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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Geographically distributed acoustical monitoring of migrating birds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A geographically distributed system of largely automated acoustical monitoring stations was developed to monitor the migration of small passerine birds. The targeted species wood warblers and sparrows migrate at night and produce short (about 120 ms at the longest) high?pitched (between roughly 6 and 10 kHz) calls as they fly often audible from the ground. The monitoring system consisted of ten stations located in New Jersey Maryland Pennsylvania and New York and a central data repository located at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Each station comprised an outdoor weatherproof microphone connected to a volunteer’s home computer. The computer automatically ran acoustic transient detection software each night that listened continuously to the microphone signal and extracted all transients matching certain criteria each to its own audio file. The detected transients were uploaded by the volunteer each morning via the Internet to the central repository for classification and archival. Results including spectrograms of all detected transients and bird call counts were displayed on a public web site updated daily. [Work supported by EPA.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

3

Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

Safaeinili, A.

1994-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused on a specific and severe fault called scuffing. The fault is generally assumed to arise of this work is the analysis of the angular position changes of the engine related events such as fuel

5

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Acoustic emission monitoring of steam turbines. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experience over several years with on-line monitoring of steam turbines, supported by relevant laboratory studies, has led to a clearer understanding of the conditions under which acoustic emission (AE) due to turbine shaft cracking can be detected. To overcome problems associated with the noisy environment, efforts have been directed at improving the AE signal discrimination capabilities of the monitoring electronics. These efforts have been guided by extensive measurements of the amplitude, frequency and time dependence of normal turbine noises in a variety of operating conditions. Similar measurements have been made in the laboratory to determine the characteristics of AE due to crack growth in rotor steels with several loading conditions and temperatures. Along with determinations of the attenuation and wave propagation characteristics of simulated AE in the rotor shafts, these measurements have permitted estimates of the detectability of AE due to crack growth under various conditions, should it occur. An essential part of the proposed monitoring will be determining the source locations and characteristics of ''normal'' operating noise and developing time histories of these sources so that when ''abnormal'' crack growth AE occurs, it will be recognized. The time histories of the ''normal'' operating noises may also reveal other potentially damaging conditions such as lubricating oil contamination, bearing wear, out-of-balance condition, loose turbine disks, blade cracking or rubbing and impingement of exfoliation particles or water droplets, each of which is known or expected to have a characteristic acoustic signature. 17 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

Randall, R.L.; Hong, C.; Graham, L.J.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component)- Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

8

Structural Health Monitoring of Smart Composite Material by Acoustic Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Health Monitoring of Smart Composite Material by Acoustic Emission S. Masmoudia , A. El composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health monitoring systems and to follow the evolution of these various mechanisms for both types of materials (with and without sensors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Novel sensor design based on acoustics. Determine in real-timeand in a single sensor packagemultiple parameters: temperature, pressure, fluid flow; and fluid properties, such as density, viscosity, fluid composition.

10

Microsoft Word - Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring_Revised.do  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LA-UR-05-6025 LA-UR-05-6025 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Title: Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring: Technology Report Author(s): Dipen N. Sinha Submitted to: Gas Technology Management Division Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 Acoustic Sensor for Pipeline Monitoring: Technology Report Dipen Sinha Los Alamos National Laboratory July 20, 2005 Executive Summary This report presents detailed information on the effort to develop acoustic sensing technologies for natural gas pipe line monitoring. It starts with a historical evolution of the project and ends with the current status. The various technical accomplishments during this effort are pointed out. The latest technique involves the use of Lamb wave propagation in the wall of a pipe generated in a stand-off manner for defect detection. The report presents

11

Acoustic-emission monitoring during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that microseismic events or acoustic emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing are recorded with a borehole seismic tool in a deviated well during multirate injection, shut-in, and flowback. The event locations indicate that fracture orientation, length, and height are compatible with regional stress directions and estimates of the fracture size that are based on pressure decline.

Stewart, L. (Schlumberger-Doll Research (US)); Cassell, B.R. (Schlumberger Wireline Services (US)); Bol, G.M. (Nederlanse Aardolie Mij. B.V. (NL))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

History of proposed Acoustical Society standard on “Underwater Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Bioacoustic Applications”.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2005 an ASA working group was formed to examine whether a standard should exist for “Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Marine Mammal Mitigation for Seismic Surveys”. Public discussions at subsequent meetings quickly showed that no consensus existed for specifying hardware requirements for passive acoustic measurements but consensus did seem possible for specifying “minimum requirements for recording and reporting bioacoustic data”. The proposed standard was renamed “Underwater Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Bioacoustic Applications” with three defined goals: (1) providing a set of requirements for information to be documented while recording acoustic data at sea (metadata requirements); (2) detailing the minimum information about acoustic hardware and software to be included when reporting results in gray or peer?reviewed literature; and (3) specifying metrics to be used when summarizing the features of an acoustic signal such as signal?to?noise ratio. A set of recommended best?practice procedures and equipment capabilities would also be included as an informative annex. After languishing for several years an attempt is being made to develop the standard further. This presentation describes the ASA standard outlines the development process and sketches the current thinking on the standard with an emphasis on the metrics portion.

Aaron Thode; David K. Mellinger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Early Detection of Steel Rebar Corrosion by Acoustic Emission Monitoring Alan D. Zdunek and David Prine BIRL Industrial Research, Evanston, IL 60201 Paper No. 547 presented at CORROSION95, the NACE International Annual Conference

15

Acoustic methods to monitor sliver linear density and yarn strength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for monitoring sliver and yarn characteristics. Transverse waves are generated relative to the sliver or yarn. At least one acoustic sensor is in contact with the sliver or yarn for detecting waves coupled to the sliver or yarn and for generating a signal. The generated signal is processed to identify the predefined characteristics including sliver or yarn linear density. The transverse waves can be generated with a high-powered acoustic transmitter spaced relative to the sliver or yarn with large amplitude pulses having a central frequency in a range between 20 KHz and 40 KHz applied to the transmitter. The transverse waves can be generated by mechanically agitating the sliver or yarn with a tapping member.

Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Acoustic condition monitoring of wind turbines: Tip faults  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a significant and growing source of the world’s energy wind turbine reliability is becoming a major concern. At least two fault detection techniques for condition monitoring of wind turbine blades have been reported in early literature i.e. acoustic emissions and optical strain sensors. These require off-site measurement. The work presented here offers an alternative non-contact fault detection method based on the noise emission from the turbine during operation. An investigation has been carried out on a micro wind turbine under laboratory conditions. 4 severity levels for a fault have been planted in the form of added weight at the tip of one blade to simulate inhomogeneous debris or ice build up. Acoustic data is obtained at a single microphone placed in front of the rotor. Two prediction methods have been developed and tested on real data: one based on a single feature - rotational frequency spectral magnitude; and another based on a fuzzy logic interference using two inputs - spectral peak and rotational peak variation with time. Results show that the single spectral peak feature can be used to determine fault severity in ranges. The implementation of the fuzzy logic using a further input feature is shown to significantly improve the detection accuracy.

Daniel J. Comboni; Bruno Fazenda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Guided wave acoustic monitoring of corrosion in recovery boiler tubing  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion of tubing used in black-liquor recovery boilers is a major concern in all pulp and paper mills. Extensive corrosion in recovery boiler tubes can result in a significant safety and environmental hazard. Considerable plant resources are expended to inspect recovery boiler tubing. Currently, visual and ultrasonic inspections are primarily used during the annual maintenance shutdown to monitor corrosion rates and cracking of tubing. This Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies project is developing guided acoustic waves for use on recovery boiler tubing. The feature of this acoustic technique is its cost-effectiveness in inspecting long lengths of tubes from a single inspection point. A piezoelectric or electromagnetic transducer induces guided waves into the tubes. The transducer detects fireside defects from the coldside or fireside of the tube. Cracking and thinning on recovery boiler tubes have been detected with this technique in both laboratory and field applications. This technique appears very promising for recovery boiler tube application, potentially expediting annual inspection of tube integrity.

Quarry, M J; Chinn, D J

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions  

SciTech Connect

Our effort in this project is to develop an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time characterization of the size and weight fractions of solids in slurries for process monitoring and to determine the optimal timing for slurry transfers. This capability will be valuable in the Savannah River Site accelerated clean-up program. Our scientific work during the first research period developed a theory, supported by experiments, to describe sound attenuation of solids in suspensions in the presence of bubbles, which permits us to determine the solid-liquid weight percent. Engineering developments during the second research period led to the design, construction, and demonstration, in our laboratories, of the Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) system that measures weight percent solids accurately in slurries of 0.5 to 8.0 weight percent on-line and in real-time. Also, we had shown the potential for these measurements in solid-gas-liquid slurries by removing the interference due to the presence of gas bubbles.

Taviarides, Lawrence L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Acoustic monitoring of severe weather in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind and rainfall are the principal physical processes responsible for the production of high?frequency (1–50 kHz) ambient sound in the ocean. The primary source of the sound is the resonant ringing of individual bubbles created during wave breaking and raindrop splashes. Larger bubbles (>300 ?m diameter) quickly return to the surface while smaller bubbles can be mixed downward at several meters. During severe weather a layer of smaller ambient bubble forms and effectively absorbs higher?frequency (>10 kHz) sound. These processes are revealed in a two?year record of ambient sound recorded from a subsurface mooring at 50N 145W in the NE Pacific Ocean as part of the Canadian SOLAS program. The passive acoustic signal of wind rain and ambient bubbleclouds are compared to the subsurface mooring data including data from an upward looking 200 kHz active sonar and a 300 kHz ADCP. The acoustic signatures of light moderate and heavy rainfall are superimposed on the signature of high wind demonstrating rainfall detection even in the presence of high wind. [Work supported by ONR Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian CFCAS NSERC.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

History of the Acoustical Society of America’s standard on “Underwater Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Bioacoustic Applications”: Metadata issues.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2005 an ASA working group was formed to examine whether a standard should exist for “Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Marine Mammal Mitigation for Seismic Surveys”. Public discussions at subsequent meetings quickly showed no consensus existed for specifying hardware requirements for passive acoustic measurements but consensus did seem possible for specifying “minimum requirements for recording and reporting bioacoustic data.” The proposed standard was renamed “Underwater Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Bioacoustic Applications” with three defined goals: (1) providing a set of requirements for information to be documented while recording acoustic data at sea (metadata requirements); (2) detailing the minimum information about acoustic hardware and software to be included when reporting results in gray or peer?reviewed literature; and (3) specifying metrics to be used when summarizing the features of an acoustic signal. After languishing for several years an attempt is being made to develop the standard further. This presentation describes what ASA standards are outlines the development process and sketches the current status of the standard with an emphasis on metadata issues.

Aaron Thode; David K. Mellinger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Health monitoring of FRP using acoustic emission and artificial neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a procedure is proposed for damage identification and discrimination for composite materials based on acoustic emission signals clustering using artificial neural networks. An unsupervised methodology based on the self-organizing map of ... Keywords: Acoustic emission, Artificial neural networks, Clustering, Composite materials, Damage, Health monitoring, Waveform analysis

R. de Oliveira; A. T. Marques

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Acoustic monitoring and signature analysis in nuclear and fossil energy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic monitoring and analysis in nuclear and fossil energy plants has been accompanied by transducer development for the hot environment. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires acoustic monitoring systems on nuclear reactors for detecting potential failures. Accelerometers are attached at critical points and their output is automatically analyzed to give warnings of loose parts or excessive vibration. In addition to providing a warning the system can monitor arrival time to be used for fault location. For use as a potential boiling detector of breeder reactors the acoustic signature of the sodium coolant boiling has been compared with background noise level. High temperature sodium?immersible microphones and waveguides for smooth energy transfer were developed for this investigation. High?temperature acoustic sensors have been used in a coal gasification plant. The presence of solids in a steam?char line has been automatically determined using passive monitoring of relative sound intensities of different frequency bands.

Henry B. Karplus

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Monitoring Industrial Pharmaceutical Crystallization Processes Using Acoustic Emission in Pure and Impure Media.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Industrial Pharmaceutical Crystallization Processes Using Acoustic Emission in Pure processes was almost never evaluated in the field of industrial pharmaceutical crystallization. Few papers. Introduction The pharmaceutical industry is set against strong requests on behalf of both consumers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

In-process acoustic emission monitoring of dissimilar metal welding: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A system to provide real-time, in-process acoustic emission monitoring to detect and locate flaws in bimetallic welds has been demonstrated. This system could provide reliable inspection of critical welds in cases where conventional NDE would be costly or impossible to apply. Tests were completed on four sample welds to determine the sensitivity of the system. Artificial flaws were introduced into two test samples and the acoustic emission results were verified by radiography and visual inspection techniques.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

ACOUSTIC EMISSION MONITORING FOR ASSESSMENT OF STEEL BRIDGE DETAILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE of surfaces in the crack wake, the exact mechanism is not of great im- portance to the structural engineer con- stants. This seems to be a useful relationship in both the laboratory and the field. Roberts #12

28

Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission  

SciTech Connect

Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry  

SciTech Connect

Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Acoustic Emission Monitoring of ASME Section III Hydrostatic Test: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Through the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has installed instrumentation on Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 for the purpose of test and evaluation of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping for flaw detection. This report describes the acoustic emission monitoring performed during the ASME Section III hydrostatic testing of Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and the results obtained. Highlights of the results are: • Spontaneous AE was detected from a nozzle area during final pressurization. • Evaluation of the apparent source of the spontaneous AE using an empirically derived AE/fracture mechanics relationship agreed within a factor of two with an evaluation by ASME Section XI Code procedures. • AE was detected from a fracture specimen which was pressure coupled to the 10-inch accumulator nozzle. This provided reassurance of adequate system sensitivity. • High background noise was observed when all four reactor coolant pumps were operating. Work is continuing at Watts Bar Unit 1 toward AE monitoring hot functional testing and subsequently monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton,, P. H.; Taylor,, T. T.; Dawson,, J. F.; Pappas,, R. A.; Kurtz,, R. J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system cludes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provide a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

Roach, Paul D. (Darien, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

Worthington, Monty [Project Director - AK] [Project Director - AK

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded Acoustic Monitor Passes Key Field Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 7, 2005 March 7, 2005 DOE-Funded Acoustic Monitor Passes Key Field Test Detection System Can Help Locate Pipeline Leaks, Damage MORGANTOWN, WV - A new, lightweight device that uses natural gas itself to detect leaks in natural gas pipelines has been successfully tested on a transmission main owned and operated by Dominion Transmission Inc., in Morgantown, W.Va. The test was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and West Virginia University, which has worked with NETL for the past 2 years to advance the detection system. The device is one of a suite of technologies being developed by the Energy Department's Office of Fossil Energy to effectively and efficiently monitor the 1.3 million miles of transmission and distribution pipelines which crisscross the United States

34

V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACETRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACETRACK...

35

Active acoustic monitoring systems for detecting, localizing, tracking, and classifying marine mammals and fish.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detection localization tracking and classification (DLTC) of marine mammals and fish is necessary for a wide range of bioacoustic studies. This includes those related to understanding anthropogenic effects and to the development of methods for mitigating harm. Active acoustic monitoring (AAM) is a robust method for monitoring marine life as it can detect and accurately localize a silent target enabling full DLTC. With the growth of the offshore renewable energy industry and the need to mitigate harm from pile driving seismic surveys and military sonar operations there is strong interest in developing AAM systems and integrating them with current mitigation techniques. There are a host of significant issues including the standard sonar problems of reverberation and propagation in high?clutter shallow water environments false alarms classification methods of deployment and cost. Furthermore AAM systems transmit acoustic energy that has the potential to disturb marine life. Much work lies ahead to develop systems that balance the risks benefits performance and costs. This paper will review the status and issues of AAM systems. This includes a discussion of implemented near?field (imaging) and far?field (tracking) systems experimental results and plans for further development testing integration and permitting.

Peter J. Stein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

PASSIVE WIRELESS SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE SENSORS FOR MONITORING SEQUESTRATION SITES CO2 EMISSION  

SciTech Connect

University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/?. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/?. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2. The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2. With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

Wang, Yizhong; Chyu, Minking; Wang, Qing-Ming

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study National Laboratory SUMMARY Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon is crucial for ensuring safe and reliable carbon storage (Bickle et al., 2007). Conventional analysis of time

Malcolm, Alison

38

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Noninvasive Monitoring of Vocal Fold Vertical Vibration Using The Acoustic Doppler Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryObjectives/Hypothesis To validate a proposed method of noninvasively monitoring vocal fold vertical vibration through utilization of the acoustic Doppler effect and the waveguide property of the vocal tract. Study Design Validation case-control study. Methods In this device, an ultrasound beam is generated and directed into the mouth. The vocal tract, acting as a natural waveguide, guides the ultrasound beam toward the vibrating vocal folds. The vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration is then recovered from the Doppler frequency of the reflected ultrasound. One subject (age 32, male) was studied and measurements were taken under three modes of vocal fold vibration: breathing (no vibration), whispering (irregular vibration), and normal phonation (regular vibration). Results The peak-to-peak amplitude of the measured velocity of vocal fold vertical vibration was about 0.16 m/s, and the fundamental frequency was 172 Hz; the extracted velocity information showed a reasonable waveform and value in comparison with the previous studies. In all three modes of phonation, the Doppler frequencies derived from the reflected ultrasound corresponded with the vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration as expected. Conclusions The proposed method can accurately represent the characteristics of different phonation modes such as no phonation, whisper and normal phonation. The proposed device could be used in daily monitoring and assessment of vocal function and vocal fold vibration.

Chao Tao; Jack J. Jiang; Dan Wu; Xiaojun Liu; Ann Chodara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support 1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information October 26, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Software version: 6.2.3, 6.2.3.1 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Tivoli Monitoring. REFERENCE LINKS: IBM Support Document: 1614003 IBM Support Portal SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027692 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user may be able to conduct HTTP TRACE and HTTP TRACK attacks to access sensitive information from the HTTP headers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method and apparatus for acoustically monitoring the flow of suspended solid particulate matter. [Patent application; monitoring char flow in coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring char flow in a coal gasifier system includes flow monitor circuits which measure acoustic attenuation caused by the presence of char in a char line and provides a char flow/no flow indication and an indication of relative char density. The flow monitor circuits compute the ratio of signals in two frequency bands, a first frequency band representative of background noise, and a second higher frequency band in which background noise is attenuated by the presence of char. Since the second frequency band contains higher frequencies, the ratio can be used to provide a flow/no flow indication. The second band can also be selected so that attenuation is monotonically related to particle concentration, providing a quantitative measure of char concentration.

Roach, P.D.; Raptis, A.C.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/57/57/48073739.pdf Cost: Free Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Screenshot References: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action[1] "This paper highlights the relevant information that needs to be tracked in order to build a comprehensive MRV system for climate finance, proposing

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic monitoring Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Designers... @ualg.pt 12;Acoustic Tomography: a tool for understanding the ocean S.M. Jesus (sjesus@ualg.pt) Si Source: Jesus, Srgio M. - Departamento de...

44

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2NT00041628 2NT00041628 Final Report Covering research during the period 1 June, 2002 through 30 September, 2008 Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project Submitted by: University of Mississippi Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology 310 Lester Hall, University, MS 38677 Principal Authors: J. Robert Woolsey, Thomas M. McGee, Carol B. Lutken Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy ii SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT DOE Award Number DE-FC26-02NT41628 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

46

Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear Power Plant Components Condition Monitoring by Probabilistic Support Vector , Redouane Seraouib  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Plant Components Condition Monitoring by Probabilistic Support Vector Machine Jie.zio@ecp.fr Abstract In this paper, an approach for the prediction of the condition of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP monitoring, Nuclear power plant, Point prediction hal-00790421,version1-12Jun2013 Author manuscript

Boyer, Edmond

48

Support means for a particle beam position monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support means is disclosed for a plurality of thermally deformable component parts that are concentrically mounted within a thermally expandable housing. The support means includes a plurality of pins that are mounted in relatively fixed or sliding relationship to either one of the concentrically positioned components or to the housing, and the pins are positioned to extend through aligned apertures in the remaining components or the housing in a manner such that the pins are free to slide in a snug relationship relative to the sides of the holes through those components or the housing. The support means enables the concentrically mounted components and the housing to undergo expansion and contraction movement, radially and longitudinally relative to one another, while maintaining concentricity of the components and the housing relative to one another. 3 figures.

VanZwienen, W.H.

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Support means for a particle beam position monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support means for a plurality of thermally deformable component parts that are concentrically mounted within a thermally expandable housing. The support means includes a plurality of pins that are mounted in relatively fixed or sliding relationship to either one of the concentrically positioned components or to the housing, and the pins are positioned to extend through aligned apertures in the remaining components or the housing in a manner such that the pins are free to slide in a snug relationship relative to the sides of the holes through those components or the housing. The support means enables the concentrically mounted components and the housing to undergo expansion and contraction movement, radially and longitudinally relative to one another, while maintaining concentricity of the components and the housing relative to one another.

VanZwienen, William H. (Bayshore, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42877 Semiannual Progress Report HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO Submitted by: CENTER FOR MARINE RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 111 BREVARD HALL, UNIVERSITY, MS 38677 Principal Author: Carol Lutken, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy ii HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT 1 JANUARY, 2011 THROUGH 30 JUNE, 2011

53

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Passive acoustic monitoring of biological and anthropogenic sounds at America’s first offshore wind farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cape Wind situated in Nantucket Sound Massachusetts is poised to become America’s first offshore windfarm. Our objective is to establish baseline (pre-construction) sound levels of human and biological activity including diel and seasonal variability of various sound types at the construction site and three nearby comparison sites. Acoustic recorders have been deployed since April 2012 recording on a 10% duty cycle (sample rate: 80 kHz). Biological contributions to the local soundscape are primarily fish sounds with the dominant signal likely being cusk eel (Family Ophidiidae) calls. These calls which are composed of stereotyped pulses with an average bout duration of 3.3 ±0.8 s and mean peak frequency of 1030 ±200 Hz show both seasonal and diel variation. Dense choruses were detected during summer (July) but limited activity occurred in the fall and winter. During vocal periods detections occurred throughout the day but peaked near dusk. Vessel traffic also showed diel and seasonal trends with peaks during the daytime and in the summer which indicates that boat activity can be tracked acoustically. These trends in biological and anthropogenic activity provide key baseline records for evaluating the influence of windfarm construction and operation on a local US soundscape.

T. Aran Mooney; Maxwell B. Kaplan; Luca Lamoni; Aimee Boucher; Laela S. Sayigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

Sinha, Dipen N

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

58

Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearities on metal and composite airframe structures via intensity based health monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonlinear structural intensity (NSI) and nonlinear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection techniques were improved and extended to metal and composite airframe structures. In this study the measurement of NSI maps at sub-harmonic frequencies was completed to provide enhanced understanding of the energy flow characteristics associated with the damage induced contact acoustic nonlinearity mechanism. Important results include NSI source localization visualization at ultra-subharmonic (nf/2) frequencies and damage detection results utilizing structural surface intensity in the nonlinear domain. A detection metric relying on modulated wave spectroscopy was developed and implemented using the NSSI feature. The data fusion of the intensity formulation provided a distinct advantage as both the single interrogation frequency NSSI and its modulated wave extension (NSSI-MW) exhibited considerably higher sensitivities to damage than using single-sensor (strain or acceleration) nonlinear detection metrics. The active intensity based techniques were also extended to composite materials and results show both NSSI and NSSI-MW can be used to detect damage in the bond line of an integrally stiffened composite plate structure with high sensitivity. Initial damage detection measurements made on an OH-58 tailboom (Penn State Applied Research Laboratory State College PA) indicate the techniques can be transitioned to complex airframe structures achieving high detection sensitivities with minimal sensors and actuators.

P. Q. Romano; S. C. Conlon; E. C. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Addendum to environmental monitoring plan Nevada Test Site and support facilities  

SciTech Connect

This 1992 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/1 0630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1992 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

NONE

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Assessment of Wildlife Gonzalo Sanchez; President, Sanchez Industrial Design, Inc., 3510 Beltline Hwy due to water, wind, geologic activity (the Geophony), acoustic signals can provide information about. Signal analysis techniques to identify wildlife and simultaneous collection of environmental parameters

Maher, Robert C.

