Sample records for acoustics flow thermal

  1. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchava, E. S. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Nodia Institute of Geophysics, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Shergelashvili, B. M. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); CODeS, KU Leuven Campus Kortrijk, E. Sabbelaan 53, 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Tevzadze, A. G. [Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Ave., Tbilisi 0179, Georgia (United States); Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  2. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Henke

    2015-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier-Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier-Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as true sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided.

  3. Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Diagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerin, Gilles

    Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas HydratesAcoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica is applied to two reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. In the last chapter, we present the thermal regime

  4. Acoustic cross-correlation flowmeter for solid-gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for measuring particle velocity in a solid-gas flow within a pipe includes: first and second transmitting transducers for transmitting first and second ultrasonic signals into the pipe at first and second locations, respectively, along the pipe; an acoustic decoupler, positioned between said first and second transmitting transducers, for acoustically isolating said first and second signals from one another; first and second detecting transducers for detecting said first and second signals and for generating first and second detected signals; and means for cross-correlating said first and second output signals.

  5. Diagnosis of Fracture Flow Conditions with Acoustic Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Roberto

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    that this turbulent flow can generate sound as fluid flows from the fracture into the well. According to Testud et al. (2009) it is widely known that industry pipe systems, valves, taps and orifices whistle when fluid flows through them. Lacombe et al. (2013... of the fluid downstream of the shear layer (Lacombe et al. 2013). During this process there is a transfer of energy from the fluid moving to vortices that create sound. Poldervaart et al. (1974) illustrated how vortices can act as an acoustic source in Fig...

  6. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols....

  7. Adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mok, Rachel V. (Rachel Verla)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation model is presented for the verification of the recently developed steady-state one-dimensional adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow theory. In this theory, a self-consistent Poisson equation is developed ...

  8. Acoustic phonon engineering of thermal properties of silicon-based nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acoustic phonon engineering of thermal properties of silicon- based nanostructures N D Zincenco1 engineering [2, 7]. The reduction of the thermal conductivity, being a bad news for the thermal management Engineering, University of California ­ Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 USA E-mail: balandin

  9. The acoustical flows of the hydrophobic and anticeptic liquids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the acoustical flows in the porous or microcrum- bling media. Concrete and brick walls being porous media absorbThe acoustical flows of the hydrophobic and anticeptic liquids in porous media V. Tsaplev North effect. Just the same, if the protective covering of the concrete or brick wall is damaged, they begin

  10. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  11. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165414 (2012) Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon nanotubes: Atomistic modeling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 165414 (2012) Acoustic energy dissipation and thermalization in carbon or bending buckling marks the transition from a regime of slow thermalization to a regime in which the energy bath" description of thermal energy in a mesoscopic model, which is capable of simulating systems

  13. Electricit de France's study of the acoustic scintillation flow meter results in expanding its range and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the next generation of acoustic scintillation flow meters. 1. Background For EDF's hydraulic power division, turbine flow metering represents a high stake issue as it involves a significant amount of knowhow, work

  14. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; /SLAC; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  15. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallinderis, Yannis, E-mail: kallind@otenet.gr [Dept. of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio Patras 26504 (Greece)] [Dept. of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio Patras 26504 (Greece); Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope [Dept. of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio Patras 26504 (Greece)] [Dept. of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio Patras 26504 (Greece)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  16. Disorder-induced mobility edges and heat flow control in anharmonic acoustic chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flach, Sergej

    in cutting-edge fields of research from across the whole of physics. Each compilation is led by its own CoOFFPRINT Disorder-induced mobility edges and heat flow control in anharmonic acoustic chains M acceptance decisions 1 Impact Factor ­ The 2009 Impact Factor increased by 31% to 2.893; your work

  17. Thin aerogel films for optical, thermal, acoustic, and electronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Material Sciences Dept.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerogels are a special class of continuously porous solid materials which are characterized by nanometer size particles and pores. Typically, aerogels are made using sol-gel chemistry to form a solvent filled, high porosity gel that is dried by removing the solvent without collapsing the tenuous solid phase. As bulk materials, aerogels are known to have many exceptional, and even some unique physical properties. Aerogels provide the highest thermal insulation and lowest dielectric constant of any other material known. However, some important applications require the aerogels in the form of thin films or sheets. For example, electronic applications require micrometer thin aerogel films bonded to a substrate, and others require thicker films, either on a substrate or as free standing sheets. Special methods are required to make aerogel thin films or sheets. In this paper, the authors discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate thin aerogel films and they describe methods to make films and thin sheets. They also give some specific applications for which aerogel films are being developed.

  18. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, Paul D. (Darien, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  19. Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Värme- och strömningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massöverföring & separationsteknik to control the humidity. This will absorb some naphthalene from the air, which then in turn gives increased

  20. Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow in an Industrial Boiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saripalli, R.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insight into the detailed thermal-flow and combustion in the boiler and showing possible reasons for superheater tube rupture. The exhaust gas temperature is consistent with the actual results from the infrared thermograph inspection....

  1. Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Värme- och strömningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massöverföring & separationsteknik åtminstone 95%. #12;Värme- och strömningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massöverföring in the vessel is 1 liter while for the gas the volume is 0.1 liter. The mass transfer is controlled by a mass

  2. Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

  3. Thermally-driven flows between a Leidenfrost solid and a ratchet surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Steffen; Baier, Tobias

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance of thermally-driven flows for the propulsion of Leidenfrost solids on a ratchet surface is studied based on a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. In contrast to a previous analysis, it is found that no significant thermal creep flow is established. Instead, the flow pattern is dominated by thermal edge and thermal-stress slip flow, the latter being directed opposite to thermal creep flow. However, in total thermally-induced flows only make a minor contribution to the propulsion of Leidenfrost solids on ratchet surfaces which is dominated by the pressure-driven flow due to the sublimating solid.

  4. Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding A. H. DILAWARI, J for the Electroslag Welding Process. In the formulation, allowance has been made {or both etee- tromagnetic and b in the use of electroslag welding (ESW), particularly for the construction of thick walled pressure vessels

  5. Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Ron Zevenhoven Course of Physics that (chemical) engineers have to work with haven't changed since then, an update was called for for quite a few of ÅA's chemical engineering students. This text is produced in two languages for several

  6. Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

  7. Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way...

  8. A Review of Thermal Acoustical and Special Project Requirements Data in Designing a Duct System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebens, A. F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    less than acceptable environment for occupants could occur. AIR LEAKAGE Probably the most neglected design criteria for duct work is air leakage. Testing by SMACNA (HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual. First Edition, August. 1985), and TIM (Thermal... 48 48 48 Appendix A of the SMACNA HVAC Air Duct Leakage Test Manual gives leakage as a percent of flow in a system by Leakage Class, fan CFM, and static pressure. The leakage in a 1" static pressure system can be as high as 24 percent in Leakage...

  9. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  10. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Kishimoto, Y. [JAERI (Japan). Naka Fusion Research

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  11. Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter. [Patent application; monitoring char flow in coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, P.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system includes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provides a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

  12. Survey of ion-acoustic-instability particle simulations and relevance to laser-fusion thermal-transport inhibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.C.

    1980-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion acoustic turbulence is examined as one mechanism which could contribute to the inhibition of electron thermal transport which has been inferred from many laser-plasma experiments. The behavior of the ion acoustic instability is discussed from the viewpoint of the literature of 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Simulation techniques, limitations, and reported saturation mechanisms and levels are discussed. A scaling law for the effective collision frequency ..nu..* can be fit to several workers' results to within an order-of-magnitude. The inferred ..nu..* is shown to be 1-2 orders-of-magnitude too small to account for the transport inhibition seen in Nd-laser-produced plasmas. Several differences between the simulation conditions and laser-produced plasma conditions are noted.

  13. Fully Nonlinear Edge Gyrokinetic Simulations of Kinetic Geodesic-Acoustic Modes and Boundary Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X Q; Belli, E; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Chang, C S; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Dimits, A M; Dorr, M R; Gao, Z; Hittinger, J A; Ko, S; Krasheninnikov, S; McKee, G R; Nevins, W M; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Suh, J; Umansky, M V

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present edge gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. A nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for the electrons. The electric field is obtained by solving the 2D gyrokinetic Poisson Equation. We demonstrate the following: (1) High harmonic resonances (n > 2) significantly enhance geodesic-acoustic mode (GAM) damping at high-q (tokamak safety factor), and are necessary to explain both the damping observed in our TEMPEST q-scans and experimental measurements of the scaling of the GAM amplitude with edge q{sub 95} in the absence of obvious evidence that there is a strong q dependence of the turbulent drive and damping of the GAM. (2) The kinetic GAM exists in the edge for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves, its radial scale is set by the ion temperature profile, and ion temperature inhomogeneity is necessary for GAM radial propagation. (3) The development of the neoclassical electric field evolves through different phases of relaxation, including GAMs, their radial propagation, and their long-time collisional decay. (4) Natural consequences of orbits in the pedestal and scrape-off layer region in divertor geometry are substantial non-Maxwellian ion distributions and flow characteristics qualitatively like those observed in experiments.

  14. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  15. 7 feb 13bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/82 Thermodynamics of separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    7 feb 13Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/82 Thermodynamics of separation processes Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow EngineeringThermodynamics course # 424304.0 v. 2013 ÅA 424304 7 feb 13Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8

  16. Passive Acoustic Detection of Wind Turbine In-Flow Conditions for Active Control and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Nathan E.

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind is a significant source of energy; however, the human capability to produce electrical energy still has many hurdles to overcome. One of these is the unpredictability of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The ABL is highly turbulent in both stable and unstable conditions (based on the vertical temperature profile) and the resulting fluctuations can have a dramatic impact on wind turbine operation. Any method by which these fluctuations could be observed, estimated, or predicted could provide a benefit to the wind energy industry as a whole. Based on the fundamental coupling of velocity fluctuations to pressure fluctuations in the nearly incompressible flow in the ABL, This work hypothesizes that a ground-based array of infrasonic pressure transducers could be employed to estimate the vertical wind profile over a height relevant for wind turbines. To analyze this hypothesis, experiments and field deployments were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed for a thick turbulent boundary layer over a neutral or heated surface. Surface pressure and velocity probe measurements were acquired simultaneously. Two field deployments yielded surface pressure data from a 49 element array. The second deployment at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, also included data from a smaller aperture, 96-element array and a 200-meter tall meteorological tower. Analysis of the data successfully demonstrated the ability to estimate the vertical velocity profile using coherence data from the pressure array. Also, dynamical systems analysis methods were successful in identifying and tracking a gust type event. In addition to the passive acoustic profiling method, this program also investigated a rapid response Doppler SODAR system, the optimization of wind turbine blades for enhanced power with reduced aeroacoustic noise production, and the implementation of a wireless health monitoring system for the wind turbine blades. Each of these other objectives was met successfully. The use of phase unwrapping applied to SODAR data was found to yield reasonable results for per-pulse measurements. A health monitoring system design analysis was able to demonstrate the ability to use a very small number of sensors to monitor blade health based on the blade's overall structural modes. Most notable was the development of a multi-objective optimization methodology that successfully yielded an aerodynamic blade design that produces greater power output with reduced aerodynamic loading noise. This optimization method could be significant for future design work.

  17. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  18. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND THERMAL ISSUES OF THE SiCf0SiC FLOW CHANNEL INSERT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    ) made of a silicon carbide composite (SiCf /SiC), which serves as electric and thermal insulator considered. The computa- tions were performed in a parametric form, using the electric and thermal. INTRODUCTION Flow channel inserts ~FCIs! made of a silicon car- bide composite ~SiCf 0SiC! were first proposed

  19. Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    value energy conversions such as heat engine cycles or chemical process to be carried outModelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove, Canberra AUSTRALIA E-mail: u3370739@anu.edu.au The natural convective flow inside a concentrating solar

  20. The mathematical structure of multiphase thermal models of flow in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tions, Darcy's law for volumetric flow rates and an energy equation in terms of enthalpy. The model with the formulation and numerical solution of equations for modelling multicomponent, two-phase, thermal fluid flow is closed with an equation of state and phase equilibrium con- ditions that determine the distribution

  1. Convex-Based Thermal Management for 3D MPSoCs Using DVFS and Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    management using variable-flow liquid cooling. 1 Introduction Power and thermal management are important] is a thermal model tool that calculates transient temperature response given the physical and power consumptionConvex-Based Thermal Management for 3D MPSoCs Using DVFS and Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling Francesco

  2. A posteriori error estimates with application of adaptive mesh refinement for thermal multiphase compositional flows in porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of diffusive fluxes. Numerical results on an example of real-life thermal oil-recovery in a reservoir refinement, compositional Darcy flow, thermal flow, finite volume method 1 Introduction The thermal under a non-isothermal condition. The governing equations are the conservation of the amount of each

  3. 10.2.2013bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 Irreversible thermodynamics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    10.2.2013Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1 University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Process EngineeringThermodynamics course # 424304.0 v. 2013 ÅA 424304 10.2.2013Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal

  4. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  5. An acoustically-driven biochip - Impact of flow on the cell-association of targeted drug carriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillafer, Christian; Neumann, Jürgen; Guttenberg, Zeno; Dissauer, Silke; Lichtscheidl, Irene; Wirth, Michael; Gabor, Franz; Schneider, Matthias; 10.1039/B906006E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of targeted drug carriers with epithelial and endothelial barriers in vivo is largely determined by the dynamics of the body fluids. To simulate these conditions in binding assays, a fully biocompatible in vitro model was developed which can accurately mimic a wide range of physiological flow conditions on a thumbnail-format cell-chip. This acoustically-driven microfluidic system was used to study the interaction characteristics of protein-coated particles with cells. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (2.86 {\\pm} 0.95 {\\mu}m) were conjugated with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-MP, cytoadhesive protein) or bovine serum albumin (BSA-MP, nonspecific protein) and their binding to epithelial cell monolayers was investigated under stationary and flow conditions. While mean numbers of 1500 {\\pm} 307 mm-2 WGA-MP and 94 {\\pm} 64 mm-2 BSA-MP respectively were detected to be cell-bound in the stationary setup, incubation at increasing flow velocities increasingly antagonized the attachment...

  6. acoustic-to-structure power flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: important for distribution networks due to the advent of distributed generation (e.g., rooftop photovoltaic flow laws can be approximated by linear equations known...

  7. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

  8. Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    : continuous distillation, packed tower columns 7.5 Particle technology, multi-phase flows 8. Short introductions to process equipment and design; biotechnology; process dynamics and control 8.1 Process equipment and design 8.2 Biotechnology 8.3 Process dynamics and control Note: Chapter 7 and 8 are not part of the exam

  9. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re{sub D} = 18?100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data.

  10. Experimental aero-acoustic assessment of swirling flows for drag applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobed, Darius Darayes

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for quiet drag technologies stems from stricter requirements for and growing demand of low-noise aircraft. The research presented in this thesis regards the use of swirling exhaust flows capable of generating ...

