility to a multi-phase absorber.

  19. 13th TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. BARNES

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau} > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K{sub i}. This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0} {approx} 2 kG, {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e} {approx} 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {le} T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T{sub e}. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce}.

  20. ON THE NATURE OF EXor ACCRETION EVENTS: AN INFREQUENT MANIFESTATION OF A COMMON PHENOMENOLOGY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Antoniucci, S.; Giannini, T.; Li Causi, G.; Ventura, P.; Di Paola, A.; Nisini, B. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio (Italy); Arkharov, A. A.; Larionov, V. M. [Central Astronomical Observatory of Pulkovo, Pulkovskoe Shosse 65, 196140 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kopatskaya, E. N., E-mail: dario.lorenzetti@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: simone.antoniucci@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: teresa.giannini@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: gianluca.licausi@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: andrea.dipaola@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: brunella.nisini@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: paolo.ventura@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: arkadi@arharov.ru, E-mail: vlar2@yandex.ru, E-mail: enik1346@rambler.ru [Astronomical Institute of St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a comparison between classical and newly identified EXor based on literature data and aimed at recognizing possible differences or similarities between the categories. Optical and near-IR two-color diagrams, modalities of fluctuations, and derived values of the mass accretion rates are indicative of strong similarities between the two samples. We demonstrate how the difference between the outburst and the quiescence spectral energy distribution of all EXor can be well fitted with a single blackbody, as if an additional thermal component appears during the outbursting phase. Temperatures of this additional component span between 1000 and 4500 K, while the radii of the emitting regions (assumed to be a uniform disk) span between 0.01 and 0.1 AU, sizes typical of the inner portions of the circumstellar disk. Spots persisting up to 50% of the outburst duration, not exceeding 10% of the stellar surface, and with temperatures compatible with the EXor mass accretion rates, are able to account for both the appearance of the additional thermal component and the dust sublimation in the inner structures of the disk. We also compare the EXor events with the most significant color and magnitude fluctuations of active T Tauri stars finding that (1) burst accretion phenomena should also be important for this latter class and (2) EXor events could be more frequent than those accidentally discovered. A remarkable case is that of the source V2493 Cyg, a T Tauri star recently identified as a strong outbursting object: New optical and near-IR photometric and spectroscopic data are presented in an attempt to clarify its EXor or FUor nature.