62

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00025093, Project No. 199105100, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) during 2006. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For over a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 52 different fish stocks at 10 different hydroprojects are tracked in real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00004134, Project No. 199105100 funded by Bonneville Power Administration during 2003. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 50 different fish stocks at 8 different hydroprojects are tracked and real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Structural Health Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Impedance Methods Lamb Wave Propagations Time Reversal Acoustics Sequential Probability Ratio Test Extreme Value Statistics Remote Monitoring Building upon previous...

65

Compressed air energy storage monitoring to support refrigerated mined rock cavern technology.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for the Compressed Air Energy Storage Monitoring to Support Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology (CAES Monitoring to Support RMRCT) (DE-FC26-01NT40868) project to have been conducted by CAES Development Co., along with Sandia National Laboratories. This document provides a final report covering tasks 1.0 and subtasks 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5 of task 2.0 of the Statement of Project Objectives and constitutes the final project deliverable. The proposed work was to have provided physical measurements and analyses of large-scale rock mass response to pressure cycling. The goal was to develop proof-of-concept data for a previously developed and DOE sponsored technology (RMRCT or Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology). In the RMRCT concept, a room and pillar mine developed in rock serves as a pressure vessel. That vessel will need to contain pressure of about 1370 psi (and cycle down to 300 psi). The measurements gathered in this study would have provided a means to determine directly rock mass response during cyclic loading on the same scale, under similar pressure conditions. The CAES project has been delayed due to national economic unrest in the energy sector.

Lee, Moo Yul; Bauer, Stephen J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Acoustic emission during polymer crystallization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... .G.; part support to L.K.) Acoustic Emission, Special Technical Publication 505, ASTM, Philadelphia, 1971; Grabec, I. & Peterlin, A. J. Polymer Sci. ...

A. Galeski; L. Koenczoel; E. Piorkowska; E. Baer

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A New Hyphenated ? Trap—GC—Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Based Electronic Nose For Monitoring Of Coffee Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An easy?to?use and versatile analytical method for complex matrix analisis like coffee was developed. The system consists of a microtrap sample preparation a home made simplified gaschomatographic separation unit and an 8?fold surface acoustic wave based sensors (SAW) array detector. For the coffee quality analysis a successful discrimination of three coffee samples could be achieved. The system would be further developed into a fully automated low cost version that can be broadly used by the coffee producers.

Mauro Carvalho; Achim Voigt; Michael Rapp

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Acoustical heat pumping engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Acoustic detection and long-term monitoring of pygmy blue whales over the continental slope in southwest Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 9-yr dataset of continuous sea noise recording made at the Cape Leeuwin station of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty hydroacoustic network in 2002–2010 was processed to detect calls from pygmy blue whales and to analyze diel seasonal and interannual variations in their vocal activity. Because the conventional spectrogram correlation method for recognizing whale calls in sea noise resulted in a too high false detection rate alternative algorithms were tested and the most robust one applied to the multi-year dataset. The detection method was based on multivariate classification using two spectrogram features of transients in sea noise and Fisher's linear discriminant which provided a misclassification rate of approximately 1% for missed and false detections at moderate sensitivity settings. An analysis of the detection results revealed a consistent seasonal pattern in the whale presence and considerable interannual changes with a steady increase in the number of calls detected in 2002–2006. An apparent diel pattern of whales' vocal activity was also observed. The acoustic detection range for pygmy blue whales was estimated to vary from about 50?km to nearly 200?km from the Cape Leeuwin station depending on the ambient noise level source level and azimuth to a vocalizing whale.

Alexander N. Gavrilov; Robert D. McCauley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

19 - Sensing solutions for assessing and monitoring wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter focuses on structural health monitoring (SHM) for wind turbines. Repair and downtime costs can potentially be reduced with the continuous monitoring of structure and environment. Available SHM approaches for rotor blades and support structure are presented extensively, with a special focus on the sensor technology and the methods used. Important monitoring methods, such as modal-based methods, acoustic emission, and ultrasound wave propagation are presented. For monitoring of support structures, different foundation concepts are introduced with specific neuralgic spots. Subsequently, some of the global and local SHM approaches, as well as case studies are presented.

R. Rolfes; S. Tsiapoki; M.W. Häckell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Acoustic cryocooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Martin, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Radenbaugh, Ray (Louisville, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Acoustic cooling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

REACTOR THERMAL/HYDRAULIC PROCESSES MONITORING AND AID TO DIAGNOSIS, USING ACOUSTICAL SIGNAL AND ON-LINE CALCULATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The instrumentation and control (IC) systems used in most nuclear power plants (NPP) are aimed at providing information for the purpose of safe start-up, power operation and shutdown. These tasks gained even more importance as a result of the Three Mile Island incident in the seventies. Substantial advancements in sensor and computer technologies make possible cost effective on- and off-line monitoring and diagnostics (MD). At present MD technology provides the necessary tools, techniques and procedures to obtain information about the condition of equipment and provide them to the operation, maintenance and engineering staff. Access to this information allows individuals to make The instrumentation and control (IC) systems used in most nuclear power plants (NPP) are aimed at providing information for the purpose of safe start-up, power operation and shutdown. These tasks gained even more importance as a result of the Three Mile Island incident in the seventies. Substantial advancements in sensor and computer

K. N. Proskouriakov

78

STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE OF WIND TURBINE USING WIRELESS SENSING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure to resist the complicated environmental loading, especially for the offshore wind turbine. How efficiency of wind turbine, the development of offshore wind farm is in full swing. The wind turbine heavily, especially for the offshore wind turbine. How to manage these wind turbines and monitor the structural safety

Boyer, Edmond

79

The potential and challenges of monitoring-supported energy efficiency improvement strategies in existing buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ongoing EU-supported CAMPUS 21 explores the energy efficiency potential of integrated security, control, and building management software. The main objective of the project is to compare the energy and indoor-environmental performance...

Schub, M.; Mahdavi, A.; Simonis, H.; Menzel, K.; Browne, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Supporting multicast deployment efforts: a survey of tools for multicast monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the Internet is expected to better support multimedia applications, new services will need to be deployed. An example of one of these next-generation services is multicast communication, the one-to-many delivery of data. Over the last ten years, multicast ...

Kamil Saraç; Kevin C. Almeroth

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Support Vector Methods and Use of Hidden Variables for Power Plant Monitoring , Claus Neubauer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An out-of-range refers to a normal operating range of a power plant unseen in the training data. In the case of an out-of-range, instead of producing a fault alarm, the system should notify the operator to include more training data which capture this new operating range. Second, we apply support vector one

Cataltepe, Zehra

83

Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516  

SciTech Connect

Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Acoustic microscopy for characterization of high?temperature superconducting tape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although material scientists constantly discover superconducting compounds with higher critical temperatures (T c ’s) manufacturing of the high?temperature superconductors(HTS) remains a problem and long lengths (>1 mile) have yet to be produced. In an effort to produce long length superconductors manufacturing steps for HTS tape production have been critically looked at to find their effects in producing tape with the desired characteristics. In support of determining superconducting tapecharacteristics acoustic microscopy offers the potential for internal microstructural material characterization. This research will ultimately support in?process monitoring of HTSmanufacturing as part of an advanced sensing system to determine the presence of defects and/or the effects of process variables on the HTS tape. This presentation will overview scanning acoustic microscopy and present images of HTS tape at several frequencies ranging from 50 to 500 MHz. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of determining the Ag/ceramic interface location and the general integrity of the constituents.

Chiaki Miyasaka; Chris Cobucci; Bernhard Tittmann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Acoustic radiation due to surface wave breaking.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While wave breaking is continually occurring at the sea surface its transient and sporadic nature makes it difficult to measure. Experimental results are presented that show how acoustic methods can be used as a remote sensor of this fundamental process. Sea surface?generated acoustic radiation (40 to 4000 Hz) is directly related to a quantitative measure of the boundary dynamics; i.e. the Toba variable. The frequency spectrum of the radiation remains remarkably unchanged over a wide range of environmental conditions but the correlation between the sound pressure level and the Toba variable undergoes an abrupt change when spilling breakers start to occur. Results support the use of acoustics to remotely measure the rate of energy being dissipated by wave breaking and the wavelength of the dominant gravity wave component. Theoretical studies have related the field measurements to analytical and laboratory results cited in the literature indicating that remote monitoring of the rate of occurrence and size distribution of ‘‘infant’’ (freshly entrained) bubbles may be possible if splashes on the surface do not radiate significant sound. Signal processing algorithms for the remote measurements discussed above are enhanced by eigenstructure analysis of the measured cross?spectral density matrix. [Work sponsored by ONR and NUSC.

Robert M. Kennedy; Stewart A. L. Glegg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A new method to measure the acoustic surface impedance outdoors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Comparative Study Evaluation Studies Journal Article Validation Studies | Acoustics Algorithms Automobiles Construction Materials analysis Electric Impedance Materials Testing methods Models, Theoretical Noise, Transportation Radiation Monitoring......

S. Carpinello; Ph. L'Hermite; M. Bérengier; G. Licitra

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Architectural acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This tutorial will familiarize people with basic concepts in architectural acoustics. Many slides of actual buildings and a brief audio tape will be used to illustrate connections between the visual appearance of buildings and the qualities of their sonic environment. The presentation will provide examples and explanations of common acoustic experiences in buildings with the under?lying reasons for their occurrence. Architectural acoustics can be characterized as an evolving empirical exploration of basic principles from many areas of acoustics through creative testing in the design and subsequent evaluation of buildings. A historical review of applied acoustical principles translated into the medium of architecture will be presented in four primary areas: (1) subjective impressions including qualities of music speech intelligibility and annoyance which are the basis for current design criteria; (2) room acoustics design with an emphasis on auditoria schools restaurants and other public buildings; (3) providing privacy from unwanted sounds and vibrations through discussion of standard measurement techniques such as sound transmission class (STC); and (4) management of noise from HVAC systems and other equipment and processes in buildings. Interesting case studies will demonstrate how complex the practical application of even relatively simple acoustical principles can be in many buildings. In recent years a significant community of laboratory and applied researchers dedicated to this field has emerged to question and quantify the empirical knowledge base that has been accumulated over time. Recent topics of interest such as new measurement modeling and simulation techniques will be briefly introduced.

Gary W. Siebein

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The reconstruction of supported platinum particles monitored by methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation and H[sub 2] TPD  

SciTech Connect

Alteration of the dehydrogenation activity of [alpha]-alumina-supported platinum particles induced by a high-temperature (723 K) treatment in argon atmosphere has been investigated. The methyl-cyclohexane dehydrogenation rate over reduced platinum particles is highly dependent on the argon treatment applied at 723 K after hydrogen treatment at the same temperature. With an increasing exposure time to the argon stream, the reaction rate increases sharply to a maximum and gradually diminishes afterwards to a stable value for a prolonged exposure time. This change is the result of two modifying actions induced by inert gas: (1) the desorption of tightly bound hydrogen species, responsible for the low initial activity, and (2) the reconstruction of the platinum crystallite surface toward a more stable active surface. The presence of [open quotes]high-temperature hydrogen[close quotes] is systematically observed on small particles after hydrogen treatment at 723 K and seems to be related to the specific electronic properties of small particles and not to their surface structure. The reconstruction of the surface of the particles is by contrast very important for obtaining stable catalytic activity. Highly dispersed (80-90%), restructured catalysts were found to be similar in stability to mediumly dispersed (45%) catalysts. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Rochefort, A.; Le Peltier, F.; Boitiaux, J.P. (Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Acoustic signatures: From natural to systems science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interest in acoustic signatures began with the problem of detecting cracks in railroad wheels. When a wheel is struck with a hammer it produces a sound like that of a bell. If the wheel is cracked it sounds dissonant and muffled. By comparing sounds from the two members of a wheelset a measure of the difference in their mechanical properties is obtained. A fully automatic system was developed and installed on a Southern Pacific track in the 1980’s. The story of this undertaking is an object lesson in systems science. Recently beams have been used as test objects in an attempt to resolve certain basic questions in the science of the acoustic monitoring method. These questions will be illustrated with results from a test fixture with various beams. The limitation of the vibration monitoring method is that other conditions such as uncertainties in the geometry of the test object its surface conditions and loading can also affect the vibration response and it is necessary to distinguish the effects due to harmful conditions from those due to harmless ones. The sensitivity of the method is thus determined by the need to make this distinction. [Work supported by NSF Grant No. MSS?9024224.

Robert D. Finch; Ben H. Jansen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Acoustics education in Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustics education in Ukraine is considered. In more than 40 universities students learn acoustics: in the acoustics department of the National Technical University in Ukraine (only one department in Ukraine) and many related departments such as Nondestructive Testing Physics Electrical Engineering etc. Acoustical specializations of departments are presented. The most promising and developing acoustical specialization is biomedical acoustics.

Stanislav M. Mayevskyy; Leonid M. Gelman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Acoustic Energy and Stellar Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the thermodynamic limitations of the generation of acoustic energy in stars. Quite recently, M. Schwarzschild and R. S. Richardson suggested that the transfer of energy in stars may, ... a heat engine, and this consideration does not support the views expressed by Richardson and Schwarzschild in dealing with the stellar model of red giants. In this model they suggest ...

1949-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Acoustic plug release indicator  

SciTech Connect

The present invention comprises an acoustic plug release indicator system. The acoustic plug release indicatior system comprises a microphone, recording system and operator listening device.

Carter, E.E. Jr.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Acoustic transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Acoustic transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Collaborative Support System for the Review of Building Energy Data in the LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-driven review process. Utilization of these facilities to provide a computer-supported collaborative environment for the review of building energy analysis data is feasible. This paper addresses the requirements such a system must meet, and proposes a design...

Willis, D.; Haberl, J.

97

Acoustics of technology enabled collaborative learning environments.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Collaborative classrooms and workstations are increasingly common in higher education buildings. These spaces present unique acoustical challenges that force designers to rethink traditional concepts and solutions. In student?centered classrooms the lecturer is removed as the visual and acoustical center of attention. Instead students are seated in groups around technology enabled workstations often facing away from the lecturer and other students. Acoustical conditions must support small?group interaction classroom discussion and learning via multimedia content. Outside the classroom collaborative workstations vary greatly but typically facilitate small?group interaction around a multimedia display and/or work surface. To promote impromptu use by students these spaces are often open to highly public areas of learning commons classroom buildings and digital libraries. Traditional noise control solutions fail to isolate these spaces without compromising their spontaneous feel and function. Despite obvious acoustical challenges both space types will continue to proliferate and new acoustical solutions must be developed.

Gregory A. Coudriet; Jeffery E. Babich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Use of an Enterprise Energy Monitoring System to Support Building Commissioning and Overall Energy Efficiency by the Hyatt Hotels Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is in the process of implementing an enterprise-wide automated Energy Information and Utility Monitoring System (UMS). New Horizon Technologies and eComponents Technology have teamed to provide an integrated solution that will ultimately include all... (UMS) installed, energy and water consumption data along with local weather data are automatically summarized in the web reports. Hotels without the UMS enter monthly utility and weather data manually at the website. The hotels also enter certain...

Burke, B.; McBride, J.; Kimble, K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Magneto?Acoustic Interaction in Mercury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetically induced acoustic absorption coefficient in liquidmercury has been measured around its inverse relaxation frequency using an on?line computer and magnetic fields of up to 10 kg. The hybrid computer?operated differential measuring system took between 2560 and 25 600 experiments per run. The results agree with Anderson's predictions [J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 25 529 (1953)]. [Work supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

Thomas D. Sachs; Gregory P. Hughes

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Acoustic detection of neutrinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When high energy neutrinosinteract with nucleons in the ocean a jet of hadrons is produced which deposits thermal energy. This thermal energy is expected to produce a sonic pulse which hopefully will be sufficiently intense and directional to enable the energy and direction of incidence of the primary neutrino to be determined [Antares Parvulescu J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 61 580(A) (1977)]. This paper discusses the physical mechanism whereby the energy of the neutrino is converted into a sound pulse. A simple model will be exploited to account for the signature expected from such an event. [Work supported in part by the U. S. Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity and by the U. S. Department of Energy.

Peter J. Westervelt

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Acoustic Based Sketch Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigate this new area, which we call acoustic based sketch recognition, and evaluate the possibilities of using it as a new interaction technique. We focus specifically on building a recognition engine for acoustic sketch recognition. We first propose a...

Li, Wenzhe

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Relationships between objective acoustic indices and acoustic comfort evaluation in nonacoustic spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much attention has been paid to acoustic spaces such as concert halls and recording studios whereas research on nonacoustic buildings/spaces has been rather limited especially from the viewpoint of acoustic comfort. In this research a series of case studies has been carried out on this topic considering various spaces including shopping mall atrium spaces library reading rooms football stadia swimming spaces churches dining spaces as well as urban open public spaces. The studies focus on the relationships between objective acoustic indices such as sound pressure level and reverberation time and perceptions of acoustic comfort. The results show that the acoustic atmosphere is an important consideration in such spaces and the evaluation of acoustic comfort may vary considerably even if the objective acoustic indices are the same. It is suggested that current guidelines and technical regulations are insufficient in terms of acoustic design of these spaces and the relationships established from the case studies between objective and subjective aspects would be useful for developing further design guidelines. [Work supported partly by the British Academy.

Jian Kang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, S.C.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ongoing developments in classroom acoustic theory and practice in 2012, and reports on efforts to implement good classroom acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We live in a time of increasingly loud competing sounds and hearing loss is the number one disability in the world. Diverse populations of school children are especially vulnerable. The result is a degradation of the child’s academic achievement. New classrooms built everyday often incorporate acoustical barriers which limit students’ achievements. Overcoming these barriers involves funding constraints construction timelines and lack of support which requires advocacy from parents school boards and design teams. This advocacy should include the ANSI Classroom Acoustics standards and an acoustical assessment of existing classrooms. Complex classroom acoustics challenges may include reduction of noise radiated by HVAC systems improved acoustic treatment of external walls to minimize exterior noise and acoustic design of walls between adjacent noisy classrooms. Next steps for schools should be to retain an architect and/or an acoustical engineer for remodels and new school construction who are well versed in acoustics for educational settings and noise control. A booklet covering these issues and designed as a practical guide for educators not versed in acoustics is in preparation by the Acoustical Society of America.

Pamela Brown; Mary Crouse

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- determines thermal gradient along the borehole - provides location of borehole fracture intersections - allows estimation of thermal drawdown and recovery rates of the...

106

Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance… (more)

Setaki, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Acoustic hemostasis: Underlying mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cessation of hemorrhage using extrinsic interventional methods is possible with delivery of energy to bleeding tissues i.e. cauterization. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is one such method with significant advantages of delivering high levels of energy to well?defined regions of deep?seated tissues even during profuse bleeding. The physical mechanisms involved in this process include thermal and mechanical effects of HIFU leading to various biological effects. Our results using HIFU devices of 1–5 MHz and focal derated intensities of 1 000–10 000 W/cm2 in solid organs such as liver spleen and kidneys and major and minor blood vessels show that temperature of targeted tissues reaches 70–100°C within seconds with formation of microbubbles approximately 5??200 ? in size and concentration of 100 bubbles/mm3. It appears that boiling of interstitial fluids and blood and acoustic cavitation are both involved. The biological effects include coagulative necrosis mechanical disruption of tissue structure potentially leading to release of tissue factors enhancing the coagulation coagulum and thrombus formation at a wound site tissue fusion via collagen and elastin remodeling and fibrin plug formation with minimal damage of the surrounding tissues. These mechanisms appear to provide an effective and safe method of hemorrhage control. [Work supported by NIH DoD NSBRI.

Shahram Vaezy; Lawrence Crum; Steve Carter; Grant O’Keefe; Vesna Zderic; Roy Martin; Riyad Karmy?Jones

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Heating Peter Ulmschneider lnstitut fiir Theoretische Astrophysik der Universitat waves are a viable and prevalent heating mechanism both in early- and in late-type stars. Acoustic heating appears to be a dominant mechanism for situations where magnetic fields are weak or absent

Ulmschneider, Peter

109

Laser light scattering by bubbles in water: Fundamentals and applications to acoustics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser light scattering is sometimes used as an alternative to acoustical methods for monitoring bubbles in seawater. There has also been interest in using lasers to investigate bubbles in wakes. In some cases light scattering by bubbles has been used in conjunction with acoustical measurements to characterize dynamics of bubbles radiating sound [J. S. Stroud and P. L. Marston J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94 2788–2792 (1993)]. In applications such as these it is important to understand the optical properties of bubbles that differ significantly from drops and particles. Examples include critical angle scattering and the transition to total reflection [D. S. Langley and P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 23 1044–1054 (1984)] forward scattering and extinction [D. S. Langley and P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 30 3452–3458 (1991); J. S. Stroud and P. L. Marston cited previously] glory back?scattering enhancements and shape effects [W. P. Arnott and P. L. Marston J. Opt. Soc. Am. A5 496–506 (1988); Appl. Opt. 30 3429–3442 (1991)] and Brewster angle scattering. Some optical effects of coatings on bubbles (which can occur naturally) have also been modeled [P. L. Marston Appl. Opt. 30 3479–3484 (1991)]. [Research supported by ONR between 1980 and 1995.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Forecasting energy consumption of multi-family residential buildings using support vector regression: Investigating the impact of temporal and spatial monitoring granularity on performance accuracy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings are the dominant source of energy consumption and environmental emissions in urban areas. Therefore, the ability to forecast and characterize building energy consumption is vital to implementing urban energy management and efficiency initiatives required to curb emissions. Advances in smart metering technology have enabled researchers to develop “sensor based” approaches to forecast building energy consumption that necessitate less input data than traditional methods. Sensor-based forecasting utilizes machine learning techniques to infer the complex relationships between consumption and influencing variables (e.g., weather, time of day, previous consumption). While sensor-based forecasting has been studied extensively for commercial buildings, there is a paucity of research applying this data-driven approach to the multi-family residential sector. In this paper, we build a sensor-based forecasting model using Support Vector Regression (SVR), a commonly used machine learning technique, and apply it to an empirical data-set from a multi-family residential building in New York City. We expand our study to examine the impact of temporal (i.e., daily, hourly, 10 min intervals) and spatial (i.e., whole building, by floor, by unit) granularity have on the predictive power of our single-step model. Results indicate that sensor based forecasting models can be extended to multi-family residential buildings and that the optimal monitoring granularity occurs at the by floor level in hourly intervals. In addition to implications for the development of residential energy forecasting models, our results have practical significance for the deployment and installation of advanced smart metering devices. Ultimately, accurate and cost effective wide-scale energy prediction is a vital step towards next-generation energy efficiency initiatives, which will require not only consideration of the methods, but the scales for which data can be distilled into meaningful information.

Rishee K. Jain; Kevin M. Smith; Patricia J. Culligan; John E. Taylor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Distributed Acoustic and Seismic Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An overview of fiber optic distributed acoustic and seismic sensor system architectures is presented.

Kirkendall, Clay

112

Acoustic demonstrations for education in speech science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic demonstrations are highly effective for education in speech science. We recently developed two educational tools for acoustics. The first educational tool is a set of physical models of the human vocal tract and related models. It contains cylinder and plate?type models [T. Arai J. Phonetic Soc. Jpn. 5(2) 31–38 (2001)] a sliding three?tube model [T. Arai Acoust. Sci. Technol. to be published] lungmodels an artificial larynx and head?shaped models [T. Arai Acoust. Sci. Technol. 27(2) 111–113 (2006)]. Each model has its own advantages and if combined effectively can produce a systematic and comprehensive education in speech production from the lungs to the head. The second educational tool is ‘‘Digital Pattern Playback (DPP)’’ [T. Arai et al. Acoust. Sci. Tech. to be published] which converts a spectrographic image of a speech signal back to sound by digital signal processing. A printed spectrogram on a sheet of paper can also be converted immediately after capturing the image from a camera and we confirmed that this is more intuitive for learners than converting from an electronic image. [Work partially supported by JSPS.KAKENHI (17500603).

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Generation of Sound Bullets with a Nonlinear Acoustic Lens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic lenses are employed in a variety of applications, from biomedical imaging and surgery, to defense systems, but their performance is limited by their linear operational envelope and complexity. Here we show a dramatic focusing effect and the generation of large amplitude, compact acoustic pulses (sound bullets) in solid and fluid media, enabled by a tunable, highly nonlinear acoustic lens. The lens consists of ordered arrays of granular chains. The amplitude, size and location of the sound bullets can be controlled by varying static pre-compression on the chains. We support our findings with theory, numerical simulations, and corroborate the results experimentally with photoelasticity measurements. Our nonlinear lens makes possible a qualitatively new way of generating high-energy acoustic pulses, enabling, for example, surgical control of acoustic energy.