  11. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  12. High Accuracy Numerical Methods for Thermally Perfect Gas Flows with Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    High Accuracy Numerical Methods for Thermally Perfect Gas Flows with Chemistry Ronald P. Fedkiw with calculations of a 1-D reacting shock tube and a 2-D combustor. 2 #12; 1 Introduction Chemically reacting, high or the incineration of waste in a dump combustor. The combination of energetic chemical reactions and compressible gas

  13. Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elperin, Tov

    Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows M to the turbulent diffusion, and its potential impact on aerosol distribution. This phenomenon was predicted a nondiffusive flux of aerosols in the direction of the heat flux and results in formation of long-living aerosol

  14. Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors J¨org M¨uller Oliver Paul Wolfram Burgard Abstract-- Recently, autonomous miniature airships have be- come a growing research field. Whereas airships are attractive as they can move freely in the three

  15. Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

  17. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    23.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/36 7.1 Humid air #12;23.11.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow

  18. Elliptic flow of thermal dileptons as a probe of QCD matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payal Mohanty; Victor Roy; Sabyasachi Ghosh; Santosh K. Das; Bedangadas Mohanty; Sourav Sarkar; Jane Alam; Asis K. Chaudhuri

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the variation of elliptic flow of thermal dileptons with transverse momentum and invariant mass of the pairs for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. The dilepton productions from quark gluon plasma (QGP) and hot hadrons have been considered including the spectral change of light vector mesons in the thermal bath. The space time evolution has been carried out within the frame work of 2+1 dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with lattice+hadron resonance gas equation of state. We find that a judicious selection of invariant mass(M) and transverse momentum (p_T) windows can be used to extract the collective properties of quark matter, hadronic matter and also get a distinct signature of medium effects on vector mesons. Our results indicate a reduction of elliptic flow (v_2) for M beyond phi mass, which if observed experimentally would give the measure of v_2 of the partonic phase.

  19. Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of as it is transported across the cell boundaries "e" and "w", using xxdx d axax )()( The grid to be used. For the heat conductivity, use k = 2 W/(m.K). Questions 5 and 6 after J. Brännbacka (2005, 2006). In exam 2008CFD2013 P 32 1 x 15°C 0°C 47°C x WW W P E EE w e x x #12;Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course

  20. Particle analysis in an acoustic cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for acoustically manipulating one or more particles. Acoustically manipulated particles may be separated by size. The particles may be flowed in a flow stream and acoustic radiation pressure, which may be radial, may be applied to the flow stream. This application of acoustic radiation pressure may separate the particles. In one embodiment, the particles may be separated by size, and as a further example, the larger particles may be transported to a central axis.

  1. Thermalization, Isotropization and Elliptic Flow from Nonequilibrium Initial Conditions with a Saturation Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Ruggieri; Francesco Scardina; Salvatore Plumari; Vincenzo Greco

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we report on our results about the computation of the elliptic flow of the quark-gluon-plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, simulating the expansion of the fireball by solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation for the parton distribution function tuned at a fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$. Our main goal is to put emphasis on the role of a saturation scale in the initial gluon spectrum, which makes the initial distribution far from a thermalized one. We find that the presence of the saturation scale reduces the efficiency in building-up the elliptic flow, even if the thermalization process is quite fast $\\tau_{therm} \\approx 0.8 \\,\\rm fm/c$ and the pressure isotropization even faster $\\tau_{isotr} \\approx 0.3 \\,\\rm fm/c$. The impact of the non-equilibrium implied by the saturation scale manifests for non-central collisions and can modify the estimate of the viscosity respect to the assumption of full thermalization in $p_T$-space. We find that the estimate of $\\eta/s$ is modified from $\\eta/s \\approx 2/4\\pi$ to $\\eta/s \\approx 1/4\\pi$ at RHIC and from $\\eta/s \\approx 3/4\\pi$ to $\\eta/s \\approx 2/4\\pi$ at LHC. We complete our investigation by a study of the thermalization and isotropization times of the fireball for different initial conditions and values of $\\eta/s$ showing how the latter affects both isotropization and thermalization. Lastly, we have seen that the range of values explored by the phase-space distribution function $f$ is such that at $p_T<0.5\\, \\rm GeV$ the inner part of the fireball stays with occupation number significantly larger than unity despite the fast longitudinal expansion, which might suggest the possibility of the formation of a transient Bose-Einstein Condensate.

  2. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser testbed.

  3. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  4. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  5. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  6. Evidence for radial flow of thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA60 Collaboration; R. Arnaldi

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter Teff extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  7. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited.

  8. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E. (11904 Bell Ave., Austin, TX 78759-2415); Sharma, Mukul M. (Dept. of Petroleum Engr. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX 78712)

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  9. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  10. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Martin, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Radenbaugh, Ray (Louisville, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  11. 3.12.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/56 9. Solar cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/Solar_Heating_Cooling_Road map_2012_WEB.pdf 3.12.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/Solar_Heating_Cooling_Road map_2012_WEB.pdf #12;3.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 8/56 http://www.brighton-webs

  12. Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

  13. A versatile scanning acoustic platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N G Parker; P V Nelson; M J W Povey

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a versatile and highly configurable scanning acoustic platform. This platform, comprising of a high frequency transducer, bespoke positioning system and temperature-regulated sample unit, enables the acoustic probing of materials over a wide range of length scales and with minimal thermal aberration. In its bare form the platform acts as a reflection-mode acoustic microscope, while optical capabilities are readily incorporated to extend its abilities to the acousto-optic domain. Here we illustrate the capabilities of the platform through its incarnation as an acoustic microscope. Operating at 55 MHz we demonstrate acoustic imaging with a lateral resolution of 25 microns. We outline its construction, calibration and capabilities as an acoustic microscope, and discuss its wider applications.

  14. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedProceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop,c.F. , ~Aquifer thermal energy storage- parameter study,~

  15. Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

  16. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  17. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  18. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

  19. ACOUSTIC WAVE TRAPPING IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL AXISYMMETRIC ARRAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Acoustic resonances are readily observed in axial flow compressors and this has led to many that both the acoustic and the water-wave channel problems reduced to the determination of the eigenvalues

  20. Role of positively charged dust grains on dust acoustic wave propagation in presence of nonthermal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An expression for ion current flowing to the dust grains is proposed, when dust charge is positive and the ions are nonthermal. Secondary electron emission has been considered as the source of positive charging of the dust grains. Investigation shows that presence of positively charged dust grains along with thermal electrons and nonthermal ions generate purely growing dust acoustic waves for both the cases of ion nonthermal parameter greater than one and less than one. In the later case, the growth is conditional.

  1. 9.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering -Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/65 2. Vapour-compression refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    . Vapour-compression refrigeration processes Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow") Refrigeration course # 424503.0 v. 2014 ÅA 424503 Refrigeration / Kylteknik 9.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal of a refrigerant fluid Picture: ÇB98 liquid-vapour saturation dome 1-2 and 3-4: reversible and isothermal 2-3 and 4

  2. Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC. Greater discharge at the B2CC pushed the entrainment zone (EZ - where flow exceeded 7 ft/s) upstream from the entrance so that fish were entrained before they began to struggle against the flow. The high EPZ also was extended by flow along the powerhouse face at both sites, but more at the B2CC (about 450 ft) than at the TDITC (about 50 ft). Fish entering the large south eddy that circulated past the B2CC entrance were provided multiple opportunities to discover and enter. In contrast, fish moving past the sampled TDITC entrance either entered adjacent sluiceway openings or moved west to the spillway because there was no eddy to provide additional opportunities. Information from our study should be useful to fisheries managers and engineers seeking to transfer SFO technologies from one site to another. There are two important components to designing SFOs, the location within the forebay to take advantage of forebay circulation and specific entrance characteristics such as discharge and depth which affect the size and shape of the EZ and the high EPZ. Providing SFOs with an EZ extending upstream of structure could reduce entrance rejection, decrease forebay residence time and risk of predation, and increase passage of schools of smolts.

  3. 12.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 4. Refrigeration process comparison;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    . Refrigeration process comparison; process equipment Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Themal and Flow") Refrigeration course # 424503.0 v. 2014 ÅA 424503 Refrigeration / Kylteknik 12.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/32 4.1 Refrigeration process comparison #12;12.11.2014Åbo

  4. Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 51, No. 3, September 2007, pp. 11131118 Characteristics of Thermal-Flow Fields in a PECVD Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    Characteristics of Thermal-Flow Fields in a PECVD Reactor with Various Operating Conditions Jae-Sang Baek and Youn be influenced by the reactor geometry, the thermo-flow conditions, and the operation procedure. In this study, the effects of various operating conditions and the shapes of the PECVD reactor are considered to elucidate

  5. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  6. Lattice ellipsoidal statistical BGK model for thermal non-equilibrium flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Jianping

    A thermal lattice Boltzmann model is constructed on the basis of the ellipsoidal statistical Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (ES-BGK) collision operator via the Hermite moment representation. The resulting lattice ES-BGK model uses ...

  7. An analog analysis of transient heat flow in solids with temperature-dependent thermal properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dwain Edward

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    they both are based on the same approximation of the thermal properties. Since these two methods of solution of the same problem produce almost the same results, the usefulness of the constant property analog method of solution must be found elsewhere... calculations. Therefore, it is concluded that the better the approximation of the variation of the thermal properties allowed by a method of solution, the more closely that method of solution will agree with the actual physical problem. In particular...

  8. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC) and the thermal envelope of buildings, but designments concern the thermal envelope, lighting and acoustics,HVAC and building’s thermal envelope. Yet requirements for

  9. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid Heat Storage Systems in the Ground. Extraction ofof the storage aquifer lies 40 m below the ground surface,water storage. The influence of regional ground water flow

  10. Calculation of heat flow and temperature fields for building envelopes containing thermal bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a preliminary meeting held at the Princeton University Center for Energy and Environmental Studies on March 14-15, 1988, Soviet and American representatives discussed these problems in some detail. After minor modifications, final problem definitions for six of the thermal bridges were generated. The seventh thermal bridge, originally submitted by the USSR, was withdrawn temporarily to add some further clarification. A common format for presenting the results was agreed upon, and both American and Soviet specialists subsequently solved the six problems. This paper presents the US solutions prepared at ORNL. 52 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging using ambient noise ............................................................................................... xviii SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION Chapter 1: Acoustic Daylight......................................................................... 1 1.2 Acoustic Daylight

  12. Momentum and thermal boundary-layer thickness in a stagnation flow chemical vapor deposition reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandy, David

    reactor David S. Dandy and Jungheum Yun Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado State University stagnation flows characteristic of highly convective chemical vapor deposition pedestal reactors. Expressions of diamond via low- pressure chemical vapor deposition, direct current (dc) arcjet reactor systems3­8 have

  13. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: A New Geothermal Well Imaging Tool. 1.To develop a robust and easily deployable DTPS for monitoring in geothermal wells; and 2. Develop the associated analysis methodology for flow imaging; and?when possible by wellbore conditions?to determine in situthermal conductivity and basal heat flux.

  14. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell (Livermore, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  15. A study of flow in stratified reservoirs by use of the thermal analogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickering, Charles William

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Uren discussed the possible significance of this nonuniformity in his f927 paper on the theoretical aspects of waterflooding, Since this time the problem of vertical permeability variations has been the subject of much discussion and numerous papers... calculations are steady-state flow conditions, unit znobility ratio, linear geometry, average or homogeneous porosity and negligible capillary pressure and gravity effects. 3 Stiles uses these assumptions to derive his waterflood equa- tions and keep...

  16. Flow and Temperature Fields Generated by a Thermally Activated Interventional Vascular Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurrin, Casey

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................ 51 24 Zoom of Previous Image to Show Heating Effects ................................... 52 25 Comparisons between Analytical and CFD Annulus Profiles .................. 53 26 Temperature Field for Low Flow... by Sakakibara et al. [22] and Coolen et al. [23] in which the investigated temperature ranges were 40 K and 0.7 K, respectively. Two different CFD codes [24] for analyzing the case of a heated cylinder show qualitative agreement with experimental results from...

  17. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Lab course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    temperature of 25 °C and that they have the same thermo-physical properties of = 0.15 W/m·K for heat a width W = 0.5 m (in the third, z direction), calculate the heat loss Q (in W) from this plate, if it has a length L = 1 m (in the x-direction) and assuming that the fluid is flowing around the plate

  18. Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    mechanisms. 1. The acoustic heating theory Only a few years after Edlen's (1941) discovery that the solar acoustic wave radiation- · b. field acoustic wave Figure 1. Panel a: Acoustic heating in late-type stars: effective temperature TeJ f, gravity g and mixing length parameter fr. Panel b: Acoustic heating in early

  19. 1.12.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/24 8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of low-temperature (waste) heat, replacing sources of (unnecessarily) high temperature heat (and, 3) outside water heat and 4) heat from another indoor space, or 5) waste heat from a process1.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/24 8. Heat

  20. Acoustic horizons in nuclear fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niladri Sarkar; Abhik Basu; Jayanta K. Bhattacharjee; Arnab K. Ray

    2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a hydrodynamic description of the spherically symmetric outward flow of nuclear matter, accommodating dispersion in it as a very weak effect. About the resulting stationary conditions in the flow, we apply an Eulerian scheme to derive a fully nonlinear equation of a time-dependent radial perturbation. In its linearized limit, with no dispersion, this equation implies the static acoustic horizon of an analogue gravity model. We, however, show that time-dependent nonlinear effects destabilize the static horizon. We also model the perturbation as a high-frequency travelling wave, and perform a {\\it WKB} analysis, in which the effect of weak dispersion is studied iteratively. We show that even arbitrarily small values of dispersion make the horizon fully opaque to any acoustic disturbance propagating against the bulk flow, with the amplitude and the energy flux of the radial perturbation undergoing a discontinuity at the horizon, and decaying exponentially just outside it.

  1. Method and apparatus for adapting steady flow with cyclic thermodynamics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Reid, Robert S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ward, William C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy transfer apparatus has a resonator for supporting standing acoustic waves at a selected frequency with a steady flow process fluid thermodynamic medium and a solid medium having heat capacity. The fluid medium and the solid medium are disposed within the resonator for thermal contact therebetween and for relative motion therebetween. The relative motion is produced by a first means for producing a steady velocity component and second means for producing an oscillating velocity component at the selected frequency and concomitant wavelength of the standing acoustic wave. The oscillating velocity and associated oscillating pressure component provide energy transfer between the steady flow process fluid and the solid medium as the steady flow process fluid moves through the resonator.

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  3. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  4. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction time was 5-10 minutes for a volume of 50 {micro}L. Moreover, a unique feature of this technology is the ability to replace the cartridges for subsequent nucleic acid extractions.

  5. Thermal impact of an eccentric annular flow around a mixed-oxide pin - An in-pile observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Strain, R.V.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Feldman, E.E. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Nomura, S. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuels Development Corporation, Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical subassembly of a liquid-metal reactor, slightly unsymmetric coolant flow and temperature distribution around fuel pins is common and inevitable. The geometric location away from the subassembly center and the irradiation-induced rod bowing are among the primary reasons for such occurrences. Studies of the hydrodynamics of the skewed coolant distribution and the associated fuel pin heat transfer are extensive in both computer modeling and laboratory experimental work. In-pile verification of the phenomenon, however, has been rare. High temperature in fuel pins and the perturbation from temperature-monitoring devices discourage such an endeavor. Recent evidence of the sensitive response of the fuel-sodium reaction product (FSRP) to its decomposition temperature, however, might make in-pile verification possible. The clearly demarcated interface of the FSRP would serve as an excellent thermal monitor that reveals the temperature contour within the fuel. This finding from the postirradiation examination (PIE) of mixed-oxide (MOX) pins, is one of the spin-offs of the run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) program jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The FSRP fuel interface is thus a good benchmark for verifying fuel and coolant temperature distributions. The RBCB experiment and the associated analysis are discussed and conclusions are presented.

  6. A high-order immersed boundary method for acoustic wave scattering and low-Mach number flow-induced sound in complex geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 examples of this is the cabin noise in automobiles associated with external air-flow and another

  7. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  8. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Box. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and National Center for Physics (NCP), Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  9. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850��������C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys���¢�������� weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in t

  10. Wind- and thermal-driven air flows and the buoyancy and advection effects on air exchange within urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnusson, Sigurður Pétur

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure to air pollutants and thermal stress in urban areas are public health concerns. The year 2008 was the first year when more than half of the human population lived in urban areas. Studies of the urban air ...

  11. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Goddard, Greg; Salzman, Gary; Sinha, Dipen; Martin, John C.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher; Graves, Steven

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  12. Ultrasonic analyte concentration and application in flow cytometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Goddard, Greg (Los Alamos, NM); Salzman, Gary (White Rock, NM); Sinha, Dipen (Los Alamos, NM); Martin, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Kwiatkowski, Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Graves, Steven (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for concentrating analytes within a fluid flowing through a tube using acoustic radiation pressure. The apparatus includes a function generator that outputs a radio frequency electrical signal to a transducer that transforms the radio frequency electric signal to an acoustic signal and couples the acoustic signal to the tube. The acoustic signal is converted within the tube to acoustic pressure that concentrates the analytes within the fluid.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  14. Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids by the Transient Grating Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Determination of Thermal Diffusivities, Thermal Conductivities, and Sound Speeds of Room. The experiments give thermal diffusivities from which thermal conductivities can be determined, sound speeds not only on the sound speed but also on the thermal diffusivity and acoustic damping of the RTILs

  15. Significance of thermal fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions in receptor-ligand mediated adhesive dynamics of a spherical particle in wall bound shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Ramesh; R. Thaokar; J. Ravi Prakash; R. Prabhakar

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of adhesion of a spherical micro-particle to a ligand-coated wall, in shear flow, is studied using a Langevin equation that accounts for thermal fluctuations, hydrodynamic interactions and adhesive interactions. Contrary to the conventional assumption that thermal fluctuations play a negligible role at high P$\\acute{e}$clet numbers, we find that for particles with low surface densities of receptors, rotational diffusion caused by fluctuations about the flow and gradient directions aids in bond formation, leading to significantly greater adhesion on average, compared to simulations where thermal fluctuations are completely ignored. The role of wall hydrodynamic interactions on the steady state motion of a particle, when the particle is close to the wall, has also been explored. At high P$\\acute{e}$clet numbers, the shear induced force that arises due to the stresslet part of the Stokes dipole, plays a dominant role, reducing the particle velocity significantly, and affecting the states of motion of the particle. The coupling between the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the particle, brought about by the presence of hydrodynamic interactions, is found to have no influence on the binding dynamics. On the other hand, the drag coefficient, which depends on the distance of the particle from the wall, plays a crucial role at low rates of bond formation. A significant difference in the effect of both the shear force and the position dependent drag force, on the states of motion of the particle, is observed when the P$\\acute{e}$let number is small.

  16. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  17. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F. [CNRS, University of Limoges, SPTCS UMR6638, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  18. A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R.; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by inferring the velocity of water through a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale; and consequently, to up-scale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for estimating the wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing simutaneously from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it is shown to be affected by both moisture content and temperature. Empirical factors are often introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and they are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology can be applied for the calibration of existing heat ratio sap flow systems at other sites. It is especially useful when an alternative transpiration calibration device, such as a lysimeter, is not available.

  19. Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    -thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer;Leuchtstoffröhre Plasma-Bildschirm Energiesparlampe #12;electrical engineering light sources textile industry

  20. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, CNRS/Université de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon/Université Lyon 1/INSA de Lyon, ECL, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Garandet, J.-P. [CEA, Laboratoire d’Instrumentation et d’Expérimentation en Mécanique des Fluides et Thermohydraulique, DEN/DANS/DM2S/STMF/LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  1. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  2. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  3. On Thermal-Pulse-Driven Plasma Flows in Coronal Funnels as Observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, A K; Murawski, K; Dwivedi, B N; Mohan, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using one-arcsecond-slit scan observations from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on 05 February 2007, we find the plasma outflows in the open and expanding coronal funnels at the eastern boundary of AR 10940. The Doppler velocity map of Fe XII 195.120 A shows that the diffuse close-loop system to be mostly red-shifted. The open arches (funnels) at the eastern boundary of AR exhibit blue-shifts with a maximum speed of about 10-15 km/s. This implies outflowing plasma through these magnetic structures. In support of these observations, we perform a 2D numerical simulation of the expanding coronal funnels by solving the set of ideal MHD equations in appropriate VAL-III C initial temperature conditions using the FLASH code. We implement a rarefied and hotter region at the footpoint of the model funnel, which results in the evolution of slow plasma perturbations propagating outward in the form of plasma flows. We conclude that the heating, which may result from magnetic reconnection, can trigger the observ...

  4. A Transect of Glacier Bay Ocean Currents Measured by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the tidal flow accelerates over Glacier Bay's shallow entrance sill to speeds of 180 cm/s and then slowsA Transect of Glacier Bay Ocean Currents Measured by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) transects of ocean current in Glacier Bay and Muir Inlet

  5. Manipulating particle trajectories with phase-control in surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Manipulating particle trajectories with phase-control in surface acoustic wave microfluidics Nathan microfluidic flow mixer Biomicrofluidics 6, 012803 (2012) Cell separation and transportation between two particle trajectories with phase-control in surface acoustic wave microfluidics Nathan D. Orloff,1 Jaclyn R

  6. Spacetime transformation acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. García-Meca; S. Carloni; C. Barceló; G. Jannes; J. Sánchez-Dehesa; A. Martínez

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed analogue transformation method has allowed the extension of transformation acoustics to general spacetime transformations. We analyze here in detail the differences between this new analogue transformation acoustics (ATA) method and the standard one (STA). We show explicitly that STA is not suitable for transformations that mix space and time. ATA takes as starting point the acoustic equation for the velocity potential, instead of that for the pressure as in STA. This velocity-potential equation by itself already allows for some transformations mixing space and time, but not all of them. We explicitly obtain the entire set of transformations that do not leave its form invariant. It is in these cases that ATA shows its true potential, allowing for building a transformation acoustics method that enables the full range of spacetime transformations. We provide an example of an important transformation which cannot be achieved with STA. Using this transformation, we design and simulate an acoustic frequency converter via the ATA approach. Furthermore, in those cases in which one can apply both the STA and ATA approaches, we study the different transformational properties of the corresponding physical quantities.

  7. Thermally driven circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelken, Haim

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several problems connected by the theme of thermal forcing are addressed herein. The main topic is the stratification and flow field resulting from imposing a specified heat flux on a fluid that is otherwise confined to a ...

  8. Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

  9. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Rummukainen, Kari; Weir, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope appr...

  10. Numerical simulations of acoustically generated gravitational waves at a first order phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Hindmarsh; Stephan J. Huber; Kari Rummukainen; David J. Weir

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present details of numerical simulations of the gravitational radiation produced by a first order {thermal} phase transition in the early universe. We confirm that the dominant source of gravitational waves is sound waves generated by the expanding bubbles of the low-temperature phase. We demonstrate that the sound waves have a power spectrum with power-law form between the scales set by the average bubble separation (which sets the length scale of the fluid flow $L_\\text{f}$) and the bubble wall width. The sound waves generate gravitational waves whose power spectrum also has a power-law form, at a rate proportional to $L_\\text{f}$ and the square of the fluid kinetic energy density. We identify a dimensionless parameter $\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW}$ characterising the efficiency of this "acoustic" gravitational wave production whose value is $8\\pi\\tilde\\Omega_\\text{GW} \\simeq 0.8 \\pm 0.1$ across all our simulations. We compare the acoustic gravitational waves with the standard prediction from the envelope approximation. Not only is the power spectrum steeper (apart from an initial transient) but the gravitational wave energy density is generically two orders of magnitude or more larger.

  11. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  12. Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

  13. Case History Acoustic signatures of crossflow behind casing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    Case History Acoustic signatures of crossflow behind casing in commingled reservoirs: A case study create unwanted con- duits behind casing that lead to crossflow between different producing zones. Crossflow results in lost production or aquifer contamination because fluid flows from a higher- pressure

  14. Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

  15. Entropic-acoustic instability of shocked Bondi accretion I. What does perturbed Bondi accretion sound like ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Foglizzo

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the radial flow of gas into a black hole (i.e. Bondi accretion), the infall of any entropy or vorticity perturbation produces acoustic waves propagating outward. The dependence of this acoustic flux on the shape of the perturbation is investigated in detail. This is the key process in the mechanism of the entropic-acoustic instability proposed by Foglizzo & Tagger (2000) to explain the instability of Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion. These acoustic waves create new entropy and vorticity perturbations when they reach the shock, thus closing the entropic-acoustic cycle. With an adiabatic index 1flow are studied analytically and solved numerically. The fundamental frequency of this problem is the cut-off frequency of acoustic refraction, below which ingoing acoustic waves are refracted out. This cut-off is significantly smaller than the Keplerian frequency at the sonic radius and depends on the latitudinal number l of the perturbations. When advected adiabatically inward, entropy and vorticity perturbations trigger acoustic waves propagating outward, with an efficiency which is highest for non radial perturbations l=1. The outgoing acoustic flux produced by the advection of vorticity perturbations is always moderate and peaks at rather low frequency. By contrast, the acoustic flux produced by an entropy wave is highest close to the refraction cut-off. It can be very large if gamma is close to 5/3. These results suggest that the shocked Bondi flow with gamma=5/3 is strongly unstable with respect to the entropic-acoustic mechanism.

  16. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartline, Ernest L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  17. Beam excited acoustic instability in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasheed, A.; Siddique, M.; Huda, F. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jung, Y.-D. [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The instability of hole-Acoustic waves due to electron beam in semiconductor quantum plasmas is examined using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered including Bohm potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange potential of the semiconductor quantum plasma species. Our model is applied to nano-sized GaAs semiconductor plasmas. The variation of the growth rate of the unstable mode is obtained over a wide range of system parameters. It is found that the thermal effects of semiconductor species have significance over the hole-Acoustic waves.

  18. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arshad, Kashif [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad and University of Wah, Wah Cantt 47040 (Pakistan); Ehsan, Zahida, E-mail: Ehsan.zahida@gmail.com [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Universita degli Studi del Molise, 86090 Pesche - IS (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Defence Road, Off Raiwind Road, Lahore 86090 (Pakistan); Khan, S. A. [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTEC, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTEC, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  19. Towards Understanding the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte Solution in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries. Towards Understanding the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte Solution in...

  20. Fluid Flow, Thermal History, and Diagenesis of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and Overlying Units in South-Central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Bradley Donald

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled during calcite precipitation. Ouachita tectonism caused tectonically valved and gravity-driven fluid flow sourced from the Anadarko basin and possibly involved sandstone aquifers or basement. Mechanisms of ancient fluid flow appear to contrast...

  1. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Krulevich, P.; Lee, A.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control. 7 figs.

  2. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA); Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Maitland, Duncan (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA); Krulevich, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  3. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA); Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Maitland, Duncan (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA); Krulevich, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control.

  4. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  5. Microscopic mechanism of low thermal conductivity in lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Themicroscopic physics behind low-lattice thermal conductivity of single-crystal rock salt lead telluride (PbTe) is investigated. Mode-dependent phonon (normal and umklapp) scattering rates and their impact on thermal conductivity were quantified by first-principles-based anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations that accurately reproduce thermal conductivity in a wide temperature range. The low thermal conductivity of PbTe is attributed to the scattering of longitudinal acoustic phonons by transverse optical phonons with large anharmonicity and small group velocity of the soft transverse acoustic phonons. This results in enhancing the relative contribution of optical phonons, which are usually minor heat carriers in bulk materials.

  6. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  7. Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paillet, Frederick I.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

  8. Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Acoustical Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yaying

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH...

  9. Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences By Kenneth S. Suslick, Yuri Didenko, Ming M. Fang Acoustic cavitation is responsible for both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. Bubble collapse in liquids, sonochemistry and sonoluminescence derive principally from acoustic cavitation: the formation, growth

  10. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  11. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  12. acoustics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 4 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  13. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  14. Rotational acoustic resonances in cylindrical Y. Duan & M. McIver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an experimental study of acoustic resonances in axial flow compressors and observe large vibrations of the blades some cut-off frequency in the problem, which means that they oscillate at frequencies at which the terminology of Parker [18], who found such modes experimentally in an axial flow compressor

  15. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Guzdar, P. N. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  16. Acoustic metafluids Andrew N. Norrisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Andrew

    of material that surrounds the object to be rendered acoustically "invisible." Stealth can also be achieved of material necessary to achieve stealth. We define these materials as acoustic metafluids, which as we are materials with anisotropic inertia and the elastic properties of what are known as pentamode materials

  17. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  18. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  19. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA); Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Maitland, Duncan (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Pat (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  20. Acoustic sensors using microstructures tunable with energy other than acoustic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for detecting acoustic energy includes a microstructure tuned to a predetermined acoustic frequency and a device for detecting movement of the microstructure. A display device is operatively linked to the movement detecting device. When acoustic energy strikes the acoustic sensor, acoustic energy having a predetermined frequency moves the microstructure, where the movement is detected by the movement detecting device.