Alessandro Spadoni; Chiara Daraio

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Acoustic well cleaner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

Maki, Jr., Voldi E. (11904 Bell Ave., Austin, TX 78759-2415); Sharma, Mukul M. (Dept. of Petroleum Engr. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX 78712)

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Acoustic anisotropy related to anisotropic stress conditions during formation and unloading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Abstracts 57th Ann. Int. SEG Mtg 1987, New Orleans, Acoustic...of a sedimentation/uplift process, although real rocks often...determined by the unloading process. In the present study, acoustic...monitored throughout the entire process, thus allowing us to observe......

E. Fjaer; R. M. Holt; J. S. Rathore; B. Åhlén

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic fetal monitoring Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monitoring Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 An Enhanced Signal Processing Strategy For Fetal Heart Rate Detection Charles Brewton Summary: the signal processing strategy for an acoustic...

117

History of engineering acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the Providence RI meeting in December 1955 it was proposed to add three new technical committees to the original seven established about a year earlier. Two of the new ones Audio Engineering and Electroacoustics and Sonic and Ultrasonic Engineering are precursors of the present Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee. In 1961 the name of the former committee was shortened to Electroacoustics and I began to attend their meetings. In 1964 the scope of the committee was broadened and its present name of Engineering Acoustics adopted. Early repeatable experiments in engineering acoustics have been attributed to Benjamin Franklin and mostly anecdotal evidence exists before that. Modern developments involve interdisciplinary involvements with all acoustics and specifically with the discovery of new materials applications of their properties and inventions of a wide variety of devices for producing receiving and using acoustics. Henry Joule Bell Berliner Edison the Curie brothers DeForest and Fessenden will be among those noted with some related recognition of them by the Engineering Acoustics TC.

Stanley L. Ehrlich

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Acoustic Building Infiltration Measurement System (ABIMS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Acoustic Building Infilitration Measurement System project is developing an acoustic method of measuring the infiltration of a building envelope.

119

Spacetime transformation acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently proposed analogue transformation method has allowed the extension of transformation acoustics to general spacetime transformations. We analyze here in detail the differences between this new analogue transformation acoustics (ATA) method and the standard one (STA). We show explicitly that STA is not suitable for transformations that mix space and time. ATA takes as starting point the acoustic equation for the velocity potential, instead of that for the pressure as in STA. This velocity-potential equation by itself already allows for some transformations mixing space and time, but not all of them. We explicitly obtain the entire set of transformations that do not leave its form invariant. It is in these cases that ATA shows its true potential, allowing for building a transformation acoustics method that enables the full range of spacetime transformations. We provide an example of an important transformation which cannot be achieved with STA. Using this transformation, we design and simulate an acoustic frequency converter via the ATA approach. Furthermore, in those cases in which one can apply both the STA and ATA approaches, we study the different transformational properties of the corresponding physical quantities.

C. García-Meca; S. Carloni; C. Barceló; G. Jannes; J. Sánchez-Dehesa; A. Martínez

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Autonomous adaptive acoustic relay positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by adaptively positioning an autonomous mobile relay so as to learn and exploit spatial variations in channel performance. The acoustic channel ...

Cheung, Mei Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Broadband acoustic imaging of breaking waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An acoustic array was deployed in the near?surface layer in Saanich Inlet BC to image breaking waves using only the naturally occurring acoustical radiation in the band (160 and 2000 Hz) from the breaking region. The 15?element array was configured as a horizontal cross with an 8?m aperture bottom?moored and positioned nominally 3 m beneath the surface. A novel broadband scheme combined information at six independent frequencies above about 400 Hz to yield unambiguous resolved images. A parametric image analysis shows that the images align closely with the wind and can be observed moving downwind with a speed roughly equal to the dominant phase speed of the wind waves. Absolute power levels are found to be consistent with previously published results. The data also provide inferences regarding the sound generation mechanism at ‘‘collective oscillation’’ frequencies below about 400 Hz. [Work supported by ONR.

Rex K. Andrew; David M. Farmer; R. Lynn Kirlin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Air transducers with high acoustic impedance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High?Z air transducers evolved from several industrial transducers. These predecessors include (a) acoustic emission and angle?beam NDT contact transducers; (b) flowmeter transducers for high?pressure methane hot refinery gases and corrosive flare gases; and (c) transducer arrays for monitoring hot corrosive gases flowing at Mach 0.1 in smokestacks of ?3–13 m. This peculiar ancestry accounts for their unusual high?acoustic?impedance construction. By not employing low?Z air?backed radiating membranes transducer bandwidth response time and sensitivity are sacrificed. The solid robust construction however offers some compensating features: tolerance to wide ranges in pressure and temperature including rapid rates of change (thermal shock depressurization); corrosion resistance; operable with standard lab equipment without bias voltage; mounting options where the transducer forms part of the pressure boundary or where it is outside the pressure boundary. Clamp?on air flow applications at one bar include small wind tunnels and plastic pipes. Acoustically isolated pairs measure secondary flow components (crossflow circulation) in a plane perpendicular to the pipe axis. Flow applications include gases such as air mild steam (pending) or other hot pressurized or corrosive fluids. Air?coupled measurements of transmission characteristics of wood or other low?density solids and air?ranging are readily demonstrated with the low?Z transducers.

Lawrence C. Lynnworth

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Single Molecule as a Local Acoustic Detector for Mechanical Oscillators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single molecule can serve as a nanometer-sized detector of acoustic strain. Such a nanomicrophone has the great advantage that it can be placed very close to acoustic signal sources and high sensitivities can be achieved. We demonstrate this scheme by monitoring the fluorescence intensity of a single dibenzoterrylene molecule in an anthracene crystal attached to an oscillating tuning fork. The characterization of the vibration amplitude and of the detection sensitivity is a first step towards detection and control of nanomechanical oscillators through optical detection and feedback.

Yuxi Tian; Pedro Navarro; Michel Orrit

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3 D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

Yuh, Sung H.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 0510, NO. 2, APRIL 1985 123 Reciprocal Acoustic Transmissions: Instrumentation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmissions: Instrumentation for Mesoscale Monitoring of Ocean Currents PETER F. WORCESTER, ROBERT C. SPINDEL in opposite directionsbetweentwo pointsin midocean, one can separate the effects of ocean currents on acoustic to measure ocean currents. Acoustic transceivers have been designedand built to measure the mean currents

Frandsen, Jannette B.

128

Transmission Line Security Monitor  

SciTech Connect

The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transmission Line Security Monitor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Online Monitoring to Enable Improved Diagnostics, Prognostics and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

For both existing and new plant designs there are increasing opportunities and needs for the application of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic and prognostic techniques. These methods can continuously monitor and assess the health of nuclear power plant systems and components. The added effectiveness of such programs has the potential to enable holistic plant management, and minimize exposure to future and unknown risks. The 'NDE & On-line Monitoring' activities within the Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems (II&CS) Pathway are developing R&D to establish advanced condition monitoring and prognostics technologies to understand and predict future phenomena, derived from plant aging in systems, structures, and components (SSC). This research includes utilization of the enhanced functionality and system condition awareness that becomes available through the application of digital technologies at existing nuclear power plants for online monitoring and prognostics. The current state-of-the-art for on-line monitoring applied to active components (eg pumps, valves, motors) and passive structure (eg core internals, primary piping, pressure vessel, concrete, cables, buried pipes) is being reviewed. This includes looking at the current deployment of systems that monitor reactor noise, acoustic signals and vibration in various forms, leak monitoring, and now increasingly condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components. The NDE and on-line monitoring projects are designed to look beyond locally monitored CBM. Current trends include centralized plant monitoring of SSC, potential fleet-based CBM and technology that will enable operation and maintenance to be performed with limited on-site staff. Attention is also moving to systems that use online monitoring to permit longer term operation (LTO), including a prognostic or predictive element that estimates a remaining useful life (RUL). Many, if not all, active components (pumps, valves, motors etc.) can be well managed, routinely diagnosed, analyzed and upgraded as needed using a combination of periodic and online CBM. The ability to successfully manage passive systems and structures is seen as the key to LTO, particularly in the USA. New approaches will be demonstrated, including prognostics for passive structures, which is critical to maintaining safety and availability and to reducing operations and maintenance costs for NPP's. To provide proactive on-line monitoring that includes estimates for RUL new projects will include advanced sensors, better understanding of stressors and challenges faced in quantification of uncertainty associated with RUL. This program area will leverage insights from past experience in other industries and seek to demonstrate the feasibility of on-line monitoring and prognostics to support NPP LTO.

Bond, Leonard J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Modern Schoolroom Acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many teachers are faced with conducting classes in buildings that were obsolete thirty years ago. Others are or soon will be teaching in new schools which are in no way modern in some of their basic construction details. A classroom laboratory or auditorium is fundamentally a shelter in which the basic functions are seeing and hearing. Daylight provides satisfactory seeing a large part of the time. In spite of this about $1.50 per square foot is the average investment for auxiliary lighting while satisfactory acoustics is often completely overlooked or is the target of severe economy measures. Architects today are often eliminating or seriously compromising on the acoustical treatment expenditure while spending lavishly for less important materials. Eighty?five percent articulation will usually result in satisfactory hearing for adults because the context supplies the transitional ties. For children however especially the very young each word and every syllable is important. Excessive reverberation time or poor sound distribution may create conditions which seriously handicap the students and teachers alike. Modern medical methods have shown that poor eyes and poor hearing are often responsible for backward children who are really average or above average in mental ability. It is inexcusable to add to their natural handicaps those of poor architecture and poor engineering. Good acoustics is as fundamental as lighting and ventilation and much more attention should be paid to this phase of school design.

L. F. Yerges; M. A. Smith

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that

134

Quartic Parameters for Acoustic Applications of Lattice Boltzmann Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quartic Parameters for Acoustic Applications of Lattice Boltzmann Scheme Fran¸cois Dubois ab Abstract. With the Taylor expansion method, we show that it is possible to improve the lattice Boltzmann lattice Boltzmann scheme. Various numerical tests support the coherence of this approach. Keywords: Taylor

135

Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

Paillet, Frederick I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection  

SciTech Connect

There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the signatures of small vessels. The sampling rate of 8 kHz and low pass filtering to 2 kHz results in an alias-free signal in the frequency band that is appropriate for small vessels. Calibration was performed using a Lubell underwater speaker so that the raw data signal levels can be converted to sound pressure. Background noise is present due to a nearby pump and as a result of tidal currents. More study is needed to fully characterize the noise, but it does not pose an obstacle to using the acoustic data for the purposes of vessel detection and signature analysis. The detection range for a small vessel was estimated using the calibrated voltage response of the system and a cylindrical spreading model for transmission loss. The sound pressure of a typical vessel with an outboard motor was found to be around 140 dB mPa, and could theoretically be detected from 10 km away. In practical terms, a small vessel could reliably be detected from 3 - 5 km away. The data is archived in netCDF files, a standard scientific file format that is "self describing". This means that each data file contains the metadata - timestamps, units, origin, etc. - needed to make the data meaningful and portable. Other file formats, such as XML, are also supported. A visualization tool has been developed to view the acoustic data in the form of spectrograms, along with the coincident radar track data and camera images.

Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

138

Annual Progress Report on the Development of Waste Tank Leak Monitoring and Detection and Mitigation Activities in Support of M-45-08  

SciTech Connect

Milestone M-45-09E of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) [TPA 1996] requires submittal of an annual progress report on the development of waste tank leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) activities associated with the retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks (SSTs). This report details progress for fiscal year 2000, building on the current LDMM strategy and including discussion of technologies, applications, cost, schedule, and technical data. The report also includes discussion of demonstrations conducted and recommendations for additional testing. Tri-Party Agreement Milestones M-45-08A and M-45-08B required design and demonstration of LDMM systems for initial retrieval of SST waste. These specific milestones have recently been deleted as part of the M-45-00A change package. Future LDMM development work has been incorporated into specific technology demonstration milestones and SST waste retrieval milestones in the M-45-03 and M-45-05 milestone series.

DEFIGH PRICE, C.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

139

West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume IV. Bibliography and supporting data for physical oceanography. Final report. [421 references  

SciTech Connect

This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume IV contains the following: bibliography; appendices for supporting data for physical oceanography, and summary of the physical oceanography along the western Louisiana coast.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.) [eds.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Acoustic normal mode fluctuation statistics in the 1995 SWARM internal wave scattering experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to understand the fluctuations imposed upon low frequency (50 to 500 Hz) acoustic signals due to coastal internal waves a large multilaboratory multidisciplinary experiment was performed in the Mid-Atlantic Bight in the summer of 1995. This experiment featured the most complete set of environmental measurements (especially physical oceanography and geology) made to date in support of a coastal acoustics study. This support enabled the correlation of acoustic fluctuations to clearly observed ocean processes especially those associated with the internal wave field. More specifically a 16 element WHOI vertical line array (WVLA) was moored in 70 m of water off the New Jersey coast. Tomography sources of 224 Hz and 400 Hz were moored 32 km directly shoreward of this array such that an acoustic path was constructed that was anti-parallel to the primary onshore propagation direction for shelf generated internal wavesolitons. These nonlinear internal waves produced in packets as the tide shifts from ebb to flood produce strong semidiurnal effects on the acoustic signals at our measurement location. Specifically the internal waves in the acoustic waveguide cause significant coupling of energy between the propagating acoustic modes resulting in broadband fluctuations in modal intensity travel-time and temporal coherence. The strong correlations between the environmental parameters and the internal wave field include an interesting sensitivity of the spread of an acoustic pulse to solitons near the receiver.

Robert H. Headrick; James F. Lynch; John N. Kemp; Arthur E. Newhall; Keith von der Heydt; John Apel; Mohsen Badiey; Ching-sang Chiu; Steve Finette; Marshall Orr; Bruce Pasewark; Alton Turgot; Steve Wolf; Dirk Tielbuerger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Acoustically invisible feeding blue whales in Northern Icelandic waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fixed passive acoustic monitoring can be used for long-term recording of vocalizing cetaceans. Both presence monitoring and animal density estimation requires the call rates and sound source levels of vocalizations produced by single animals. In this study blue whale calls were recorded using acoustic bio-logging systems in Skjálfandi Bay off Húsavík Northeast Iceland in June 2012. An accelerometer was attached to individual whales to monitor diving behavior. During 21?h recording two individuals 8?h 45?min and 13?h 2?min respectively 105 and 104 lunge feeding events and four calls were recorded. All recorded calls were down-sweep calls ranging from 105 to 48?Hz. The sound duration was 1–2?s. The source level was estimated to be between 158 and 169?dB re 1?Pa rms assuming spherical sound propagation from the possible sound source location to the tag. The observed sound production rates and source levels of individual blue whales during feeding were extremely small compared with those observed previously in breeding grounds. The feeding whales were nearly acoustically invisible. The function of calls during feeding remains unknown.

Tomonari Akamatsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Use of high performance computing resources for underwater acoustic modeling.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The majority of standard underwater propagation models provide a two?dimensional (range and depth) acoustic field for a single frequency point source. Computational resource demand increases considerably when the three?dimensional acoustic field of a broad?band spatially extended source is of interest. An upgrade of the standard parabolic equationmodel RAM for use in a high?performance computing (HPC) environment is discussed. A benchmarked upgraded version of RAM is used in the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative HPC?environment to model the three?dimensional acoustic field of a seismic airgun array. Four?dimensional visualization (time and space) of the generated data volume is also addressed. [Research supported by the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative TeraGrid Fellowship and the Joint Industry Programme through the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers.

Anca M. Niculescu; Natalia A. Sidorovskaia; Peter Achi; Arslan M. Tashmukhambetov; George E. Ioup; Juliette W. Ioup

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NON-STATIONARY CONDITION MONITORING THROUGH EVENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in large diesel engines used for propulsion and power generation. Such operation involves frequent changes the technique for non-stationary condition monitoring of large diesel engines based on acoustical emission that cannot be separated from alarms originating from real faults. MAN B&W Diesel has conducted experiments

146

Monitoring materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Performance Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

148

Wireless technology and library acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The modern library cannot function without modern technology. Printers copiers wireless computers and espresso machines all contribute to the soundscape of the typical municipal library (and many academic libraries too). While some of these noise sources are stationary and can be isolated acoustically wireless computing has transformed the acoustic experience for the typical library patron. Study carrels and desks used to define the boundaries of study and work areas in libraries and architects could design spaces accordingly. With wireless technology every space is a study space. This paper will discuss the implications of wireless technology on library acoustics. Measurement results at a variety of case study libraries will be presented.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PROJECT SPECIFIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR A WAVE GLIDER-BASED PASSIVE ACOUSTIC DETECTION SYSTEM,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPECIFIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR A WAVE SPECIFIC CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR A WAVE GLIDER-BASED PASSIVE ACOUSTIC DETECTION SYSTEM, Attachment PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed Action Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) proposes to conduct a proof-of-principle study to develop a wave glider-based passive acoustic detection system for monitoring whale populations (e.g., presence, distribution, relative abundance). Long-term goals of the project include better understanding whale populations to facilitate environmentally responsible development of offshore energy and improving the capability to monitor the world's oceans. Location of Action The proposed action would occur at PNNL facilities in Richland, Washington; at the Marine Science Laboratory

150

Measurement of Acoustic Impedance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic impedance of a sample of material forming one boundary of a shallow cylindrical cavity can be determined by measuring the sound pressure produced when a known volume current is injected into the cavity from a high impedance source. The volume current is effectively determined by observing the pressure when the cavity is terminated rigidly. An impedance determination is thus reduced to measurement of the complex ratio of two observed voltages. By designing a ring source to suppress the first radial mode of the cavity the upper frequency limit set by uniformity of pressure distribution is extended by at least an octave. By avoiding leaks measurements can also be extended to very low frequencies. Secondary effects due to finite source impedance viscosity and heat losses at the walls have been evaluated. The method appears to be simple rapid and precise.

O. K. El?Mawardi

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Acoustically invisible cylinder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coatings of new type recently proposed by the author (Acoustical Physics 2007 vol. 53 N5 pp. 535?545) are applied to bodies of cylindrical geometry to reduce reflection or scattering of sound and thus to make them undetectable by imaging systems. Such a coating called as a coating with extended reaction represents a periodic set of small elements with coupling between the neighboring elements. Appropriate choice of the coupling parameters makes its efficiency much higher than that of commonly used coatings. In the present paper it is shown by computer simulation that a rather simple coating of this type can reduce the back?scattered pressure amplitude more than 40 dB (with respect to the rigid cylinder) practically at all frequencies. Considerable reduction of the scattered power can also be achieved in a low frequency range. The width of this range and the reduction index depend on the number of couplings introduced into the coating.

Yuri Bobrovnitskii

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Acoustic Correlates of Information Structure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports three studies aimed at addressing three questions about the acoustic correlates of information structure in English: (1) do speakers mark information structure prosodically, and, to the extent they do; ...

Breen, Mara

153

INSTRUMENTATION FOR SURVEYING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION LINES  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S. natural gas is distributed through more than one million miles of high-pressure transmission pipelines. If all leaks and infringements could be detected quickly, it would enhance safety and U.S. energy security. Only low frequency acoustic waves appear to be detectable over distances up to 60 km where pipeline shut-off valves provide access to the inside of the pipeline. This paper describes a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) developed to record and identify acoustic signals characteristic of: leaks, pump noise, valve and flow metering noise, third party infringement, manual pipeline water and gas blow-off, etc. This PAMP consists of a stainless steel 1/2 inch NPT plumbing tree rated for use on 1000 psi pipelines. Its instrumentation is designed to measure acoustic waves over the entire frequency range from zero to 16,000 Hz by means of four instruments: (1) microphone, (2) 3-inch water full range differential pressure transducer with 0.1% of range sensitivity, (3) a novel 3 inch to 100 inch water range amplifier, using an accumulator with needle valve and (4) a line-pressure transducer. The weight of the PAMP complete with all accessories is 36 pounds. This includes a remote control battery/switch box assembly on a 25-foot extension chord, a laptop data acquisition computer on a field table and a sun shield.

John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measuring the effects of acoustical environments on nurses in health?care facilities: A pilot study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the methods and results of a pilot ecological study conducted in four health?care facilities (acute?care community?care and long?term?care). The objective was to consolidate and test tools for exposure assessment and the investigation of study outcomes in particular stress. Area and personal monitoring was performed. Nurse noise exposures were monitored. Full?shift monitoring of sound levels was performed and conventional acoustical parameters derived; new acoustical descriptors including occurrence rate and peakiness were also determined. Two questionnaire scales were developed: a study questionnaire to assess perception of the acoustical environment and of work? and noise?related stresses and a daily diary to capture variations in the perceived stress and document aggressive events. The study questionnaire was found to measure disturbance impaired communication and mental fatigue. Biological markers of noise?related stress (salivary cortisol and heart?rate variability) were collected. Exposure measures were correlated with outcomes; while the results were often not statistically significant due to small sample sizes they identified interesting relationships and validated the measurement tools for future use. Long?term?care was identified as the most acoustically?critical environment both from a physical?acoustical perspective and from the perspective of workers.

Hind Sbihi; Murray Hodgson; George Astrakianakis; Pamela Ratner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sustainability Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sustainability Support serves as a corporate technical assistance, coordination, and integration resource to support line organizations in the resolution of sustainability issues and management concerns.

157

System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Time-lapse travel time change of multiply scattered acoustic waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of applications where detecting temporal changes may be useful include the monitoring of volcanoes, oil reservoirs time-lapse changes in the oil reservoir caused by a massive miscible CO2 flood to enhance oil recovery heterogeneous reservoirs. © 2005 Acoustical Society of America. DOI: 10.1121/1.2000827 PACS number s : 43.20.Fn

Snieder, Roel

159

Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound Instructor-surface interaction. Spring 2011 1 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound #12;Spring 2011 ME706 Acoustics and Aerodynamic Sound Students are expected to: · Exhibit a level of mathematical maturity roughly equivalent

160

Lattice Boltzmann method for adiabatic acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sauro Succi and Stefano Ubertini Lattice Boltzmann method for adiabatic acoustics...Burlington, MA 01803, USA The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been proved...recovery of the full NS equations. lattice Boltzmann method|computational aero-acoustics...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

IN ACOUSTICS UndergraduateCourses2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLYING SOUND KNOWLEDGE IN ACOUSTICS Acoustics UndergraduateCourses2015 #12;SOUTHA 2 #12;Reach-leadingacademicsoncoursesthataredesignedaroundyou. Wegetyoureadyfortheglobaljobsmarket,whilegivingyouagreat studentexperience. Acousticalcountriestoreducenoise REDUCING AIRCRAFT NOISE OurRollsRoyceUniversity TechnologyCentreforGas Turbine

Sóbester, András

162

Acoustic data transmission through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Acoustic Logs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acoustic Logs Acoustic Logs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: determine porosity of layers Stratigraphic/Structural: map discontinuities to determine their orientation. Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 1.00100 centUSD 1.0e-3 kUSD 1.0e-6 MUSD 1.0e-9 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 4.62462 centUSD 0.00462 kUSD 4.62e-6 MUSD 4.62e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 16.001,600 centUSD 0.016 kUSD 1.6e-5 MUSD 1.6e-8 TUSD / foot

164

Acoustic privacy and health care.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic privacy can be differentiated into two categories: freedom from intrusive noise such as a person snoring or wheezing in the next bed traffic outside the windows carts in the hallways and footsteps on the floor above; and speech privacy—the freedom from being overheard and of overhearing others. Providing the proper acoustical environment and the protecting privacy must be a joint effort between the facility designers and hospital staff. A brief discussion of the basic requirements for speech privacy and HIPAA privacy and a quality background sound will be presented.

Neil Moiseev

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Acoustic repair: Recent experience with the acoustic control system (ACS) for improving acoustic conditions in two existing venues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active acoustics systems are becoming more prevalent in architectural acoustics practice particularly in the context of repairing or improving acoustics in existing venues. Governmental policies to reduce funds and subsidies put into new facilities for the performing arts are another reason for designers to consider the use of active acoustics. This paper highlights two recent examples of such installations of ACS systems one at the Sydney Opera House Concert Hall and the other at MBCCH Winnepeg Canada. Collaboration between the system designer the musicians and the acoustics consultant will be emphasized along with techniques used to evaluate the systems' performance in the halls.

Timothy E. Gulsrud; Arthur van Maurik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Harnessing fluid-structure interactions to design self-regulating acoustic metamaterials  

SciTech Connect

The design of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials with tunable and adaptive wave properties remains one of the outstanding challenges for the development of next generation acoustic devices. We report on the numerical and experimental demonstration of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial with dispersion characteristics, which autonomously adapt in response to changes of an incident aerodynamic flow. The metamaterial consists of a slender beam featuring a periodic array or airfoil-shaped masses supported by a linear and torsional springs. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils lead to strong attenuation at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed on the incident fluid. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic bandgap materials to autonomously adapt their dispersion properties through fluid-structure interactions, and has the potential to dramatically impact a variety of applications, such as robotics, civil infrastructures, and defense systems.

Casadei, Filippo [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Bertoldi, Katia [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Kavli Institute for Bionano Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Keyboard Acoustic Emanations Scott Leishman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this step is the matrix. After that, the Viterbi algorithm [11] is used to infer qi, i.e. the best sequenceKeyboard Acoustic Emanations Scott Leishman ML Tea Talk - May 3rd, 2006 1 (or why you shouldn

Roweis, Sam

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic oscillation signature Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

47 ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ON SHALLOW WATER Summary: ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES...

169

Panama City 2003 Broadband Shallow?water Acoustic Coherence Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In June 2003 a series of acoustic propagation experiments were conducted off the coast of Panama City Florida. The experiments were designed to measure and provide an understand of signal phase and amplitude fluctuations and signal spatial and temporal coherence over several large horizontal and vertical arrays. The propagation measurements were conducted in a water depth of 8.8m and at ranges of 70 m and 150 m. The acoustic measurements cover frequencies from 1 to 140 kHz. The propagation measurements were supported by data obtained by wave rider buoys CTD’s thermister chains and current meters. Bottom penetration data was also obtained using a buried hydrophone array. The experiments will be outlined and the data sets described.

Steve Stanic; Edgar Kennedy; Dexter Malley; Bob Brown; Roger Meredith; Robert Fisher; Howard Chandler; Richard Ray; Ralph Goodman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Signal Processing in Acoustics: Science or Science Fiction?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Signal processing in acoustics is based on one fundamental concept—extracting critical information from noisy uncertain measurement data. Acoustical processing problems can lead to some complex and intricate paradigms to perform this extraction especially from noisy sometimes inadequate measurements. Whether the data are created using a seismic geophone sensor from a monitoring network or an array of hydrophone transducers located on the hull of an ocean?going vessel the basic processing problem remains the same—extract the useful information. Techniques in signal processing (e.g. filtering Fourier transforms time?frequency and wavelet transforms) are effective; however as the underlying acoustical process generating the measurements becomes more complex the resulting processor may require more and more information about the process phenomenology to extract the desired information. The challenge is to formulate a meaningful strategy that is aimed at performing the processing required even in the face of these high uncertainties. In this article we briefly discuss this underlying signal processing philosophy from a “bottoms?up” perspective enabling the problem to dictate the solution rather than visa?versa. Once accomplished we ask ourselves the final and telling question “Did it work or are we kidding ourselves?” Are the results science or are they science fiction?

James V. Candy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft PowerPoint - In-Situ Acoustic Measurements_Skliar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustic Measurements of Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments Yunlu Jia and Mikhail Skliar University of Utah, Chemical Engineering mikhail.skliar@Utah.edu Introduction * Harsh environment of coal gasification lead to rapid degradation of refractory which impacts reliability and economics of the process. * Harsh gasification environment makes it difficult to utilize the tradition insertion sensors to monitor the process and the refractory. * This project adopts an approach of using noninvasive ultrasound methods to provide real-time, in-situ information about the refractory temperature and thickness. Stages of refractory degradation [1]. Industrial Experience: Tsinghua University Coal Gasifier

172

Ion Monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Acoustic behavior of triple glazings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Making of triple glazings is the only way to still improve thermal performances of Insulating Glass Units. Possible ways with double glazings are already in use: increase the space between glasses use low emissivity coatings and special gas with lower thermal conductivity as argon or krypton. Specific acoustic weak point of double glazings is the resonance between the two panes which works as a mass spring mass system and coupling of eigenmodes of panes through the air (gas) cavity. These phenomena are of course still more important with triple glazings as there are two resonances. The paper will give all comparative data concerning thermal and acoustic performances and describe a way to achieve the same single number values of sound transmission loss with triple glazing that with double glazing by adding absorption in the gas cavities.

Marc Rehfeld; David Fournier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Acoustic characteristics of English fricatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of noise spectrum, while there are some data suggesting that /f,v/ may be distin- guished from /Y,Z/ on the basis of transition information.a!Electronic mail: jongman@ukans.edu 1252 1252J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108 (3), Pt. 1, Sep 2000 0001...! Variance ~MHz! Skewness Kurtosis /f,v/ 5108 6.37 0.077 2.11 /T,D/ 5137 6.19 20.083 1.27 /s,z/ 6133 2.92 20.229 2.36 /S,Z/ 4229 3.38 0.693 0.421257 J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 108, No. 3, Pt. 1, Sep 2000with h2 ranging from 0.001 for skewness to 0.004 for spec...

Jongman, Allard; Wayland, Ratree; Wong, Serena

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

LOGISTICS SUPPORT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic logistics activities such as transportation, inventory management, ... to deliver high levels of customer satisfaction. Logistics support functions perform those activities which move ... strategy and p...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design and implementation of a marine animal alert system to support Marine Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

Power extracted from fast moving tidal currents has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. Device developers and utilities are pursuing deployment of prototype tidal turbines to assess technology viability, site feasibility, and environmental interactions. Deployment of prototype turbines requires permits from a range of regulatory authorities. Ensuring the safety of marine animals, particularly those under protection of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 has emerged as a key regulatory challenge for initial MHK deployments. The greatest perceived risk to marine animals is from strike by the rotating blades of tidal turbines. Development of the marine mammal alert system (MAAS) was undertaken to support monitoring and mitigation requirements for tidal turbine deployments. The prototype system development focused on Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW), an endangered population of killer whales that frequents Puget Sound and is intermittently present in the part of the sound where deployment of prototype tidal turbines is being considered. Passive acoustics were selected as the primary means because of the vocal nature of these animals. The MAAS passive acoustic system consists of two-stage process involving the use of an energy detector and a spectrogram-based classifier to distinguish between SKRW’s calls and noise. A prototype consisting of two 2D symmetrical star arrays separated by 20 m center to center was built and evaluated in the waters of Sequim Bay using whale call playback.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Choi, Eric Y.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

Vertical axis wind turbine acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Acoustics Charlie Pearson Corpus Christi College Cambridge University Engineering Department A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy September 2013 Declaration Described in this dissertation is work... quickly to changing wind conditions, small- scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have been proposed as an efficient solution for deployment in built up areas, where the wind is more gusty in nature. If VAWTs are erected in built up areas...

Pearson, Charlie

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Impact on acoustic propagation by internal waves and tides in the region of shelf and slope.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal waves (IWS) and tidal activities were investigated in the South China Sea (SCS) and the northeastern seas of Taiwan. These oceanic processes cause large fluctuations and impact on underwater acoustic propagation. These effects include two?dimensional (2?D) and three?dimensional (3?D) effects. The 2?D and 3?D effects are related to the angle between the directions of sound propagation and IW front. When the IW front are from 20 to 90 deg with respect to the acoustic propagation direction acoustic mode coupling is the dominant factor which could be sufficiently predicted by the N×2D simulations. Acoustic energy is exchanged between modes and is re?distributed among the water columns. However when the angles between the wave front and the acoustic wave propagation are 0–20 deg the horizontal refraction effect dominates over mode coupling and the fully 3?D calculation is needed. The acoustic energy would be refracted as a consequence resulting in energy focusing and defocusing. These effects are clearly seen by the series of data collected in the SCS and the region of Northern East of Taiwan. Computer modeling results are used to manifest experiment data results in this research. [This work is supported by National Science Council of Taiwan.

Chi?Fang Chen; Yung?Sheng Linus Chiu; Yuan?Ying Chang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Achieving selective interrogation and sub-wavelength resolution in thin plates with embedded metamaterial acoustic lenses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and high resolution identification of acoustic sources having critical implications for applications such as structural health monitoring. The proposed concept is based on the design of dynamically tailored structural elements via embedded acoustic metamaterial lenses. This approach provides a completely new alternative to conventional phased-array technology enabling the formation of steerable and collimated (or focused) ultrasonic beams by exploiting a single transducer. Numerical results show that the ultrasonic beam can be steered by simply tuning the frequency of the excitation. Also the embedded lens can be designed to achieve sub-wavelength resolution to clustered acoustic sources which is a typical scenario encountered in incipient structural damage.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electrostatic monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Seismic Monitoring - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curation Services Ecological Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Meteorology and Climatology Services Seismic Monitoring Seismic Monitoring Email Email Page | Print Print Page...

183

Finite element analysis of a quadratic eigenvalue problem arising in dissipative acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with absorbing walls able to dissipate acoustic energy. A large attention has been paid to this kind of problems Aires, 1428 - Buenos Aires, Argentina. Partially supported by Universidad de Buenos Aires through grant TX-048 and ANPCyT, through grant PICT 03-00000-00137. Member of CONICET (Argentina). E-mail: rduran

Duran, Ricardo

184

Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular X. Jacob, V. Aleshin, V. Tournat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular Medium X. Jacob, V the mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular packed structure provide information on the elasticity in unconsolidated granular media is supported by its macroscopic manifestation in nature in the form of avalanches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Successfully merging architectural and electronic acoustical treatments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In enclosed volumes the integration of electronic acoustical components with architectural surface treatments forms a hybrid system that produces the perceived acoustical conditions. Since the underlying operating principles for electro-acoustic enhancement systems differs considerably between manufacturers the requirements for system infrastructure are not germane nor is the optimum integration of architectural treatments. As a result the nature of the work performed by the acoustical consultant changes to accommodate optimum performance of the specific “hybrid” system which may also include other forms of variable treatments.

Steve Barbar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Surface acoustic wave for microfluidic applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Surface acoustic wave-based (SAW) microfluidics attracts attention from microfluidic research community due to its simple fabrication, large force and fast, yet efficient operation. The scope… (more)

Luong, Trung Dung.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. Available for thumbnail of...

189

Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

Kercel, S.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation Using the Adaptive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation Using the Adaptive Wavelet 2008 #12;This thesis entitled: Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation Using. (Ph.D.) Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation Using the Adaptive Wavelet

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

191

Physiological Bases of Acoustic LRT in Nonstutterers, Mild  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physiological Bases of Acoustic LRT in Nonstutterers, Mild Stutterers, and Severe Stutterers* Ben C stutterers' prolonged acoustic laryngeal reaction time (LRT) values. Prephonatory kinematic data were foreperiods. Acoustic data replicated a previously observed composite stuttering severity and foreperiod

192

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

193

Environmental Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cell processing facilities should implement and maintain a program of environmental monitoring regardless of whether product manufacturing occurs in an unclassified laboratory space or in a Class 10,000 cleanroom

A. Gee MI Biol; PhD; D.L. Lyon MT (ASCP); CLSp (MB)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Simplified, low?cost, efficient, acoustic levitation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently I have improved apparatus for the acoustic levitation of a drop of one liquid in another making it practical to build for anyone who has an oscillaior and audio amplifier with response to 50 kHz a current probe an inexpensive oscilloscope and a lead zirconate titanate cylinder of the right size. This piezoelectric cylinder (1.5?in. o.d. and length 0.125?in. thickness) is epoxied near the center of a foot long piece of standard 30?mm o.d. pyrex tube. A hollow piston with o?ring seal and O. 005?in. diaphragm acts as an excellent bottom pressure?release reflector of acoustic energy as is the top air—liquid interface leading to strong acoustic standing waves at particular resonance frequencies. Optimum frequencies are determined by observing the input current to the transducer as the oscillator is tuned between 47 and 55 kHz and as liquid and piston levels are adjusted. Benzene droplets in water have been levitated with only a fraction of a watt input to the transducer. More details of this simple system will be described. [Work supported by U. S. Office of Naval Research and NSF Heat Transfer Program.

Robert E. Apfel

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Further applications of time?frequency methods in acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time?frequency (t?f) methods have been repeatedly established as effective tools to successfully analyze a variety of signatures from many types of sources or scatterers. Many such signatures have been acoustic in nature and we have studied these most extensively in the past. We have presented several of these examples before [viz. G. C. Gaunaurd and H. C. Strifors J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 1746 136th ASA Mtg. (1998)]. Here we will cover acoustical applications that we have analyzed but which were not adequately covered in 1998. We will also outline additional ones—more extensively discussed in Appl. Mech. Rev. 50 131–149 (1997)—and a recent radar application [i.e. ibid. IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 46 1252–1262 (1998)]. In this case the present t?f processing was shown capable of successfully identifying an air target that had been covered with a dielectric RCS?reducing layer. We believe that this general approach jointly with the way we have used it to physically interpret broadband sonar/radar signatures can lead to straightforward implementations for many practical target?classification problems associated with many types of sensors. [Work partially supported by the ILIR Program of the authors’ Institutions and the ONR.

G. C. Gaunaurd; H. C. Strifors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter  

SciTech Connect

The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. As part of the transmitter downsizing effort some of the design parameters of the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic tube transducer in the transmitter were studied, including the type of PZT, the backing material, the necessary drive voltage, the transmitting bandwidth and the length of the transducer. It was found that, to satisfy the 156-dB source level requirement of JSATS, a square wave with a 10-volt amplitude is required to drive 'soft' PZT transducers. PZT-5H demonstrated the best source level performance. For Navy types I and II, 16 volts or 18 volts were needed. Ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) closed-cell foam was found to be the backing material providing the highest source level. The effect of tube length on the source level is also demonstrated in this paper, providing quantitative information for downsizing of small piezoelectric transmitters.

Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

The milling process monitoring using 3D envelope method BISU Claudiu1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the past decades that measure vibration (acceleration) [3], dynamic force [4], acoustic emission monitored, vibration measurement has been widely adopted as a popular tool. Effective utilization proposes a method to vibration analysis in order to on-line monitoring of milling process quality. Adapting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

Analysis of Thermal Monitor features of the Intel Pentium -M Processor Analysis of Thermal Monitor features of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into limited thermal environment and the second is maximizing the battery life of the entire system. The Intel achieve longer battery life, lower acoustic noise and a cooler box. Thus, thermal constrains are a majorAnalysis of Thermal Monitor features of the Intel® Pentium® -M Processor Analysis of Thermal

Skadron, Kevin

199

Supporting Statement:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supporting Statement: Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 This supporting statement provides additional information regarding the Department of Energy (DOE) request for processing of the renewal of the proposed information collection, OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants. The numbered questions correspond to the order shown on the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Form 83-I, "Instructions for Completing OMB Form 83-I." 1. Explain the circumstances that make the collection of information necessary. The Department of Energy (DOE) requires collection of information for Recovery Act Smart Grid grants. Sections 1304 and 1306 of the Energy Independence and Security Act

200

Web Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Support We want to be able to respond promptly to your queries. To expedite our response, please check the specific website or page in question for the name of the appropriate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Final Technical Report: Development of Post?Installation Monitoring Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The development of approaches to harness marine and hydrokinetic energy at large?scale is predicated on the compatibility of these generation technologies with the marine environment. At present, aspects of this compatibility are uncertain. Demonstration projects provide an opportunity to address these uncertainties in a way that moves the entire industry forward. However, the monitoring capabilities to realize these advances are often under?developed in comparison to the marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies being studied. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County has proposed to deploy two 6?meter diameter tidal turbines manufactured by OpenHydro in northern Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington. The goal of this deployment is to provide information about the environmental, technical, and economic performance of such turbines that can advance the development of larger?scale tidal energy projects, both in the United States and internationally. The objective of this particular project was to develop environmental monitoring plans in collaboration with resource agencies, while simultaneously advancing the capabilities of monitoring technologies to the point that they could be realistically implemented as part of these plans. In this, the District was joined by researchers at the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington, Sea Mammal Research Unit, LLC, H.T. Harvey & Associates, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Over a two year period, the project team successfully developed four environmental monitoring and mitigation plans that were adopted as a condition of the operating license for the demonstration project that issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in March 2014. These plans address nearturbine interactions with marine animals, the sound produced by the turbines, marine mammal behavioral changes associated with the turbines, and changes to benthic habitat associated with colonization of the subsea base support structure. In support of these plans, the project team developed and field tested a strobe?illuminated stereooptical camera system suitable for studying near?turbine interactions with marine animals. The camera system underwent short?term field testing at the proposed turbine deployment site and a multi?month endurance test in shallower water to evaluate the effectiveness of biofouling mitigation measures for the optical ports on camera and strobe pressure housings. These tests demonstrated that the camera system is likely to meet the objectives of the near?turbine monitoring plan and operate, without maintenance, for periods of at least three months. The project team also advanced monitoring capabilities related to passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals and monitoring of tidal currents. These capabilities will be integrated in a recoverable monitoring package that has a single interface point with the OpenHydro turbines, connects to shore power and data via a wet?mate connector, and can be recovered to the surface for maintenance and reconfiguration independent of the turbine. A logical next step would be to integrate these instruments within the package, such that one instrument can trigger the operation of another.

Polagye, Brian [University of Washington] [University of Washington

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban) task. Monitoring infrastructure capacity is at least as complex as monitoring urban land markets Levinson, D. (2000) Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity p. 165-181 in Land Market Monitoring for Smart Urban

Levinson, David M.

203

Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method Restoration...

204

Acoustics as a Human Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There was a time when acoustics was only a human science but this changed as philosophers learned to use mathematical and other measurement tools for ordering and validating their thought processes. This century has seen many changes in the description of the field as a whole and the human aspects continue to be among the most perplexing. The highlights of accomplishments to date some observations on our current status of knowledge and some projections into the future are presented for your entertainment—if not for your information.

S. S. Stevens

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Acoustical Communications for Wireless Downhole Telemetry Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on this testbed in order to characterize the channel behavior are explained as well. Moreover, the large scale statistics of the acoustic waves along the pipe string are described. Results of this work indicate that acoustic waves experience a frequency- dependent...

Farraj, Abdallah

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

Cyrus K Aidun

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Multiresolution Reproducing Kernel Particle Methods in Acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and reliability of dynamic analysis. This is of great importance because the noise prediction of a complexMultiresolution Reproducing Kernel Particle Methods in Acoustics R. A. Uras Reactor Engineering In the analysis of complex phenomena of acoustic systems, the computational model­ ing requires special attention

Liu, Wing Kam

208

R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, © 2012 Tutorial Created in Comsol 4.3 (2012) #12;R. White Variables ­ space and time (x,y,z,t) Dependent Variables ­ unknown field (such as u) #12;R. White, Comsol (such as u) #12;R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, © 2012 Finite Element Analysis (FEA / FEM) ­ 1

White, Robert D.

209

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

210

Optoacoustic laser monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues  

SciTech Connect

Real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues, cells, and other biological objects with a high spatial and time resolution, which is necessary for selective destruction of cancer and benign tumours during cryotherapy, as well as for preventing any damage to the structure and functioning of biological objects in cryobiology, is considered. The optoacoustic method, based on the measurement and analysis of acoustic waves induced by short laser pulses, is proposed for monitoring the cooling and freezing of the tissue. The effect of cooling and freezing on the amplitude and time profile of acoustic signals generated in real tissues and in a model object is studied. The experimental results indicate that the optoacoustic laser technique can be used for real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of biological objects with a submillimeter spatial resolution and a high contrast. (laser biology and medicine)

Larin, Kirill V; Larina, I V; Motamedi, M; Esenaliev, R O [University of Texas, Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

From echolocation clicks to animal density—Acoustic sampling of harbor porpoises with static dataloggers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monitoring abundance and population trends of small odontocetes is notoriously difficult and labor intensive. There is a need to develop alternative methods to the traditional visual line transect surveys especially for low density areas. Here the prospect of obtaining robust density estimates for porpoises by passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is demonstrated by combining rigorous application of methods adapted from distance sampling to PAM. Acoustic dataloggers (T-PODs) were deployed in an area where harbor porpoises concurrently were tracked visually. Probability of detection was estimated in a mark–recapture approach where a visual sighting constituted a “mark” and a simultaneous acoustic detection a “recapture.” As a distance could be assigned to each visual observation a detection function was estimated. Effective detection radius of T-PODs ranged from 22 to 104 m depending on T-POD type T-POD sensitivity train classification settings and snapshot duration. The T-POD density estimates corresponded to the visual densities derived concurrently for the same period. With more dataloggers located according to a systematic design density estimates would be obtainable for a larger area. This provides a method suitable for monitoring in areas with densities too low for visual surveys to be practically feasible e.g. the endangered harbor porpoise population in the Baltic.

Line A. Kyhn; Jakob Tougaard; Len Thomas; Linda Rosager Duve; Joanna Stenback; Mats Amundin; Geneviève Desportes; Jonas Teilmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Micro-battery Development for Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System Applications  

SciTech Connect

The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. This study focuses on the optimization of microbattery design based on Li/CFx chemistry. Through appropriate modifications, a steady high-rate pulse current with desirable life time has been achieved while the weight and volume of the battery is largely reduced. The impedance variation in as-designed microbatteries is systematically compared with that of currently used watch batteries in JSATS with an attempt to understand the intrinsic factors that control the performances of microbatteries under the real testing environments.

Chen, Honghao; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Wang, Qiang; Lozano, Terence J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Li, Huidong; Chen, Xilin; Yuan, Yong; Gross, Mark E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xiao, Jie

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

Arch supports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arch supports Arch supports Name: Tu Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My question is about the foot. Actually, it's not really on the chemistry of the human body. I have flat feet and I need to wear an orthopedic, otherwise know as an arch support in my shoe. What it does is elevate and support the arch of my foot. Here is my scenario question. The orthopedic is very rigid and has a spring constant much higher than the rest of my foot. As a result, at high pressures, my foot will first absorb some of the force. At higher forces and as my foot had absorbed some of the force, the orthopedic begins to play a greater role. It's much stiffer. Thus a greater proportion of force is placed on my arches than on a person's arches who is not flat footed at high forces. Ideally then, an orthopedic would have the same spring constant as a natural arch and/or the foot. Is this the case of the use of an orthopedic?

214

R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, 2/25/08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, 2/25/08 #12;R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, 2,y,z,t) Dependent Variables ­ unknown field (such as u) #12;R. White, Comsol Acoustics Introduction, 2/25/08 Finite ­ space and time (x,y,z,t) Dependent Variables ­ unknown field (such as u) #12;R. White, Comsol Acoustics

White, Robert D.

215

22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Zonca, Liu Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 2 Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 3 2 Linear

Zonca, Fulvio

216

Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect

A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10??m wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3??m dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi, E-mail: dhagat@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

Acoustic probing of salt using sonar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Oecember 1977 Major Subject...: Geophysics ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Com ttee ea of e r nt em er ember December 1977 ABSTRACT Acoustic Probing of Salt Using Sonar. (December 1977...

Butler, Kenneth Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

222

Study on acoustics for SSC measurements Using the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background of higher- frequency, acoustic backscatterance sensors (ABS, for a review see Thorne and Hanes, 2002), and optical backscatterance sensors (OBS), whose sample ranges ar

Voulgaris, George

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic environments prediction Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction The Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy... (AOB) is a light acoustic receiving device that incorporates acoustic and ... Source: Jesus, Srgio M. - Departamento de...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic energy-driven fluid Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search results for: acoustic energy-driven fluid Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Acoustic Identification of Unknown Fluids Summary: Acoustic Identification of Unknown Fluids...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic field evaluation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanoparticles using bulk acoustic waves Bart Raeymaekers,a Summary: nanoparticles a one dimensional acoustic field and b two-dimensional acoustic field. 014317-2 Raeymaekers......