  1. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  2. Tunable thermal link

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  3. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  4. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  5. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alers, George A. (Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Jr., Leigh R. (Albuquerque, NM); MacLauchlan, Daniel T. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  6. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/28 6. Food cooling and freezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    , food, pollution, health and quality of life, population growth, consumption Cooling and freezing air affects moisture loss from products, etc. Picture: ÇB98 23.11.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal, and avoiding high air velocities Picture:http://www.sun-dried-tomatoes.com/information.html Picture:http://res2

  7. UNH Thermal WorkshopUNH Thermal Workshop or how important isor how important is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) EPA grants to UNH for thermal regimes of Northeast g g Streams and Thermal Impacts of Stormwater BMPs response curves Ecological targets Enviro. flow targets Implement program River types alteration Statewide

  8. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  9. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  10. Slow sound in lined flow ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auregan, Yves

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the acoustic propagation in lined flow duct with a purely reactive impedance at the wall. This reacting liner has the capability to reduce the speed of sound, and thus to enhance the interaction between the acoustic propagation and the low Mach number flow ($M\\simeq0.3$). At the lower frequencies, there are typically 4 acoustic or hydrodynamic propagating modes, with 3 of them propagating in the direction of the flow. Above a critical frequency, there are only 2 propagating modes that all propagate in the direction of the flow. From the exact 2D formulation an approximate 1D model is developed to study the scattering of acoustic waves in a straight duct with varying wall impedance. This simple system, with a uniform flow and with a non-uniform liner impedance at the wall, permits to study the scattering between regions with different waves characteristics. Several situations are characterized to show the importance of negative energy waves, strong interactions between acoustic and hydrodynamic mod...

  11. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  12. Method and apparatus for separating mixtures of gases using an acoustic wave

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geller, Drew A.; Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoacoustic device separates a mixture of gases. An elongated duct is provided with first and second ends and has a length that is greater than the wavelength of sound in the mixture of gases at a selected frequency, and a diameter that is greater than a thermal penetration depth in the mixture of gases. A first acoustic source is located at the first end of the duct to generate acoustic power at the selected frequency. A plurality of side branch acoustic sources are spaced along the length of the duct and are configured to introduce acoustic power into the mixture of gases so that a first gas is concentrated at the first end of the duct and a second gas is concentrated at the second end of the duct.

  13. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad H. Ansari; Yuli V. Nazarov

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shanon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  14. Thermal/MechanicalThermal/Mechanical Properties of WoodProperties of Wood--PVCPVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .composites. Heat flow, heat capacity, andHeat flow, heat capacity, and enthalpyenthalpy Glass transition/Mechanical Analysis TechniquesThermal/Mechanical Analysis Techniques #12;Rubbery Leathery Viscous liquid Rigid (Semi

  15. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  16. A transient thermal cloak made of engineered thermal materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yungui; Jiang, Wei; Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformation optics originating from the invariance of Maxwell's equations under the coordinate mapping has enabled the design and demonstration of many fascinating electromagnetic devices that were unconceivable or deemed impossible before [1-11], and has greatly contributed to the advancement of modern electromagnetism and related researches assisted with the development of metamaterials [12-15]. This technique has been extended to apply to other partial differential equations governing different waves [16-23] or flux [24-28], and has produced various novel functional devices such as acoustic cloaks [20-23] and Schrodinger's 'hat' [19]. In the present work we applied the coordinate transformation to the time-dependent heat diffusion equation [24-28] and achieved the manipulation of the heat flux by predefined diffusion paths. In the experiment we demonstrated a transient thermal cloaking device engineered with thermal metamaterials and successfully hid a centimeter sized strong 'scatter' (thermal disturbe...

  17. Acoustic propagation in an epoxy resin at very low temperatures P. Doussineau and W. Schn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    thermal conductivity varies as T2. Their acoustic behaviour is also quite characteristic : the velocity to the presence of conduction elec- trons [2]. Most of the low temperatures properties of semiconducting glasses experiments in PMMA and polycarbonate (PQ have revealed a linear beha- viour of the attenuation of 18 GHz

  18. Effect of nonthermality of electrons on the speed and shape of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a warm plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelwahed, H. G. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences and Humanitarian Studies, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a warm collisionless plasma with nonthermal electrons are investigated by a direct analysis of the field equations. The Sagdeev's potential is obtained in terms of ion acoustic speed by simply solving an algebraic equation. It is found that the amplitude and width of the ion-acoustic solitons as well as the parametric regime where the solitons can exist are sensitive to the population of energetic non-thermal electrons. The soliton and double layer solutions are obtained as a small amplitude approximation.

  19. Acoustic signal estimation using multiple blind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joonsung

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes two algorithms for recovering an acoustic signal from multiple blind measurements made by sensors (microphones) over an acoustic channel. Unlike other algorithms that use a posteriori probabilistic ...

  20. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  1. Acoustical Communications for Wireless Downhole Telemetry Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farraj, Abdallah

    2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the use of advanced acoustical communication techniques for wireless downhole telemetry systems. Using acoustic waves for downhole telemetry systems is investigated in order to replace the wired communication systems...

  2. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  3. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, D.N.; Olinger, C.T.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn.

  4. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  5. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butler, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  6. Acoustic detection of Immiscible Liquids in Sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Seifert, Patricia K.; Nihei, Kurt T.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory cross-well P-wave transmission at 90 kHz was measured in a 61 cm diameter by 76 cm tall water-saturated sand pack, before and after introducing a non-aqueous phase organic liquid (NAPL) (n-dodecane). In one experiment NAPL was introduced to form a lens trapped by a low permeability layer; a second experiment considered NAPL residual trapped behind the front of flowing NAPL. The NAPL caused significant changes in the travel time and amplitude of first arrivals, as well as the generation of diffracted waves arriving after the direct wave. The spatial variations in NAPL saturation obtained from excavation at the end of the experiment correlated well with the observed variations in the P-wave amplitudes and travel times. NAPL residual saturation changes from NAPL flow channels of 3 to 4% were detectable and the 40 to 80% NAPL saturation in the NAPL lens was clearly visible at acoustic frequencies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that small NAPL saturations may be more easily detected with amplitude rather than travel time data, but that the relationships between the amplitude changes and NAPL saturation maybe more complex than those for velocity.

  7. Effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode in magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren Haijun [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical research on the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) induced by equilibrium toroidal rotation flow in the tokamak plasmas is approached by using ideal magnetohydrodynamic model. The dispersion relation of the GAM is presented by taking into account magnetic field perturbations. It is shown that {beta} can decrease the frequency of the GAM.

  8. An efficient approximation for the vibro-acoustic response of a turbulent boundary layer excited panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hal-01004463,version1-11Jun2014 Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Sound and Vibration 264, 4 and the acoustic pressure radiated when a thin elastic plate is immersed in a low Mach number flow of fluid. The mechanical properties of this panel are a Young's modulus E, a Pois- son coefficient and a mass per unit

  9. LLNL`s acoustic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.

    1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a frequency sensitive acoustic transducer that operates in the 10 Hz to 10 kHz regime. This device uses modem silicon microfabrication techniques to form mechanical tines that resonate at specified frequencies. This high-sensitivity device is intended for low-power battery powered applications.

  10. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

  11. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Hector N. (Evans, GA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

  12. Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

  13. Thermal Sciences The thermal sciences area involves the study of energy conversion and transmission, power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Thermal Sciences The thermal sciences area involves the study of energy conversion and transmission, power generation, the flow of liquids and gases, and the transfer of thermal energy (heat) by means in virtually all energy conversion devices and systems. One may think of the jet engine as a mechanical device

  14. Separation of Yeast Cells from MS2 Viruses Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K A; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a rapid and robust separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing in a microfluidic device. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) generates acoustic standing waves in the microchannel. These standing waves induce acoustic radiation force fields that direct microparticles towards the nodes (i.e., pressure minima) or the anti-nodes (i.e., pressure maxima) of the standing waves depending on the relative compressidensity between the particle and the suspending liquid.[1] For particles larger than 2 {micro}m, the transverse velocities generated by these force fields enable continuous, high throughput separation. Extensive work in the last decade [2-4] has demonstrated acoustic focusing for manipulating microparticles or biological samples in microfluidic devices. This prior work has primarily focused on experimental realization of acoustic focusing without modeling or with limited one-dimensional modeling estimates. We recently developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices.[1] Here we compare results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. Figure 1 shows a typical experimental acoustic focusing result for microparticles (diameter = 2.0 {micro}m) in a 500 {micro}m wide by 200 {micro}m deep microchannel. In this case, the PZT driving frequency and voltage are, respectively, 1.459 MHz and 6.6 V. The microparticles tightly focus (full width half maximum (FWHM) {approx}30 {micro}m) less than 30 s after the initiation of the acoustic field. We simulated the same geometry and operating conditions for comparison. The surface plot in Figure 2 illustrates the two-dimensional pressure field orthogonal to the flow direction (x-direction) from the simulation. The superimposed vector plot shows the acoustic radiation force in this plane. The dark regions and the light regions respectively represent the nodes and anti-nodes of the acoustic pressure field. The corresponding force field predicts acoustic focusing at the center of the microchannel, which is confirmed by the experimental results shown in Figure 1. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (typical cell size of 4-6 {micro}m depending on the cell growth stage, measured using a Coulter counter) and MS2 bacteriophage (typical diameter {approx}30 nm [5]) using acoustic focusing (Figure 3). A mixture of S. cerevisiae and MS2 labeled with Ribogreen was prepared and injected into one inlet of the microchip (i.e., half of the microchannel was filled with the sample). We varied driving voltages from 1.96 to 4.76 V, while fixing the driving frequency at 1.459 MHz and flow rate at 20 {micro}l/min. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. Increased driving voltages enhanced the acoustic focusing of the yeast cells thereby achieving good separation. We are able to achieve yields of > 80% and sample purities of > 90% in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  15. Intermttional Jourmtl ~/" Thermophysics. I,'ol. 18. No. I. 1997 Measurements of the Thermal Diffusivity of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    , transient, and novel hybrid heat-flow methods. In the periodic thermal-wave method, a sample of known

  16. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P. [DEN/DTN/STPA/LIET, CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G. [Aix-Marseille Univ, LMA UPR 7051 CNRS, site LCND, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Flow and Geomechanics N. Guy*, G. Enchéry and G. Renard IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue de Bois of Thermal EOR: Comprehensive Coupling of an AMR-Based Model of Thermal Fluid Flow and Geomechanics when both thermal fluid flow and geomechanics are coupled in order to take into account variations

  18. Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal management plays an important part in the cost of electric drives in terms of power electronics packaging. Very promising results have been obtained by using microporous coatings and skived surfaces in conjunction with single-phase and two-phase flows. Sintered materials and thermoplastics with embedded fibers show significant promise as thermal interface materials, or TIMs. Appropriate cooling technologies depend on the power electronics package application and reliability.

  19. Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wen-Chen

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instrument in the field, such as portable gas chromatography or photoionization. However, these instruments usually are expensive and inap- (2) propriate for a personal monitoring program. Indirect methods involve collecting the toxicants in certain media..., the thermal desorber contained four ma)or parts: a purging gas purifi- cation chamber, a desorption oven, a syringe type collection chamber and a gas chromatographic sample infection loop. A diagram of sample flow from purge gas source through the thermal...

  20. Improved Bacterial and Viral Recoveries from 'Complex' Samples using Electrophoretically Assisted Acoustic Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, K; Rose, K; Jung, B; Fisher, K; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated front-end sample preparation technologies can significantly enhance the sensitivity and reliability of biodetection assays [1]. We are developing advanced sample preparation technologies for biowarfare detection and medical point-of-care diagnostics using microfluidic systems with continuous sample processing capabilities. Here we report an electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing technique to rapidly extract and enrich viral and bacterial loads from 'complex samples', applied in this case to human nasopharyngeal samples as well as simplified surrogates. The acoustic forces capture and remove large particles (> 2 {micro}m) such as host cells, debris, dust, and pollen from the sample. We simultaneously apply an electric field transverse to the flow direction to transport small ({le} 2 {micro}m), negatively-charged analytes into a separate purified recovery fluid using a modified H-filter configuration [Micronics US Patent 5,716,852]. Hunter and O'Brien combined transverse electrophoresis and acoustic focusing to measure the surface charge on large particles, [2] but to our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration combining these two techniques in a continuous flow device. Marina et al. demonstrated superimposed dielectrophoresis (DEP) and acoustic focusing for enhanced separations [3], but these devices have limited throughput due to the rapid decay of DEP forces. Both acoustic standing waves and electric fields exert significant forces over the entire fluid volume in microchannels, thus allowing channels with larger dimensions (> 100 {micro}m) and high throughputs (10-100 {micro}L/min) necessary to process real-world volumes (1 mL). Previous work demonstrated acoustic focusing of microbeads [4] and biological species [5] in various geometries. We experimentally characterized our device by determining the biological size-cutoff where acoustic radiation pressure forces no longer transport biological particles. Figure 1 shows images of E.Coli ({approx}1 {micro}m) and yeast ({approx}4-5 {micro}m) flowing in a microchannel (200 {micro}m deep, 500 {micro}m wide) at a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min. The E.Coli does not focus in the acoustic field while the yeast focuses at the channel centerline. This result suggests the acoustic size-cutoff for biological particles in our device lies between 2 and 3 {micro}m. Transverse electrophoresis has been explored extensively in electric field flow fractionation [6] and isoelectric focusing devices [7]. We demonstrated transverse electrophoretic transport of a wide variety of negatively-charged species, including fluorophores, beads, viruses, E.Coli, and yeast. Figure 2 shows the electromigration of a fluorescently labeled RNA virus (MS2) from the lower half of the channel to the upper half region with continuous flow. We demonstrated the effectiveness of our electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing device by separating virus-like particles (40 nm fluorescent beads, selected to aid in visualization) from a high background concentration of yeast contaminants (see Figure 3). Our device allows for the efficient recovery of virus into a pre-selected purified buffer while background contaminants are acoustically captured and removed. We also tested the device using clinical nasopharyngeal samples, both washes and lavages, and demonstrated removal of unknown particulates (>2 ?m size) from the sample. Our future research direction includes spiking known amounts of bacteria and viruses into clinical samples and performing quantitative off-chip analysis (real-time PCR and flow cytometry).

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  2. Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E. (INEEL); Shenoy, A.; Baccaglini, G. (General Atomics); Pletcher, R.H. (Iowa State U.); Wallace, J.M.; Vukoslavcevic, P. (U. Maryland); Jackson, J.D. (U. Manchester, UK); Kunugi, T. (Kyoto U., Japan); Satake, S.-i. (Tokyo U. Science, Japan)

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.

  3. Acoustic techniques for localizing holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vnuk, D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material that does not come out of a process as product or waste is called holdup. When this is fissile material, its location and quantity must be determined to improve safeguards and security as well as safety at the facility. The most common method for detecting and measuring holdup is with radiation based techniques. When using them, one must consider equipment geometry, geometry of holdup, and effects of background radiation when converting the radiation measurement into a fissile material quantity. We are developing complementary techniques that use tiny acoustic transducers, which are unaffected by background radiation, to improve holdup measurements by aiding in determining the above conversion factors for holdup measurements. Thus far, we have applied three techniques, Acoustic Interferometry, Pulse Echo, and bending Wave Propagation, of which the latter appears most effective. This paper will describe each of these techniques and show how they may ultimately reduce costs and personnel radiation exposure while increasing confidence I and accuracy of holdup measurements.