226

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power data through the surroundings (e.g., floors, ductwork, walls), to estimate the sound level that will be heard. Industry-standard calculations published by ASHRAE's 1991 Algorithms for HVAC Acoustics handbook are the basis for this estimate. In TAP, you can model the conditions of an HVAC system by choosing specific equipment and building component criteria. TAP will analyze the sound path and calculate the total effect for the enclosed space. You can continuously adjust the data and system design criteria to compare the results effortlessly. TAP will even plot presentation quality graphs of

227

Tiltrotor Acoustic Flight Test: Terminal Area Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a comprehensive description of an acoustic flight test of the XV-15 Tiltrotor Aircraft with Advanced Technology Blades (ATB) conducted in August and September 1991 at Crows Landing, California. The purpose of this cooperative research ...

Maria O. L. Santa; Wellman J. B.; Conner D. A.; Rutledge C. K.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Acoustical Holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is validated by conducting an experiment with a compression driver and four numerical simulations. The numerical and experimental results show that holographically-projected acoustic fields match well with directly-calculated and directly-measured fields....

Niu, Yaying

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However there have been limited in situmeasurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity I with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence ? s to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume ? e . Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering.

Louis Goodman; Marcos M. Sastre-Córdova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Subsurface Glider Localization Using Broadband Acoustic Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researcher, ORE Abstract Ocean gliders are low-power, buoyancy-driven, autonomous underwater vehicles inherent in broadband ocean acoustic tomography signals, this uncertainty can be reduced by 1-2 orders

Frandsen, Jannette B.

231

Acoustic Energy Storage in Single Bubble Sonoluminescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single bubble sonoluminescence is understood in terms of a shock focusing towards the bubble center. We present a mechanism for significantly enhancing the effect of shock focusing, arising from the storage of energy in the acoustic modes of the gas. The modes with strongest coupling are not spherically symmetric. The storage of acoustic energy gives a framework for understanding how light intensities depend so strongly on ambient gases and liquids and suggests that the light intensities of successive flashes are highly correlated.

Michael P. Brenner; Sascha Hilgenfeldt; Detlef Lohse; Rodolfo R. Rosales

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Field-scale acoustic investigation of a damaged anisotropic shale during a gallery excavation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, the gallery Ga08 was excavated in August 2008 to join the end-face of the pre-existing gallery Ga04. The aim of the present work was to perform in situ acoustic experiments to monitor the evolution of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) induced during the gallery construction. The end-face of Ga04 was instrumented with two arrays of acoustic transducers allowing for the active and passive seismic monitoring, i.e. acoustic survey and micro-seismicity. From the acoustic survey data, which required a high energy acoustic source to emit high frequency signals (21, 25, 31 and 38 kHz), the rock mass was observed to be anisotropic and heterogeneous at the scale of the experiment. P-wave velocities were determined to be, in average, between 3300 m/s along a structural bedding plane, and 2700 m/s at ? ? 70 ° incidence relative to that. Assuming a transversely isotropic shale formation, the P-wave velocity dependence versus ? was modeled using Thomsen's Weak Transverse Isotropy model (Thomsen, 1986) [36]. Thomsen's P-wave anisotropy parameter was found to be ? ? 0.15 , and the fifth Thomsen's parameter controlling the deviation of the wave front from an ellipsoidal geometry was found to be ? ? 0.16 . The S-wave velocity was estimated along a single direction of aligned receivers and turned out to be around 1560 m/s at ? ? 30 ° . We also show that the rock mass acts as a frequency filter for acoustic waves, related to the rock mass heterogeneities, i.e. the inter-bedding structure, which induces wave scattering and refraction. From the micro-seismicity data, we identified a large number of micro-seismic events (MSEs) detected on the acoustic arrays during and following the excavation. Most of the \\{MSEs\\} were induced on the excavated face but we also located some \\{MSEs\\} inside the rock mass itself. We show that these events are located close to a major fault, which seems to be reactivated by the excavation process.

Y. Le Gonidec; A. Schubnel; J. Wassermann; D. Gibert; C. Nussbaum; B. Kergosien; J. Sarout; A. Maineult; Y. Guéguen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Parametric acoustic arrays: A Bergen view.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the University of Bergen (UoB) Norway research activity in physical acoustics started in the mid?1960s with investigations on the parametric acoustic array (PAA). The newly appointed professor in applied mathematics Sigve Tjo/tta had some years earlier been at Brown University and was inspired by the concept at a fundamental level but also wanted experimental confirmation. No previous acoustical activity existed at UoB. The PAA project was started as a master project at Department of Physics where the main activity was in nuclear high?energy and ionospheric physics. Bellin and Beyer’s experiment served as a model. The results provided new information on the axial and directional properties of the difference frequency wave field. Inspired by this theoretical modeling continued along with further measurements. Other nonlinear effects like acoustic streaming (boundary layer density gradient) were also investigated. In 1975 a project together with SIMRAD and Norwegian Technical University resulted in a bottom penetrating PAA later commercialized as “TOPAS.” Numerical modeling based on the KZK equation resulted in the “Bergen Code ” still in use for computing nonlinear acoustic propagation problems. In later years activity at UoB has expanded to encompass linear physical acoustics of various sorts occasionally using PAA as a tool.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Measurement of the acoustic pressure distribution occurring around an aerial substation adjacent to apartment buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The subject matter of the research work presented in this paper refers to the measurements of the values of the acoustic pressure levels (noise) occurring around a main feeding?point aerial substation adjacent to apartment buildings. The paper presents the values of the noise accompanying the particular power devices mainly transformers during their regular operation. The main aim of this research work was the comparison and assessment of the acoustic pressure values measured with the permissible values defined by environmental standards binding in Poland. The research analysis carried out proved that during a long?term operation of power appliances installed in substations the acoustic pressure level that they emit into the environment is not constant but is subject to changes. Thus the increase of the noise level above the permissible values can be the cause of violation of environmental standards. Due to a significant increase of people's awareness and readiness to claim their rights the main consequence of violating the standards is a growing number of claims. Therefore it is imperative that the level of the acoustic pressure be monitored during routine tests especially around high?power transformers.

Sebastian Borucki; Tomasz Boczar; Andrzej Cichon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Acoustics at University of Texas: History and current introductory course in physical acoustics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As an academic discipline at the University of Texas acoustics began in the 1930s under C. Paul Boner in Physics and Lloyd A. Jeffress in Psychology. World War II saw Boner and many physicsgraduate students go to Harvard for “war work ” largely in underwater acoustics. When the war ended Boner returned and founded the Defense Research Laboratory later named Applied Research Laboratories. Interest in acoustics grew in Physics during the postwar years but eventually waned in the 1950s and 1960s. Acoustical activity developed in the 1960s in the College of Engineering chiefly Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Today physical and engineering acoustics is a strong interdisciplinary program at Texas with faculty in several departments in Engineering and still a vestige in Physics. In addition much work on speech hearing and music is done in other parts of the University. Engineering features two basic courses in physical acoustics Acoustics I and II and five specialty courses which are described in an accompanying paper. Here we concentrate on Acoustics I and II which provide an introduction to propagation reflection and transmission refraction normal modes horn theory propagation in stratified fluids absorption and dispersion waveguides directional radiation diffraction and arrays.

David T. Blackstock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Viscosity Effects in Acoustic Inductances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The linear acousticinductance and resistance of narrow circular tubes short compared to a wavelength have usually been represented by limiting formulas valid either for very low frequencies (viscous flow) or for relatively high frequencies (pistonlike displacement). Crandall's text gives a general mathematical development with particular stress on resistance but variation of inductance with frequency and viscosity has not been discussed generally nor has numerical reduction of mathematical results been generally available. The present paper describes quantitatively the dependence of inductance and resistance upon the general parameter radius times square root of the quantity density times frequency divided by viscosity. With increase of this parameter resistance increases while inductance diminishes from the “static” value to the limiting “high frequency” value. Experimental checks are made to ascertain whether resistance values are strongly affected by flow?transition end?effects found in hydraulics. Impedance?tube studies are made of five tube diameters from 0.0187 to 0.750 in. at 50 to 167 c/sec. Length/diameter is approximately 10 to render inductance end?corrections relatively small. Acoustic pressures are reduced until linear behavior appears. Measured resistance is generally within five percent of calculation as resistance increases to twice the “static” value. Measured inductance generally agrees with calculation within limits of the end?correction over the range of significant variation.

A. W. Nolle

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Physical acoustic information for magnitude estimation of rate of speech  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several studies have demonstrated that the phonetic identity of a segment can be altered by the rate of a precursive sequence. While this rate normalization effect has been shown for both consonants and vowels [J. L. Miller Phonetica 38 159–180(1981)] it has never been clear what the physical acoustic basis of the rate information is. In these experiments subjects' magnitude estimations of rate for a short passage are used to assess the physical acoustic parameters used by the listener to perceive rate of speech. From earlier experiments [F. Grosjean and N. Lass Lang. Speech20(3) 198–208(1977)] it appears likely that the source of information for rate is not based upon any higher information including words or word boundaries. In the first experiment subjects give rate estimations for a passage spoken at five rates by a female English speaker that has been low?pass filtered at 300 Hz. Estimates for these filtered stimuli in which energy for F1 and higher formants is deleted leaving only pitch and amplitude information are indistinguishable from those for intact passages. It appears then that not even phonetic perception is necessary for perception of rate in this paradigm. Data for estimates of rate for passages with only pitch or only amplitude information will also be presented. [Work supported by NINCDS.

Keith R. Kluender

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

New underwater acoustic tank facility at Georgia Tech  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large underwater acoustic tank facility located in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech has recently been completed. The facility includes a rectangular concrete water tank 25 feet deep 25 feet wide and 34 feet long containing around 160 000 gallons of water. There are three computer?controlled positioners: an x?y?z?? positioner and a z?? positioner mounted on carriages and a bottom mounted rotator. The facility has a large rectangular nearfield array which can be used either as a receiver or a transmitter. A single vertical nearfield line array can be translated by the x?y positioner to synthesize a cylindrical nearfield receiving array. The rectangular nearfield transmitting array and the synthesized cylindrical receiving array were designed to be used with the bottom mounted rotator to measure the true farfield bistatic target strength of any target up to one meter in length as a function of the target aspect angle. Such measurements can be done from 2 kHz to over 10 kHz. The tank is being used for transducer development materials and flow noise studies in addition to structural acoustics. Several available multichannel data acquisition systems will be described. [Work supported in part by a DURIP grant from ONR.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Panama City 2003 Acoustic Coherence Experiments: Environmental Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During June 2003 the Naval Research Laboratory conducted a series of acoustic propagation experiments to measure both high (20 to 150 kHz) and low (1 to 10 kHz) frequency spatial and temporal coherence in very shallow water. Environmental data collected to support the acoustic measurements included water column current bottom current sea?surface wave height tide height CTD water column profiles and mid?water time series two?dimensional micro?scale seawater temperature and weather parameters. Wave periods varied from 3 to 7 seconds and wind speeds ranged from 4 to 35 knots throughout the experiment. Temperature and salinity profiles characterized periods when the water column was isovelocity and periods when the water column was stratified with a strong depth dependence of temperature and salinity. Current magnitudes were always less than 25 cm/s. Experimental geometry and methods of environmental data collection are briefly described and environmental conditions and their impact on the propagation environment are emphasized.

Roger Meredith; Robert Fisher; Steve Stanic; Edgar Kennedy; Dexter Malley; Bob Brown

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Norton, Stephen J. (Raleigh, NC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustically coupled oscillations Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Mechanical Engineering PENNPENNSSTATETATE Acoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine Combustion... InstabilityAcoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine Combustion Instability ...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustically enhanced remediation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PENNPENNSSTATETATE Summary: Department of Mechanical Engineering PENNPENNSSTATETATE Acoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine Combustion... InstabilityAcoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic properties Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Mechanical Engineering PENNPENNSSTATETATE Acoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine Combustion... InstabilityAcoustic Analysis of Gas Turbine Combustion Instability ...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave chemical Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lyle N.- Department of Aerospace Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Collection: Engineering 8 Acoustic Identification of Unknown Fluids Summary: Acoustic Identification...

247

Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

History of American acoustics—Introductory comments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The history of acoustics has been illuminated by the efforts in recent years of R. Bruce Lindsay and so this Bicentennial Session is being held in his honor. In addition certain numerological factors spurred our efforts in this Bicentennial Year 1976. It was just one hundred years ago that A. G. Bell's invention—the first practical telephone—was exhibited at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. A year later in 1877 the first edition of Rayleigh's Theory of Sound appeared. The conjunction of these two events eventually had a powerful influence on the development of acoustics. The invited speakers will in the papers which follow endeavor to describe all of the significant advances made by Americans to technical acoustics. Apparently it all began with Joseph Henry's efforts to solve a problem in auditorium acoustics. At the brink of World War II acoustics was invaded by a host of scientists and engineers. During the period 1941–45 and in the post war years frontiers were breached in almost every direction at such a rate that description of the advances made cannot be done here. And so most of our speakers will bring their histories up only to about the year 1940.

Richard K. Cook

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator. 13 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. 12 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Stopbands in the existence domains of acoustic solitons  

SciTech Connect

A fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential approach is used to study the existence domain of fast mode ion-acoustic solitons in a three-species plasma composed of cold and warm adiabatic positive ion species and Boltzmann electrons. It is shown that for appropriate values of the cold-to-warm ion charge-to-mass ratio, ?, and the effective warm ion-to-electron temperature ratio, ?, there is a range in cold to warm ion charge density ratio, f, over which a stopband in soliton speed exists. Solitons do not propagate in the stopband, although they can occur for both higher and lower speeds. The stopbands are associated with a limiting curve of the existence domain that is double-valued in speed for a range of values of f. Analytical estimates of the upper and lower limits of ? and ? that support stopbands are found. It is suggested that, inter alia, the analysis should be applicable to the solar wind plasma.

Nsengiyumva, F., E-mail: franco.nseng@gmail.com; Hellberg, M. A., E-mail: hellberg@ukzn.ac.za; Mace, R. L., E-mail: macer@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Verheest, F., E-mail: frank.verheest@ugent.be [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B–9000 Gent (Belgium)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

Camilli, Richard

256

Laser-excited acoustic oscillations in silver and bismuth nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent acoustic oscillations in Bi and Ag nanowire samples were studied with a femtosecond pump-probe technique and detection of the scattered light. The observed optical and acoustic properties reflect the nanostructure of these materials...

Jerebtsov, Sergey N.; Kolomenskii, Alexandre A.; Liu, Haidong; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Zuxin; Luo, Zhiping; Wu, Wenhao; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Schuessler, Hans A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spatiotemporal processing and time-reversal for underwater acoustic communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-rate underwater acoustic communication can be achieved using transmitter/receiver arrays. Underwater acoustic channels can be characterized as rapidly time-varying systems that suffer severe Inter Symbol Interferences ...

Wang, Daniel Y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media. Wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides. Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for ...

Schmidt, Henrik

259

MHD wave refraction and the acoustic halo effect around solar active regions - a 3D study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An enhancement in high-frequency acoustic power is commonly observed in the solar photosphere and chromosphere surrounding magnetic active regions. We perform 3D linear forward wave modelling with a simple wavelet pulse acoustic source to ascertain whether the formation of the acoustic halo is caused by MHD mode conversion through regions of moderate and inclined magnetic fields. This conversion type is most efficient when high frequency waves from below intersect magnetic field lines at a large angle. We find a strong relationship between halo formation and the equipartition surface at which the Alfv\\'en speed $a$ matches the sound speed $c$, lending support to the theory that photospheric and chromospheric halo enhancement is due to the creation and subsequent reflection of magnetically dominated fast waves from essentially acoustic waves as they cross $a=c$. In simulations where we have capped $a$ such that waves are not permitted to refract after reaching the $a=c$ height, halos are non-existent, which su...

Rijs, Carlos; Przybylski, Damien; Cally, Paul S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Key acoustical issues associated with the renovation and restoration of the Southern Theatre, Columbus, Ohio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For an acoustics designer of performing arts facilities the renovation and restoration of a landmarked facility can be frustrating as there are rarely opportunities to alter the original architecture and therefore alter the original acoustics. The Southern Theatre renovation and restoration was somewhat unique with respect to the extent to which the theater interior was altered to address code issues and to incorporate HVAC systems. The Southern Theatre originally opened in 1896. The stagehouse main floor and second balcony were rebuilt as part of the renovation. The second balcony which originally had a separate entrance from the street was redeveloped to incorporate contemporary theater seating as well as some additional technical support spaces including control rooms and new lighting positions. With the wide scope of the renovation came the opportunity to introduce some important acoustic improvements. Among the key issues discussed are the acoustical design of a unique silent air supply system and design of an unusual enclosure for music ensembles that develops the lower volume of the stagehouse as a partially coupled reverberation chamber.

David W. Kahn; Ronald T. Eligator

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ocean acoustic effects of explosions on land: Evaluation of Cook Inlet beluga whale habitability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Eagle River Flats is an impact region for artillery at Fort Richardson Alaska. Adjacent to the Flats is the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet which is the habitat for a distinct population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). In order to assess the effects of 155 mm artillery explosions on the habitat of these whales a series of 6.8 kg C4 plastique charges were detonated on land 500 meters from the waters edge. In addition to land seismic and acoustic arrays hydrophones were deployed in the Knik Arm at high and low tide. This paper discusses the ocean acoustic measurements. The received signal 30 meters from the shore in water depths of 8 meters was more intense at high tide with broadband peak levels of approximately 180 dB re 1 microPa. The dominant frequency was about 20 Hz and most of the received acoustic energy was below 500 Hz. The geology and oceanography of the area were used to model the acoustic time series. Modeled and measured time series are compared to validate the geophysical model and provide estimates of peak pressure and energy flux density over the near shore habitat. [Work supported by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CRREL.

Sara K. Tremblay; Thomas S. Anderson; Erin C. Pettit; Peter M. Scheifele; Gopu R. Potty; James H. Miller

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advances in biomedical applications of time reversal acoustic focusing of ultrasound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time reversal acoustics (TRA) is one of the most efficient methods of ultrasound focusing in heterogeneous composite biological media especially inside reverberating cavities such as the skull. In this talk we will overview several recently developed therapeutic applications of TRA focusing of ultrasound including enhanced drug delivery to brain tumors generation of focal regions of complex shape tailored to the geometry of the target lesion and TRA dynamic focusing that allows to maintain the constant acoustic intensity in the focus regardless the variation of acoustical parameters of the media. We are currently developing several new medical applications of TRA such as remote charging of batteries in internal implants and leadless energizing deep brain stimulators which are based on the possibility to remotely generate an electrical signal in tissue using TRA principles. These applications employ a TRA focusing system with wireless electromagnetic feedback from the tiny implanted piezotransducer acting as a beacon. The acoustic energy is accurately focused at the piezotransducer generating required electrical signal while providing minimum exposure of surrounding tissues to ultrasound energy. Possibility of remote generation of electrical signals in tissue with amplitudes reaching tens of volts was demonstrated. [Work supported by NIH R21 CA164935-01.

Alexander Sutin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Statistical energy analysis limits for acoustic radiation car: an alternative approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to a new pass?by noise regulation Vehicle exterior noise will have to be reduced in the coming years. This may be achieved by optimizing underbody and underhood absorption and screening apertures. There is then a need for numerical techniques able to predict sound reduction related to acoustic absorption and transmission loss changes. Through a work supported by ADEME and headed by PSA energy?based predictive techniques such as Analytical Statistical Energy Analysis (ASEA) and discretized Energy Flow Analysis (DEFA) were tested against the actual physical problem to be solved through a series of benchmarks. Both theories are compared across several simple acoustic problems. It is concluded that both methods do not fit to the initial acoustic optimization requirement due to their intrinsic assumptions that restrict their applicative range. More fitted numerical techniques are now investigated: among new candidates the Virtual SEA (VSEA) technique that allows the creation of a numerical model of coupled acoustic cavities from the finite element global modes without the serious limitations of ASEA and a matrix approach based on Craigh?Bampton substructuration of the cavities.

Gérard Borello; Alex Borello; Julien Primus; Laurent Gagliardini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sentential, lexical, and acoustic effects on the perception of word boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of sentential context lexical knowledge and acoustic cues on the segmentation of connected speech. Listeners heard near-homophonous phrases (e.g. ? pl ? mpa ? ? for “plum pie” versus “plump eye”) in isolation in a sentential context or in a lexically biasing context. The sentential context and the acoustic cues were piloted to provide strong versus mild support for one segmentation alternative (plum pie) or the other (plump eye). The lexically biasing context favored one segmentation or the other (e.g. ? sk ? mpa ? ? for “scum pie” versus *“scump eye ” and ? l ? mpa ? ? for “lump eye” versus *“lum pie ” with the asterisk denoting a lexically unacceptable parse). A forced-choice task in which listeners indicated which of two words they thought they heard (e.g. “pie” or “eye”) revealed compensatory mechanisms between the sources of information. The effect of both sentential and lexical contexts on segmentation responses was larger when the acoustic cues were mild than when they were strong. Moreover lexical effects were accompanied with a reduction in sensitivity to the acoustic cues. Sentential context only affected the listeners’ response criterion. The results highlight the graded interactive and flexible nature of multicue segmentation as well as functional differences between sentential and lexical contributions to this process.

Sven L. Mattys; James F. Melhorn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Achieving acoustical satisfaction in a green building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Carnegie Institution’s Global Ecology Research Center at Stanford University has garnered many accolades including the AIA’s Excellence in SustainabilityAward. This building incorporates many ‘‘green’’ and energy?saving design features mechanical systems and materials. The occupants of this facility have given it high marks in U.C. Berkeley’s Center for the Built Environment’s (CBE) survey of buildings. Staff at the Global Ecology Research Center are shown to be more satisfied with their acoustical environment than occupants of other green buildings surveyed by CBE. Measured acoustical data for speech privacy in open plan and enclosed conference rooms will be presented along with descriptions of acoustical design attributes for the building.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Acoustical design issues for library facility planners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acting under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services retained Charles M. Salter Associates Inc. to provide a document explaining acoustical and audio/visual requirements for libraries to library planners architects and lay people. Acoustical design issues for libraries discussed on the website include site noise considerations noise standards for each use space room acoustics considerations sound isolation between various use spaces vibration control for mechanical equipment and audio/visual system considerations. The completed document forms a part of the Libris Design library facility planning information system which includes a website with recent information on facility planning topics and a database of recently constructed California public libraries.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Developing criteria for identifying acoustical defects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a construction defect lawsuit of a multifamily residential project the determination of whether a defect exists often hinges on the criteria applied. For many acoustical items such as plumbing and HVAC noise there are no code requirements but a number of guidelines and recommendations. For items such as noise from traffic or airborne and impact sound isolation between units minimum code requirements exist but often a more stringent standard is applied. How does an expert decide when it is appropriate to apply an acoustical standard that is beyond that required by building codes? Project drawings marketing materials homeowner regulations and other documents can provide indications of the intent and promise of the project as it relates to acoustical issues. The process is discussed with examples from recent cases.

John LoVerde; David W. Dong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation J.D. Regele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Timescale Detonation Initiation J.D. Regele , D.R. Kassoy and O to perform one and two-dimensional simulations of acoustic timescale detonation initiation using thermal overdriven detonation wave that decays to a steady-state CJ wave. A 1-D parametric study of acoustic

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

270

The Impact of Civil Rights Legislation on Classroom Acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................... 30 v Abbreviations ADA American with Disabilities Act ADAAG Americans With Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines ANSI American National Standards Institute ARI Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute ASA Acoustical... classroom acoustics standards for subsequent inclusion in the Americans With Disabilities Act Access Guidelines (ADAAG), and to reference classroom acoustics in the International Building Code (IBC). However, opposition from the modular classroom and HVAC...

Teel, Jeffrey

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Acoustic characteristics of clearly spoken English fricatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic characteristics of clearly spoken English fricatives renc n Fr cept em exam s to aref fric ed b gram wn effe e co h w by effo y an and 21/1 Deliberately clarified speech has been seen to yield intelligi- 2003; Krause and Braida, 2004... situations.3962 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125 #2;6#1;, June 2009 0001-4966/2009/12 ution subject to ASA license or copyright; see http://acousticalsociety.org/ce, Kansas 66044 ancisco, California 94104 ed 1 September 2008#2; to be understood more easily...

Maniwa, Kazumi; Jongman, Allard

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Monitoring your job  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Monitoring and Managing Jobs Monitoring and Managing Batch Jobs These are some basic commands for monitoring and modifiying batch jobs while they're queued or running. NERSC...

274

Utility Monitor September 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility Monitor September 2010 Why monitor utility syntax? Enforce and Maintain Company-Wide DB2 Utility Standards. Jennifer Nelson Product Specialist, Rocket Software © 2010 IBM Corporation © 2010............................................................................................................... iv 1 Why Monitor DB2 Utility Syntax

275

IVSS-2005-ARC-04 Intelligent Vehicle Based Architecture for Real-Time Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in cars for various other applications like inertial guidance systems, and crash detection for air- bag. 59 #12;ACOUSTIC WAVES OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DETECTING SENSOR A number of statistical measuresIVSS-2005-ARC-04 Intelligent Vehicle Based Architecture for Real-Time Monitoring of Soldiers

Mahmud, Syed Masud

276

336 Florida Entomologist 84(3) September 2001 AN OPTOELECTRONIC SENSOR FOR MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

336 Florida Entomologist 84(3) September 2001 AN OPTOELECTRONIC SENSOR FOR MONITORING SMALL optoelectronic system for measuring rapid movements in one dimension, such as the protraction of an insect leg, optoelectronic photodetector, cricket acoustic startle response RESUMEN Detectores ópticos de movimiento han sido

Hoy, Ronald R.

277

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine --An acoustic amplifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics Group MS K764, Los Alamos, NM 87545 backhaus) efficiencies 6" 24 " 72 " Acoustic power: 100 W 1 kW 50 kW T.A. efficiency: 23% 30% 25% All-metal bonded PZT stacks Metal joints, rather than epoxy joints, between PZT elements allow stacks to generate high power

Lee, Dongwon

280

New acoustic devices for breathing investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of spirometry control in medicine and medical engineering still remains urgent. The necessity of getting more and more information from spirometry investigations imposes more and more stringent requirements for spirometers, volumeters and ... Keywords: acoustic waves propagation, air-gas velocity, breathing, flow rate, measurement, moving in channel media, spiroanalyser

Semyon Shkundin

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Acoustics of modular construction—Industry overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This session will provide an overview of the issues and efforts impacting the commercial modular construction industry throughout North America with particular focus on acoustics in relocatable classrooms. The Modular Building Institute is the international nonprofit trade association representing manufacturers and dealers of commercial modular facilites both temporary and permanent serving educational health care retail industrial military and multi?family markets.

Thomas E. Hardiman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

283

Research equipment: Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the acoustic wave. More specifically, the equipment consists of: i. HP 4195A (10Hz-500MHz) ii. HP 8753ES (30kHz measurements on many SAW devices iii. Agilent E5061A (300kHz-1.5GHz) http Scientific Corp.): Atmospheric plasma etching, for surface cleaning, surface treatment and activation

Gizeli, Electra

284

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of marine seismic airgun sources" Les Hatton CISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns Introduction Modelling Marine Life Impact Where next Overview #12 Normal speed surface movie of airgun firing Courtesy IO limited #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns

Hatton, Les

285

Acoustic Lexemes for Organizing Internet Audio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Lexemes for Organizing Internet Audio Michael A. Casey In this article, a method is proposed for automatic fine-scale audio description that draws inspiration from ontological sound automation of audio description at the level of sound objects for indexing and retrieving sound segments

Casey, Michael

286

ElectroAcoustical HansGerd Berns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DUMAND will be deployed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean approximately 25 km off the west coast at DUMAND Site : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 46 6.4 First Acoustical Survey Operations at DUMAND : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 50 7.2 Transducer: ITC­3217 Modified : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 51 7.3 Power Amplifier

Berns, Hans-Gerd

287

Upgrading secret military facilities—What is more important, acoustic design standards or acoustical performance?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense has developed acoustical performance standards that are to be achieved in the design and construction of meeting and conference rooms where sensitive and secret information will be discussed. These performance standards rely on published acoustical industry design data which are readily available. The intention of these standards is to prevent sensitive and secret information from being heard understood or otherwise obtained by persons or devices that are not authorized to have access to such information. This paper presents design and field performance test results for new and renovated secret rooms that initially passed the acoustical design criteria and acoustical standard field tests but failed to provide the desired secret level acoustical performance. Further investigations and research into partition component and building composite performance indicated that floors walls ceilings doors windows and perimeter penetrations by conduit and HVAC ducting which individually met the design standards and when installed meet the design standards but as a composite did not provide the intended acoustical performance that would prevent unauthorized access to sensitive and secret information by persons or devices outside the designated perimeter. Reasons for certain performance failures are discussed and specific successful remedies are presented.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Rock stress and fracture analysis Hydrological: Use for fracture identification in open and cased holes. Also used for evaluating hydro fracturing/well stimulation effectiveness. Thermal: Dictionary.png Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log: An acoustic logging technique where the acoustic transmitter and receivers are lowered down hole and waveforms that travel through the well mud,

289

Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation.

Dong Zhen; Tie Wang; Fengshou Gu; Belachew Tesfa; Andrew Ball

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to developing technologies to meet escalating requirements for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) monitoring and associated inspections. This commitment involves the customization and transfer of existing remote monitoring/information management technologies for use by the IAEA. This paper describes an information management system called INSIST International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool, which was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the IAEA Action Team in its role of monitoring and verifying compliance under United Nations Special Commission (UNSC) Resolutions 687, 707, and 715. Initial emphasis was placed on developing and deploying functionality and databases customized to support the Action Team. Throughout the design and customization of INSIST, emphasis was placed on information storage and retrieval capabilities for data gathered by the Action Team. In addition, PNL provided the Action Team with maps and satellite images and other relevant Iraqi databases to further facilitate the following activities: monitoring nuclear activities, facility operations, and nuclear material inventories assisting in inspection planning and training providing post inspection analysis providing onsite inspection support reporting on inspection findings.

Steinmaus, K.L.; Wukelic, G.E.; Beal, O.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Acoustic boundary layer and acoustic radiation from a ribbed flat plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic boundary?layer theory(patterned after the viscous boundary?layer theory) is derived by noting that for low frequencies where the structural wavelength is much less than the fluid acoustic wavelength there is a region about the vibrating structure which behaves as if the fluid was incompressible. The dimension of this region depends upon the particular conditions of the problem. In a paper presented by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62 S32(A) (1977)] the theory behind the acoustic boundary layer was developed and applied to simple unit problems. In this paper the near and the far field of a force driven plate is obtained by the use of the acoustic boundary?layer theory. Two different problems are addressed. In the first instance the structure is assumed to be homogeneous while in the second problem presented a rib is attached to the flat plate. In both instances the fully coupled fluid structure problem is solved and comparisons between the exact classical approach and the proposed theory are discussed.

Mauro Pierucci

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Argonne Acoustic Levitation Video Goes Viral  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Inside the Advanced Photon Source" Inside the latest Argonne Now "Inside the Advanced Photon Source" Inside the latest Argonne Now APS Director Stephenson Named Argonne Distinguished Fellow Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Argonne Acoustic Levitation Video Goes Viral SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 Bookmark and Share Drops of solution being suspended for a long period of time, thanks to the vibrational force of sound waves that keep them stationary in an air column. More than 41,000 Google hits for "acoustic levitation Argonne" as of

293

Definition: Acoustic Televiewer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Televiewer Televiewer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Acoustic Televiewer The Acoustic Televiewer (ATV) log provides a very-high resolution, sonic image of the borehole wall. The tool consists of an ultrasonic transducer coupled with a downhole inclinometer. These devices are used to generate an oriented image of seismic velocity variation and wave amplitude. These images are then examined and highlighted to reveal fractures, bedding planes and orientation of those features. The log is useful for strata and fracture delineation, and can also be used to evaluate compressional-wave velocity, borehole deviation and eccentricity.[1] References ↑ http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/esc/geotech/gg/atv_log.htm Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

294

Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer  

SciTech Connect

Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Acoustical performance testing of duct silencers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The test method used in North America to evaluate the acoustical performance of duct silencers is ASTM E477. The ASTM standard provides an approved method for measuring the aerodynamic pressure drop dynamic insertion loss and self?generated noise of duct silencers. Unfortunately restrictions on the construction of the test duct in the current standard cause erroneous results in the measurement of insertion loss at low frequencies. These errors are due to acoustic resonances that occur naturally in the empty test duct. It is recommended that the standard be modified to require anechoic terminations at both ends of the test duct. It is also recommended that more specific design criteria for the source chamber be established and that a new section be added to provide for the measurement of the radiated noise from the casing of the test specimen. Specific recommendations relating to all of these issues will be provided.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Powerful, efficient, robust, electro?acoustic transducers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The STAR™ resonant reciprocating transducer began as a lightweight linear alternator design for a space?power free?piston Stirling engine in the early 1990's. It has since been developed into a range of commercially available motors and alternators with rated powers from 100 to over 10 000 watts (acoustic). As motors these are acoustic pressure drivers with unlimited operating life and typical transduction efficiencies of 80?90 percent. This paper explains the electrodynamics and operation of these moving? magnet Lorentz?force devices and the unique geometric configuration that has allowed scaling over such a wide range. We discuss the design and function of the unique single?degree?of?freedom flexure suspension that enables both the compact geometry and unlimited service life without wear. Data is presented from a large sample of units placed in service during the last decade demonstrating the durability and performance of these remarkable devices.

John Corey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

An overview of time?reversal acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time?reversal invariance is a very powerful concept in physics. In the field of acoustics where time reversal invariance occurs time?reversal experiments may be achieved simply with arrays of transmit?receive transducers allowing an incident wave field to be sampled recorded time?reversed and re?emitted. Time reversal mirrors (TRMs) may be used to study random media and chaotic reverberating structures. Common to these complex media is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM the sharper the focus. TRMs open the way to new signal processings that interest imaging detection telecommunications and therapy. Time reversal mirrors have plenty of applications including ultrasonic therapy and medical imaging non destructive testing telecommunications underwater acoustics seismology sound control home automation. An overview of these fields will be presented.

Mathias Fink

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD); Chandran, Ravi (Ellicott City, MD)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations Development Programme Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Resource Type: Workshop Website: www.un-redd.org/UNREDDProgramme/InternationalSupport/MeasurementReport UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Screenshot References: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification[1] Background "The specific objectives of the workshop were to develop a roadmap with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

State Support of Domestic Production  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the State Support of Domestic Production DE-FC26-04NT15456. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) performed efforts in support of State programs related to the security, reliability and growth if our nation's domestic production of oil and natural gas. The project objectives were to improve the States ability to monitor the security of oil and gas operations; to maximize the production of domestic oil and natural gas thereby minimizing the threat to national security posed by interruptions in energy imports; to assist States in developing and maintaining high standards of environmental protection; to assist in addressing issues that limit the capacity of the industry; to promote the deployment of the appropriate application of technology for regulatory efficiency; and to inform the public about emerging energy issues.

Amy Wright

2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Reduction of Doppler effect for the needs of wayside condition monitoring system of railway vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology of acoustic condition monitoring of vehicles in motion is based on the assumption that diagnostically relevant information is stored in the acoustic signal generated by a passing vehicle. Analyzing the possibilities of increasing the effectiveness of condition monitoring of a passing vehicle with stationary microphones, it should be noted that the acoustic signal recorded in these conditions is disturbed with the disturbance resulting from the Doppler effect. Reduction of signal's frequential structure disturbance resulting from the Doppler effect allows efficient analysis of changes in frequential structure of recorded signals and as a result extraction of relevant diagnostic information related with technical condition of running gear of vehicle. This article presents a method for removal of signal's frequential structure disturbances related with relative move of vehicles and stationary monitoring station. For elimination of the frequential non-stationary of signals disturbance-oriented dynamic signal resampling method was used. The paper provides a test of two methods for defining the time course of local disturbance of signal's frequential structure: the method based on the Hilbert transform and the method of analytical description of signal's disturbance based on the knowledge of a phenomenon that causes frequential non-stationarity of signals. As an example, the results of the processing and analysis of acoustic signals recorded by wayside measuring station, during the passage of WM-15A railway vehicle on an experimental track of Polish Railway Institute, are presented.

Jacek Dyba?a; Stanis?aw Radkowski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Detectors - Instrument Support | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detectors Detectors Detectors The detector design group, led by Yacouba Diawara is responsible for supporting the design of HFIR and SNS instruments by developing the necessary infrastructure and acquiring detector components that will be used to complete the functionality of the instruments. The group's mission also includes supporting detector research and development (R&D) for the various instruments and their different needs. The support effort for instrument design entails monitoring detector development worldwide as neutron facilities around the globe are getting upgraded and adopting the newest technologies. Detector group technician Ted Visscher inspects a parahedreal lens on an Anger camera Detector group technician Ted Visscher inspects a parahedreal lens on an

306

Acoustical renovation of portable classrooms for cochlear implanted pupils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anticipating increased enrollment of children with cochlear implants the Riverside County Office of Education undertook the acoustical renovation of two portable classrooms in California’s Riverside County: Wildomar Elementary School in Wildomar and Katherine Finchy Elementary School in Palm Springs. The aim was to improve the acoustical environment to make the classrooms suitable for pupils with severe hearing disabilities (reduce noise and reverberation). Lacking an acoustical standard specific for cochlear implanted pupils the acoustical goals chosen were those of the ANSI acoustical standard S12.60?2002. Key changes were intended to reduce interior noise from HVAC and improve the facade insulation to reduce exterior noise intrusion. The resulting acoustical improvements are documented. Costs and lessons learned are discussed.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Condition Monitoring Benefit for Operation Support of Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As more offshore wind parks are commissioned, the focus will inevitably ... case, both short-term risks associated with wind turbine component assemblies, and long-term risks related...

Dr. Sebastian Thöns; Dr. David McMillan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

Moore, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Fisher, Karl A. (Brentwood, CA)

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Penn State's graduate program in acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The posters will present a comprehensive overview of the graduate program in acoustics at Penn State. In part the posters will contain the following: (1) descriptions of the acoustics and related courses offered; (2) examples of the facilities available and the research being conducted; (3) listings of graduate theses completed and in progress; (4) information on special extended education programs—telecommunication and summer—leading to a master's degree in acoustics.

Alan D. Stuart

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

INL Portal Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supported Browsers The INL Portal supports Internet Explorer 6.0, 7.0; Firefox 1.5, 2.0; and Safari 2.0 (Mac only) browsers. You can download one of the supported browsers from the...

312

Spectral-element numerical modeling for acoustic and elastic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problems: many oil fields are located offshore (deep offshore, or shallower). · Anisotropic rocks dispersive surface waves. Oil industry applications Offshore In foothill regions #12;Ocean acoustics

313

COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICAL IMAGE LOGS FROM THE COSO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to permeability in the reservoir. Acoustic image logs reveal a similar natural fracture population, but generally image slightly fewer fractures, and do not reveal rock...

314

Acoustic scattering by axisymmertic finite-length bodies with application to fish : measurement and modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the complexities of acoustic scattering by finite bodies in general and by fish in particular through the development of an advanced acoustic scattering model and detailed laboratory acoustic ...

Reeder, D. Benjamin (Davis Benjamin), 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic measurements Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-429 Summary: by the acoustics team (Table 9, Fig. 19). Acoustic detection distances were not measured for this group. P. electra... NMFS ACOUSTIC STUDIES...

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustical measurements Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-429 Summary: by the acoustics team (Table 9, Fig. 19). Acoustic detection distances were not measured for this group. P. electra... NMFS ACOUSTIC STUDIES...

317

Acoustic energy radiated by nonlinear spherical oscillations of strongly driven bubbles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considerations of surface stability. With the quasi-acoustic...acoustic energies of bubbles driven at 23.5kHz...universal boundary of bubble stability at the upper threshold...harmonic modes on bubble levitation, stability and SLJ. Acoust...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

INL Portal Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Log into the INL Portal User ID: Password: Log In Forgot your password? INL Portal Support Home Supported Browsers Planned Monthly Maintenance Related Communities Subcommunities...

319

Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

A survey of the acoustical quality of seventeen libraries at Princeton University  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify objective acoustic measures that correlate with the subjective responses of students and administrators to libraries at Princeton University. The motivation for this study was to determine what is necessary in order to provide a comfortable acoustic environment for users of a new science library to be built on campus. On 31 March 2003 Acentech Incorporated evaluated 17 library spaces and interviewed a number of students and librarians at Princeton. Based on the results of the survey the author proposes that a comfortable acoustic environment in a library is an environment that provides freedom from distraction; in other words casual conversation and other noises in the library will not distract users reading or studying in the library. In order to provide such an environment a library must have (1) appropriate levels of background sound (2) a physical barrier between noise?producing and noise?sensitive sections and (3) sufficient sound absorbing material in the space. Measured quantitative metrics support these conclusions.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Prospects of the treatment of acoustical insulation in building codes of México.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustical insulation of dwellings in order to protect them from environmental noise is an issue not yet addressed in building regulations in Mexico but the Federal Government through the National Housing Commission (CONAVI) has promoted the development of a Building Code for Dwellings which in the future could include provisions about this subject. So far authorities have focused their attention on the problems of energy efficiency and thermal insulation of public buildings. On the subject of housing they have proposed levels of thermal insulation that could be adopted as standards and have also promoted the study of constructive solutions appropriate to those standards. The levels of acoustical and thermal insulation that are produced by various constructive solutions used by housing developers in the metropolitan area of the city of Puebla Mexico are analyzed in this work in order to compare their performance with international standards. A more comprehensive regulatory framework is needed in Mexico and the results of this research will produce recommendations on acoustical insulation capacities that the National Housing Commission could include in its code. [Project supported by funds from CONACYT and CONAVI.

Mario E. Vergara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Prospects of the treatment of acoustical insulation in building codes of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustical insulation of dwellings in order to protect them from environmental noise is an issue not yet addressed in building regulations in Mexico but the Federal Government through the National Housing Commission (CONAVI) has promoted the development of a Building Code for Dwellings which in the future could include provisions about this subject. So far authorities have focused their attention on the problems of energy efficiency and thermal insulation of public buildings. On the subject of housing they have proposed levels of thermal insulation that could be adopted as standards and have also promoted the study of constructive solutions appropriate to those standards. The levels of acoustical and thermal insulation that are produced by various constructive solutions used by housing developers in the metropolitan area of the city of Puebla Mexico are analyzed in this work in order to compare their performance with international standards. A more comprehensive regulatory framework is needed in Mexico and the results of this research will produce recommendations on acoustical insulation capacities that the National Housing Commission could include in its code. [Project supported by funds from CONACYT and CONAVI.

Mario E. Vergara Balderas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Experimental study of acoustic radiation from a boundary layer transition region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall pressurefluctuations were measured on a rigid axisymmetric body in the CEPRA 19 low?noise anechoic wind tunnel using flush?mounted microphones placed from the laminar region to the fully turbulent boundary layer. Microphones placed in the laminar flow region are used to detect noise radiated from the transition region which occurs naturally without separation under a slightly positive pressure gradient. Cross?spectral analyses show upstream acoustic propagation in a very wide frequency band 4–30 kHz detected in the laminar region. A method of conditional analysis is then used to establish the sequence of events from the onset of near?harmonic instability wave packets to the generation about 10 ms later of turbulent spots leading to the acoustic emission. This intermittent acoustic radiation is detected in the nearfield for wind velocities ranging from 20–70 ms. Farfield detection was not achieved probably because of instrument limitations and propagation effects. [Work supported by DRET Direction des Recherches et Etudes Techniques.

J. C. Perraud; A. Julienne

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Commercial thermoacoustic products and next?step developments in acoustic cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CFIC?Qdrive committed to development and commercialization of thermoacoustic energy conversion devices in 1999 by combining the newly developed acoustic perspective and tools developed at Los Alamos with a deep well of Stirling?cycle experience to achieve a total physics model with both inertial and viscous behavior of the working fluid. Such acoustic?Stirling devices combine the mechanical simplicity robustness and efficiency. Focusing first on refrigeration for cryogenics; this work has led to a family of standard products that have found uses worldwide from air?quality sampling and oil refinery support to military aviation oxygen liquefaction. This paper details the basic operation of these acoustic? Stirling products and the key technological elements that make them viable and attractive in cryogenics; then examines the implications for less?cold uses like food?storage and air?conditioning; with a discussion of achievable performance in accessible applications. We review the work now underway to develop devices to meet those opportunities with environmentally benign cooling of superior performance.

John Corey; Philip Spoor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Monitoring jobs with qs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Monitoring jobs with qs Monitoring jobs with qs qs is an alternative tool to the SGE-provided qstat for querying the queue status developed at NERSC. qs provides an...

326

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Multidimensionality of parental monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the construct of parental monitoring and its relation to antisocial behavior in children. The factor structure of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Poor Monitoring/Supervision Scale (Frick, 1991) was examined to determine...

Secrest, Laura A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

FAOFAO''s Support tos Support to National Forest Monitoring and AssessmentNational Forest Monitoring and Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mSubplots Towards starting point of the plot Rectangular subplot (RSP) Circular subplot (CSP and CSP3 125m Plot 250m 20 m Plot starting point RSP2 and CSP2 RSP1 and CSP1 Plot end point #12;FAOFAO

329

HOTLink rack monitor  

SciTech Connect

A remote data acquisition chassis, called a HOTLink Rack Monitor, HRM, has been developed for use in the Fermilab control system. This chassis provides for 64 analog input channels, 8 analog output channels, and 8 bytes of digital I/O. The interface to the host VMEbus crate is by way of a 320 MHz HOTLink serial connection to a PMC mezzanine module. With no processor intervention, all data sources in the remote chassis are read at 100 sec intervals, time stamped, and stored in a 2 MB circular buffer on the PMC module. In operation, the memory always contains the most recent 16 k samples of 10 kHz data from all 64 analog input channels. An expansion module that resides in the HRM chassis records snapshot data for 8 analog channels, each channel consisting of up to 16 k readings, digitized at rates up to 10 MHz. Snapshot data is also returned and stored in buffers on the PMC module. Because the HRM presents a memory-mapped interface to the host, it is independent of the operating system and may be used in any system that supports PMC mezzanine modules.

Al R Franck et al.

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Holland, Robert C.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

A new mechanism for resource monitoring in Grid computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grid computing is a technology for distributed computing. To manage a large scale of Grid resources for dynamic access, resource management is a key component. In this paper, a Grid Resource Information Monitoring (GRIM) prototype is introduced. To support ... Keywords: Grid Resource Information Monitoring, Grid Resource Information Retrieving, Grid computing, Resource management

Wu-Chun Chung; Ruay-Shiung Chang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system consists of instrument and control equipment and components necessary to provide human operators with sufficient information to monitor and control the operation of the repository in an efficient and safe manner. The system consists of operator consoles and workstations, multiple video display terminals, communications and interfacing equipment, and instrument and control software with customized configuration to meet the needs of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Process and logic controllers and the associated input/output units of each system interfaced with this system will be configured into Remote Terminal Units (RTU) and located close to the systems to be monitored and controlled. The RTUs are configured to remain operational should communication with CCC operations be lost. The system provides closed circuit television to selectively view systems, operations, and equipment areas and to aid in the operation of mechanical systems. Control and monitoring of site utility systems will be located in the CCC. Site utilities include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment; plant compressed air; plant water; firewater; electrical systems; and inert gases, such as nitrogen, if required. This system interfaces with surface and subsurface systems that either generate output data or require remote control input. The system interfaces with the Site Communications System for bulk storage of operational data, on-site and off-site communication, and a plant-wide public announcement system. The system interfaces with the Safeguards and Security System to provide operational status and emergency alarm indications. The system interfaces with the Site Operation System to provide site wide acquisition of data for analysis and reports, historical information for trends, utility information for plant operation, and to receive operating plans and procedures.

E.F. Loros

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect

Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplitude acoustic wave Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences 15 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic waves moving Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering 14 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics 19 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave induced Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 9 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic waves generated Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences 17 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

340

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave detector Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics 3 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma Summary: 233 Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave actuated Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma actuator, flow control, acoustic control, airframe noise 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Background... applications. Section 3 reviews some applications related to aero-acoustics,...