  4. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  5. POWER FLOW ANALYSIS OF ELECTROSTRICTIVE ACTUATORS DRIVEN BYSWITCHMODE AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    is developed with includes a dynamic structural model of the actuator, a dynamic model of the power electronics. It is shown that an outer acoustic control loop can modify this mechanical admittance and optimize the power, the power flow between the electrical and mechanical systems is analyzed through simulation. The flow

  6. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  7. Adjustable, rapidly switching microfluidic gradient generation using focused travelling surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Im, Sunghyuk; Hang Ha, Byung; Ho Jung, Jin; Ahmad Ansari, Mubashshir; Jin Sung, Hyung, E-mail: hjsung@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daejak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a simple device to generate chemical concentration gradients in a microfluidic channel using focused travelling surface acoustic waves (F-TSAW). A pair of curved interdigitated metal electrodes deposited on the surface of a piezoelectric (LiNbO{sub 3}) substrate disseminate high frequency sound waves when actuated by an alternating current source. The F-TSAW produces chaotic acoustic streaming flow upon its interaction with the fluid inside a microfluidic channel, which mixes confluent streams of chemicals in a controlled fashion for an adjustable and rapidly switching gradient generation.

  8. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  9. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) nonintrusively assesses changes in a sealed item, such as a special nuclear material (SNM) container. The acoustic spectrum of a container is a function of its geometry, material of construction, and occupied volume and a function of the parameters of the contents, such as acoustic velocity, viscosity, and composition. Measuring the spectrum establishes a fingerprint for that item. Monitoring for changes in the fingerprint can be used to detect intrinsic changes in the contents or tampering. Spectra are obtained by inducing vibrations in a container at a given frequency with one transducer and detecting the vibrational response at that frequency with a second transducer. The excitation and detection frequency is then incremented until the desired frequency range is sampled. If desired, the signature can then be reduced to a series of resonant peaks, which facilitates the comparison of spectra for many applications. Required measurement time is typically 10 to 40 s, depending on the measurement range and resolution. Useful attributes of ARS are that spectra respond to various parameters differently, only a few seconds are required to perform an ARS measurement, and measurements can be performed without disturbing the container or its contents. Analysis for these applications of ARS is based on comparison of spectra from the same item taken at different times, so anomalies can be detected without any modeling of the system. However, some theoretical modeling can aid in interpreting spectra.

  10. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  11. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  12. Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

    This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam...

  13. Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

  14. Acoustics of finite-aperture vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld surface integral is provided, which makes it feasible to rigorously model, evaluate and compute the acoustic scattering and other mechanical effects of finite-aperture vortex beams such as the acoustic radiation force and torque on a viscoelastic sphere in various applications in acoustic tweezers and microfluidics, particle entrapment, manipulation and rotation. Partial-wave series expansions are derived for the incident field of acoustic spiraling (vortex) beams, comprising high-order Bessel and Bessel-Gauss beams.

  15. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  16. Platforms and Methods for Acoustic Detection and Monitoring of Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    #12;Platforms and Methods for Acoustic Detection and Monitoring of Key Ecosystem Properties Nils Olav Handegard #12;· Introduction · Platforms carrying acoustics · Methods · Applications ­ What we have done · Applications ­ What we would like to do #12;· Introduction · Platforms carrying acoustics

  17. Ion acoustic solitons/double layers in two-ion plasma revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: gslakhina@gmail.com; Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Kakad, A. P., E-mail: amar@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion acoustic solitons and double layers are studied in a collisionless plasma consisting of cold heavier ion species, a warm lighter ion species, and hot electrons having Boltzmann distributions by Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. In contrast to the previous results, no double layers and super-solitons are found when both the heavy and lighter ion species are treated as cold. Only the positive potential solitons are found in this case. When the thermal effects of the lighter ion species are included, in addition to the usual ion-acoustic solitons occurring at M?>?1 (where the Mach number, M, is defined as the ratio of the speed of the solitary wave and the ion-acoustic speed considering temperature of hot electrons and mass of the heavier ion species), slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers are found to occur at low Mach number (M?acoustic mode is actually a new ion-ion hybrid acoustic mode which disappears when the normalized number density of lighter ion species tends to 1 (i.e., no heavier species). An interesting property of the new slow ion-acoustic mode is that at low number density of the lighter ion species, only negative potential solitons/double layers are found whereas for increasing densities there is a transition first to positive solitons/double layers, and then only positive solitons. The model can be easily applicable to the dusty plasmas having positively charged dust grains by replacing the heavier ion species by the dust mass and doing a simple normalization to take account of the dust charge.

  18. AIAA 2003-0085 Integration of RANS and LES Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    investigations of highly complex flow systems, such as the aero-thermal flow through an entire aircraft gas inadequate or too expensive to be applied to a generic problem. As an example, the aero-thermal flow through-component phenomena, such as compressor/combustor instability and combus- tor/turbine hot-streak migration. Therefore

  19. Three-dimensional phenomena in microbubble acoustic streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, Alvaro; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Kähler, Christian J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasound-driven oscillating micro-bubbles have been used as active actuators in microfluidic devices to perform manifold tasks such as mixing, sorting and manipulation of microparticles. A common configuration consists on side-bubbles, created by trapping air pockets in blind channels perpendicular to the main channel direction. This configuration consists of acoustically excited bubbles with a semi-cylindrical shape that generate significant streaming flow. Due to the geometry of the channels, such flows have been generally considered as quasi two-dimensional. Similar assumptions are often made in many other microfluidic systems based on \\emph{flat} micro-channels. However, in this paper we show that microparticle trajectories actually present a much richer behavior, with particularly strong out-of-plane dynamics in regions close to the microbubble interface. Using Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry, we reveal that the apparent planar streamlines are actually projections of a \\emph{streamsurface} wi...

  20. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: a multiscale approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Jin-Han

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King, Gor'kov and Doinikov, clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regi...

  1. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilton, Richie J., E-mail: richard.shilton@iit.it [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Travagliati, Marco [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Beltram, Fabio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cecchini, Marco, E-mail: marco.cecchini@nano.cnr.it [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754?MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w???10??, where ? is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  2. acoustic impedance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nassir Navab 6 ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A CO2 EOR PROJECT, Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC...

  3. acoustic impedance inversion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A CO2 EOR PROJECT, Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: ACOUSTIC IMPEDANCE INVERSION FOR STATIC...

  4. acoustic wave resonator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helmholtz resonators Physics Websites Summary: Numerical modeling of nonlinear acoustic waves in a tube connected with Helmholtz resonators Bruno Acoustic wave propagation in a...

  5. acoustic wave resonators: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helmholtz resonators Physics Websites Summary: Numerical modeling of nonlinear acoustic waves in a tube connected with Helmholtz resonators Bruno Acoustic wave propagation in a...

  6. acoustic band gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 2 Acoustic band gap...

  7. amplitude acoustic wave: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    same.29 Keywords: Nonlinear standing wave; Closed acoustic Heller, Barbara 4 Long-range propagation of finite-amplitude acoustic waves in an ocean waveguide Geosciences Websites...

  8. alternative proposal acoustic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in theory. However, two critical Zhou, Shengli 80 ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE...

  9. acoustic noise reduction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic receivers of vessels using spectral subtraction Physics Websites Summary: , cavitation etc. created by the propellers generate immense acoustic noise in the vicinity...

  10. acoustic background noise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or remove acoustic background noise uses setups Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 3 Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Wind Turbine...

  11. acoustic desorption liad: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coverage... Juwono, Tjipto 2013-01-01 18 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  12. acoustic neurinomas early: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 10 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  13. acoustic equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was to be Music 302 Maher, Robert C. 13 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  14. acoustic monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acoustic methods have impediments as well, of course, most notably 26 Acoustic daylight imaging via spectral factorization: Helioseismology and reservoir monitoring: The...

  15. assisted acoustic focusing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and solved. A. G. Ramm 2008-05-16 28 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  16. acoustic microscopy risswachstumsstudien: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang; Rong-Gen Cai 2004-11-18 8 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  17. acoustic insulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teo, Chi Yan Jeffrey 2011-01-01 17 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  18. acoustic passive localization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inter-sensor propagation Boyer, Edmond 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  19. acoustic chemometrics monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acoustic methods have impediments as well, of course, most notably 27 Acoustic daylight imaging via spectral factorization: Helioseismology and reservoir monitoring: The...

  20. acoustic neurinoma presenting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    testable. Visser, M 1999-01-01 18 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  1. acoustic howling suppression: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 15 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  2. acoustics ultrasonic imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junjie Gong; Fangfang Shi; Yijing Ke 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  3. acoustic chemometric monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acoustic methods have impediments as well, of course, most notably 27 Acoustic daylight imaging via spectral factorization: Helioseismology and reservoir monitoring: The...

  4. acoustic noise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of anisotropy in oceanic ambient noise fields and its relevance to Acoustic Daylight imaging CiteSeer Summary: Acoustic Daylight is a new technique for creating pictorial...

  5. acoustic 4f imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  6. acoustic neuroma mimicking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    botnet owners have Stojmenovic, Ivan 12 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  7. acoustic 3-d imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    landmarks or com- plete Delson, Eric 20 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  8. acoustic microscopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang; Rong-Gen Cai 2004-11-18 8 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  9. acoustic neuroma surgery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 8 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  10. acoustic trauma evokes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Requirements Lockery, Shawn 18 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  11. airborne acoustical noise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of anisotropy in oceanic ambient noise fields and its relevance to Acoustic Daylight imaging CiteSeer Summary: Acoustic Daylight is a new technique for creating pictorial...

  12. acoustic overstimulation modifies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesizer can Johnson, Michael T. 13 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  13. acoustic neuroma treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 10 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  14. acoustic neuroma resection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 6 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  15. acoustic nmr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isaac; Steffen, Matthias 2004-01-01 9 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  16. acoustic neurinoma removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Leningrad unknown authors 4 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  17. acoustic wave based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic dispersion over SAW wavelengths down to 200 nm, meaning the SAW propagation ... Siemens, Mark 44 Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in...

  18. acoustic wave sensors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic wave devices can be used as wireless sensor elements (SAW transponders Zachmann, Gabriel 30 Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Research Challenges CiteSeer...

  19. acoustic wave sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic wave devices can be used as wireless sensor elements (SAW transponders Zachmann, Gabriel 30 Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Research Challenges CiteSeer...

  20. acoustical testing laboratory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Acoustics, Vol. 9, No. 3 (2001) 1215-1225 c IMACS AIRBORNE ACOUSTICS October 1999 Revised 16 April 2000 A recently developed theoretical model of the airborne...

  1. acoustics ultrasound device: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at low frequencies (5-35MHz Gizeli, Electra 6 Ultrasound acoustic emission in water-stressed plants of Picea abies Karst. Physics Websites Summary: Ultrasound acoustic...

  2. Non-radial instabilities of isothermal Bondi accretion with a shock: vortical-acoustic cycle vs post-shock acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Foglizzo

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear stability of isothermal Bondi accretion with a shock is studied analytically in the asymptotic limit of high incident Mach number M_1. The flow is unstable with respect to radial perturbations as expected by Nakayama (1993), due to post-shock acceleration. Its growth time scales like the advection time from the shock r_sh to the sonic point r_son. The growth rate of non-radial perturbations l=1 is higher by a factor M_1^{2/3}, and is therefore intermediate between the advection and acoustic frequencies. Besides these instabilities based on post-shock acceleration, our study revealed another generic mechanism based on the cycle of acoustic and vortical perturbations between the shock and the sonic radius, independently of the sign of post-shock acceleration. The vortical-acoustic instability is fundamentally non-radial. It is fed by the efficient excitation of vorticity waves by the isothermal shock perturbed by acoustic waves. The growth rate exceeds the advection rate by a factor log M_1. Unstable modes cover a wide range of frequencies from the fundamental acoustic frequency ~c/r_sh up to a cut-off ~c/r_son associated with the sonic radius. The highest growth rate is reached for l=1 modes near the cut-off. The additional cycle of acoustic waves between the shock and the sonic radius is responsible for variations of the growth rate by a factor up to 3 depending on its phase relative to the vortical-acoustic cycle. The instability also exists, with a similar growth rate, below the fundamental acoustic frequency down to the advection frequency, as vorticity waves are efficiently coupled to the region of pseudosound. These results open new perspectives to address the stability of shocked accretion flows.

  3. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jin-Han, E-mail: J.H.Xie@ed.ac.uk; Vanneste, Jacques [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia, and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King [“On the acoustic radiation pressure on spheres,” Proc. R. Soc. A 147, 212–240 (1934)], Gor'kov [“On the forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in an ideal fluid,” Sov. Phys. 6, 773–775 (1962)], and Doinikov [“Acoustic radiation pressure on a rigid sphere in a viscous fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 447–466 (1994)], clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regime, the mean motion of the particle remains intimately coupled to that of the surrounding fluid, and while viscosity affects the fluid motion, it plays no part in the acoustic pressure. Simplified equations, valid when only two physical effects control the particle motion, are also derived. They are used to obtain sufficient conditions for the particle to behave as a passive tracer of the Lagrangian-mean fluid motion.

  4. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  5. Characterization of acoustically forced swirl flame dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    of the flame to acoustic excitation is required. This study presents an analysis of phase-locked OH PLIF images of acoustically excited swirl flames, to identify the key controlling physical processes and qualitatively discuss, and whose relative significance depends upon forcing frequency, amplitude of excitation, and flame

  6. Cooperative Multihop Communication for Underwater Acoustic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Cooperative Multihop Communication for Underwater Acoustic Networks Cecilia Carbonelli and Urbashi propagation 1. INTRODUCTION Underwater sensor networks will find applications in data collection, pollution acoustic (UWA) channels differ from those in other media, such as radio channels, due to the high temporal

  7. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  8. Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine --An acoustic amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine -- An acoustic amplifier: ambient heat exchanger (water) stacked kW sound hot diesel exhaust hot diesel exhaust 34" 24" Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine -- An acoustic@lanl.gov 505-667-7545 A lighter, smaller, faster, cheaper version of free-piston Stirling 500W Lightweight

  9. Parallel-Flow-Shear Driven Low-Frequency Plasma Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiguro, Seiji [Theory and Computer Simulation Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Matsumoto, Noriaki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full three dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed in order to investigate effects of field-aligned (parallel) ion flow shears on low-frequency plasma instabilities. It is shown that the parallel ion flow velocity shear can induce the ion-acoustic instability, even when the ion flow velocity is so small that the instability can not take place. Simulation results are consistent with the analysis based on the local theory.

  10. Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

  11. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming leg, Carol

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, legal representative, Carol (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  13. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between 1 and 3.5 based on the burner co-flow annulus diameter (St = f{sub p}U{sub avg}/d{sub m}). Finally, wavelet analyses of heat release rate perturbations indicate highly responsive modes are characterized by sustained low frequency oscillations which accompany the high amplitude velocity perturbations at these modes. Higher intensity low frequency heat release rate oscillations are observed for lean flame/low pulsing frequency conditions. (author)

  14. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

    1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  15. Thermophotovoltaics : shaping the flow of thermal radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?elanovi?, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the modeling, design, and optimization of photonic crystals as spectral control components for high-performance thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion. In particular, we focus on the use of ...

  16. Solar thermal aerosol flow reaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Pitts, J. Roland; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Tamburini, Joseph R.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an environmentally beneficial process using concentrated sunlight to heat radiation absorbing particles to carry out highly endothermic gas phase chemical reactions ultimately resulting in the production of hydrogen or hydrogen synthesis gases.

  17. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique`s sensitivity to ``nuisance`` effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective.

  18. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  19. Monitoring microbe-induced physical property changes using high-frequency acoustic waveform data: Toward the development of a microbial megascope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth Hurst

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of microbe generated gas bubbles in controlled, saturated sediment columns utilizing a novel technique involving acoustic wave propagation. Specifically, the effect of denitrifying bacteria on saturated flow conditions was evaluated in light of the stimulated production of N{sub 2} gas and the resulting plugging of the pore throats. The propagation of high frequency acoustic waves through the sediment columns was used to locate those regions in the column where gas accumulation occurred. Over a period of six weeks, regions of gas accumulation resulted in the attenuation of acoustic wave energies with the decreases in amplitude typically greater than one order of magnitude.

  20. ash flow temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    load has been... Hart, M. N.; Bond, S. K. 1980-01-01 120 Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control Kedar Hippalgaonkar,, Renewable Energy...

  1. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  2. 15 Acoustic Daylight Imaging in the Michael J. Buckingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    15 Acoustic Daylight Imaging in the Ocean Michael J. Buckingham Scripps Institution of Oceanography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 15.4 Acoustic daylight images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 15.5 Concluding. Sensors and Imaging ISBN 0­12­379771­3/$30.00 #12;416 15 Acoustic Daylight Imaging in the Ocean Acoustic

  3. Correlation time of ocean ambient noise intensity in San Diego Bay and target recognition in acoustic daylight images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadsworth, Adam J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity Data Chapter 3 Acoustic Daylight Image TargetC. L. Epifanio. Acoustic Daylight: Passive Acoustic ImagingRecognition in Acoustic Daylight Images A Thesis submitted

  4. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  5. Investigation of technology for the monitoring of UF/sub 6/ mass flow in UF/sub 6/ streams diluted with H/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, O.J.; Cooley, J.N.; Hewgley, W.A.; Moran, B.W.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability, availability, and effectiveness of gas flow meters are assessed as a means for verifying the mass flows of pure UF/sub 6/ streams diluted with a carrier gas. The initial survey identified the orifice, pitot tube, thermal, vortex shedding, and vortex precession (swirl) meters as promising for the intended use. Subsequent assessments of these flow meters revealed that two - the orifice meter and the pitot tube meter - are the best choices for the proposed applications: the first is recommended for low velocity gas, small diameter piping; the latter, for high velocity gas, large diameter piping. Final selection of the gas flow meters should be based on test loop evaluations in which the proposed meters are subjected to gas flows, temperatures, and pressures representative of those expected in service. Known instruments are evaluated that may be applicable to the measurement of uranium or UF/sub 6/ concentration in a UF/sub 6/ - H/sub 2/ process stream at an aerodynamic enrichment plant. Of the six procedures evaluated, four have been used for process monitoring in a UF/sub 6/ environment: gas mass spectrometry, infrared-ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, and acoustic gas analysis. The remaining two procedures, laser fluorimetry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, would require significant development work before they could be used for process monitoring. Infrared-ultravioloet-visible spectrophotometry is judged to be the best procedure currently available to perform the required measurement.

  6. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying, E-mail: yli582@usc.edu; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [NIH Transducer Resource Center and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 ?m, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  7. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gable, Todd J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  8. Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

  9. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi, E-mail: dhagat@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10??m wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3??m dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  10. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galkowski, Joseph J. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  11. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  12. Existence domains of dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, PO Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa)] [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, PO Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)] [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)] [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Sagdeev potential method, the existence of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons is investigated in a plasma comprising cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, Boltzmann electrons, and non-thermal ions. This model supports the existence of positive potential supersolitons in a certain region in parameter space in addition to regular solitons having negative and positive potentials. The lower Mach number limit for supersolitons coincides with the occurrence of double layers whereas the upper limit is imposed by the constraint that the adiabatic positive dust number density must remain real valued. The upper Mach number limits for negative potential (positive potential) solitons coincide with limiting values of the negative (positive) potential for which the negative (positive) dust number density is real valued. Alternatively, the existence of positive potential solitons can terminate when positive potential double layers occur.

  13. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  14. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  15. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Flow Field in the Vicinity of the Suction Inlet of a Model Cutter Suction Dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dismuke, Colin Patrick

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the three-dimensional velocity flow field measurements in the vicinity of the inlet mouth of a cutterhead suction dredge. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), an accurate visualization of the velocity...

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  20. Instabilities of Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingming Chen

    1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion disk instabilities are briefly reviewed. Some details are given to the short-wavelength thermal instabilities and the convective instabilities. Time-dependent calculations of two-dimensional advection-dominated accretion flows are presented.

  1. THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: thermal hydraulics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    -fluid modeling of nuclear reactor systems. Thermal-hydraulic analysis codes such as RELAP5-3D ~Ref. 1! and FLICA regions of the system. In fact, the CFD code FLUENT has previously been coupled to RELAP5-3D ~Refs. 3

  2. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  3. Pressurizer with a mechanically attached surge nozzle thermal sleeve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wepfer, Robert M

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal sleeve is mechanically attached to the bore of a surge nozzle of a pressurizer for the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor steam generating system. The thermal sleeve is attached with a series of keys and slots which maintain the thermal sleeve centered in the nozzle while permitting thermal growth and restricting flow between the sleeve and the interior wall of the nozzle.

  4. Accelerated Analyte Uptake on Single Beads in Microliter-scale Batch Separations using Acoustic Streaming: Plutonium Uptake by Anion Exchange for Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, Walter F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Peper, Shane M.; Petersen, Steven L.; Grate, Jay W.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of acoustic streaming as a non-contact mixing platform to accelerate mass transport-limited diffusion processes in small volume heterogeneous reactions has been investigated. Single bead anion exchange of plutonium at nanomolar and sub-picomolar concentrations in 20 microliter liquid volumes was used to demonstrate the effect of acoustic mixing. Pu uptake rates on individual ~760 micrometer diameter AG 1x4 anion exchange resin beads were determined using acoustic mixing and compared with Pu uptake rates achieved by static diffusion alone. An 82 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device was placed in contact with the underside of a 384-well microplate containing flat-bottomed semiconical wells. Acoustic energy was coupled into the solution in the well, inducing acoustic streaming. Pu uptake rates were determined by the plutonium remaining in solution after specific elapsed time intervals, using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) for nanomolar concentrations and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) analysis for the sub-picomolar concentration experiments. It was found that this small batch uptake reaction could be accelerated by a factor of about five-fold or more, depending on the acoustic power applied.

  5. L.L.Thompson: Finite element methods for acoustics, Preprint: J.Acoust.Soc.Am. A review of finite element methods for time-harmonic acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lonny L.

    L.L.Thompson: Finite element methods for acoustics, Preprint: J.Acoust.Soc.Am. A review of finite element methods for time-harmonic acoustics Lonny L. Thompson Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina, 29634-0921, USA Email: lonny.thompson@ces.clemson.edu (Dated

  6. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has · STOP (Structural, Thermal, and Optical Performance) analyses of optical systems Thermal engineers lead evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

  7. Cooling/heating augmentation during turbine startup/shutdown using a seal positioned by thermal response of turbine parts and consequent relative movement thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a turbine rotor, a thermal mismatch between various component parts of the rotor occurs particularly during transient operations such as shutdown and startup. A thermal medium flows past and heats or cools one part of the turbine which may have a deleterious thermal mismatch with another part. By passively controlling the flow of cooling medium past the one part in response to relative movement of thermally responsive parts of the turbine, the flow of thermal medium along the flow path can be regulated to increase or reduce the flow, thereby to regulate the temperature of the one part to maintain the thermal mismatch within predetermined limits.

  8. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  9. W-320 Project thermal modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

  10. Synthesis of anisotropic swirling surface acoustic waves by inverse filter, towards integrated generators of acoustical vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riaud, Antoine; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological samples actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAW) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. Despite this versatility, SAW transducers developed up to date only authorize the synthesis of the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves. In particular, acoustical integrated sources able to generate acoustical vortices (the analogue of optical vortices) are missing. In this work, we propose a flexible tool based on inverse filter technique and arrays of SAW transducers enabling the synthesis of prescribed complex wave patterns at the surface of anisotropic media. The potential of this setup is illustrated by the synthesis of a 2D analog of 3D acoustical vortices, namely "swirling surface acoustic waves". Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. Swirling SAW can be useful in fragile sensors whose neighborhood...

  11. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Norton, Stephen J. (Raleigh, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  12. Micromachined Optical and Acoustic Waveguide Systems for Advance Sensing and Imaging Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Chung

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    it possible to utilize single-crystalline silicon as a structural material for acoustic wave propagation. It enables the development of high-performance integrated acoustic circuits and allows direct acoustic signal processing and control. The acoustic...

  13. Micromachined Optical and Acoustic Waveguide Systems for Advance Sensing and Imaging Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Chung

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    it possible to utilize single-crystalline silicon as a structural material for acoustic wave propagation. It enables the development of high-performance integrated acoustic circuits and allows direct acoustic signal processing and control. The acoustic...

  14. The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Abstract Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been...

  15. Thermal Performance of Poly Alpha Olefin Nanofluid with Spherical and Non-spherical Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chan Hyun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on nanofluids has been undertaken for several years because of the reported enhancements of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and enhanced heat transfer performance in laminar flow. Nanofluid is the fluid where nanoparticles...

  16. Thermal hydraulic performance analysis of a small integral pressurized water reactor core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Stuart R. (Stuart Ryan), 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal hydraulic analysis of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) core has been performed. Thermal margins for steady state and a selection of Loss Of Flow Accidents have been assessed using three ...

  17. Thermal Performance of Poly Alpha Olefin Nanofluid with Spherical and Non-spherical Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chan Hyun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on nanofluids has been undertaken for several years because of the reported enhancements of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and enhanced heat transfer performance in laminar flow. Nanofluid is the fluid where nanoparticles...

  18. Ion-acoustic solitary waves in ultra-relativistic degenerate pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasheed, A.; Tsintsadze, N. L. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The arbitrary and the small amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been studied. The former is studied by using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach in a plasma consisting of the degenerate ultrarelativistic electrons, positrons, and the non-relativistic classical ions. It is seen that only compressive solitary waves can propagate through such plasmas. The numerical calculations show that the region of existence of the ion-acoustic solitary waves depends upon the positron (ion) number density and the plasma thermal temperature. This study is appropriate for applications in inertial confinement fusion laboratory research as well as the study of astrophysical dense objects such as white dwarf and dense neutron stars.

  19. Thermocapillary Flow on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid in Cassie-Baxter state above a structured superhydrophobic surface is ideally suited for surface driven transport due to its large free surface fraction in close contact to a solid. We investigate thermal Marangoni flow over a superhydrophobic array of fins oriented parallel or perpendicular to an applied temperature gradient. In the Stokes limit we derive an analytical expression for the bulk flow velocity above the surface and compare it with numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. Even for moderate temperature gradients comparatively large flow velocities are induced, suggesting to utilize this principle for microfluidic pumping.

  20. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

  1. Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

  2. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200?300 ?D,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  3. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

  4. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

  5. Laser and acoustic lens for lithotripsy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Makarewicz, Anthony J. (San Ramon, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic focusing device whose acoustic waves are generated by laser radiation through an optical fiber. The acoustic energy is capable of efficient destruction of renal and biliary calculi and deliverable to the site of the calculi via an endoscopic procedure. The device includes a transducer tip attached to the distal end of an optical fiber through which laser energy is directed. The transducer tip encapsulates an exogenous absorbing dye. Under proper irradiation conditions (high absorbed energy density, short pulse duration) a stress wave is produced via thermoelastic expansion of the absorber for the destruction of the calculi. The transducer tip can be configured into an acoustic lens such that the transmitted acoustic wave is shaped or focused. Also, compressive stress waves can be reflected off a high density/low density interface to invert the compressive wave into a tensile stress wave, and tensile stresses may be more effective in some instances in disrupting material as most materials are weaker in tension than compression. Estimations indicate that stress amplitudes provided by this device can be magnified more than 100 times, greatly improving the efficiency of optical energy for targeted material destruction.

  6. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  7. Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

  8. A simple toy model of the advective-acoustic instability I. Perturbative approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Foglizzo

    2008-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Some general properties of the advective-acoustic instability are described and understood using a toy model which is simple enough to allow for analytical estimates of the eigenfrequencies. The essential ingredients of this model, in the unperturbed regime, are a stationary shock and a subsonic region of deceleration. For the sake of analytical simplicity, the 2D unperturbed flow is parallel and the deceleration is produced adiabatically by an external potential. The instability mechanism is determined unambiguously as the consequence of a cycle between advected and acoustic perturbations. The purely acoustic cycle, considered alone, is proven to be stable in this flow. Its contribution to the instability can be either constructive or destructive. A frequency cut-off is associated to the advection time through the region of deceleration. This cut-off frequency explains why the instability favours eigenmodes with a low frequency and a large horizontal wavelength. The relation between the instability occurring in this highly simplified toy model and the properties of SASI observed in the numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse is discussed. This simple set up is proposed as a benchmark test to evaluate the accuracy, in the linear regime, of numerical simulations involving this instability. We illustrate such benchmark simulations in a companion paper.

  9. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  10. Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active flames F. Nicoud-acoustic modes in combustors. In the case of a non-isothermal reacting medium, the wave equation for the pressure

  11. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  12. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  13. Acoustic characteristics of bay bottom sediments in Lavaca Bay, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch, Mary Catherine

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    acoustic return of the bay bottom, and 2) strong, shallow reflectors??surface strong, mounds, buried strong, andburied multiples, which describe strong acoustic returns in the upper 5 m of stratigraphy. Within the lower package, four categories were...

  14. acoustic wave equation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    media Josselin Garnier in acoustics4,34 , and also in other domains, such as seismic wave propagation7,8,35 . Experimental observations show that the attenuation of acoustic waves...

  15. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Aaron A. (Richland, WA); Samuel, Todd J. (Pasco, WA); Valencia, Juan D. (Kennewick, WA); Gervais, Kevin L. (Richland, WA); Tucker, Brian J. (Pasco, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Reid, Larry D. (Benton City, WA); Munley, John T. (Benton City, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Wright, Bob W. (West Richland, WA); Panetta, Paul D. (Richland, WA); Thompson, Jason S. (Richland, WA)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  16. Hybrid percussion : extending physical instruments using sampled acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aimi, Roberto Mario, 1973-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a system architecture for creating hybrid digital-acoustic percussion instruments by combining extensions of existing signal processing techniques with specially-designed semi-acoustic physical ...