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic cavitation bubble Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Physics 62 Acoustic saturation in bubbly cavitating flow adjacent to an oscillating wall T. Colonius,a) Summary: Acoustic saturation in bubbly cavitating flow...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic measuring instruments Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

text... III Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) ... Source: Smith III, Julius Orion - Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Stanford...

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative proposal acoustic Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'acoustique 1990 APPLICATION OF FAST HARTLEY TRANSFORM TO ACOUSTIC INTENSITY MEASUREMENT W.S. GAN Acoustical... Services (1989)Pte Ltd, 29 Telok Ayer Street, Singapore 0104....

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic resonance determination Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 31 Acoustic Identification of Unknown Fluids Summary: Acoustic Identification of Unknown Fluids Executive Overview: Scientists at Los Alamos National......

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic linear acoustics Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Shallow Water '06 experiment are analyzed. Acoustic, environmental, and on-board ship radar... packet passed through the acoustic track. Preliminary analysis of the ......

347

Acoustical and Noise Control Criteria and Guidelines for Building Design and Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise, vibration and acoustical design, construction, commissioning and operation practices influence building cost, efficiency, performance and effectiveness. Parameters for structural vibration, building systems noise, acoustics and environmental...

Evans, J. B.; Himmel, C. N.

348

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic cardiographic assessment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACOUSTICS: RESULTS OF AN EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY INVESTIGATION Summary: wrightii. A one-dimensional acoustic resonator technique was used to assess the biomass and effective......

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic heating Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 46 Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Summary: Consortium Comparisons of gyre-scale acoustic and direct thermal measurements of heat...

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic testing Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OCEAN Summary: A COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC THERMOMETRY, XBT, TOPEX, AND HOT OBSERVATIONS OF OCEAN TEMPERATURE... @apl.washington.edu) Abstract - Acoustic thermometry offers naturally...

351

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustical testing laboratory Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering 10 A COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC THERMOMETRY, XBT, TOPEX, AND HOT OBSERVATIONS OF OCEAN TEMPERATURE IN THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC OCEAN Summary: A COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC...

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave integrated Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

93 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium Summary: 1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the...

353

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave total Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

98 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium Summary: 1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the...

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic gravity waves Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium Summary: 1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the...

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave sensing Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

62 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium Summary: 1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the...

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic tiltedti media Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Follow geometry and physical properties of a desired acoustic system Efficient Source: Smith III, Julius Orion - Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Stanford...

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic propagation experiment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of perceptual measurements Statistics for acoustics experiments Acoustics of porous media . The second... of Waveguides: Wave propagation in a guide Mode matching ...

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic neurinoma presenting Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grant Collection: Engineering 20 Wave Gliders for Acoustic Applications Asst. Prof. Brian Bingham Summary: the design of a vehicle with integrated acoustic communication and...

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 24 Wave Gliders for Acoustic Applications Asst. Prof. Brian Bingham Summary: Wave Gliders for Acoustic Applications Asst. Prof. Brian Bingham...

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic transfer functions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 3 The Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy A Light Acoustic Data Acquisition System Summary: : The AOB functionality allows for the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Multipurpose characterization of glazing systems with silica aerogel: In-field experimental analysis of thermal-energy, lighting and acoustic performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal-energy, acoustic and lighting performance of innovative glazing systems with aerogel inclusion is evaluated through in-field experiments. The study is carried out by monitoring two dedicated prototype buildings located in central Italy, and the consistency of results with in-lab analyses is investigated. Analyses showed that aerogel can decrease energy consumption for heating by up to 50% in winter, and its capability to keep the thermal zone warmer even several days after that the heating system is switched off. Acoustic analyses confirmed in-lab measurements, showing aerogel capability to increase the façade acoustic insulation index by 3 dB. Lighting analyses showed aerogel effect to lower the daily average illuminance level by about 10% during sunny days. In cloudy weather conditions, with low level of solar radiation and indoor illuminance, the effect was relatively higher. In those cases when windows include shading elements such as protruding roof or deep window pad, aerogel effect was not clearly identified through continuous monitoring. The results of this integrated in-field experimental campaign showed that aerogel filled glazing cameras represent effective and innovative solutions for energy saving in winter, useful for improving acoustic façade performance with limited penalties in terms of daylighting.

Franco Cotana; Anna Laura Pisello; Elisa Moretti; Cinzia Buratti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

An overview of acoustic?structural interactions: Vibration and acoustic radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structural vibration and the resulting acoustic radiation is a fully decoupled problem in a gas and a fully coupled problem in a fluid. The fluid?structure interaction problem encompasses a broad spectrum of areas of interest in engineering applications. This ranges from mechanically existed structures (acoustic radiation) to acoustically induced vibrations (elasticscattering) to hydrodynamically applied forces (flow noise). The coupled fluid?structure interaction for each of these problems is essentially the same; the difference lies in the manner utilized in applying the prescribed forcing function to the structure in satisfying the interfaceboundary condition and in analyzing the radiated acoustic field. The common link relating these problems is the fact that the same governing equations for the fluid and the structure are applicable in each of these areas. This commonality between the diverse fluid?structure interactions will be stressed. The different techniques being used to solve the problems for each of the three types of problems will be presented and a brief review of the state of the art will be given.

Mauro Pierucci

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

History of structural acoustics and vibrations in the Acoustical Society of America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural acoustics refers to the interaction of sound and structures—the response of structures to sound the radiation of sound from vibrating structures and the effect of the acoustic medium on the structural vibrations. Interest in these subjects increased greatly during the 1930s and 40s because of practical applications in the design of microphones and loud speakers used in telephones radios and electronic phonographs. The combination of electrical and mechanical systems lead to the use of electrical engineering concepts such as impedance circuits and electrical analogies in the analysis of mechanical systems. In later years much of the work dealt with various aspects of underwater structures prompted by U.S. Navy interests. The field which began with classical analytical mechanics applications has progressed to new approaches including statistical energy analysis near?field acoustical holography fuzzy structures active control of vibrations and smart materials. In recognition of these new developments the name of the technical committee was changed in 1987 from ‘‘Shock and Vibration’’ to ‘‘Structural Acoustics and Vibration.’’

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Acoustics of Buildings: including Acoustics of Auditoriums and Sound-proofing of Rooms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE acoustics of buildings is a subject which has always possessed importance, but with the increasing size of ... is a subject which has always possessed importance, but with the increasing size of public buildings and the congestion of our urban populations, it has assumed much greater importance in ...

1924-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Multidelay Model Relating Tide Height to Underwater Acoustic Phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observed relationships between environmental parameters and underwater acoustic phase were earlier reported and a multi?input nonrealizable model was analyzed showing that among several parameters tide height has the strongest coherence with measured phase fluctuations. This work is concerned with a special case of the above model where the system is single input with a realizable impulse response consisting of few delays. Several cases are considered such as a single delay two or more delays. Among these a special case is found where one of the delays is fixed at zero time (in phase no delay component). Two kinds of results are reported—one where optimization is carried out on all energy bands another where optimization is carried out on selected bands that are least corrupted by noise and the effect of other parameters. The resulting transfer function is calculated and errors from measured values are given individually for each band and also collectively as a figure of merit for that solution. [Work supported by Office of Naval Research Code 468.

Kamal Yacoub; Jose Almeida

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nonuniform acoustic localization: Decay of the incoherent impulse response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustic localization in random?scattering media is a consequence of backscatter enhancement in the regime of strong scattering. In statistically uniform conservative media idealized localization is predicted to lead above a critical frequency to eternal trapping of wave energy within the bulk and decoupling of interior strongly scattered wave solutions from any propagating spectrum exterior to the strong?scattering region. Small?size correlations show a diffusive transient approach to the later stationary noise spectrum. It is shown here that strong but nonuniform scattering leads to ‘‘almost?localization ’’ producing scattered solutions that are weakly coupled to a propagating spectrum in the manner of resonances. Such states produce an exponential rather than diffusive decay tail in the incoherent late?time impulse response with a time constant predicted to exhibit universal scaling with frequency for smooth nonuniformity. The predicted relation agrees well with a long?known scaling regime in earthquake?seismic coda which has been attributed to multiple scatter. Preliminary evidence is presented for similar exponential decay in impulse reflections from saturated sand suggesting a similar multiple?scattering origin. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research Code 321OA.

Eric Smith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

Sinha, Dipen

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Montana State University Proprietary 1 Summary of Gun Shot Acoustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montana State University Proprietary 1 Summary of Gun Shot Acoustics Robert C. Maher, Montana State University 4 April 2006 Audio recordings of gun shots can provide information about the gun location interpreting such recordings arises from reverberation (overlapping acoustic signal reflections) due to the gun

Maher, Robert C.

372

Quantitative Photo-Acoustic Imaging of Small Absorbers Habib Ammari  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative Photo-Acoustic Imaging of Small Absorbers Habib Ammari Emmanuel Bossy Vincent Jugnon Hyeonbae Kang§ December 1, 2009 Abstract In photo-acoustic imaging, energy absorption causes thermo absorber from the absorbed density. AMS subject classifications. 31B20, 35B37,35L05 Key words. photo

Kang, Hyeonbae

373

Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia) Graduate School 29 April 2013) Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted proportional to temperature) and current in the ocean (Munk et al., 1995). Other than coastal sea studies (e

Frandsen, Jannette B.

374

Characterizing Ocean Turbulence from Argo, Acoustic Doppler, and Simulation Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. TurbSim models statistics at the height of a turbine hub (5m) well, but do not model coherent eventsCharacterizing Ocean Turbulence from Argo, Acoustic Doppler, and Simulation Data Katherine Mc Ocean Turbulence from Argo, Acoustic Doppler, and Simulation Data written by Katherine McCaffrey has

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

375

Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wells Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging...lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging...properties of soft tissue. In Handbook of elastic properties of solids...W. , Trahey, G. 1995 A fundamental limit on delay estimation using...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A new concept of ocean acoustic tomography Lionel CROS(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a synthetic signal in ship noise with the con- straint to have an accurate estimation of the channel: discreet acoustic tomography, estimation, detection, optimization, performance analysis. R´ESUM´E COURT: La disc`ete, estimation, d´etection, optimisation, analyse de perfor- mance. 1 INTRODUCTION Ocean acoustic

Boyer, Edmond

377

15 Acoustic Daylight Imaging in the Michael J. Buckingham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radiation, including light. Acoustic techniques are thus a pre- ferred choice for probing the ocean depths. Two types of acoustic sys- tems, passive sonar and active sonar, are commonly used as detection devices in the ocean [1]. A passive sonar simply listens for the sound radiated by a target

Buckingham, Michael

378

An Advanced Channel Framework for Improved Underwater Acoustic Network Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as pollution, climate change and severe weather events is rapidly increasing. At the same time, as ocean underwater sensors, vehicles and devices together using acoustic communication. Network protocol development operation. However, acoustic communication performance is dynamic and dependent upon the environment

Zhou, Shengli

379

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser Induced

California at San Diego, University of

380

A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A decade of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean B. D. Dushaw,1 P. F. Worcester,2 W. H of acoustic thermometry in the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 114, C07021, doi:10.1029/2008JC005124. 1 of basin-scale heat content in the northeast Pacific Ocean were made using a broadband 133-Hz source

Frandsen, Jannette B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

382

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AcousticCalc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AcousticCalc AcousticCalc Developed over the last decade, AcousticCalc helps designers predict sound levels at the room level from a distant sound source. The program uses the ASHRAE Handbook and ASHRAE's 1991 Algorithms for HVAC Acoustics handbook methods with the "Source-Path-Receiver" model. This easy-to-use Windows-based program allows a user to define and save unlimited number of sound sources, save and define unlimited number of sound "paths" (composed of long list of possible duct component types) and model the ceiling effect and three different models for room effect. AcousticCalc allows a user to import and export (share) sound sources, user-defined devices, terminal units, and duct silencers with other users. Easy-to-navigate "tree" modeling allows an unlimited number of sound

383

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Semburg, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

Benjamin Semburg; for the IceCube Collaboration

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Acoustic emission before avalanches in granular media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Avalanches of granular media are mainly characterized by the observation and the measurement of the main angles of avalanche corresponding first to the movement of isolated beads and to the whole movement of a great part of the grains. These characterisations do not give any information about the rearrangements of the grains inside the layer of granular beads. As any movement of a grain produces a deformation of the structure it is quite normal to expect for a sound that will propagate inside the granular medium. We present an experimental study of the precursors of avalanches on spherical granular glass beads and silica aerogels in powder (size of grains less than 80 micrometers). Acoustic emission has been recorded with two piezoelectric transducers placed on the lower part of the material layer. Our results show clearly that before any movement on the upper part of the beads layer so for an angle less than the first angle of avalanche movements inside the material produce pulsed sounds that can be recorded. Theses vibrating events are occurring more and more when the angle is increasing until the first angle of avalanche where acoustic emission becomes intense.

Vincent Gibiat; Eric Plazza; Pierre De Guibert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Acoustic and seismic measurement of ice processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As sea ice responds to environmental forcing it deforms leading to the storage of strain energy. When mechanical failure occurs most of this energy is dissipated through fracturing but a small portion radiates as seismic and acoustic waves. These waves provide useful signals for sensing the failure process in the ice. In a recent ice mechanics experiment conducted north of Prudhoe Bay (SIMI ’94) a large number of ice failure events were observed using geophone and hydrophone arrays. Preliminary results are presented including a large?scale tensile fracture test and naturally occurring sounds near a closing lead. For the artificial fracture the acoustic signals allow determination of cracking rate fracture advance and crack propagation velocities. The overall crack propagation speed is estimated to be of order 50 m?s?1; maximum cracking activities occur prior to peak loading. In the second data set the naturally occurring stick?slip process was observed as two ice sheets moved against each other in a closing lead. A wide range of frequencies can occur simultaneously representing different components of the sliding and slipping mechanisms.

David M. Farmer; Yunbo Xie

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Improved efficiency of an acoustic parametric source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the customary design of an acoustic parametric source a primary signal consisting of two high–frequency wave components is projected into the water. Because of the inherent nonlinearity of acoustic propagation the two primary components mix to form a wave at the difference frequency. This paper describes how one can increase the parametric conversion of energy into the difference–frequency beam through the use of primary signals other than the two–component signal described above. For example another primary signal one might use consists of a sinusoidal carrier wave undergoing amplitude modulation. Use of such an AM primary signal with 100% modulation leads to a predicted difference–frequency pressure amplitude that is 2.5 dB greater than the corresponding amplitude obtained with a two–component primary signal of the same total input power. This prediction shows approximate agreement with a measured increase of 2.1 dB. For a primary signal consisting of N components theory predicts an increase in difference–frequency level that approaches 6 dB as an upper limit.

Anthony I. Eller

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Helioseismology in a bottle: modal acoustic velocimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of the differential rotation of the Sun's interior is one of the great achievements of helioseismology, providing important constraints for stellar physics. The technique relies on observing and analyzing rotationally-induced splittings of p-modes in the star. Here we demonstrate the first use of the technique in a laboratory setting. We apply it in a spherical cavity with a spinning central core (spherical-Couette flow) to determine the mean azimuthal velocity of the air filling the cavity. We excite a number of acoustic resonances (analogous to p-modes in the Sun) using a speaker and record the response with an array of small microphones on the outer sphere. Many observed acoustic modes show rotationally-induced splittings, which allow us to perform an inversion to determine the air's azimuthal velocity as a function of both radius and latitude. We validate the method by comparing the velocity field obtained through inversion against the velocity profile measured with a calibrated hot film anemo...

Triana, Santiago Andrés; Nataf, Henri-Claude; Thorette, Aurélien; Lekic, Vedran; Lathrop, Daniel P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

John Svoboda

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPORARY SUPPORT HUMAN RESOURCES GUIDELINE Workforce Planning | One Washington Square | San José of the Request for Temporary Support, Workforce Planning will make a determination of the type of temporary

Su, Xiao

392

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Secuirty  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Mission Support Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security Development of an Army Energy Security Assessment Model FUPWG Mr. Chuck Tremel, CTC 21 October 2010 2 2 Purpose * Provide an overview of the Army Energy Security Assessment (ESA) methodology - Being developed by Concurrent Technologies Corporation - Monitored by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineering Research and Development-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) * Engage Utility and Government Stakeholders 3 3 Overall Program Objectives * Develop/enhance the draft ESA methodology demonstrated under the Army Power and Energy Initiative (APEI) - Leverage existing processes (e.g., Anti-terrorism/Force Protection) - Critical Mission focused * Validate the methodology at an Army installation

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic waves propagating Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

propagating Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acoustic waves propagating...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic waves propagation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

propagation Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acoustic waves propagation...

395

Insulation Monitors Settings Selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the chapter general requirements set to insulation monitors selection in AC and DC networks ... given. Examples of regulations requirements for circuits insulation equivalent resistance are presented. Traditio...

Piotr Olszowiec

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Environmental monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

Holland, R.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Section 42: Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using techniques that do not jeopardize the containment of waste in the disposal system. Ten monitoring parameters were identified in an analysis performed to fulfill the section...

398

Sexual Assault Support Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

session, you may be seen at PCS for further counselling/support or be provided with a referral to another organization that exists to provide peer support and referrals to survivors of sexual assault. We are a pro-diversity organization: we support and offer referrals to people of all backgrounds, cultures, abilities, genders

399

Office of Sustainability Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Sustainability Support serves as AU’s organizational lead in partnering with the Department’s Sustainability Performance Office to support the understanding and implementation of sustainability programs and requirements within the Department, including through supporting development and implementation of DOE’s annual Strategic Sustainability Program Plan.

400

Good classroom acoustics are a good investment for America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Buzz Towne’s idealism sparked ASA’s current activities to improve classroom acoustics including ANSI S12 WG43’s activity to produce an American standard for classroom acoustics. But idealism alone may not suffice to realize the reforms Buzz sought. It will help if advocates can show that good classroom acoustics are a good investment for community and nation. Absent were the resources necessary for serious economic cost?benefit studies some very informal ‘‘back?of?the?envelope’’ engineering estimates were made by acousticians audiologists and material vendors. All assume 20 year life cycles for new and renovated classrooms. In one scenario costs for quiet HVAC and sound absorbing ceilings are shown to be a small fraction of costs for ordinary school construction yielding substandard acoustics. In another scenario costs for quiet classroom HVAC are shown to be small compared to annual operating costs per student. A third scenario shows that a modest but plausible assumed increase in average lifetime earnings generously will repay the initial costs for good acoustics. These scenarios do not consider the economic costs of bad acoustics including high dropout rates truancy juvenile crime and teacher burnout. The authors hope to inspire others to more fully study the economic social and educational benefits of good acoustics.

David Lubman; Louis C. Sutherland

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal Neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 meter square; acoustic pulses were "linear sweep-spread signals" - multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10-22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with a accuracy of ~0.2 m (along the beam) and ~1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km3-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

K. G. Kebkal; R. Bannasch; O. G. Kebkal; A. I. Panfilov; R. Wischnewski

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Passive acoustics embedded on gliders—Weather observation through ambient noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underwater gliders can provide high resolution water temperature and salinity profiles. Being able to associate them with a surface weather conditions estimation would allow to better study sea-air interactions. Since in-situ observations of the marine meteorological parameters are difficult the development of a glider embedded weather sensor has been studied based on the WOTAN approach. In the 1–30 kHz frequency range the background underwater noise is dominated by wind generated noise. Focusing on the sound pressure level at 5 8 10 and 20 kHz allows to estimate the wind speed. Thus deploying a glider with an embedded hydrophone gives an access to the surface weather conditions around its position. We have deployed gliders in the Mediterranean sea with passive acoustic monitoring devices onboard. Four months of data have been recorded. Wind speed estimations have been confronted to weather buoys observations and atmospheric models predictions. Wind estimates have been obtained with a ~2 m/s error. A specific emphasis has been placed on the robustness of the processing through multi frequencies analysis and depth induced attenuation correction. A downscaling study has been performed on the acoustic sampling protocol in order to meet the low energy consumption glider standards for a future real time embedded processing. The glider generated noise and its vertical movement are not perturbing the estimation. Moreover the surface behavior of the Slocum gliders allows an estimation of the wind direction.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Augmentation of acoustic transmission by a transition layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has already been reported by the author at a previous meeting [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 73 S95 (1982)] that certain types of transition layers can improve the transmission of acoustic waves from one medium to another. In this paper conditions under which the transmissions of an acoustic wave is enhanced by the transition layer are presented. The case of a finite thickness elastic layer has been studied and it has been determined that at certain key frequencies an optimum transition layer thickness exists which greatly improves the interaction between the two media.

Mauro Pierucci

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Acoustic pursuit of invisible moving targets by cats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Head movements evoked by an invisible acoustic target were used as a metric to analyze localization of moving sources of sound in naive cats. The target was presented in the lateral sound field and moved along an arc at constant angular speeds. Head-movement trajectories were characterized by a large-magnitude orienting component that undershot the target and a tracking component elicited by the target during acoustic pursuit. The tracking component was characterized by a succession of stepwise head movements that maintained a relatively close alignment of the median plane of the head with the moving acoustic target.

Ralph E. Beitel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Simultaneous acoustic and microwave backscattering from the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous and coincident measurements of acoustic and microwavebackscatter from the air/sea interface were obtained during Phase II of the SAXON-FPN experiment in December 1992 and again in March 1993. The acoustic and microwave grazing angles were both set to 17° and the wavelengths were matched being set to 2.14 3.00 and 5.66 cm corresponding to respectively acoustic frequencies of 26.5 50 and 70 kHz and microwave frequencies of 5.3 10 and 14 GHz. Backscattering cross sections normalized by ensonified area for the acoustic (? 0 a ) and microwave (? 0 m ) returns were determined and their dependence on wind speed was investigated. The acoustic scattering strength is defined as 10? log 10 (? 0 a ) and the microwavescattering strength is defined as 10? log 10 (? 0 m )?10? log 10 (4?). The results of these experiments show that the two scattering strengths are comparable at wind speeds below about 3 m/s but that the acoustic scattering strength increases much faster than the microwavescattering strength with increasing wind speed until reaching saturation. If these wind-speed dependencies are represented by a power law U n then n is 5–6 for ? 0 a and 2–4 for ? 0 m for wind speeds between 2 and 7 m/s. This difference is ascribed to the effect of bubbles on the acoustic backscatter. The more rapid increase of ? 0 a compared to ? 0 m implies that for our 17° grazing angle acoustic scattering from the surface is negligible at all but the lowest wind speeds. Therefore a simple model is used for bubble scattering to fit the acoustic data as a function of wind speed for all three acoustic frequencies. The bubble densities required to fit the data agree well with previous measurements of near-surface bubble distributions. The model predicts an overshoot of the acoustic scattering strength (above the saturation level) at moderate wind speeds which is clearly seen in the data at 26.5 and 70 kHz. Finally a composite surface scatteringmodel is utilized for the pure surface scattering component along with the bubble model to predict the wind-speed dependence of the acoustic scattering strength at a 45° grazing angle and compare the results with earlier measurements.

Peter H. Dahl; William J. Plant; Bernd Nützel; Anke Schmidt; Heinz Herwig; Eugene A. Terray

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Study of maximizing acoustic energy coupling to salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF MAXIMIZING ACOUSTIC ENERGY COUPLING TO SALT A Thesis by YNG-JOV HNANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major... Subject: Geophysics STUDY OF &MAXIMIZING ACOUSTIC ENERGY COUPLING TO SALT A Thesis by YNG-JOU HWANG Approved as to style and content by: C arrman o ommit e em er em e er Hea o epartment December 1979 ABSTRACT Study of Haximizing Acoustic Energy...

Hwang, Yng-Jou

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed.

Jubin, R.T.

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acoustic nonlinearity in fluorinert FC-43  

SciTech Connect

Fluorinert FC-43 nonlinearity was investigated using two approaches: (i) a finite amplitude method with harmonic production; and (ii) a nonlinear frequency mixing in the fluid with consequent beam profile measurement of the difference frequency. The finite amplitude method provides information on the coefficient of nonlinearity, {beta}, through the amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic, at a certain transmitter-receiver distance. A calibrated hydrophone was used as a receiver, in order to obtain direct pressure measurements of the acoustic waves in the fluid. The role of transmitter-receiver distance in {beta} determination is investigated. In the second approach, a single transducer is used to provide two high-frequency beams. The collinear high-frequency beams mix nonlinearly in the fluid resulting in a difference frequency beam and higher order harmonics of the primaries. The difference frequency beam profite is investigated at lengths beyond the mixing distance. The experimental data are compured with the KZK theory.

Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osterhoudt, Curtis F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mombourquette, Paul C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Collisional damping of the geodesic acoustic mode  

SciTech Connect

The frequency and damping rate of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is revisited by using a gyrokinetic model with a number-conserving Krook collision operator. It is found that the damping rate of the GAM is non-monotonic as the collision rate increases. At low ion collision rate, the damping rate increases linearly with the collision rate; while as the ion collision rate is higher than v{sub ti}/R, where v{sub ti} and R are the ion thermal velocity and major radius, the damping rate decays with an increasing collision rate. At the same time, as the collision rate increases, the GAM frequency decreases from the (7/4+{tau})v{sub ti}/R to (1+{tau})v{sub ti}/R, where {tau} is the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature.

Gao Zhe [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

A perspective on the CMB acoustic peak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CMB angular spectrum measurements suggest a flat universe. This paper clarifies the relation between geometry and the spherical harmonic index of the first acoustic peak ($\\ell_{peak}$). Numerical and analytic calculations show that $\\ell_{peak}$ is approximately a function of $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M$ where $\\Omega_K$ and $\\Omega_M$ are the curvature ($\\Omega_K > 0$ implies an open geometry) and mass density today in units of critical density. Assuming $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M \\ll 1$, one obtains a simple formula for $\\ell_{peak}$, the derivation of which gives another perspective on the widely-recognized $\\Omega_M$-$\\Omega_\\Lambda$ degeneracy in flat models. This formula for near-flat cosmogonies together with current angular spectrum data yields familiar parameter constraints.

T. A. Marriage

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Raising Photoemission Efficiency with Surface Acoustic Waves  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a novel technique that may help increase the efficiency and reduce costs of photoelectron sources used at electron accelerators. The technique is based on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in piezoelectric materials, such as GaAs, that are commonly used as photocathodes. Piezoelectric fields produced by the traveling SAW spatially separate electrons and holes, reducing their probability of recombination, thereby enhancing the photoemission quantum efficiency of the photocathode. Additional advantages could be increased polarization provided by the enhanced mobility of charge carriers that can be controlled by the SAW and the ionization of optically-generated excitons resulting in the creation of additional electron-hole pairs. It is expected that these novel features will reduce the cost of accelerator operation. A theoretical model for photoemission in the presence of SAW has been developed, and experimental tests of the technique are underway.

A. Afanasev, F. Hassani, C.E. Korman, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, M. Poelker, K.E.L. Surles-Law

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method and apparatus for real time weld monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are provided for real time weld monitoring. An infrared signature emitted by a hot weld surface during welding is detected and this signature is compared with an infrared signature emitted by the weld surface during steady state conditions. The result is correlated with weld penetration. The signal processing is simpler than for either UV or acoustic techniques. Changes in the weld process, such as changes in the transmitted laser beam power, quality or positioning of the laser beam, change the resulting weld surface features and temperature of the weld surface, thereby resulting in a change in the direction and amount of infrared emissions. This change in emissions is monitored by an IR sensitive detecting apparatus that is sensitive to the appropriate wavelength region for the hot weld surface.

Leong, Keng H. (Lemont, IL); Hunter, Boyd V. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Electronic Monitoring White Papers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the initial development costs. But if that system can be easily implemented in another area, those costs for operations, maintenance, and quality checks (QA & QC). The goal of video monitoring is to provide a cost monitoring programs in NMFS-managed fisheries where data extracted from video are used for science

417

HP Steam Trap Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumption Peak Demand Mgt Peak Demand Mgt Similar Weather Day Analysis Metering and Verafication Steam Meter Monitoring ? Peak Demand Management ? Steam Consumption Management ? Steam Bill Verification ? Measurement and Verification ... Consumption Peak Demand Mgt Peak Demand Mgt Similar Weather Day Analysis Metering and Verafication Steam Meter Monitoring ? Peak Demand Management ? Steam Consumption Management ? Steam Bill Verification ? Measurement and Verification ...

Pascone, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Projects To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems Selected Projects To Develop Novel Monitoring Networks for Advanced Power Systems Selected September 1, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Five projects that will develop technologically sophisticated monitoring networks for advanced fossil energy power systems have been selected for continued research by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects will support efforts by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) Advanced Research--Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program to study novel approaches in model development and validation; monitoring refractory health; and wireless, self-powered sensors for advanced, next-generation power systems. They will monitor the status of equipment, materials

419

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

420

Acoustically sensing the presence of methane and carbon dioxide in underground coal mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A WSN can be used to continuously sense monitor and transmit data to a centralized control station in a under ground coal mine. A fact limiting the possibility is the presence of highly humid condition in UG coal mines. Current sensors cannot work continuously over prolonged period in UG coal mine environment. This paper describes a multi-aspect data fusion approach for acoustical sensors which make it possible to measure the build up of methane and carbon dioxide in UG coal mine environment. Suggested approach takes time of flight phase and attenuation of sonic pulses to determine the build up of methane and carbon dioxide. Suggested approach is more power efficient in comparison to existing sensors. A temperature sensor is used to accommodate change in characteristics of sonic pulses.

A. Singh; M. Radhakrishna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Acoustic logs indicate fractured rock and potentially permeable zones. References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Goranson, C.; Schroeder, R. (1 June 1978) Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Acoustic_Logs_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=510216"

422

On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin Department of Mathematics, such as submicron air bubbles in water, where the natural oscilla- tion frequencies are high. In contrast, when

Kaper, Tasso J.

423

Acoustic radiation from a plate with sinusoidally varying properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acoustic radiation produced by an infinite flat plate with sinusoidally varying properties and driven by a distributed load is presented. The plate is assumed to be thin with constant thickness but with stiffness varying sinusoidally along the axis. The analysis is an extension of the work previously reported [M. Pierucci J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 79 S35 (1986)]. The analysis consists of solving the coupled fluid?structure equations with the added difficulty of having nonconstant coefficients. The system reduces to a convoluted equation which has been solved analytically. The results indicate the presence of acoustic pressure components radiating in directions that are related to the difference between the forcing function wavenumber and the wavenumber of the stiffness variation. Acoustic radiation patterns will be presented.

Mauro Pierucci

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

FOR ASSESSING ROOM ACOUSTICS Jasper van Dorp Schuitman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUDITORY MODELLING FOR ASSESSING ROOM ACOUSTICS Jasper van Dorp Schuitman #12;Auditory modelling Promoties, in het openbaar te verdedigen op donderdag 15 september 2011 om 10:00 uur door Jasper VAN DORP

425

Purely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic detonation initiation process is presented that can be independent of diffusion, viscosity and turbulence to accelerate detonation formation. It is shown that given sufficient resolution, the detonation formation time

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

426

Design parameters for acoustical treatments in a subway station renovation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustical treatments have been incorporated into the design of renovations in the Essex Street MBTA Station in Boston. Criteria were developed relating to noise reduction from train noise on the platform and sound isolation between northbound and southbound sides of the station. This paper discusses the limitations on acoustical treatments imposed by the functional and structural restraints of the station including the availability of surfaces to be treated safety access requirements maintenance and durability restrictions and architectural goals relating to aesthetics lighting and textures. The presentation focuses on the manner in which the acoustical consultant and architect responded to each other's goals and the way that conflicts were resolved. Measurements were made of existing acoustical parameters. The renovations are presently under construction.

Carl J. Rosenberg; Neville A. Powers; Allen M. Lieb

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Acoustic Waveform Logging - Advances In Theory And Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full-waveform acoustic logging has made significant advances in both theory and application in recent years, and these advances have greatly increased the capability of log analysts to measure the physical properties of ...

Cheng, C. H.

428

Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

Mahmood, S. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haas, F. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Development of Combined Opto-Acoustical Sensor Modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The faint fluxes of cosmic neutrinos expected at very high energies require large instrumented detector volumes. The necessary volumes in combination with a sufficient shielding against background constitute forbidding and complex environments (e.g. the deep sea) as sites for neutrino telescopes. To withstand these environments and to assure the data quality, the sensors have to be reliable and their operation has to be as simple as possible. A compact sensor module design including all necessary components for data acquisition and module calibration would simplify the detector mechanics and ensures the long term operability of the detector. The compact design discussed here combines optical and acoustical sensors inside one module, therefore reducing electronics and additional external instruments for calibration purposes. In this design the acoustical sensor is primary used for acoustic positioning of the module. The module may also be used for acoustic particle detection and marine science if an appropriat...

Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Neff, M; Richardt, C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Acoustical power amplification and damping by temperature gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ceperley proposed a concept of a traveling wave heat engine [“A pistonless Stirling engine—The traveling wave heat engine ” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 1508–1513 (1979).] that provided a starting point of thermoacoustics today. This paper verifies experimentally his idea through observation of amplification and strong damping of a plane acoustic traveling wave as it passes through axial temperature gradients. The acoustic power gain is shown to obey a universal curve specified by a dimensionless parameter ???; ? is the angular frequency and ?? is the relaxation time for the gas to thermally equilibrate with channel walls. As an application of his idea a three-stage acoustic power amplifier is developed which attains the gain up to 10 with a moderate temperature ratio of 2.3.

Tetsushi Biwa; Ryo Komatsu; Taichi Yazaki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multi-level acoustic modeling for automatic speech recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context-dependent acoustic modeling is commonly used in large-vocabulary Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) systems as a way to model coarticulatory variations that occur during speech production. Typically, the local ...

Chang, Hung-An, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Tones for Real: Managing Multipath in Underwater Acoustic Wakeup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but acoustic prop- agation is five orders-of-magnitude slower than RF, so propagation times stretch to hundreds. Their success has sparked interest in bringing these characteristics underwater to improve our ability to chart

Heidemann, John

433

Progress in Fiber Optical Acoustic and Seismic Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the progress in fiber optic acoustic and seismic sensor systems is presented. Common advancements in areas such as multiplexing are covered as well as specific progress in...

Kirkendall, Clay; Cole, James H; Tveten, Alan B; Dandridge, Anthony

434

Transverse acoustic actuation of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two methods for the transverse acoustic actuation of {110}-cut Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals are discussed. In this actuation mode, crystals are used that have the {110}- type twinning planes parallel to the base of the crystal. ...

Simon, Jesse Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Measurement of the Q value of an acoustic resonator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cylindrical acoustic resonator was externally driven at the first resonance frequency by a compression driver. The acoustic energy stored in the resonator and the power dissipated per unit time were evaluated through the simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and velocity, in order to determine the Q value of the resonator. The resulting Q value, being employed as a measure of the damping in a resonator, was obtained as 36. However, the Q value determined from a frequency response curve known as a conventional technique turned out to be 25, which is 30% less than that obtained in the present method. By further applying these two methods in the case of a resonator having an acoustic load inside, we present an accurate measurement of the Q value of the resonator by making full use of its definition.

Tetsushi Biwa; Yuki Ueda; Hiroshi Nomura; Uichiro Mizutani; Taichi Yazaki

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Neighborhood analysis methods in acoustic modeling for automatic speech recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the problem of using nearest-neighbor based non-parametric methods for performing multi-class class-conditional probability estimation. The methods developed are applied to the problem of acoustic ...

Singh-Miller, Natasha, 1981-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. It is based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier-Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow. As a consequence of this unsteady and non-radiating base flow, the perturbation equations satisfy a conservation law. It is demonstrated that this flow perturbations can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Moreover, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfills Lighthills acoustic analogy. Therefore, we can define the deviations of the Navier-Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as true sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity is provided.

Christian Henke

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Acoustical wave propagation in buried water filled pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a comprehensive way of dealing with the problem of acoustical wave propagation in cylindrically layered media with a specific application in water-filled underground pipes. The problem is studied in ...

Kondis, Antonios, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Crystalline Silicon under Acoustic Cavitation: From Mechanoluminescence to Amorphization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physicochemical behavior of crystalline silicon under acoustic cavitation is investigated in water sparged with argon at low temperature (10 and 20 °C). Surprisingly, spectroscopic investigations reveal that argon (bubbling continuously through the ...

Matthieu Virot; Rachel Pflieger; Ekaterina V. Skorb; Johann Ravaux; Thomas Zemb; Helmuth Möhwald

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "acoustic monitoring support" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

AUV Cooperative Operations using Acoustic Communication and Navigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Idaho, Moscow Idaho, 83844- 0902 + CDNSWC Acoustic Research Detachment, 33890 North Main Street to collect valuable data for scientific and military purposes. Historically, individual vehicles have been

Idaho, University of

442

The Measurement of Bubble-Size Distributions by Acoustical Backscatter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multifrequency acoustical-backscatter technique is described for determining the size distribution of bubbles with radii between 8 and 130 µm. The method makes use of the resonance in the microbubbles and operates at six frequencies ranging ...

Svein Vagle; David M. Farmer

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

An Inversion of Acoustical Attenuation Measurements to Deduce Bubble Populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of natural bubble populations is required for many areas of ocean science. Acoustical methods have considerable potential for achieving this goal because bubbles scatter sound strongly close to their natural frequency, which depends ...

H. Czerski

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The CLEAR 2006 CMU acoustic environment classification system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the CLEAR 2006 acoustic environment classification evaluation and the CMU system used in the evaluation. Environment classification is a critical technology for the CHIL Connector service [1] in that Connector relies on maintaining awareness ...

Robert G. Malkin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Crystalline titanate catalyst supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Drug Therapy: Nutritional Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aggressive early feeding is beneficial. Thus, the factors determining the risk of malnutrition are multiple and interrelated, and include the patient's previous nutritional status, the disease process itself, and the magnitude and anticipated duration of associated catabolic stresses. Another reason that it... The indications for providing nutrients by the enteral or intravenous route (nutritional support) are not well defined, and the efficacy of nutritional support in many circumstances is unproved. Nonetheless, nutritional support is widely used for several ...

Souba W.W.

1997-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

An experimental and theoretical acoustic investigation of single disc propellers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL ACOUSTIC INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE DISC PROPELLERS A Thesis ELIZABETH ANN BUMANN Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Kenneth D. Korkan... 1988) Elizabeth Ann Bumsnn, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chairinan of Advisory Committee: Dr. Kenneth D. Korkan An experimental study of the acoustic field associated with two, three, and four blade propeller configurations was performed...

Bumann, Elizabeth Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Comparison of linear and nonlinear acoustic probing of rock salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1980 Major Subject: Geophysics COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO 'RANG Approved as to style and content by: l('-/c~k~&(. Chairman o Comm ' ee Member) Member / I Member Head...

Wang, Albert Min-Hao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

CEMs turn monitoring giant  

SciTech Connect

Crucial to complying with environmental regulations is selecting appropriate pollution control equipment to capture or destroy regulated pollutants. But just as important is selecting a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEM). CEMs play a dual role in an overall compliance strategy. On one hand, they identify the type and quantity of emissions at a source as a first step for determining which regulatory requirements and control technologies are applicable. They also provide ongoing emissions data to demonstrate compliance with air and other environmental regulations. Facilities are required to monitor their processes with CEMs, or a comparable technology, under several titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. CEMs meet regulatory requirements if they include a SO[sub 2] concentration monitor, nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) concentration monitor, volumetric flow monitor, opacity monitor, diluent gas monitor and data acquisition and handling system. The entire system and each subsystem has to be installed and certified before it can be used for compliance. A written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) plan for the CEMs must accompany the permit application. The acid rain rules also impose performance standards and frequent calibration checks to ensure the integrity of CEMs data.

White, J.R. (KVB/Analect, Irvine, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assessment of ecosystem biodiversity by acoustic diversity indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of ecosystem biodiversity by measurement of acoustic diversity was explored [B. L. Krause Explorers J. Winter 156–160 (1993)]. Specific acoustic indices (e.g. based on frequency spectrum) were developed and correlated with standard diversity indices (e.g. standard species abundance indices). Necessary technological infrastructures and analytic processes to measure acoustic dynamics of ecological biodiversity were explored. An automated web?based infrastructure capable of capturing processing and relaying real?time field measurements from multiple ecosystems to desktop and home computers was developed tested and implemented. Key infrastructure components were remote field instrumentation remote computer processing wireless digital relay instrumentation Internet server and automation relational database and website software. A dynamic digital library of ecological acoustic samples correlated ecosystem attributes and acoustic analysis methodologies was established. Library resources including digital sound files captured from ecosystems were made available to researchers and the public over the Internet [N. Metzger and M. Blumenthal Realizing Info. Future NAP 113–119 (1994)]. Indices of acoustic ecosystem diversity were refined through application on existing digital ecosystem sound recordings and digital sounds captured from multiple ecosystems. The performance of these indices was compared to standard biodiversity indices applied to the same ecosystems.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Straddle Carrier Radiation Portal Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation’s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. The U.S. ports of entry include the following vectors: land border crossings, seaports, airports, rail crossings, and mail and express consignment courier facilities. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) determined that a screening solution was needed for Seaport cargo containers being transported by Straddle Carriers (straddle carriers). A stationary Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for Straddle Carriers (SCRPM) is needed so that cargo containers can be scanned while in transit under a Straddle Carrier. The Straddle Carrier Portal operational impacts were minimized by conducting a time-motion study at the Port, and adaptation of a Remotely Operated RPM (RO-RPM) booth concept that uses logical lighting schemes for traffic control, cameras, Optical Character Recognition, and wireless technology.

Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Mullen, O Dennis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Improve emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

Vining, S.K. [Marathon Oil Co., Texas City, TX (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

455

Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nanostructured catalyst supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

457

Research Ethics & Compliance Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Ethics & Compliance Support Dr Ted Rohr, Director RECS #12;http://research.unsw.edu.au/research-ethics-and-compliance-support-recs #12;Research is considered by: Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) A and B: � All human research involving more than low risk Human Research Ethics Advisory Panels (HREAPs) A to I: � All human research

Blennerhassett, Peter

458

Structural Risk Minimization Kernels Support Vector Machines Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dimensional Spaces Many acceptable solutions bad generalization Structural Risk Minimization Kernels SupportStructural Risk Minimization Kernels Support Vector Machines Support Vector Machines Kernel Methods Structural Risk Minimization Kernels Support Vector Machines 1 Structural Risk Minimization High Dimensional

Kjellström, Hedvig

459

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Hopper Batch Jobs See the man pages for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, ALPS logs and job summary statistics. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. To delete a job from the hopper xfer queue users must add an additional parameter @hopper06 Example:6004861.hopper06@hopper06 qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low)

460

Structural Health Monitoring Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security, LLC 1 LA-CC-10-032 LA-UR 10-01259 1 Introduction to SHMTools SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM)...

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461

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

462

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

464

MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and by monitoring changes in the underground resistivity properties in the vicinity of injection due to fracture porosity enhancement. To these ends, we are acquiring a dense grid

465

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

466

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

SciTech Connect

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Decision support software technology demonstration plan  

SciTech Connect

The performance evaluation of innovative and alternative environmental technologies is an integral part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mission. Early efforts focused on evaluating technologies that supported the implementation of the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. In 1986 the Agency began to demonstrate and evaluate the cost and performance of remediation and monitoring technologies under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program (in response to the mandate in the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)). In 1990, the US Technology Policy was announced. This policy placed a renewed emphasis on making the best use of technology in achieving the national goals of improved quality of life for all Americans, continued economic growth, and national security. In the spirit of the technology policy, the Agency began to direct a portion of its resources toward the promotion, recognition, acceptance, and use of US-developed innovative environmental technologies both domestically and abroad. Decision Support Software (DSS) packages integrate environmental data and simulation models into a framework for making site characterization, monitoring, and cleanup decisions. To limit the scope which will be addressed in this demonstration, three endpoints have been selected for evaluation: Visualization; Sample Optimization; and Cost/Benefit Analysis. Five topics are covered in this report: the objectives of the demonstration; the elements of the demonstration plan; an overview of the Site Characterization and Monitoring Technology Pilot; an overview of the technology verification process; and the purpose of this demonstration plan.

SULLIVAN,T.; ARMSTRONG,A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Acoustic horn reflectance: Equations and measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reflectance is the transfer function between forward and reflected components of pressure waves that propagate in wave guides such as acoustic horns. Exact solutions to Webster's Horn Equation are only known for a few specific shapes including parabolic conical and exponential. Explicit equations for reflectance in these three horn shapes were recently published for infinite-length horns. Measured reflectance in 3D-printed finite-length examples of these horn shapes show no similarity in the frequency-domain to exact reflectance for infinite-length horns. The similarity improves after adjustments to both the equations and the measurements. New equations were derived for exact reflectance of finite-length horns. Measured reflectance was smoothed by time-domain windowing. In contrast to frequency-domain reflectance comparisons of time-domain reflectance prior to the time sound reaches the end of the horn were not much affected by these adjustments. Because exact equations are known and 3D-printed examples are easy to obtain these three horn shapes may be useful as standards for comparing different reflectance-measurement systems.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Plasma Shape Effects on Geodesic Acoustic Oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) oscillations in tokamak plasmas are known to be sensitive to the value of the safety factor q. Through its linear and nonlinear interactions with ITG turbulence it has recently been shown in direct numerical global simulations that the turbulence driven heat transport is larger when GAM oscilations of large amplitude are present, resulting in an anomalous transport scaling with the inverse plasma current. GAM dispersion relations have been derived for circular, large aspect ratio configurations, and, recently, for helical configurations. Linear simulation results are presented using the global, PIC, finite element codes GYGLES and ORB5 for the GAM frequency, damping rate and Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flow for a scan in plasma elongation. It is found that CAM frequency slightly decreases, while GAM damping rate and residual zonal flows increase with elongation. Nonlinear ITG simulations using the ORB5 code show that elongation reduces heat transport and that this is related to the plasma current and not q alone.

Villard, L.; Angelino, P.; Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Sauter, O.; Tran, T. M. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom -- Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bottino, A. [Max-Planck Gesellschaft Institute for Plasma Physics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hatzky, R. [Computer Center of the IPP, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck Gesellschaft, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

A method for numerical representation of arbitrary boundaries in acoustic wavefront propagation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An enhancement to the application of a wavefront propagation algorithm for underwater acoustics based on the level set method is presented. The presence of discontinuities in the phase space at reflecting boundaries requires the use of specialized differencing techniques to prevent oscillations in the computed solutions of the acoustic phase. A weighted essentially non?oscillatory method is applied for this purpose necessitating the use of uniformly spaced grids over the computational domain. In order to represent arbitrary boundaries in this implementation one has to either modify the grid to include the boundary (reduces the convergence rate) or develop an appropriate boundary condition to apply within the region of interest. Earlier versions of this work approximated the actual boundary location by the location of the nearest grid point. This resulted in a stair?step effect in the solutions which resolves with finer grid resolution. However the phase space is high?dimensional; a highly resolved grid can be impractical. In this work a new method is proposed and validated which applies a model based on ray interactions with the boundary to improve results on sparser grids. [Work supported by ONR 333 and by the Science Mathematics & Research for Transformation (SMART) Program.

Sheri Martinelli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Acoustic quality of buildings: Contributions to the workers health of the health area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents a case study carried through in a research center education assistance and technological development in the areas of the health of the woman child and adolescent situated in Rio de Janeiro where pathologies of average and high complexity are taken care of. It intended detect environmental problems that could affect the health of workers of the institution in order to support the elaboration of the action plan to mitigate urgent questions and to develop an architectonical project for a new center. The environments and processes of work had been evaluated through a participative approach being visited all the sectors of the center carried through interviews half-structuralized with workers of all the sectors and promoted debates that had pointed the noise as one of the main factors of bother and stress. The observation in loco and analyze of the project allowed to detect that the architectural design and the disrespect of basic acoustics recommendations had contributed for this picture. Measurements carried through in some pointed areas as uncomfortable indicated to have exposition to sound pressure level above 75 dB(A). However the resolution of the many of identified acoustic problems will have to wait the construction of the new headquarters.

Marcia S. Almeida; Liliane R. Teixeira; Ana Paula Gama; Stephanie Livia S. Silva; Olga Dick; Isabele C. Costa; Denise Torreao; Paulo Roberto L. Jo