  17. Distributed Space-Time Cooperative Schemes for Underwater Acoustic Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojanovic, Milica

    Distributed Space-Time Cooperative Schemes for Underwater Acoustic Communications Madhavan, which is a main characteristic of underwater acoustic channels. A time-reversal distributed space in oceanic research, such as [3] [4]: data collec- tion, pollution monitoring, tactical surveillance

  18. Challenges for Efficient Communication in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Challenges for Efficient Communication in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks Ian F. Akyildiz for oceano- graphic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore explo- ration and tactical surveillance in collaborative monitoring missions. Underwater acoustic network- ing is the enabling technology

  19. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  20. Ultrafast photo-acoustic spectroscopy of super-cooled liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klieber, Christoph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Picosecond laser ultrasonic techniques for acoustic wave generation and detection were adapted to probe longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves in liquids at gigahertz frequencies. The experimental effort was designed ...

  1. Anisotropic Complementary Acoustic Metamaterial for Canceling out Aberrating Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Chen

    In this paper, we investigate a type of anisotropic, acoustic complementary metamaterial (CMM) and its application in restoring acoustic fields distorted by aberrating layers. The proposed quasi two-dimensional (2D), ...

  2. 13.811 Advanced Structural Dynamics and Acoustics, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Foundations of 3D elasticity. Fluid and elastic wave equations. Elastic and plastic waves in rods and beams. Waves in plates. Interaction with an acoustic fluid. Dynamics and acoustics of cylindrical shells. Radiation and ...

  3. acoustical response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound Massachusetts at Amherst, University of 195 Acoustic Laptops as a research...

  4. Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acoustic excitation. The thermoacoustic instability fosteredgain motivation from thermoacoustic phenomena pervasive into the quantification of thermoacoustic instabil- ity in an

  5. An experimental and theoretical acoustic investigation of single disc propellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bumann, Elizabeth Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance strip analysis which utilized a NACA 4-digit series airfoil data bank to calculate the lift and drag for each blade segment given the shape and motion of the propeller. A RPM range between 3500 and 7000 RPM in 250 increments was used for each... ACOUSTIC PREDICTION TECHNIQUES . . 4 Gutin Garrick and Watkins Lighthill's Acoustic Analogy Ffowcs - Williams and Hawkings Farassat Ha. nson Woan and Gregorek . 8 10 11 III ACOUSTIC COMPACT SOURCE THEOR'I Blade Element Theory Acoustic...

  6. Lattice thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2} using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyoungchul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kaviany, Massoud, E-mail: kaviany@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied the non-equilibrium ab-initio molecular dynamics and predict the lattice thermal conductivity of the pristine uranium dioxide for up to 2000?K. We also use the equilibrium classical molecular dynamics and heat-current autocorrelation decay theory to decompose the lattice thermal conductivity into acoustic and optical components. The predicted optical phonon transport is temperature independent and small, while the acoustic component follows the Slack relation and is in good agreement with the limited single-crystal experimental results. Considering the phonon grain-boundary and pore scatterings, the effective lattice thermal conductivity is reduced, and we show it is in general agreement with the sintered-powder experimental results. The charge and photon thermal conductivities are also addressed, and we find small roles for electron, surface polaron, and photon in the defect-free structures and for temperatures below 1500?K.

  7. Solar thermal power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  8. Opto-acoustic recanilization delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Benett, William (Livermore, CA); Broughton, Kathryn (Berkeley, CA); Esch, Victor (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber delivered laser pulses emulsify thrombus by mechanical stresses that include a combination of pressure, tension and shear stress. Laser radiation is delivered to the locality of a thrombus and the radiation is absorbed by blood, blood dot, or other present materials. The combination of a leading pressure wave and subsequent vapor bubble cause efficient, emulsification of thrombus. Operating the laser in a low average power mode alleviates potential thermal complications. The laser is operated in a high repetition rate mode to take advantage of ultrasound frequency effects of thrombus dissolution as well as to decrease the total procedure time. Specific parameter ranges for operation are described. The device includes optical fibers surrounding a lumen intended for flow of a cooling agent. The fibers may be arranged concentrically around the lumen to deliver radiation and heat over as large an area as possible. An alternative design approach incorporates the optical fibers into the wall of the guiding catheter and utilizes the catheter lumen as the cooling channel. An eccentric tip enables rotation of the device to address all parts of the vasculature. The eccentricity can be provided via a variety of means: spring dip, balloon, protrusion, etc.

  9. A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe F. Aymea , C. Carioub , M is a great advantage. In this frame, a new intensity acoustic probe has been developed to compute acoustic quantities which can be input data for energetic identification methods. 1 Introduction Noise matters

  10. Wormhole-Resilient Secure Neighbor Discovery in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Rui

    ), Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV), and surface stations, and nearby nodes communicate via acoustic ratherWormhole-Resilient Secure Neighbor Discovery in Underwater Acoustic Networks Rui Zhang and Yanchao in underwater acoustic networks (UANs) with floating node mobility. In hostile environments, neighbor discovery

  11. ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

  12. Offices and dwellings: what building acoustics for sustainable development?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Offices and dwellings: what building acoustics for sustainable development? M. Asselineau, A.asselineau@peutz.fr Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3211 #12;Sustainability for sustainable projects as defined in the French standards, one specifically deals with acoustic comfort. Over

  13. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  14. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, N. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Hussain, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, PIEAS, Nilore, Islamabad 44000 Pakistan (Pakistan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  15. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ma, Qingyu, E-mail: maqingyu@njnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronics of Jiangsu Province, School of Physics Science and Technology, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Xianlin District, Nanjing 210023 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics of MOE, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  16. Acoustic probing of salt using sonar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Kenneth Bryan

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , glycerine, and s1li cone oil provi ded satisfactory performance. In spite of these results, Gupta did not develop a workable means of us1ng 11quid coupl1ng media under mine condit1ons. In his field tests, Gupta used dental impression plaster (a coupling... acoustic pulses which are coupled 1nto the salt via a castor oil coupling medium. The acoustic source signa'i is a square-enveloped pulse of compress1onal waves; a pulse duration of e1ther 0. 3 ms or 1. 1 ms is used. The ranges to discontinuities...

  17. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  18. LATEX TikZposter Simulation of two-phase flow for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    below). Sunlight Fresnel Solar collector · Absorber tube (two-phase flow) · Secondary reflector · SolarLATEX TikZposter Simulation of two-phase flow for direct steam-generating solar thermal power Aachen University Simulation of two-phase flow for direct steam-generating solar thermal power plants

  19. Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

  20. Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

  1. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  2. Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, R.F.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the GEOTEMP2 wellbore thermal simulator is described. The major technical features include a general purpose air and mist drilling simulator and a two-phase steam flow simulator that can model either injection or production.

  3. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  4. Opto-acoustic interactions in gravitational wave detectors: Comparing flat-top beams with Gaussian beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gras, S.; Blair, D. G.; Ju, L. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the thermal noise in the future generation of gravitational wave detectors, flat-top beams have been proposed to replace conventional Gaussian beams, so as to obtain better averaging over the Brownian motion of the test masses. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the unwanted opto-acoustic interactions in such interferometers, which can lead to the phenomenon of parametric instability. Our results show that the increased overlap of the Mesa beams with the test masses leads to approximately 3 times as many unstable modes in comparison to a similar interferometer with Gaussian beams.

  5. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  6. Non-Riemannian geometry of vortex acoustics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, Maracana, 20550, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of acoustic torsion is introduced by making use of the scalar wave equation in Riemann-Cartan spacetime. Acoustic torsion extends the acoustic metric previously given by Unruh (PRL-1981). The wave equation describes irrotational perturbations in rotational nonrelativistic fluids. This physical motivation allows us to show that the acoustic line element can be conformally mapped to the line element of a stationary torsion loop in non-Riemannian gravity. Two examples of such sonic analogues are given. The first is the stationary torsion loop in teleparallel gravity. In the far from the vortex approximation, the Cartan torsion vector is shown to be proportional to the quantum vortex number of the superfluid. The torsion vector is also shown to be proportional to the superfluid vorticity in the presence of vortices. The formation of superfluid vortices is shown not to be favored by torsion loops in Riemann-Cartan spacetime, as long as this model is concerned. It is suggested that the teleparallel model may help to find a model for superfluid neutron stars vortices based on non-Riemannian gravity.

  7. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  8. Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

  9. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline silicon test structures, as well as uncontrolled nonuniform changes in this quantity over time and during operation.

  10. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  11. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  12. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  13. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  14. Flow Measurement with Tangential Paddlewheel Flow Meters: Analysis of Experimental Results and in-situ Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, J. B.; Haberl, J. S.

    the premature drop-out of magnetic-type tangential paddlewheel sensors, as well as several in-situ diagnostic measures for ascertaining whether or not a flow meter is experiencing turbulent conditions or if a flow sensor's output signal is suffering a degraded... per second for magnetic-type, and 0.5 to 2 feet per second for non-magnetic-type flow sensors deviated from the actual flow by 20% or more which makes the measurement of flow and thermal energy use in this regime highly suspect. Figure 4 also indicates...

  15. Coshcous turbulence and its thermalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jian-zhou [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Mark [SNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissipation rate {mu}[cosh(k/k{sub c}) - 1] in Fourier space, which reduces to the Newtonian viscosity dissipation rate {nu}k{sup 2} for small k/k{sub c}, can be scaled to make a hydrodynamic system either actually or potentially converge to its Galerkin truncation. The former case acquires convergence to the truncation at a finite wavenumber k{sub G}; the latter realizes as the wavenumber grows to infinity. Intermittency reduction and vitiation of extended self-similarity (ESS) in the partially thermalized regime of turbulence are confirmed and clarified. Onsager's pictures of intermittent versus nonintermittent flows are visualized from thermalized numerical fields, showing cleanly spotty versus mistily uniform properties, the latter of which destroys self-organization and so the ESS property.

  16. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  17. A one-way coupled, EulerLagrangian simulation of bubble coalescence in a turbulent pipe flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    modifies the speed of sound in the bubbly mixture, which has implications for marine acoustic signatures. Gas­liquid flow at microgravity conditions ­ I. Dispersed bubble and slug flow. Int. J. Multiphase- ical in many heat transfer problems where liquid water contacting a hot surface boils and the resulting

  18. Variational bounds on the energy dissipation rate in body-forced shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Nikola

    , the bulk (space and time averaged) dissipation rate per unit mass is proportional to the power required applied to many flows driven by boundary conditions, including shear flows and a variety of thermal

  19. Sheathless Size-Based Acoustic Particle Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guldiken, Rasim

    Particle separation is of great interest in many biological and biomedical applications. Flow-based methods have been used to sort particles and cells. However, the main challenge with flow based particle separation systems ...

  20. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaladze, T. [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan) [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I.Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Georgia (United States); Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com [Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic ion-acoustic periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons are investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived with appropriate boundary conditions for periodic waves. The corresponding analytical and various numerical solutions are presented with Sagdeev potential approach. Differences between the results caused by the kappa and Maxwell distributions are emphasized. It is revealed that only hump (compressive) structures of the cnoidal waves and solitons are formed. It is shown that amplitudes of the cnoidal waves and solitons are reduced in an EPI plasma case in comparison with the ordinary electron-ion plasmas. The effects caused by the temperature variations of the warm ions are also discussed. It is obtained that the amplitude of the cnoidal waves and solitons decreases for a kappa distributed (nonthermal) electrons and positrons plasma case in comparison with the Maxwellian distributed (thermal) electrons and positrons EPI plasmas. The existence of kappa distributed particles leads to decreasing of ion-acoustic frequency up to thermal ions frequency.

  1. Acoustic data transmission through a drillstring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for acoustically transmitting data along a drillstring is presented. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, acoustic data signals are conditioned to counteract distortions caused by the drillstring. Preferably, this conditioning step comprises multiplying each frequency component of the data signal by exp (-ikL) where L is the transmission length of the drillstring, k is the wave number in the drillstring at the frequency of each component and i is (-1).sup.1/2. In another embodiment of this invention, data signals having a frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring are generated preferably traveling in only one direction (e.g., up the drillstring) while echoes in the drillstring resulting from the data transmission are suppressed.

  2. Acoustic data transmission through a drillstring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for acoustically transmitting data along a drillstring are presented. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, acoustic data signals are conditioned to counteract distortions caused by the drillstring. Preferably, this conditioning step comprises multiplying each frequency component of the data signal by exp ([minus]ikL) where L is the transmission length of the drillstring, k is the wave number in the drillstring at the frequency of each component and i is ([minus]1)[sup 1/2]. In another embodiment of this invention, data signals having a frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring are generated preferably traveling in only one direction (e.g., up the drillstring) while echoes in the drillstring resulting from the data transmission are suppressed. 20 figs.

  3. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  4. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD); Chandran, Ravi (Ellicott City, MD)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  5. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Broido, D. A. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Reinecke, T. L. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  6. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  7. Electromagnetic effects on geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashir, M. F., E-mail: frazbashir@yahoo.com [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Smolyakov, A. I. [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon S7N 5E2 (Canada); Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Elfimov, A. G. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Melnikov, A. V. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Murtaza, G. [Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the full electromagnetic drift kinetic equations for electrons and ions, the general dispersion relation for geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) is derived incorporating the electromagnetic effects. It is shown that m?=?1 harmonic of the GAM mode has a finite electromagnetic component. The electromagnetic corrections appear for finite values of the radial wave numbers and modify the GAM frequency. The effects of plasma pressure ?{sub e}, the safety factor q, and the temperature ratio ? on GAM dispersion are analyzed.

  8. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Lyon, M.J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Mullen, M.F.; Sinha, D.N.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objects resonate at specific frequencies when mechanically excited. The specific resonance frequencies are a function of shape, size, material of construction, and contents of the object. This paper discusses the use of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to monitor containers and detect tampering. Evaluation of this technique is based on simulated storage simulations. Although these simulations show promise for this application of ARS, final evaluation will require actual field testing.

  9. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Lyon, M.J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Mullen, M.F.; Sinha, D.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objects resonate at specific frequencies when mechanically excited. The specific resonance frequencies are a function of shape, size, material of construction, and contents of the object. This paper discusses the use of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to monitor containers and detect tampering. Evaluation of this technique is based on simulated storage situations. Although these simulations show promise for this application of ARS, final evaluation will require actual field testing.

  10. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  11. Underwater Acoustic Detection of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Niess; V. Bertin

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the acoustic detection method of 10^18-20 eV neutrinos in a Mediterranean Sea environment. The acoustic signal is re-evaluated according to dedicated cascade simulations and a complex phase dependant absorption model, and compared to previous studies. We detail the evolution of the acoustic signal as function of the primary shower characteristics and of the acoustic propagation range. The effective volume of detection for a single hydrophone is given taking into account the limitations due to sea bed and surface boundaries as well as refraction effects. For this 'benchmark detector' we present sensitivity limits to astrophysical neutrino fluxes, from which sensitivity bounds for a larger acoustic detector can be derived. Results suggest that with a limited instrumentation the acoustic method would be more efficient at extreme energies, above 10^20 eV.

  12. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels.

  13. Observation of a single-beam gradient force acoustical trap for elastic particles: acoustical tweezers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baresch, Diego; Marchiano, Régis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to manipulate matter precisely is critical for the study and development of a large variety of systems. Optical tweezers are excellent tools to handle particles ranging in size from a few micrometers to hundreds of nanometers but become inefficient and damaging on larger objects. We demonstrate for the first reported time the trapping of elastic particles by the large gradient force of a single acoustical beam in three dimensions. We show that at equal power, acoustical forces overtake by 8 orders of magnitude that of optical ones on macroscopic objects. Acoustical tweezers can push, pull and accurately control both the position of the particle and the forces exerted under damage-free conditions. The large spectrum of frequencies covered by coherent ultrasonic sources will provide a wide variety of manipulation possibilities from macro- to microscopic length scales. We believe our observations improve the prospects for wider use of non-contact manipulation in biology, biophysics, microfluidics and...

  14. Scanning acoustic microscopy for mapping the microstructure of soft materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustics provides a powerful modality with which to 'see' the mechanical properties of a wide range of elastic materials. It is particularly adept at probing soft materials where excellent contrast and propagation distance can be achieved. We have constructed a scanning acoustic microscope capable of mapping the microstructure of such materials. We review the general principles of scanning acoustic microscopy and present new examples of its application in imaging biological matter, industrial materials and particulate systems.

  15. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Fisher, Karl A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  16. Heat-flow reconnaissance of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the 46 new values of heat flow determined for the Gulf Coastal Plain are in the low to normal range, but heat-flow values averaging 1.8 heat-flow unit (HFU) were obtained in Claiborne, Ouachita, and Union parishes, Louisiana. Moreover, a zone of relatively high heat-flow values and steep thermal gradients (35 to 46/sup 0/C/km) extends from northern Louisiana into southwestern Mississippi. Also near Pensacola, Florida, temperatures of 50/sup 0/C at 1-km depth have been extrapolated from thermal gradients. Future development of low-grade geothermal resources may be warranted in these areas.

  17. acoustical engineering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electricity Thermoacoustic Energy Conversion Waste or prime heat soundThermoacoustic Stirling Engine -- An acoustic amplifier: ambient heat exchanger (water) stacked Lee, Dongwon...

  18. acoustic field application: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INVERSION FOR STATIC AND DYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A CO2 EOR PROJECT, POSTLE FIELD, OKLAHOMA by Alana Robinson 12;ii 12;iii ABSTRACT Seismic inversion for acoustic...

  19. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney, Charles R. P., E-mail: c.r.p.courtney@bath.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath (United Kingdom); Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy [Institute of Medical Science and Technology, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35?MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-?m-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  20. acoustically driven microcentrifugation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The (more) Philips, Scott M., 1980- 2007-01-01 9 Microscale acoustofluidics: Microfluidics driven via acoustics and ultrasonics CiteSeer Summary: This article reviews...

  1. acoustic wave total: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Surface acoustic wave-based (SAW) microfluidics attracts attention from microfluidic research community due to its simple...

  2. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  3. acoustic wave secondary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 10 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  4. acoustic sources numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solitons CERN Preprints Summary: Acoustic solitons can be obtained by considering the propagation of large amplitude sound waves across a set of Helmholtz resonators. The model...

  5. acoustic wave atomization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fluid and acoustic computations, hybrid methodologies still Kohlenbach, Ulrich 12 Propagation of atomic matter waves inside an atom wave guide Quantum Physics (arXiv)...

  6. acoustic wave chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 11 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  7. acoustic wave monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 14 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  8. acoustic gravity waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 29 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  9. acoustic solitary waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma CERN Preprints Summary: The excitation and propagation of finite amplitude low frequency solitary waves are investigated in an Argon...

  10. acoustic wave actuated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 17 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  11. acoustic waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 9 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  12. acoustic wave induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inside the drop. Brunet, P; Matar, O Bou; Zoueshtiagh, F 2010-01-01 5 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  13. acoustic phonon scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 19 Carrier and Phonon...

  14. acoustic wave sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 12 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  15. acoustic wave vapor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 9 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  16. acoustic wave integrated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 17 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  17. acoustic wave oxygen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 9 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  18. acoustic wave biosensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities Tomsovic, Steve 11 Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves CERN Preprints Summary: We propose an...

  19. acoustic cavitation bubble: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G. Simon; M. T. Levinsen 2002-09-11 204 Analytical and experimental investigations of gas turbine model combustor acoustics operated at atmospheric pressure Physics Websites...

  20. acoustic emission characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  1. acoustic emission weld: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  2. acoustic emission characteristics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  3. acoustic emission tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  4. acoustic emission analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  5. acoustic experience shapes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  6. acoustic emission study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  7. acoustic emission signal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  8. alloy acoustic emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  9. active acoustic emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  10. acoustic emission studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  11. acoustic propagation experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  12. acoustic emission sensors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  13. acoustic emission spectroscopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  14. acoustic emission monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  15. acoustic emission sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  16. acoustic emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  17. acoustic emission signals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  18. acoustic emission parameters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  19. acoustic emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  20. acoustic emission testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  1. acoustic emission techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  2. acoustic emission method: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  3. acoustic emission technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  4. acoustic cardiographic assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  5. acoustic emission technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods such as acoustic emission as a global method associated to a local method such as TOFD technique which permits an accurate characterization and precise sizing of flaw...

  6. Finite Element Methods for Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The non- linear terms in these wave equations imply that the sound speed ... ics, the finite element formulation of nonlinear acoustic equations for fluids has.

  7. acoustic wave devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baron, G. Martin, T. Laroche, and S. Ballandras FEMTO Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 Design and Fabrication of Acoustic Wave Actuated Microgenerator for Portable Electronic...

  8. acoustic wave device: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baron, G. Martin, T. Laroche, and S. Ballandras FEMTO Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 Design and Fabrication of Acoustic Wave Actuated Microgenerator for Portable Electronic...

  9. acoustic source localization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dan 113 2011 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics October 16-19, 2011, New Paltz, NY INFORMED SOURCE SEPARATION: UNDERDETERMINED SOURCE SIGNAL...

  10. acoustic environments prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1998, 2001 production by small animals limit the efficiency of sound communication (Bennet-Clark, 1998; Larsen Elias, Damian Octavio 135 Acoustic Source Localization Using the...

  11. acoustic wave properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1998, 2001 production by small animals limit the efficiency of sound communication (Bennet-Clark, 1998; Larsen Elias, Damian Octavio 136 Effect of drift-acoustic waves on...

  12. acoustic mate recognition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    occurs when an expected phone is pronounced as a different one, which leads to erroneous recognition. Acoustic confusion occurs when the pronounced phone is found to lie...

  13. acoustic streaming devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    frequency and the acoustic contrast factor, while it is inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity. Barnkob, Rune; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik 2012-01-01 27...

  14. acoustic power absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The distribution of acoustic power over sunspots shows an enhanced absorption near the umbra--penumbra boundary. Earlier studies revealed that the region of enhanced absorption...

  15. acoustic field evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The distribution of acoustic power over sunspots shows an enhanced absorption near the umbra--penumbra boundary. Earlier studies revealed that the region of enhanced absorption...

  16. acoustic field produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The distribution of acoustic power over sunspots shows an enhanced absorption near the umbra--penumbra boundary. Earlier studies revealed that the region of enhanced absorption...

  17. acoustic focusing devices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in suitable environment, therefore to produce maximum efficiency. In this paper, we present an acoustic wave actuated micro-generator for power system by using the energy of...

  18. acoustic particle manipulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fields. Two types of manipulations are considered: (1) front-pushing, where the micro-robot pushes Sitti, Metin 38 Particle Filter Design using Importance Sampling for Acoustic...

  19. acoustic doppler current: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Vibro-Acoustic Heart Signals: Correlation. In this work, heart sounds, apical pulse, and arterial pulse signals were simultaneously acquired, along analysis of...

  20. acoustic space development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    paper Liu, Yijun 10 ACOUSTIC SPACE DIMENSIONALITY SELECTION AND COMBINATION USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY PRINCIPLE Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  1. acoustic testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sets in the field cricket genus Robillard, Tony 3 EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF THE BLIND OCEAN ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY CONCEPT Engineering Websites Summary: EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF THE...

  2. Soundfield simulation : the prediction and validation of acoustical behavior with compute models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saad, Omar, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, acoustical consultants could only try to convince the client/architect that with calculations and geometrical plots they could create an acoustically superb space. Now, by modeling the significant acoustical ...

  3. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

  4. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  5. Density dependence of the room temperature thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, Caroline S.; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Parsons, Gregory N.; Losego, Mark D. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina thin films as a function of atomic density. Using time domain thermoreflectance, we measure the thermal conductivity of the thin alumina films at room temperature. The thermal conductivities vary ?35% for a nearly 15% change in atomic density and are substrate independent. No density dependence of the longitudinal sound speeds is observed with picosecond acoustics. The density dependence of the thermal conductivity agrees well with a minimum limit to thermal conductivity model that is modified with a differential effective-medium approximation.

  6. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  7. Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    conduction · Heat conduction in Bose condensates ­ electronic superconductors ­ superfluid helium ­ Bose condensate of magnons #12;Outline--toward perfect thermal insulators · Einstein and minimum thermal directions #12;Gas kinetic equation is a good place to start · Anharmonicity (high T limit) · Point defect

  8. alv-x1 liftoff acoustic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The reduction of weight of multi 23 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  9. acoustic wave-assisted scanning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gent transportation systems (ITS 17 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging Geosciences Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic properties Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the signal properties. To measure acoustics... Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring... is in the area of...

  11. Acoustical and Noise Control Criteria and Guidelines for Building Design and Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. B.; Himmel, C. N.

    Noise, vibration and acoustical design, construction, commissioning and operation practices influence building cost, efficiency, performance and effectiveness. Parameters for structural vibration, building systems noise, acoustics and environmental...

  12. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  13. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  14. Proceedings of Acoustics 2012 -Fremantle 21-23 November 2012, Fremantle, Australia Australian Acoustical Society 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Proceedings of Acoustics 2012 - Fremantle 21-23 November 2012, Fremantle, Australia Australian consequently became the one of the dominant styles in Western and other musics. THE VOICE vs. OTHER MUSICAL string is excited by striking--an impulsive and therefore broad-band mechanism for energy input. In bowed

  15. Spring 2014 ME 720 Acoustics II ENG ME 720 Acoustics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    of the wave equation using Green's functions and compact Green's functions; retarded potentials; energy flux of fluid mechanics and acoustics should aim to build a library of classic texts. These are usually classics are now out of print, but are often available from libraries and online sources. Course grading

  16. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  17. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  18. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  19. Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Dipen

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

  20. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers. 4 figs.

  1. Equivalence Principle and the Baryon Acoustic Peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldauf, Tobias; Simonovi?, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation $\\delta(\\lambda_L)$ on short distance physics. In the non-relativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at $l_{\\rm BAO}$, this naive expectation breaks down for $\\lambda_Lpower spectrum. Finally, the success of BAO reconstruction schemes is argue...

  2. Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sinha, Dipen

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

  3. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1983-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  4. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvaniaTemperatureMultipurpose Acoustic

  5. acoustic detection test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic detection test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Feasibility of acoustic...

  6. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  7. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  8. A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean B. D. Dushaw,1 P. F. Worcester,2 W. H of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 114, C07021, doi:10.1029/2008JC005124. 1 of basin-scale heat content in the northeast Pacific Ocean were made using a broadband 133-Hz source

  9. Final evaluation of the acoustics of the APS conference center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Along with a description of the changes that I prescribed on the original design, this report is an evaluation of the acoustical properties of the new Advanced Photon Source Auditorium at Argonne National Laboratory. Acoustical deficiencies in the hall are presented with several options for their expedient and economical solution.

  10. Exploiting the BandwidthDistance Relationship in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojanovic, Milica

    (UWASNs) may also be augmented with autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs); for example, this unmanned1 Exploiting the Bandwidth­Distance Relationship in Underwater Acoustic Networks Paolo Casari consumption, and transmission delay in a Underwater Wireless Acoustic Sensor Network (UWASN). We compare

  11. Acoustic wave propagation in two-phase heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Osypik; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of an acoustic wave through two-phase porous media with spatial variation in porosity is studied. The evolutionary wave equation is derived, and the propagation of an acoustic wave is numerically analyzed in application to marine sediments with various physical parameters.

  12. ON THE ACOUSTIC SINGLE LAYER POTENTIAL: STABILIZATION AND FOURIER ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffa, Annalisa

    ON THE ACOUSTIC SINGLE LAYER POTENTIAL: STABILIZATION AND FOURIER ANALYSIS A. BUFFA AND S. SAUTER in the stability and convergence estimates attains its minumum. Key words. Acoustic scattering, Galerkin boundary discretizations for the Helmholtz problem suffer from the pollution effect, i.e., the constants in the Galerkin

  13. Three-Dimensional Routing in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Three-Dimensional Routing in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks Dario Pompili and Tommaso Melodia applications in oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention in a 3D underwa- ter acoustic sensor network is investigated at the network layer, by considering

  14. Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources T. Douglas Masta for determining the acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric, baffled, time-harmonic sources under the Fresnel. The expressions presented are generalized to three different Fresnel approximations that correspond, respectively

  15. Autonomous Data Collection from Underwater Sensor Networks using Acoustic Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to collect data from an underwater sensor network. The sensors. A potential solution is the use of a mobile autonomous under- water vehicle (AUV) equipped with an acousticAutonomous Data Collection from Underwater Sensor Networks using Acoustic Communication Geoffrey A

  16. An Advanced Channel Framework for Improved Underwater Acoustic Network Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    such as pollution, climate change and severe weather events is rapidly increasing. At the same time, as ocean underwater sensors, vehicles and devices together using acoustic communication. Network protocol development operation. However, acoustic communication performance is dynamic and dependent upon the environment

  17. ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT LEWES, DELAWARE January 2009 #12;ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT LEWES, DELAWARE Prepared for SUMMARY The University of Delaware (UD), Lewes proposes to locate a Gamesa G90 2.0MW wind turbine

  18. STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Douglas C.

    STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

  19. Optimal control techniques for thermo-acoustic tomography Maitine Bergounioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These hybrid systems use an electromagnetic pulse as an input and record ultrasound waves as an output-acoustic tomography (TAT) when the heating is realized by means of microwaves, and of photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) when optical heating is used. While in TAT waves of radio frequency range are used to trigger

  20. acoustic absorption peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic absorption peak First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On the variations of acoustic...